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++UK Brexit
Title:
HD
Summary: Rural residents on possible EU exit referendum
Story No: 2057938
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 05/06/2015 03:16 PM
People: David Cameron
Subscription:

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SHOTLIST

AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY

Farm outside Boston, England - 5 May 2015

1. Close of sowing and planting machine on farm as it begins to move; pulls away to show wide of workers sitting on machine placing Brussels sprout seedlings in machine for planting

2. Close of dirt as machine passes over, planting seedlings

3. Workers pulling seedlings from tray and placing into machine for planting

4. Ground shot showing close of dirt and seedlings with workers on planting machine in distance

AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY

Boston, England - 6 May 2015

5. Produce retailer Len Evans serving customer at farmers' market

6. Pan left of produce

7. Close of sign on produce reading (English) "Local Sprouting Broc 1.30 lb"

8. Wide of produce stand at farmers' market

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Len Evans, produce retailer:

"It should, it should remain in Europe, but not as it is at the moment. You know, all our powers have been taken away. It's no good, no good for the country. Stay in Europe because we need Europe to trade with each other, but on a different level."

AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY

Boston, England - 5 May 2015

10. Close of UK flag on store sign; pan left to show EU flag

11. Wide of store sign showing (from right to left) UK and EU flags next to Lithuanian and Polish flags with writing overhead reading (English) "Euro drinks and food"

12. Wide street scene on West Street where many eastern European shops have opened

13. Street sign reading (English) "West Street"

14. Sign on store front reading (English) "The best goods from the Baltic States," (Lithuanian) "The best of Lithuanian goods," (Latvian) "Best of Latvian goods," (Polish) "The best of Polish goods" and (Russian) "Best of Russian goods."

14. People outside shop

15. Wide of people walking in front of shop with store sign reading (English) "European Market - Welcome" with EU flags on either side

16. Close of sign reading (English) "Boston"

17. Wide of Boston sign on road leading into town

AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY

Boston, England - 6 May 2015

18. Various top shots of Boston

19. Various of St. Botolph's church also known as the Boston Stump

20. Wide of people walking on commercial pedestrian street

21. SOUNDBITE (English) Lyn Luxton, prospective parliamentary candidate for the Pilgrim Party, in Boston and Skegness constituency:

"We most definitely do need, you know, to make sure that, if you like, the British way of life is, we're able to preserve that, whilst also being at the table. But I do think that the best way to work with something is to work in something, not to take yourself out of it."

AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY

Boston, England - 5 May 2015

22. Wide of people walking on commercial pedestrian street

23. SOUNDBITE (English) vox pop, Janet Green:

"No, we must get out now. We must get out before the country is ruined altogether. It's two-thirds there now, but we might just pull it back. Without coming out, no hope."

24. Close of chips being fried; tilts up to show worker Sam Cilek

25. Wide of Cilek taking fish out of fryer

26. Close of fish being taken out of fryer

27. Wide of Cilek behind counter as customer walks out

28. SOUNDBITE (English) Sam Cilek, manger at fish and chips restaurant:

"We are local people in this area that can't get decent jobs because so many different people all around the world, it's not the same anymore. I've been here in Boston 29 years, even I see the difference. We've got to put somebody to say 'stop.'"

AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY

Farm outside of Boston, England - 5 May 2015

29. Wide of farm

30. Close of sign reading (English) "Vote Conservative" with farm seen in background

31. Sign reading (English) "Vote Labour"

32. Sign reading (English) "Vote UKIP"

33. Wide of signs on farm

STORYLINE

With less than a day before heading to the polls, residents of Boston - a typical English town north of London - were considering their future both within Great Britain as well as within the European Union.

Boston was a typical English town with an ancient church and traditional shops.

But in the last 10 years, Polish supermarkets, Baltic bakeries and translation service offices have sprung up in town.

The free flow of citizens that came after the European Union expanded into the former Communist countries of Eastern Europe brought a huge increase in migrants seeking work.

Some locals from the town of about 65,000 that gave its name and its Pilgrim heritage to the Massachusetts city aren't pleased.

The change Boston is seeing is not unique - and unhappiness about Britain's transformation is reshaping the political landscape as voters prepare to choose a new government.

There's been a surge of support for outsider politicians focused on immigration.

A victory for Prime Minister David Cameron's Conservative Party could bring Britain a step closer to leaving the 28-nation European Union.

Cameron promised to hold a referendum on EU membership in 2017 as he sought to blunt the rise of the UK Independence Party, which says Britain should leave the bloc so it can stem the tide of immigrants from Europe and return all decision-making back to London from EU headquarters in Brussels.

While the British campaign has focused mostly on issues like the economy and health care, uncertainty over Britain's possible exit - informally called "Brexit" - may curtail investment and rattle financial markets until the issue is resolved.

In Boston, set amid agriculturally rich flatlands 120 miles (200 kilometres) north of London, the immigrants came mostly to pick fruit, vegetables and flowers and work in food factories.

Eastern European newcomers have gone on to open businesses, reviving a shabby shopping area on West Street.

Len Evans, a retailer who sold produce at the farmers' market on Wednesday disagrees with how EU membership has evolved, but said he thought that with some changes, Britain is better off within the union.

Lyn Luxton, a prospective parliamentary candidate for the Pilgrim Party, in Boston and Skegness constituency, agreed.

"I do think that the best way to work with something is to work in something, not to take yourself out of it," she said.

The possibility of an in-or-out referendum remains appealing to many Bostonians who claim migrants are taking jobs from locals and live on government handouts.

"No, we must get out now," said local Janet Green.

"We must get out before the country is ruined altogether. It's two-thirds there now, but we might just pull it back. Without coming out, no hope."

Sam Cilek, a manger at a fish and chips restaurant who came to Boston from Turkey almost 30 years ago after marrying a woman from the town, said Boston can't cope with the influx of foreigners.

===========================================================

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++UK Referendum 2
Title:
HD
Summary: London Mayor Boris Johnson to back Brexit
Story No: 4024522
Source: POOL
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/21/2016 06:13 PM
People: Boris Johnson , David Cameron
Subscription:

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POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY

London - 21 February 2016

1. SOUNDBITE (English) Boris Johnson, Mayor of London:

"I don't think anybody could realistically claim that this is fundamental reform of the EU or of Britain's relationships with the EU, and it's my view that after 30 years of writing about this, we have chance actually to do something, I have a chance actually to do something. I would like to see a new relationship based more on trade, on co-operation, but as I say with much less of this super national element."

++BLACK FRAMES++

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Boris Johnson, Mayor of London:

"I've decided after a huge amount of heartache because I did not want to do anything, the last thing I wanted was to go against (British Prime Minister) David Cameron or the government. But after a great deal of heartache I don't think there is anything else I can do. I will be advocating "Vote Leave" or whatever the team is called, I understand there are many of them, because I want a better deal for the people of this country, to save them money and to take back control. That's really, I think, what this is all (about)."

++BLACK FRAMES++

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Boris Johnson, Mayor of London:

"The truth is that is has been agonisingly difficult and I think for many of us, what I said over many years, well a couple of years now is, I would like to be in a reformed EU and that's my hope, an EU that's based more on free trade, you know fundamental treaty change."

++BLACK FRAMES++

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Boris Johnson, Mayor of London:

"Is it better for Britain to remain in Europe as it currently is or is there a way that we could actually get a better deal that did more for British democracy, restored some control to the people of this country, that's the crucial thing for me."

++BLACK FRAMES++

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Boris Johnson, Mayor of London:

"I look at what the prime minister achieved the other day, and I have to say that given the time that he had, he did fantastically well. I think everybody should pay tribute to David Cameron for what he pulled off in a very short space of time."

STORYLINE:

London Mayor Boris Johnson said on Sunday he is joining a campaign to encourage Britain to leave the European Union.

He posed a direct challenge to Prime Minister David Cameron, who has launched a major push to win support for his call to keep his country within the EU.

Britons will vote in a June 23 referendum on whether to stay in or leave the 28-nation bloc

===========================================================

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Subjects: Municipal governments , Local governments , Government and politics
People: Boris Johnson , David Cameron
Organisations: United Kingdom government, European Union
Locations: London , England , United Kingdom
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++UK Referendum
Title:
HD
Summary: UK PM warns youth of consequences of Brexit
Story No: 4030785
Source: UK POOL
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 04/07/2016 01:00 PM
People: David Cameron
Subscription:

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SHOTLIST:

UK POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY

Exeter - 7 April 2016

1. University of Exeter students

2. SOUNDBITE (English) David Cameron, British Prime Minister:

"It is, I think, one of the most important political decisions that you will take in your lifetime. When we have a general election we vote in a government and if we don't like that government, five years later we can vote them out again. That's obviously not a bit I like about life, but none the less that's the way it works. With this referendum about whether we stay in or whether we leave a reformed European Union it's a vote and a decision that we will be living with probably for the rest of our life time. So it is absolutely vital we really think hard about all of the issues and we make a clear and sensible decision."

3. Student asking question

4. SOUNDBITE (English) David Cameron, British Prime Minister:

"So I make no apology for the fact that we have, you know, we are sending to every household in the country, this leaflet which sets out what the government's view is and why we come to that view. We are not neutral in this. We think it would be a bad decision to leave. We think it would be bad for our economy, bad for jobs, bad for investment, bad for families' finances. We think it would be bad for universities. We are not neutral so we have made a clear stance in this leaflet which I hope everyone will get a copy of at their home."

5. University of Exeter sign

6. SOUNDBITE (English) David Cameron, British Prime Minister:

"Because I think that in many ways you have the most to gain by staying in a reformed European Union and you also have the most to lose if we leave the European Union but I'm afraid to say that as things stand, you're the least likely people to vote. That's what's happened in past general elections. So, my plea is really have a look at this and decide to vote on June 23."

7. Cameron leaving

STORYLINE:

British Prime Minister David Cameron said on Thursday that he makes no apology for sending pro-European Union (EU) leaflets "to every household in the country".

Cameron had come under fire for spending more than 9 million pounds sterling (12.6 million US Dollars) on publicity ahead of the referendum on the future of Britain's EU membership.

Speaking at the University of Exeter Cameron warned the young people that they had the most to lose if the UK left the EU, and urged them to vote on 23 June.

===========================================================

Clients are reminded:

(i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: info@aparchive.com

(ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service

(iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory.

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Subjects: Government and politics , General elections , Elections
People: David Cameron
Organisations: United Kingdom government, European Union
Locations: Exeter , England , United Kingdom
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UK Brexit
Title:
HD
Summary: UK Home Secretary: UK more secure in EU
Story No: 4033130
Source: UK POOL
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 04/25/2016 01:33 PM
People: Theresa May , Boris Johnson
Subscription:

Britain's membership of the European Union means it is "more secure from crime and terrorism," British Home Secretary Theresa May argued in a speech on Monday.

It was May's first major speech since backing the campaign for Britain to remain a member of EU.

She said Britain had "avoided the worst of migration crisis that has hit continental Europe" because it was not part of the Schengen borderless area.

Meanwhile, the Mayor of London, Boris Johnson - a backer of the campaign for Britain to leave the EU, also known as "Brexit" - dismissed suggestions that Britain cannot cope if it leaves the 28 nation bloc.

Britain will hold a referendum on continued membership of the EU on 23 June.

Britain's membership of the European Union means it is "more secure from crime and terrorism," British Home Secretary Theresa May argued in a speech on Monday.

It was May's first major speech since backing the campaign for Britain to remain a member of EU.

She said Britain had "avoided the worst of migration crisis that has hit continental Europe" because it was not part of the Schengen borderless area.

Meanwhile, the Mayor of London, Boris Johnson - a backer of the campaign for Britain to leave the EU, also known as "Brexit" - dismissed suggestions that Britain cannot cope if it leaves the 28 nation bloc.

Britain will hold a referendum on continued membership of the EU on 23 June.

UK POOL

London - 25 April 2016

1. British Home Secretary Theresa May arriving to deliver speech in favour of Britain remaining in the European Union (EU) ++MUTE++

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Theresa May, UK Home Secretary:

"Now I know that some people say the EU (European Union) does not make as more secure because it does not allow us to control our border. But that is not true. Free movement rules means it is harder to control the volume of European immigration and as I said yesterday, that is clearly no good thing. But they do not mean we cannot control the border. The fact that we are not part of Schengen (area), the group of countries without border checks, means we have avoided the worst of migration crisis that has hit continental Europe over the last year. It means we can conduct checks on people travelling to Britain from elsewhere in Europe and, subject to certain rules and the availability of information, it means we can block entry for serious criminals and terrorists."

++BLACK FRAMES++

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Boris Johnson, Mayor of London (backing campaign for Britain to leave the EU):

"We've been told we have to go to the back of the queue, that seems to me to be ridiculous when you consider that actually the real reason we haven't been able to do a free-trade deal with the United States in the last 43 years is that we are part of the EU."

++BLACK FRAMES++

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Boris Johnson, Mayor of London (backing campaign for Britain to leave the EU):

"73 per cent of the non-EU trade we do at the moment is done without any kind of trade deal whatever, so first to be sort of bullied in this way, I don't want to exaggerate - for people to say that we are going to be unable to cope on our own I think is absoultely wrong."

++ENDS ON SOUNDBITE++

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UK Farage
Title:
HD
Summary: UKIP leader on 'Brexit'
Story No: 4033676
Source: UK POOL
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 04/29/2016 10:47 AM
People: Nigel Farage , Theresa May , Jean-Claude Juncker , Angela Merkel
Subscription:

Nigel Farage, the leader of the UK Independence Party (UKIP), on Friday called it "impossible" for Britain to control immigration while it is a member of the European Union (EU).

He was speaking in London at a campaign event in favour of the UK leaving the EU, a possibility known as "Brexit".

Farage, himself a Member of the European Parliament (MEP) for the South East of England, also raised security concerns linked to Europe's migration influx as an argument in favour of "Brexit".

Britons will vote in a referendum on June 23 on whether the country should leave or remain in the EU.

Nigel Farage, the leader of the UK Independence Party (UKIP), on Friday called it "impossible" for Britain to control immigration while it is a member of the European Union (EU).

He was speaking in London at a campaign event in favour of the UK leaving the EU, a possibility known as "Brexit".

Farage, himself a Member of the European Parliament (MEP) for the South East of England, also raised security concerns linked to Europe's migration influx as an argument in favour of "Brexit".

Britons will vote in a referendum on June 23 on whether the country should leave or remain in the EU.

UK POOL

London - 29 April 2016

+++MUTE AS INCOMING+++

1. Leader of the UK Independence Party (UKIP) Nigel Farage walking up to lectern

2. SOUNDBITE (English): Nigel Farage, leader of the UK Independence Party (UKIP)

"When Theresa May (British Home Secretary) says that it is difficult to control immigration as a member of the European Union (EU), she's wrong. It isn't difficult. It's impossible. And the reason is all too clear. This is a British passport. And what are the first two words on it? European Union. Since the Treaty of Maastricht, we have been citizens of the European Union. And this passport is available to 508 million people."

++BLACK FRAMES++

3. SOUNDBITE (English): Nigel Farage, leader of the UK Independence Party (UKIP)

"The common asylum policy that my friend Mr. Juncker (Jean-Claude Juncker, President of the European Commission) was putting into place this time last year went miles away from any traditional definition of what a refugee is. A refugee is an individual or group of individuals who fear persecution because of their race, orientation, beliefs or religion. But the European Union has expanded that or extended that and effectively, what Angela Merkel (German Chancellor) did in July of last year, which I think must rank as one of the worst decisions by a Western leader since 1945, to say we can take people in unlimited numbers has led, I'm afraid in those countries, to very grave consequences. You know when the boss of Europol says there are up to 5-thousand jihadis who have come into Europe in the last 18 months posing as migrants through the Greek islands, I believe him. When Sir Richard Dearlove, the former boss of MI6 (British intelligence agency) says that we are far less safe not controlling our borders, I believe him."

++BLACK FRAMES++

4. SOUNDBITE (English): Nigel Farage, leader of the UK Independence Party (UKIP)

"For too long in the minds of many people the European question has been over here and the immigration and borders question has been over here. Increasingly, people are beginning to see them as one and the same. We have to, in this campaign, make people understand that EU membership and uncontrolled immigration are synonymous with each other. We have to make people understand that what this referendum is about is taking back control of our lives, our laws and our borders. We have to make people understand this may be the last opportunity we ever get to become a normal country once again. Over 180 countries control their borders and decide who is suitable to come and live and work and settle there. We have surrendered that to Brussels. We have surrendered that to a new concept of EU citizenship."

5. Farage sitting down after speech

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Subjects: Brexit referendum , European Mass Migration Crisis , Referendums , Government and politics , Immigration , Events , Elections , Social issues , Social affairs
People: Nigel Farage , Theresa May , Jean-Claude Juncker , Angela Merkel
Organisations: European Union, European Commission, European Parliament
Locations: London , England , United Kingdom
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Germany Latvia Brexit
Title:
HD
Summary: Merkel says she wants UK to say in EU
Story No: 4033714
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 04/29/2016 01:56 PM
People: Angela Merkel
Subscription:

German Chancellor Angela Merkel stressed on Friday that she wishes for Great Britain to stay in the European Union.

Speaking at a news conference in Berlin with Latvian Prime Minister Maris Kucinskis, she explained that she wishes for "a strong, economically thriving Great Britain in the European Union."

Prime Minister Kucinskis echoed Merkel's view, explaining that Latvia hopes for a "positive result of the referendum" and that "the British referendum will not weaken the EU".

Britons will vote in a referendum on June 23 on whether the country should leave or remain in the EU.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel stressed on Friday that she wishes for Great Britain to stay in the European Union.

Speaking at a news conference in Berlin with Latvian Prime Minister Maris Kucinskis, she explained that she wishes for "a strong, economically thriving Great Britain in the European Union."

Prime Minister Kucinskis echoed Merkel's view, explaining that Latvia hopes for a "positive result of the referendum" and that "the British referendum will not weaken the EU".

Britons will vote in a referendum on June 23 on whether the country should leave or remain in the EU.

Berlin - 29 April 2016

1. German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Latvian Prime Minister Maris Kucinskis arriving for press conference

2. Cameramen filming

3. SOUNDBITE (German) Angela Merkel, German Chancellor:

"Everyone will talk about it from their own perspective, I'll say it from my perspective: we wish for a strong, economically thriving Great Britain in the European Union, and the actual decision still lies with the citizens of Great Britain."

4. Wide of news conference

5. SOUNDBITE (Latvian) Maris Kucinskis, Latvian Prime Minister:

"Regarding Brexit, we already discussed it one month ago in Brussels. I can only say that Latvia also hopes that there will be a positive result of the referendum, that we will not have to worry. Latvia is ready to do everything to strengthen the unity of the European Union, and we will be on the side of our partners who want to strengthen, not weaken this unity. We hope that the British referendum will not weaken the EU."

6. Cutaway to journalists

7. Merkel and Kucinskis shaking hands in front of flags and departing room

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Subjects: Brexit referendum , Referendums , Government and politics , Events , Elections
People: Angela Merkel
Organisations: Germany government, European Union, United Kingdom government
Locations: Berlin , Berlin , Germany
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UK Brexit
Title:
HD
Summary: Bank of England chief warns of Brexit impact
Story No: 4035344
Source: UK POOL
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 05/12/2016 01:57 PM
People: Mark Carney
Subscription:

The Governor of the Bank of England on Thursday warned of big risks to Britain's economy should voters decide in a June referendum to leave the European Union.

Carney said a yes vote could trigger a possible "technical recession" in the UK and warned that the fall-out from a "Brexit" could hit growth "materially" and see the pound drop "sharply" in value.

The governor's statement was seen as a stark assessment from the head of an institution known for being independent of political campaigns.

It came as the Bank cut its growth outlook for the next three years and kept rates on hold at 0.5 percent.

The Governor of the Bank of England on Thursday warned of big risks to Britain's economy should voters decide in a June referendum to leave the European Union.

Carney said a yes vote could trigger a possible "technical recession" in the UK and warned that the fall-out from a "Brexit" could hit growth "materially" and see the pound drop "sharply" in value.

The governor's statement was seen as a stark assessment from the head of an institution known for being independent of political campaigns.

It came as the Bank cut its growth outlook for the next three years and kept rates on hold at 0.5 percent.

UK POOL

++NO CUTAWAYS AVAILABLE, SOUNDBITES SEPARATED BY BLACK++

London - 12 May 2016

1. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Carney, Bank of England Governor

"Material slowdown in growth, notable increase in inflation - that's the MPC's judgment. It's a judgement not based on, it is a judgement not based a whim, it is a judgment based on a rigorous analysis and careful consideration. And it is the judgement of the independent MPC and it is the judgement of all members of the MPC, I'll make that very clear. Of course there's a range of possible scenarios around those directions which could possibly include a technical recession, could possibly include that. We haven't done a formal forecast."

++BLACK++

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Carney, Bank of England Governor

The recent behaviour of the foreign exchange markets suggests that were the UK to vote to leave the EU, sterling's exchange rate would fall further, perhaps sharply. This would likely be consistent with changes to some of the real fundamentals that drive sterling, including the terms of trade, productivity and risk premium. In isolation, a further fall in sterling would boost inflation over the policy horizon.

++BLACK++

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Carney, Bank of England Governor

"So this combination of influences on demand, supply and the exchange rate could lead to a materially lower path for growth and a notably higher path for inflation than in the central projections set out in today's monetary inflation report."

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Ireland UK Referendum
Title:
HD
Summary: Fears of Brexit along Ireland's EU-blurred border
Story No: 4038431
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 06/03/2016 05:55 AM
People:
Subscription:

Fears of "Brexit" are stark among the inhabitants of Blacklion in the Republic of Ireland and Belcoo in Northern Ireland, UK - two border villages that could be further separated if the United Kingdom opts to leave the European Union.

Only a gurgling stream separates the two villages, but Ireland's soft border could become a hard fact of life again if the United Kingdom leaves the European Union, the sovereignty-sharing bloc that has done much to blur the 95-year-old boundary.

Should a majority of British voters reject continued EU membership in the UK's June 23 referendum, Northern Ireland's nearly 500-kilometre (310-mile) frontier with the Irish Republic would become the only British land border with the 27-nation EU.

The closely intertwined residents of Belcoo in Northern Ireland and Blacklion barely 200 metres (218 yards) away in the republic would find themselves again in two diverging lands.

While some view that prospect as an opportunity, many more express dread at the thought.

Farmer Hugh Maguire, 60, whose Blacklion home rests barely inside the republic but whose nearby farm of sheep, cattle and hens lies in Northern Ireland, said he could not survive without EU subsidies.

Both communities are heavily dependent on EU funding. Agriculture is the top employer, and farms receive 329 euros (365 US dollars) per hectare of land from the EU's Single Farm Payment subsidy scheme in place since 2003, an annual payment exceeding 80,000 euros (90,000 US dollars) for Maguire's 241-hectare farm.

Few Northern Ireland farmers are confident that the British government, long a critic of EU farm subsidies, would maintain anything close to that level of state support.

Maguire estimates that EU payments provide two-thirds of his income while most of the rest requires open market access to livestock marts in the republic, where prices for spring lamb are stronger.

Behind the bar in 'Jack's Bar' in Belcoo in Northern Ireland, owner Paul Leonard and his son Stephen look likely to cancel each other's votes. The son favors staying in the EU, while the father is eyeing the exit.

Fears of "Brexit" are stark among the inhabitants of Blacklion in the Republic of Ireland and Belcoo in Northern Ireland, UK - two border villages that could be further separated if the United Kingdom opts to leave the European Union.

Only a gurgling stream separates the two villages, but Ireland's soft border could become a hard fact of life again if the United Kingdom leaves the European Union, the sovereignty-sharing bloc that has done much to blur the 95-year-old boundary.

Should a majority of British voters reject continued EU membership in the UK's June 23 referendum, Northern Ireland's nearly 500-kilometre (310-mile) frontier with the Irish Republic would become the only British land border with the 27-nation EU.

The closely intertwined residents of Belcoo in Northern Ireland and Blacklion barely 200 metres (218 yards) away in the republic would find themselves again in two diverging lands.

While some view that prospect as an opportunity, many more express dread at the thought.

Farmer Hugh Maguire, 60, whose Blacklion home rests barely inside the republic but whose nearby farm of sheep, cattle and hens lies in Northern Ireland, said he could not survive without EU subsidies.

Both communities are heavily dependent on EU funding. Agriculture is the top employer, and farms receive 329 euros (365 US dollars) per hectare of land from the EU's Single Farm Payment subsidy scheme in place since 2003, an annual payment exceeding 80,000 euros (90,000 US dollars) for Maguire's 241-hectare farm.

Few Northern Ireland farmers are confident that the British government, long a critic of EU farm subsidies, would maintain anything close to that level of state support.

Maguire estimates that EU payments provide two-thirds of his income while most of the rest requires open market access to livestock marts in the republic, where prices for spring lamb are stronger.

Behind the bar in 'Jack's Bar' in Belcoo in Northern Ireland, owner Paul Leonard and his son Stephen look likely to cancel each other's votes. The son favors staying in the EU, while the father is eyeing the exit.

AP TELEVISION

Blacklion, Republic of Ireland - 24 May 2016

1. Farmer Hugh Maguire with a calf and cows on pasture

2. Close of calf

3. Sheep running on pasture

4. Maguire, pointing to horizon UPSOUND (English): "Right around the borderline of the mountain, right the way on, you can see parts of Southern Ireland."

5. Sheep grazing

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Hugh Maguire, farmer:

"Probably 70 percent of my income is off it, 65 to 70 percent is from the EU (European Union). We couldn't survive only for the subsidies. There is no way we could survive, especially on this land that we're farming."

7. Maguire leaving farm through gate

AP TELEVISION

Belcoo, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom (UK) - 24 May 2016

8. Bridge leading from Belcoo, Northern Ireland (UK) to Blacklion, Republic of Ireland, with sign reading (English and Gaelic) "Welcome to County Cavan"

9. Close of sign reading (English and Gaelic) "Blacklion" with speed limit in kilometres per hour

10. Bridge connecting Belcoo, Northern Ireland (UK) and Blacklion, Republic of Ireland

AP TELEVISION

Blacklion, Republic of Ireland - 24 May 2016

11. Sign of "The Market House" tourist centre and gift shop

12. Tourist administrator Helena Corcoran talking to colleague in tourist centre

13. Leprechaun puppets for sale in tourist centre

14. SOUNDBITE (English) Helena Corcoran, tourist administrator and local resident:

"We've had so much tragedy and grief along the border area, that I just feel and hope that they will stay in. My fear is, I suppose, that this border will appear and will make everyday life difficult for everybody basically, because this is the main road from North to South, from Sligo, and we get a lot of traffic, a lot of tourists, and we've already suffered enough in this area, so we don't need to suffer anymore."

15. Mug for sale with images of Ireland and reading (English) "Greetings from Ireland"

AP TELEVISION

Blacklion, Republic of Ireland - 25 May 2016

16. Top shot of bridge connecting Blacklion, Republic of Ireland and Belcoo, Northern Ireland (UK)

17. SOUNDBITE (English) John Paul Feeley, Cavan County councilman:

"Europe, and the structural funding and the peace funding have been hugely important in terms of giving areas like this the leg-up that they need to reach or to get into step with the rest of the country and progress economically."

AP TELEVISION

Belcoo, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom (UK) - 25 May 2016

18. Sign reading (English) Belcoo, with speed limit in miles per hour

19. Bartender Stephen Leonard carrying board out of pub "Jack's Bar"

20. Stephen Leonard serving guests inside pub

21. SOUNDBITE (English) Stephen Leonard, bartender:

"Behind the bar you hear both sides of the story, and you hear now a lot of things like there'll be borders back up, the police will be back out stopping and just all stuff like that, and I've never witnessed it, and I wouldn't like to witness it from what you've heard years ago."

22. Stephen Leonard talking to his father Paul Leonard

23. SOUNDBITE (English) Paul Leonard, self-employed pub owner:

"It probably would possibly enhance the economy again, maybe we'd be freer to be able to do things without the regulation of Europe, you know, so it would. At the end of the day, before the UK market ever went down to the EU, they have always had a very strong economy, they were always well able to survive. They have an identity of their own."

24. Paul Leonard pouring beer and handing glass to his son UPSOUND (English): "Hey Stephen, that's for you."

25. Stephen Leonard drinking beer in pub

26. Pan from river to bridge between Blacklion, Republic of Ireland and Belcoo, Northern Ireland (UK)

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UK Referendum Aerials
Title:
HD
Summary: Aerials of London landmarks ahead of Brexit vote
Story No: 4040025
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 06/13/2016 06:20 AM
People: David Cameron , Boris Johnson
Subscription:

British voters are deciding in a June 23 referendum on whether or not to leave the 28-nation European Union bloc - a move being called a "Brexit" for short.

From the international banks in the skyscrapers of Canary Wharf to the traditional home of Britain's financial industry in the City of London and the hedge funds of Mayfair, bankers and money managers across the capital are watching the June 23 referendum on EU membership with trepidation.

Many in London, the most pro-EU place in Britain, fear a vote to leave would undermine London's position as the world's pre-eminent financial centre and damage an industry that underpins the British economy.

The London tourist industry is also concerned that a possible leave vote will jeopardise the European holiday market.

UK Prime Minister David Cameron is leading the remain campaign in the EU, while Boris Johnson, the former London mayor and Conservative Party rebel is leading the "leave" campaign with one eye on his political future as a possible prime minister.

British voters are deciding in a June 23 referendum on whether or not to leave the 28-nation European Union bloc - a move being called a "Brexit" for short.

From the international banks in the skyscrapers of Canary Wharf to the traditional home of Britain's financial industry in the City of London and the hedge funds of Mayfair, bankers and money managers across the capital are watching the June 23 referendum on EU membership with trepidation.

Many in London, the most pro-EU place in Britain, fear a vote to leave would undermine London's position as the world's pre-eminent financial centre and damage an industry that underpins the British economy.

The London tourist industry is also concerned that a possible leave vote will jeopardise the European holiday market.

UK Prime Minister David Cameron is leading the remain campaign in the EU, while Boris Johnson, the former London mayor and Conservative Party rebel is leading the "leave" campaign with one eye on his political future as a possible prime minister.

HD Rushes available in \\Source_Clips\News Rushes

London - 24 May 2016

++AERIALS++

1. London Eye in foreground, Big Ben in background, pull out to show Parliament

2. Big Ben

3. Wide of Houses of Parliament

4. Westminster Abbey

5. Wide of river with London Eye

6. London Eye from different angle

7. Boat going under Tower Bridge, London Assembly in Background

8. Tower of London

9. Boat on Thames

10. Shard building, HMS Belfast in background

11. Tilt up Shard, traffic on London Bridge

12. St Paul's Cathedral

13. Wide of City

14. Mid of Gherkin

15. Bank of England

16. Buckingham Palace

17. Close of flag on Palace, pull out

18. MI6 building

19. Tate Modern

20. Globe theatre

21. Cutty Sark

22. Wide of bend in Thames, Canary Wharf

23. Canary Wharf

24. Various of O2 Centre

25. Various of Olympic Park

Uxbridge - 24 May 2016

26. Various of green fields in Uxbridge

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Subjects: Brexit referendum , Referendums , Financial services , Government and politics , Travel , Leisure travel , Events , Elections , Industries , Business , Lifestyle
People: David Cameron , Boris Johnson
Organisations: United Kingdom government, European Union
Locations: Uxbridge , England , United Kingdom
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UK Polls Open 3
Title:
HD
Summary: Voting, reax, as polls open in UK EU referendum
Story No: 4041825
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 06/23/2016 07:18 AM
People:
Subscription:

Polls opened in Britain on Thursday morning for a referendum on whether the country should quit the European Union bloc it joined 43 years ago.

More than 46 million people are registered to vote in Thursday's plebiscite, which asks: "Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union or leave the European Union?"

Polls are open until 10 p.m. (2100GMT), with results due early Friday.

London – 23 June 2016

1. Election officials putting up sign reading (English) "Polling Station"

2. Wide of school used as polling station

3. Officials putting up sign

4. Pan down from polling station sign to officials

5. Close of opening times on sign

6. People entering polling station, pans left to sign reading (English) "Polling Station"

7. Wide of voter walking into voting station

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Hasan Naqvi, investment banker:

"This is, I'd say the most important day in the past 20 years, at least for the U.K. and the economic consequences of a vote out are huge, so that's why I'm voting to stay."

9. Various of sign with rain water dripping

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Rosemarie Ashworth, voter:

"We live in, I think a very global world, very interconnected. I think it would be a very poor reflection on us if we decided to step back from our responsibility as a country, so I'm hoping we're going to stay in today and try to make the EU a better place and generally contribute to a world which is more tolerant, more accepting and more open with its borders."

11. Tilt up from polling station sign to woman

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Georgie Erangey, voter:

"I'm just hopeful that we live up to our ideals and our responsibility in the world and actually stay in Europe and work together to make the world and Europe a better place."

13. Wide of people leaving after voting

14. Close of voter with umbrella waiting

15. Wide of polling station with puddle in foreground

16. Pull focus from rain to polling station sign

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Subjects: Brexit referendum , Referendums , Voting , Events , Elections , Government and politics
Organisations: European Union
Locations: London , England , United Kingdom
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Instant Library
Title:
SD
Summary: UK - Brexit - Tributes at UK parliament to murdered British MP / Farage: UK result shows that EU is dying / UK PM to resign in wake of "Leave" result
Story No: G12458
Source: POOL, AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 06/24/2016 12:00 AM
People: David Cameron , Thomas Mair , Jo Cox , Nigel Farage
Subscription:

Londoners on June 17th 2016 left flowers, candles and messages outside Westminster as tributes to murdered Labour Party legislator Jo Cox.

The 41-year-old was shot to death June 16th in her constituency near Leeds in northern England.

A 52-year-old man has been arrested but has not been charged.

He has been named locally as Tommy Mair.

West Yorkshire Police have not offered a motive for the killing.

***

Hundreds gathered in Trafalgar Square on June 22nd for a celebration of the life of murdered MP Jo Cox on what would have been her 42nd birthday.

Her husband Brendan Cox took the stage to remember his wife and what she stood for.

Cox thanked people for gathering to honour the memory of his wife and said she would have spent her birthday trying to convince people that Britain is stronger in Europe.

But he said that the day was primarily about Jo "and the much wider battle against hatred that she was engaged in."

She had been an outspoken supporter of migrants.

Friends and family planned to hold a celebration of Cox's life in cities around the world June 22nd.

***

Leading "Leave" campaigner Nigel Farage of Britain's UKIP party on June 24th said the result of the UK referendum showed that the "EU is dying" and predicted other EU members could follow Britain's lead and hold their own leave referendum.

***

British Prime Minister David Cameron said he will resign by the fall and insists the British people's will must be respected after voters chose to leave the 28-nation European Union.

He said he is not the 'captain' that will steer the country through negotiations.

Tributes at UK parliament to murdered British MP

4040904

AP TELEVISION

London - 17 June 2016

1. Picture of member of Parliament Jo Cox surrounded by flowers

2. Two women hugging each other

3. Various of flowers, candles and letters

00:14:19

Celebration of life of murdered UK MP

4041727

POOL

London - 22 June 2016

4. Various AERIALs of Trafalgar square, people gathering for celebration of Jo Cox's birthday ++MUTE++

5. BT Tower with message reading Jo Cox #MoreInCommon

00:25:05

Farage: UK result shows that EU is dying

4042053

AP TELEVISION

London - 24 June 2016

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Nigel Farage, UKIP leader and leading "Leave" campaigner:

" The EU is failing, the EU is dying, I hope we're not the first brick out of the wall, I hope this is the first step towards a Europe of sovereign nation states."

00:35:04

UK PM to resign in wake of "Leave" result

4042067

POOL

London - 24 June 2016

7. British Prime Minister David Cameron approaching the lectern to give a statement

8. SOUNDBITE (English) David Cameron, British Prime Minister:

"Good morning everyone. The country has just taken part in a giant democratic exercise, perhaps the biggest in our history"

9. SOUNDBITE (English) David Cameron, British Prime Minister:

" But the British people have made a very clear decision to take a different path and as such I think the country requires fresh leadership to take it in this direction"

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UK Referendum Reax 2
Title:
HD
Summary: Reax in Billingsgate as UK vote points to EU exit
Story No: 4042036
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 06/24/2016 05:25 AM
People:
Subscription:

London's early morning market traders on Friday reacted to the news that Britain has voted to leave the European Union after a bitterly divisive referendum campaign.

"Best news ever," said one vendor at the capital's historic Billingsgate fish market.

Britain's vote to "leave" allows it to take greater control of its economy and its borders, but shatters the stability of the continental unity forged after World War II.

The decision launches what will be years of negotiations over trade, business and political links with the EU, which will shrink to a 27-nation bloc.

Results released early Friday show the "leave" side prevailed 52 percent to 48 percent in Thursday's vote as tallied by British broadcasters.

The vote had a turnout of 72 percent.

London's early morning market traders on Friday reacted to the news that Britain has voted to leave the European Union after a bitterly divisive referendum campaign.

"Best news ever," said one vendor at the capital's historic Billingsgate fish market.

Britain's vote to "leave" allows it to take greater control of its economy and its borders, but shatters the stability of the continental unity forged after World War II.

The decision launches what will be years of negotiations over trade, business and political links with the EU, which will shrink to a 27-nation bloc.

Results released early Friday show the "leave" side prevailed 52 percent to 48 percent in Thursday's vote as tallied by British broadcasters.

The vote had a turnout of 72 percent.

AP TELEVISION

London - 24 June 2016

1. Preparations at fish market

2. Vendor carrying box with fish

3. Fish boxes

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Allen Laurence, 65, vendor at Billingsgate fish market:

"Absolutely wonderful, best news ever. We want England - or Great Britain - to come back how it was years ago, and it's going the way that we want it to go. So yes, I am pleased, very pleased, for the country overall."

5. Vendor sorting fish

6. People at fish market hall

7. Fish in box

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Francesco, no last name given:

"I'm just sad because I'm Italian, I don't think it's going to be easy for me for here. I don't know, we will see what's happening."

9. Entrance of Billingsgate fish market

10. Bird flying over wind direction indicator

11. Various of Smithfield meat market

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Mathew Heart, 46, vendor at Smithfield meat market:

"It won't affect me at all, this is the thing. I reckon it will be two years before anything has actually been done, even of we win, it won't affect me for a while yet. But I think it's just great we've got our independence back."

13. Various of Smithfield meat market

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Subjects: Brexit referendum , Referendums , Events , Elections , Government and politics
Organisations: European Union
Locations: London , England , United Kingdom
Show story thumbnails
UK BREXIT 2 (CR)
Title:
HD
Summary: British Prime Minister Resigns
Story No: apus058108
Source: UK POOL
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 06/24/2016 08:11 AM
People: David Cameron
Subscription:

STORY

British Prime Minister David Cameron says he's resigning, now that the majority of British voters decided to leave the European Union.

Cameron says Britain needs fresh leadership.

He says although Britain's departure from the EU is not what he would have chosen, negotiations should begin to leave the 28-member bloc and that he's not the "captain" to steer the country through those negotiations.

Cameron says he should be replaced by October.

British Prime Minister David Cameron says he's resigning, now that the majority of British voters decided to leave the European Union.

Cameron says Britain needs fresh leadership.

He says although Britain's departure from the EU is not what he would have chosen, negotiations should begin to leave the 28-member bloc and that he's not the "captain" to steer the country through those negotiations.

Cameron says he should be replaced by October.

STORY

British Prime Minister David Cameron says he's resigning, now that the majority of British voters decided to leave the European Union.

Cameron says Britain needs fresh leadership.

He says although Britain's departure from the EU is not what he would have chosen, negotiations should begin to leave the 28-member bloc and that he's not the "captain" to steer the country through those negotiations.

Cameron says he should be replaced by October.

British Prime Minister David Cameron says he's resigning, now that the majority of British voters decided to leave the European Union.

Cameron says Britain needs fresh leadership.

He says although Britain's departure from the EU is not what he would have chosen, negotiations should begin to leave the 28-member bloc and that he's not the "captain" to steer the country through those negotiations.

Cameron says he should be replaced by October.

SHOWS

UK POOL

London - 24 June 2016

SOUNDBITE (English) David Cameron, British Prime Minister:

"I fought this campaign in the only way I know how, which is to say directly and passionately what I think and feel... I held nothing back. I was absolutely clear about my belief that Britain is stronger, safer and better off inside the European Union. And I made clear the referendum was about this, and this alone... But the British people have made a very clear decision to take a different path. And as such I think the country requires fresh leadership to take it in this direction. I will do everything I can as prime minister to steady the ship over the coming weeks and months. But I do not think it would be right for me to be the captain that steers our country to its next destination...There is no need for a precise timetable today, but in my view we should aim to have a new prime minister in place by the start of the Conservative Party conference in October."

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Subjects: Government and politics , National governments , Political resignations , Brexit referendum
People: David Cameron
Organisations: European Union, United Kingdom government
Locations: London , England , United Kingdom
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UK Farage 5
Title:
HD
Summary: Victorious Brexit campaigner Farage in London
Story No: 4042179
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 06/24/2016 01:08 PM
People: Nigel Farage , David Cameron
Subscription:

Leading "Leave" campaigner Nigel Farage of Britain's UK Independence Party on Friday said of British Prime Minister David Cameron's resignation "he has done the honourable thing."

Leading "Leave" campaigner Nigel Farage of Britain's UK Independence Party on Friday said of British Prime Minister David Cameron's resignation "he has done the honourable thing."

London - 24 June 2016

1. UK Independence Party leader Nigel Farage and supporters at news conference

2. Flags waving

3. Various cutaways of media

4. Flags

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UK Scotland Trump (CR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Trump In Scotland Hails 'Brexit' Vote
Story No: apus058114
Source: US POOL
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 06/24/2016 01:16 PM
People: Donald Trump
Subscription:

FOR CLEAN VERSION SEE STORY NUMBER: 4042153

Donald Trump, in a visit to Scotland on Friday, hailed Britain's vote to leave the European Union, drawing parallels to the anger driving his own presidential campaign.

"I love to see people take their country back," he told reporters at a news conference at one of his golf courses in Scotland. "And that's really what's happening in the United States" and other parts of the world.

The campaign leading to Thursday's stunning vote for Britain to leave the European Union shared some of the populist themes driving the Trump campaign, including a wariness of immigration, concern about borders and skepticism of the value of multinational organizations.

"People want to see borders. They don't necessarily want people pouring into their country that they don't know who they are and where they come from," Trump said.

Trump, whose visit to Scotland is his first international trip since sealing sufficient delegate support to be the GOP standard bearer this fall, also predicted that other nations will follow the United Kingdom's lead.

FOR CLEAN VERSION SEE STORY NUMBER: 4042153

Donald Trump, in a visit to Scotland on Friday, hailed Britain's vote to leave the European Union, drawing parallels to the anger driving his own presidential campaign.

"I love to see people take their country back," he told reporters at a news conference at one of his golf courses in Scotland. "And that's really what's happening in the United States" and other parts of the world.

The campaign leading to Thursday's stunning vote for Britain to leave the European Union shared some of the populist themes driving the Trump campaign, including a wariness of immigration, concern about borders and skepticism of the value of multinational organizations.

"People want to see borders. They don't necessarily want people pouring into their country that they don't know who they are and where they come from," Trump said.

Trump, whose visit to Scotland is his first international trip since sealing sufficient delegate support to be the GOP standard bearer this fall, also predicted that other nations will follow the United Kingdom's lead.

US POOL

Turnberry, Scotland - 24 June 2016

++SOUNDBITES SEPARATED BY WHITE FLASHES++

1. SOUNDBITE (English) Donald Trump, Presumptive US Republican presidential nominee :

"One of the big votes in the history of Europe and Scotland and everywhere. It was very excting coming in. We were landing and we'd just heard the results so I wish everybody a lot of luck. I think that it's purely historic and what's happening is historic."

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Donald Trump, Presumptive US Republican presidential nominee :

"They want to take their country back and they want to have independence in a sense. And you see it with Europe, all over Europe. You're going to have more than just, in my opinion, more than just what happened last night. You're going to have I think many other cases where they want to take their borders back, they want to take their monetary back. They want to take a lot of things back. They want to be able to have a country again. So I think you are going to have this happen more and more, I believe that. And I think it's happening in the United States. It's happening by the fact I have done so well in the polls, you look at the recent polling and you look at the swing states and you see how I'm doing and I haven't even started my campaign yet essentially. I mean we've done very well, we are raising a lot of money for the Republican party."

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Donald Trump, Presumptive US Republican presidential nominee :

"I really do see a parallel between what's happening in the United States and what's happening here, people want to see borders, they don't necessarily want people pouring into their country, that they don't know who they are and where they come from. They have no idea and I think not only did it win but it won by a much bigger margin than people thought it would happen."

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Donald Trump, Presumptive US Republican presidential nominee :

"You just have to embrace it, it's the will of the people. It's not a question of approaching it. It's the will of the people. It's always the will of the people, ultimately that wins out."

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Donald Trump, Presumptive US Republican presidential nominee :

"Look if the pound goes down, their going to do more business. If the pound goes down more people are coming to Turnberry, frankly. And the pound has gone down. And let's see what the impact of that is. But I think places like Scotland and England and different places in Great Britain I think you're going to see a lot of activity."

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UK Markets Close
Title:
HD
Summary: UK stocks close calmer after frantic Brexit plunge
Story No: 4042236
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 06/24/2016 06:23 PM
People:
Subscription:

Stock markets and the pound plunged on Friday amid investor concerns about the economic repercussions of Britain's departure from the EU, the world's largest economic bloc, but were calmer at closing time.

Michael Ingram, a market strategist at BGC brokerage said the "outright panic" that set in at the opening of trading subsided somewhat to help the pound sterling recover some of its lost value by closing time.

Britain's FTSE 100 dropped 3.1 percent. At one point it was 8 percent lower. The German DAX index sank 6.8 percent and France's CAC 40 index tumbled 8 percent.

The pound hit its lowest level since 1985 before recovering slightly to trade at 1.3744 US dollars.

That's still far below the 1.4808 US dollars it traded at late Thursday in New York.

Ingram said that Britain's exit from the EU would be a "question mark" over the future of London as a financial centre for some time.

But he said suggestions that it would be taken over by Paris and Frankfurt as main trading hubs were "absolutely fanciful" when compared to London's size, infrastructure and human resources.

Stock markets and the pound plunged on Friday amid investor concerns about the economic repercussions of Britain's departure from the EU, the world's largest economic bloc, but were calmer at closing time.

Michael Ingram, a market strategist at BGC brokerage said the "outright panic" that set in at the opening of trading subsided somewhat to help the pound sterling recover some of its lost value by closing time.

Britain's FTSE 100 dropped 3.1 percent. At one point it was 8 percent lower. The German DAX index sank 6.8 percent and France's CAC 40 index tumbled 8 percent.

The pound hit its lowest level since 1985 before recovering slightly to trade at 1.3744 US dollars.

That's still far below the 1.4808 US dollars it traded at late Thursday in New York.

Ingram said that Britain's exit from the EU would be a "question mark" over the future of London as a financial centre for some time.

But he said suggestions that it would be taken over by Paris and Frankfurt as main trading hubs were "absolutely fanciful" when compared to London's size, infrastructure and human resources.

London - 24 June 2016

1. Various of trading room of BGC brokerage, traders

2. Michael Ingram being interviewed

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Ingram, market strategist at BGC brokerage:

"A day of high drama, I think we drew back from the outright panic that we had at the open. Of course this was no better illustrated what the roller coaster ride in and around sterling it was trading as high as 1.50 dollar overnight, then when the results started to come in and people thought 'my goodness maybe we are going to vote for a Brexit', we saw this deathly plunge down, at one point 1.31 against the dollar and then as the market opened in London we saw a bit of recovering, recover, traded up to more or less the 1.40 level and now it's ending the day in London about 1.36."

4. Cutaway of traders

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Ingram, market strategist at BGC brokerage:

"The only thing we can be certain about is more uncertainty at this particular point in time. I think over the next couple of days, over the weekend the focus will shift from the market arena to the political arena, obviously it's already had political ramifications, the resignation of David Cameron for instance, we know that Scotland is likely to move actually quite rapidly to a further referendum which is likely to see them leave the UK and of course we started to get the feedback from European leaders feed through, that is going to continue."

6. Traders

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Ingram, market strategist at BGC brokerage:

"I think certainly there is going to be a question mark over the future of London as a financial centre for some time. However I think the disparity in size and capacity and the sort of human resource and supporting infrastructure that the City of London has could not be accommodated in any way by either Frankfurt and Paris. So I think the idea that we're going to see a relatively rapid decampment of the financial community to continental Europe I think is absolutely fanciful and always remember that there is a deep-seated distrust of Anglo-Saxon capitalism, market based capitalism amongst Europeans."

8. Empty desks after end of trade

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Germany Brexit
Title:
HD
Summary: Merkel: Brexit talks very, very complicated
Story No: 4234863
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 10/15/2019 10:57 AM
People: Angela Merkel
Subscription:

German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Tuesday likened the effort to break the Brexit deadlock to "squaring the circle," but is vowing again to work until the last moment to secure an orderly British withdrawal from the European Union.

Merkel pointed to the difficulties of reconciling the UK's desire to leave the EU customs union with the need to ensure an open border between Ireland and Northern Ireland in a speech Tuesday to German machinery makers.

She said that "what they are trying to negotiate is something like squaring the circle, and it is very, very complicated."

She added that "we will work until the last minute for an orderly British withdrawal" but the EU is also prepared if no deal is reached.

Merkel also said that Britain leaving will require the EU to be more "competitive and to take geopolitical responsibility."

Berlin - 15 October 2019

1. Merkel arriving at the 11th Mechanical Engineering Summit

2. Audience at summit

3. Wide of summit

4. Audience

5. SOUNDBITE (German) Angela Merkel, German Chancellor:

(Speaking about Brexit) "What they are trying to negotiate is something like squaring the circle, and it is very, very complicated."

6. Audience

7. SOUNDBITE (German) Angela Merkel, German Chancellor:

"We will work until the last minute for an orderly British withdrawal."

8. Journalist

9. SOUNDBITE (German) Angela Merkel, German Chancellor:

"But one thing is clear already now: Britain will develop into another competitor at Europe's doorstep, and that will require the European Union even more strongly to be competitive and to take geopolitical responsibility."

10. Wide of summit

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Subjects: Government and politics , Brexit referendum , Brexit
People: Angela Merkel
Organisations: European Union, Germany government
Locations: Europe , United Kingdom , Western Europe , Berlin , Germany
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EU Barclay
Title:
HD
Summary: Brexit secretary: Deal with EU still very possible
Story No: 4234836
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 10/15/2019 08:42 AM
People: Michel Barnier
Subscription:

British Brexit Secretary Stephen Barclay said on Tuesday that talks on Britain's departure from the European Union were ongoing and "a deal is still very possible".

Barclay was speaking in Luxembourg where he was attending the EU's General Affairs council.

The European Union said Tuesday that a Brexit divorce deal is possible this week but that the British government's proposals so far are not sufficient to seal an agreement.

The EU's Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier said ahead of a meeting of EU ministers that the main challenge now is to turn British proposals on the complex issue of the border on the island of Ireland into something binding.

Technical teams from Britain and the EU worked through the weekend and Monday, but both sides said significant gaps remained between their positions.

EU leaders are meeting for a two-day summit in Brussels from Thursday. Brexit will top the agenda as the Oct. 31 Brexit deadline looms.

Luxembourg - 15 October 2019

1. SOUNDBITE (English) Stephen Barclay, British Brexit Secretary: ++INCLUDES ARRIVAL AND LEAVING SHOT++

Journalist question: "Mr Barnier has just spoken about discussions becoming more and more difficult. Are there any grounds for optimism?"

Barclay: "I'm looking forward to the General Affairs Council this morning, an opportunity to discuss these issues with my EU counterparts. The talks are ongoing, we need to give them space to proceed, but detailed conversations are underway and a deal is still very possible."

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Subjects: Brexit referendum , Brexit
People: Michel Barnier
Organisations: European Union
Locations: Luxembourg , Western Europe , Europe , United Kingdom
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UK Brexit Queens Speech 2
Title:
HD
Summary: Brexit protesters on hand for Queen's Speech
Story No: 4234711
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 10/14/2019 01:05 PM
People: Boris Johnson , Prince Charles
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Brexit supporters and opponents braved bad weather to watch Queen Elizabeth II ride to Westminster on Monday for the ceremonial state opening of parliament.

Clusters of British and EU flags lined Whitehall as the monarch, accompanied by the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall, made her way to parliament in the horse-drawn Diamond Jubilee State Coach.

Britain is scheduled to leave the EU on 31 October, and an EU summit on Thursday or Friday is considered one of the last possible chances to approve a divorce agreement.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson insists the country will leave at the end of the month with or without a deal.

London - 14 October 2019

1. Various of Queen Elizabeth II's procession coming down Whitehall towards parliament

2. Various of Brexit supporters waving Union Jack flags and umbrellas singing (in English)"Bye, bye EU, bye, bye EU"

3. Mid of British flag and EU umbrella

4. Mid of British flags

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Tim Griffiths, pro-Brexit demonstrator:

"Well, actually like the British culture, which is represented by this sort of thing. The thing is, that is not the EU, that is the United Kingdom, and a lot of people want to celebrate that, even people who talk about remain, like the Royal family and things like that. The thing is, that structure is not compatible with the EU, is it, and we need to make that choice, we need to realise that and make a proper decision."

6. Wide of Brexit supporters shouting (English) "Brexit now, Brexit now"

7. Various of anti-Brexit demonstrators and cutaways of guardsman

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Helen Searby, anti-Brexit demonstrator:

"I'm here today because I want to send a message to the Queen to say that we don't want our United Kingdom broken up, we want to stay, we want to keep it intact, we want the Union intact and Boris Johnson (British Prime Minister) with his crazy antics, trying to force through a Brexit, a no-deal Brexit or any kind of Brexit, is going to lead to the break up of our United Kingdom."

9. Various of Queen's procession heading back to Buckingham Palace after speech

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UK Brexit Business
Title:
HD
Summary: Brexit uncertainty worries at Lancashire factory
Story No: 4234444
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 10/12/2019 11:18 AM
People:
Subscription:

It might just look like ordinary rolls of fabric, but it will eventually end up furnishing the interiors of luxury motor cars and buses.

A factory in the north of England is the first step in a long process which ends at the showrooms of Alfa Romeo, Ford, Fiat, and Jaguar Land Rover.

From UniRoyal Global's factory in Earby, the fabric will be despatched to Eastern European countries such as Romania, Czech Republic and North Macedonia for laminating and cutting before being shipped to car production plants in Italy, Spain and the UK.

There it will be used as seat covers, arm rests, glove compartments and door coverings.

UniRoyal Global also needs to import raw materials, such as petrochemicals from the Netherlands and backing material from Turkey.

Such is the nature of the European Union's single market that goods can be rapidly despatched without tariffs or customs forms on a daily basis or "just in time", as they call it, throughout Europe.  

There's no need to stockpile because goods arrive in time for production.

Each process is a small cog in a big wheel.

But now with the UK leaving the Europe Union, 40 years of trade links are being disrupted as the UK might be out of the single market.  

"For the past 40 years we've been completely linked. To unravel that now is a virtually impossible task," said Michael Raines, Commercial Director of UniRoyal Global.  

For him, what's worse than leaving the single market is not knowing what the future holds which makes it difficult to do business.

"Customers are nervous, we've had several customers holding back," he said.

He fears customers may just go elsewhere within Europe.

"If our customers lose faith in the fact that they have tariffs to do business in the UK they may just take all their business into Europe," Raines added.

In the meantime customers are stocking up before the October 31 deadline in the event of a no deal.  

This also causes disruption as the factory had to move from a two to a three shift pattern to satisfy the extra orders, which means paying workers overtime.

This is history repeating itself.  

In the run up to the previous Brexit deadline of March 31 this year, the same happened.  

But in the end Britain didn't leave and requested an extension.

However, customers had stocked up enough before the deadline to last them another six weeks, so in April UniRoyal had to slow down production, but still pay its workforce.

The company ended up with a credit deficit.

Despite the risk to business and their jobs, workers there mostly want Brexit done.

"I think it would be a risk but we've had 3 years to sort it out," said Paul Turner, 50, who has worked at the factory for 22 years.

"Everything's a risk, every day's a risk, but if we don't leave then we are disrespecting democracy," he added.

Another factory worker, Philip Hayes, who has also worked at the factory for 22 years said he felt like the UK was being "overruled by Europe."

On the other hand, the designer at the factory Lucas Payne was concerned.  

He voted to leave the EU, but didn't expect the Brexit result.  

It was more of a protest vote.

"I'm also worried about it from a business point of view as well because of the regulation and all the change that might be involved in it and how difficult it might be for us," he added.

With less than three weeks to go before the UK is due to depart the EU, business owners are hoping for a deal that will keep them within the single market, without that they face uncertain times ahead.

In the meantime they are ramping up production to help their customers stockpile for the disruption of a no-deal Brexit.

Earby - 1 October 2019

1. Various of coated fabric being made from chemicals in the UniRoyal factory

Frankfurt - 10 September 2019

2. Various of a Jaguar Land Rover Defender being unveiled at the Frankfurt Motor Show.

Earby - 1 October 2019

3. Various of coated fabric being made from chemicals in the UniRoyal factory

4. Factory workers talking to each other

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Raines, Commercial Director of UniRoyal:

++AUDIO AS INCOMING++

"For the past 40 years, we've been completely linked. To unravel that now is a virtually impossible task because of vehicle design and the technologies that go into it, homologation, the safety features and so on, you can't just pull it all away and go and build a car somewhere else."

6. Cutaway of machine

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Raines, Commercial Director of UniRoyal Global:

++AUDIO AS INCOMING++

"The uncertainty means it's difficult to plan your business going forward and customers are nervous. We've had several customers hold back on giving us orders because they don't know what the future looks like. When you are in the automotive industry and 85 per cent of what we do is automotive, you are talking about 3, 4, 5-year production runs for a vehicle and they're making these commitments. Our customers are making commitments now for the next 4 to 5 years and when they haven't got all the facts, for example, they don't know where we're going to be with our Brexit. They don't know whether the UK is still a safe bet for them to place that level of business over that period of time because we are talking millions in terms of revenue."

8. Cutaway of machine

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Raines, Commercial Director of UniRoyal Global:

++AUDIO AS INCOMING++

"If our customers lose faith in the fact that they have tariffs to do business in the UK, they may just take all their business into Europe. We have competitors, everyone has competitors. All our competitors sit in mainland Europe. As a result of that we may find ourselves under competitive pressure and again having to change the shape of our business."

10. Various of rolls of fabric ready for despatch, which are extra orders from Europe

11. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Raines, Commercial Director of UniRoyal Global:

"But we've already had this last March where we had a massive ramp up of production prior to March and then a big let down, then we had some quiet periods and now we're ramping up again and then another potential let down if we don't get a deal or if no-deal is not an option which we hope is the case. Then, we've just got this feast and famine going on. And it's just not the way... the smooth way to run your business."

12. Factory worker Paul Turner

13. Machine

14. SOUNDBITE (English) Paul Turner, 50, who has worked at the factory for 22 years:

++AUDIO AS INCOMING++

"Well, I mean I think it would be a risk, but we've had 3 years to sort it out. That's the frustrating thing. From myself... from my perspective, as I 'm in the north, I mean the majority voted to leave. Yes, it's a risk. Can we manage on our own? I don't know. But everything's a risk, every day's a risk, but if we don't leave then we are disrespecting democracy."

15. Various of workers in factory

16. Factory worker Philip Hayes

17. SOUNDBITE (English) Philip Hayes, 56, worker at the factory for 22 years:

++AUDIO AS INCOMING++

"I did vote leave. I didn't vote for a good deal or a bad deal, I voted to leave if you will. I think because when the British government can't pass any laws and we get overruled by Europe, I think that's a step too far."

18. Various of factory worker Graham Keats working on a machine

19. SOUNDBITE (English) Graham Keats, factory worker who voted for Brexit and would still vote for it:

"I was working where I work now when I did voted and I knew the implications it might have, but you know that things weren't really explained to people properly. You know, they were just broadcasting the good side and not the bad side, you know. I do know we are dependant on Europe and people we deal with are mostly European companies so... but I didn't think it'd have this effect, you know. I thought they'll have some effect and I thought they'd come to some sort of agreement because the trade goes both ways."

20. Designer Lucas Payne who voted leave more as a protest vote and didn't expect Brexit

21. Designing tools

22. SOUNDBITE (English) Lucas Payne, designer at the factory:

"I am worried about it. I'm worried about it. I'm also worried about it from a business point of view as well because of the regulation and all the change that will be involved and how difficult it might be for us. So I believe that what we need is we need reform in Europe rather than to leave."

23. Various of workers working in the factory

24. Pull out from rolls of material ready to be exported to Europe

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Belgium Sinn Fein Brexit
Title:
HD
Summary: Sinn Fein: Brexit not good in any scenario
Story No: 4233930
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 10/09/2019 03:37 PM
People: Michelle O'Neill , Michel Barnier
Subscription:

Sinn Féin Vice-President Michelle O'Neill on Wednesday said that she wanted to protect "Irish interests" just 22 days away from a potential hard Brexit.

Speaking in Brussels, O'Neill praised the EU for "protecting the Good Friday agreement throughout all the Brexit debacle".

She said Brexit was "not good for our people in any scenario", but added that "ultimately our people need a deal" to protect livelihoods and avoid "our peace process being thrown under a bus."

Earlier EU Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier said that the recent British proposals were fundamentally flawed on dealing with the border on the island of Ireland and giving the regional authorities in Northern Ireland a veto on how to proceed.

Brussels - 9 October 2019

1. Exterior of European Parliament building

2. Sinn Féin Vice-President Michelle O'Neill waiting to speak to media

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Michelle O'Neill, Sinn Féin Vice-President:

"We are here, where we are 22 days out from a potential crash out Brexit, we are here to make the case again for Irish interest. The EU has been very consistent and firm in protecting the Good Friday agreement throughout all the Brexit debacle, and we want to make sure that in these last days as we move ever closer towards what is looking like a crash out Brexit that we make the case for Irish interests, that there must be protection for the Good Friday agreement and for the Irish people."

4. Cutaway of European Parliament logo

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Michelle O'Neill, Sinn Féin Vice-President:

"You have to plan for all scenarios. Brexit is not good for our people in any scenario, whether there is a deal or no deal. Ultimately right up until the eleventh hour we continue to work and make the case for a deal, ultimately our people need a deal, but that deal must include a backstop, the protection for the Good Friday agreement, the all island economy needs to be protected and there can be no return to a hard border. So we hope that there is a deal because this is about livelihood, this is about jobs being lost, this is about businesses being closed, this is about our peace process being thrown under a bus."

6. Various of Michelle O'Neill

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Subjects: Brexit referendum , Brexit , Peace process , Diplomacy , International relations , Government and politics
People: Michelle O'Neill , Michel Barnier
Organisations: European Parliament, European Union
Locations: Brussels , Belgium , Western Europe , Europe
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UK Ireland Invisible Border
Title:
HD
Summary: Fears over Brexit effect on UK-Ireland border
Story No: 4233845
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 10/09/2019 08:03 AM
People: Boris Johnson
Subscription:

The small ferry moves gently across the calm waters of Carlingford Lough, connecting the picturesque hamlet of Greencastle in Northern Ireland with the village of Greenore, a mile and a half (2.4 kilometres) away in the Republic of Ireland.

It began sailing a little more than two years ago, saving farmers, commuters and tourists an hour-long drive inland to the nearest bridge.

The service is another sign that the border has all but vanished since the Good Friday Agreement was signed in 1998, ending decades of sectarian violence, replaced with a quiet sense of normality older generations cherish and younger people can take for granted.

But if the UK leaves the European Union on October 31 without a Brexit divorce deal, this local boat could find itself plying an international border.

"We don't know what to expect," said Paul O'Sullivan, the ferry company's Managing Director, "Brexit has resulted in chaos for our company."

With both in the EU, the border barely resonates. As members, both the UK and Ireland have to abide by the rules of the club - the free movement of goods, services, capital and people.

In a no-deal Brexit, that all goes and the border - the only land border between the UK and the EU - will resonate once again.

Little wonder then that it's been the most intractable issue in the Brexit negotiations over the past three or so years since the UK voted to leave the EU in June 2016.

Like many businesses, the Carlingford Lough Ferry has received little guidance: will farmers carrying hay from the south need to declare their goods? Will there be forms? Customs officers with clipboards? And then there's the question of whether the ferry will be allowed to operate at all.

"The worst-case scenario for us would be customs checks: hard infrastructure at the border which would mean presumedly hard infrastructure," said O'Sullivan.

This uncertainty is already being felt with a travel operator from Dublin withholding next year's bookings fearing customers won't sign up to tours if they face lengthy border procedures.

With little more than three weeks to go before the scheduled Brexit date of October 31, the two sides have failed to agree on a plan to ensure the border remains open, without the checkpoints that were magnets for violence during three decades of conflict. More than 3,500 people died during "The Troubles."

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has said that the UK as a whole, including Northern Ireland which voted to remain in the EU during the referendum, has to leave on the scheduled Brexit date - with or without a deal. Not doing so, he says, would undermine faith in democracy.

That stance has raised concerns that a physical border will return and threaten the fragile peace process in Northern Ireland and the economic opportunities it has created.

No one really knows what will happen even though political leaders on all sides keep insisting the border will stay open. People are worried about the long-term impact of the potential changes.

The inability to no longer move freely is likely to hurt the smallest operators the most.

Piloting the ferry across the Lough, Shane Horner remembered as a child the border checks and the military troops deployed all along the border. Crossing was slow and intimidating but "once that stopped it was grand, you could come and go as you pleased."

Today, farmers from the Republic take the new ferry service to sell silage and hay from the lush fields of County Louth to customers north of the border. Wedding parties use it to cross for events in the medieval Carlingford.

It's a bus service on the water, not a stronghold between nations.

"There is a cross-community dimension," said O'Sullivan who remembers meeting people on the ferry visiting the south for the first time ever. "If there is a hard Brexit, it almost certainly will have an adverse impact."

Newry, Northern Ireland - 29 September 2019

1. Aerial of border between Northern Ireland (left) and Republic of Ireland (right) separated by the Carlingford lough (estuary)

Carlingford Lough, border region - 2 October 2019

2. Aerial of small fishing harbour next to Carlingford ferry

3. Carlingford ferry crossing the estuary

4. Various of Carlingford ferry arriving at Greencastle ferry dock

5. Close of car ramp touching the dock

6. Various of truck driving onto ferry

7. Car boarding ferry, UPSOUND (English) "Welcome onboard Carlingford ferry"

8. Car parking on ferry ahead of departure

9. Mariner holding the gates of the ferry as the vessel departs

10. Mid of detail of car

11. Aerial of ferry departing

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Paul O'Sullivan, Managing Director, Carlingford Ferry:

"Brexit has resulted in chaos for our company in terms of being able to plan. We don't know what to expect. We cross the border on Carlingford Lough between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland 30 times per day. We operate every day of the year except Christmas Day."

13. Cutaway of water flowing by the vessel

14. SOUNDBITE (English) Paul O'Sullivan, Managing Director, Carlingford Ferry:

"We've not been contacted by any authority, revenues commission departments of the governments, we've not had any official contact which is strange... we're one month out of potentially an exit."

15. Wide of view of lough from the stern of ferry

16. SOUNDBITE (English) Paul O'Sullivan, Managing Director, Carlingford Ferry:

"The worst-case scenario for us would be customs checks: hard infrastructure at the border which would mean presumedly hard infrastructure at our terminal in Greenore in County Louth and Green Castle in County Down. That would be the worst-case scenario."

17. Pan of vehicles on deck of ferry

18. View from stern over mountains with rescue boat in foreground

19. SOUNDBITE (English) Paul O'Sullivan, Managing Director, Carlingford Ferry:

"There is a cross-community dimension in this as much as a business and transportation solution. If there is a hard Brexit, it almost certainly will have an adverse impact."

20. Mid of pilot house

21. Various of captain Shane Horner

22. Close on hand holding rudder, UPSOUND (English) "When I was very young there used to be the border checks, there used to army checkpoints and stuff. Once that stopped it was grand, you could come and go as you pleased." ++CONTINUES OVER SHOT 23++

23. Various inside of pilot house

24. SOUNDBITE (English) no name given, truck driver:

"I will probably save me about an hour on the journey and you are probably talking about 35 miles (56 km), 25 litres of fuel. It's handy, it's handy. I find it very useful."

25. Various of views from ferry

26. SOUNDBITE (English) Ozzy McCall, 53, electrician commuting with the ferry:

"This is a much nicer way for me to commute home from work. I live in the North and work in the North, but by going this way it cuts out (the towns of) Rostervor, Warrenpoint and Newry which are really busy in the evening and it gives me a nicer journey home."

27. Ferry docking at Greenore

28. Various of truck disembarking

29. Sign for Carlingford ferries with Greencastle in background

30. Aerial of countryside around the castle

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EU Barnier Brexit
Title:
HD
Summary: Barnier: Brexit deal 'very difficult, but possible'
Story No: 4233866
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 10/09/2019 10:36 AM
People: Michel Barnier , Boris Johnson
Subscription:

The European Union's chief Brexit negotiator said on Wednesday the bloc would remain "calm, vigilant, respectful and constructive" ahead of crucial Brexit negotiations on Thursday.

Michel Barnier also said a deal was "very difficult, but possible."  

Barnier will be meeting with UK Brexit envoy Stephen Barclay on Thursday as both sides are saying that the chances of reaching a divorce deal look increasingly slim.

EU and UK negotiators have been meeting at technical level this week and Barclay's visit comes in the wake of a series of acrimonious comments from both sides on the state of relations.

The EU has said that British Prime Minister Boris Johnson needs to have workable proposals by the end of the week if there is to be any chance of a breakthrough at the October 17-18 EU summit.

Brussels - 9 October 2019

1. European Union chief Brexit negotiator arriving

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Michel Barnier, European Union chief Brexit negotiator: ++CONTINUES FROM PREVIOUS SHOT / ENDS ON BARNIER LEAVING++

"Same procedure as every week. I will debrief the Brexit Steering Group and this afternoon in the plenary I will be at the side of (European Commission) President (Jean-Claude) Juncker. In any case the EU will remain calm, vigilant, respectful and constructive. The technical talks continue and I invited for a working lunch (Britisg Brexit Secretary) Steve Barclay tomorrow. That's all, thank you."

Journalist (English, off-screen): "Is a deal still possible?"

Barnier: "The deal is possible and very difficult, but possible."

3. Various of Barnier greeting colleagues at Brexit steering group meeting ++MUTE++

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Subjects: Brexit referendum , Brexit , Labor unions , Labor issues , Social issues , Social affairs
People: Michel Barnier , Boris Johnson
Organisations: European Union, European Commission
Locations: United Kingdom , Western Europe , Europe
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UK PM EP President
Title:
HD
Summary: UK PM welcomes European Parliament president
Story No: 4233785
Source: UK POOL
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 10/08/2019 06:18 PM
People: Boris Johnson
Subscription:

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson held talks at Downing Street on Tuesday with European Parliament President David Sassoli.

The Italian MEP has been meeting with key European leaders in an effort to break the Brexit impasse.

His talks with Johnson come as Britain and the European Union traded ill-tempered barbs earlier in the day, with the UK saying that a Brexit deal might be impossible, while insisting it was still working for one with just over three weeks until its scheduled departure from the bloc.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson's office said EU intransigence had led to a breakdown in negotiations, prompting a top European leader to warn against playing a "stupid blame game" - and chide Johnson in Latin.

The meeting also comes ahead of Parliament's suspension on  Tuesday evening so that a new session can begin next week with a major policy speech from Johnson's Conservative government.

An earlier attempt by the government to shut down Parliament for five weeks was ruled illegal by Britain's Supreme Court because it had the effect of preventing legislators from scrutinizing the government's Brexit plans.

This week's shorter suspension is more routine. Lawmakers will return on Monday.

UK POOL

London - 8 October 2019

1. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson greeting European Parliament President David Sassoli outside No. 10 Downing Street, then enteringUPSOUND (English) of journalist asking: "Is there any point in you still talking?"

Johnson: "Of course"

2. Various of Johnson and Sassoli meeting inside No. 10

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Subjects: Government and politics , Brexit referendum , Brexit , Legislature
People: Boris Johnson
Organisations: United Kingdom government, European Parliament, European Union
Locations: London , England , United Kingdom , Western Europe , Europe
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UK Johnson Brexit Harry Dunn
Title:
HD
Summary: UK PM on Brexit, US diplomatic immunity case
Story No: 4233556
Source: UK POOL
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 10/07/2019 12:33 PM
People: Boris Johnson
Subscription:

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Monday said he would speak with the US ambassador to the UK about a case involving a US diplomat's wife who left the country after reportedly becoming a suspect in a fatal crash.

Johnson said he did not think it was right to "use the process of diplomatic immunity for this type of purpose" and added he would raise the issue with the White House if necessary.

He also urged the woman, named in Britain as Anne Sacoolas, to return to the UK to face investigation.

Harry Dunn, 19, was killed on 27 August after his motorcycle collided with a car near RAF Croughton, a British military base near Oxford.

The base is home to a signals intelligence station operated by the US Air Force.

During a visit to Watford, the prime minister also repeated his insistence that Britain would leave the European Union on 31 October.

"That's the what the people of this country voted for. I think most people want just to get Brexit done, it's been going on for a long time now," he said.

++NO CUTAWAYS AVAILABLE - SOUNDBITES SEPARATED BY BLACK++

UK POOL

Watford - 7 October 2019

1. SOUNDBITE (English) Boris Johnson, UK Prime Minister

"And we will leave the European Union on October the 31st. That's the what the people of this country voted for. I think most people want just to get Brexit done, it's been going on for a long time now."

++BLACK++

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Boris Johnson, UK Prime Minister

(Question: What are you gonna do to help the parents and is it, is it right, that diplomatic immunity should be used even for one of our greatest ally? Is it right it should be used in this way?)

"Well, I think everybody's sympathy is very much with the family of Harry Dunn and our condolences to them for their tragic loss. And no, I must answer you directly, I do not think that it can be right to use the process of diplomatic immunity for this type of purpose. And I hope that Anne Sacoolas will come back and we'll engage properly with the processes of laws that are carried out in this country. And that's a point that we've raised, or are raising today with the American ambassador here in the UK. And I hope it will be resolved very shortly and, you know, to anticipate a question that you might want to raise, if we can't resolve it, then of course I will be raising it myself personally with the White House."

++ENDS ON SOUNDBITE++

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Subjects: Government and politics , Brexit referendum , Brexit
People: Boris Johnson
Organisations: United Kingdom government, European Union
Locations: United Kingdom , Western Europe , Europe
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UK Johnson Arcuri Brexit
Title:
HD
Summary: UK PM on Arcuri probe and Brexit talks
Story No: 4233544
Source: UK POOL
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 10/07/2019 11:43 AM
People: Emmanuel Macron , Boris Johnson
Subscription:

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Monday said it was time to "get together" with the European Union and "really thrash this thing out", as he tries to overcome opposition to his Brexit deal.

The EU has responded coolly to his proposals to maintain an open Irish border after Britain leaves the 28-nation bloc.

Under the plan, there would be customs checks, but they could be conducted away from the border.

Johnson said his plan was "a big step forward, big advance, big compromise by the UK government" and called on the EU to make clear its position on the UK's "very generous, fair and reasonable offer".

The prime minister was also asked about the US businesswoman at the centre of a storm over her ties to him.

Jennifer Arcuri earlier on Monday refused to say whether she had had an intimate relationship with the prime minister and had received money or favourable treatment during Johnson's time as mayor of London.

The prime minister refused to comment on her comments, and also refused to say whether he would answer a call to appear before the Greater London Authority to answer questions about his relationship with the businesswoman.

++NO CUTAWAYS AVAILABLE - SOUNDBITES SEPARATED BY BLACK FRAMES++

UK POOL

Watford - 7 October 2019

1. SOUNDBITE (English) Boris Johnson, UK Prime Minister:

(Question: You've been summoned though before the GLA (Greater London Authority), to appear before the GLA and (have) until tomorrow to say whether you'll do it. Will you do it?)

"Look, I've said everything I'm going to say on that particular subject."

++BLACK FRAMES++

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Boris Johnson, UK Prime Minister:

SOUNDBITE (English)

(Question: I just want to go back to Miss Arcuri, 'cause these are fresh details out this morning, saying that you... visited her home repeatedly. What do you have to say about what she's had to say this morning?)

"Well, I really said everything I want to say about that and I'm very happy to talk about what more we're doing to support not just Watford (hospital) but every new hospital built programme that we've got going."

++BLACK FRAMES++

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Boris Johnson, UK Prime Minister:

(Question: Is it not time to sort of concede more or maybe accept that your proposal is today dead in the water?)

"Well, I think actually our proposal is very fair, very reasonable. What it does is it respects the Good Friday Agreement, the peace process in Northern Ireland. It makes sure there's no border, but there's no hard borders, no checks at all at the border between Northern Ireland and Ireland. It also goes further in allowing Northern Ireland and Ireland to remain in alignment, both for agri-foods, for cattle and so on and for food, but also for industrial goods as well. And that's a big step forward, big advance, big compromise by the UK government."

++BLACK FRAMES++

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Boris Johnson, UK Prime Minister:

"What we're saying to our friends is: this is a very generous, fair and reasonable offer we've made. What we'd like to hear from you now is what your thoughts are. And if you have a problem, if you have issues with any of the proposals that we've come up with then let's get into the the detail and discuss them."

++BLACK FRAMES++

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Boris Johnson, UK Prime Minister:

(Question: How are you going to sell it?)

"Well I talked to both Antti Rinne, the Finnish prime minister, and to Emmanuel Macron yesterday and I think, you know, that they can see that there is an argument now for pushing on and getting on with some stats... some substantive talks on the detail of what we're proposing, just to go over it again. We've gone a long way. We're talking about keeping Northern Ireland in alignment with Ireland, by consent, whether over agri-food or over industrial products and standards. Now, that's a big concession by the UK. The issue is what is the EU's objections that... what's their suggestions, where are they coming from? We haven't really heard the detail from them about what they think the problems are. It's time for us to get together and really thrash this thing out."

++ENDS ON SOUNDBITE++

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Subjects: Government and politics , Brexit referendum , Brexit
People: Emmanuel Macron , Boris Johnson
Organisations: United Kingdom government, Ireland government, European Union
Locations: London , England , United Kingdom , Western Europe , Europe , Northern Ireland
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UK Brexit NorthEast
Title:
HD
Summary: Firms fear impact of No Deal Brexit on UK's NEast
Story No: 4233509
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 10/07/2019 08:02 AM
People: Boris Johnson
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Britain's North East Chamber of Commerce has warned that a 'no deal' Brexit could have a disastrous impact for businesses in this part of the United Kingdom.

Jack Simpson, International trade and Brexit adviser for the chamber, said the northeast trades 60 per cent of global trade with the European Union, and "anything that further adds more friction to this trading relationship will serve to damage those regional trading links."

Simpson added that any fiscal barriers, administration costs and time delays at borders will make this area of the country less competitive in what is today their biggest market.

But businesses in the northeast had differing views on how Brexit could impact them.

Bonds Foundry, a company that makes steel castings for heavy industry such as oil and gas exploration and the marine and construction trade, has a long history dating back to the late 1800s.  

The company employs 240 people at its three sites in the north of England, including this one in Crook near Durham.

It exports 60 per cent of what it produces to the European Union.

Chairman Paul Duncan bought the first foundry in 2000 and has since built up a thriving industry with a turnover of around 25 million pounds sterling (just over 30 million US dollars) a year.

In an already competitive industry Duncan believes leaving the EU will be disastrous for his business.

"My worry in a very competitive industry in an international industry we are reliant on exporting," he said. "My worry is that it makes the task at hand more difficult."

He feels that the government doesn't understand business up in the northeast or the employment difficulties that it currently juggles.

"I don't think it is going to be fine," Duncan says, adding he expects some of his existing EU clients will end up going with his competitors within Europe.

  

Neil Robinson is the works manager of Bonds Foundry.  

He voted remain in the EU referendum but was conflicted after listening to the politicians and says he could easily have voted leave.  

Many of his colleagues did vote to leave, reflecting the heavily skewed Brexit poll in the northeast.

Robinson says immigration was a big factor and many workers didn't really think about the business side of things and how it would affect their job security.

According to the North East England Chamber of Commerce this part of England exported 13.2 billion pounds sterling in 2018, 60 per cent - 7.9 billion - of which was to the EU.

The chamber says a 'no deal' Brexit would heavily impact the northeast.

A few businesses, however, are not deterred by an exit from the bloc.

John Elliot, Chairman of Ebac Ltd, which makes washing machines, water coolers and dehumidifiers, sees it as an opportunity.

His company has a turnover of 20 million pounds sterling (just over 30 million US dollars) a year, employs 250 people and exports to the Europe and the United States.  

"I think the European Union is conceptually flawed, he said.  "I think it is an organisation that has nothing but costs and less flexibility and bureaucracy.  So I think once we are an independent country we will be free to set our own industrial strategy which suits us."

He imports components from Italy and Korea and exports to France, Italy, Greece and Spain - goods worth 8 million pounds sterling (10 million US dollars) a year.  

Yet he doesn't see a 'no deal' Brexit as a problem.

"We've got to look at the longer term, what's right for the UK. And if we're going to have problems short term, let's get through them."

With less than a month to go before the UK is set to leave the EU, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson's willingness to embrace a "no-deal" Brexit has alarmed many lawmakers, since the government's own assessment of such a scenario warns of an economic slowdown, severe delays at British ports, and possible food and medicine shortages.

Crook - 2 October 2019

1. Various of worker soldering steel casting in Bonds Foundry

2. Various of steel castings being transported by steel pulleys

3. Various set-ups of Paul Duncan, chairman of Bonds Foundry Group

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Paul Duncan, chairman of Bonds Foundry Group:

"We employ about 240 people mainly in this area in places where there are not many alternative jobs to be had. My worry in a very competitive industry, in an international industry we are totally relying on exporting. My worry is that it makes the job, the task at hand more difficult. And the politicians tell us that we are in for a new dawn. I am skeptical as to whether that is truly the case."

5. Various of castings encased in sand being moved by pulleys

6 SOUNDBITE (English) Paul Duncan, chairman of Bonds Foundry Group:

"I think it's just a fact that they (politicians) don't understand. This is the north. This is the hard bitten north where employment is difficult. I don't think it is going to be fine. It can only be worse than it is currently. Because with the existing arrangements we have no restrictions as to where we can export to and as a consequence of Brexit those barriers will go up."

7. Various of casting encased in sand being lifted up and moved

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Paul Duncan, chairman of Bonds Foundry Group:

"We have had traditional long-standing customers from Germany, Italy and Spain and France. If I was them, probably, I would be looking for alternatives because with new procedures and the potential for tariffs and difficulties in terms of exporting and importing into their countries, it can only be more difficult. We also only have competitors in each of those places so it would be much easier to go local than it is to go international and coming to us."

9. Various of casting being moved

10. Various of worker soldiering large steel cast

11. Set-up of Neil Robinson, works manager of Bonds Foundry Group:

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Neil Robinson, works manager of Bonds Foundry Group:

"Their feelings (talking about people who voted leave and many of the factory workers will have done) will be get out of there, look after number 1. We don't want the immigration side of it, the open borders and don't really give much thought to the business side but I've been in this industry for a long time and our customer base is primarily exports to the EU as well as parts of the UK but mainly abroad. It's a little bit worrying about what's going to happen in the long run."

Durham - 30 September 2019

13. Set-up shot of Jack Simpson, International trade and Brexit adviser for the North East England Chamber of Commerce

14. SOUNDBITE (English) Jack Simpson, International trade and Brexit adviser for the North East England Chamber of Commerce:

"So 'no deal' would have a disastrous impact on the northeast economy. The northeast trades 60 per cent of global trade with the European Union. Anything that further adds more friction to this trading relationship will serve to damage those regional trading links. We're talking about further fiscal barriers, further administration costs and further time delays at the border which will make it more damaging and harder to trade with the European Union and make us less competitive in our biggest market. The northeast also receives 500 million pounds in regional funding, that's helping businesses start up, scale up and also improve the business environment and culture here in the northeast."

Newton Aycliffe - 2 October 2019

15. Various of washing machines being put together at Ebac Ltd

16. Set-up of John Elliot, Chairman of Ebac Ltd

17. SOUNDBITE (English) John Elliot, Chairman of Ebac Ltd:

"I think the European Union is conceptually flawed. I think it is an organisation that has nothing but costs and less flexibility, bureaucracy. So I think once we are an independent country we will be free to set our own industrial strategy, which suits us. We currently have a system whereby our tariffs with the rest of the world is set by the 27 other countries and I don't think it can be right that all of us are going to benefit from the same tariffs. So I think being independent and setting tariffs for our personal circumstances will make our economy stronger."

18. Various of robots putting together washing machines

19. SOUNDBITE (English) John Elliot, Chairman of Ebac Ltd:

"If people want to be open and do things differently then they could make complications, but business will find a way around it, and that short term problem is not the big issue. We've got to look at the longer term, what's right for the UK? And if we're going to have problems short term, let's get through them."

20. Various of workers making water coolers

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UK Brexit Plan Reax
Title:
HD
Summary: London reactions to Johnson's new Brexit deal
Story No: 4232880
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 10/02/2019 05:57 PM
People: Jean-Claude Juncker , Michel Barnier , Boris Johnson
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As British Prime Minister Boris Johnson presented new proposals on Brexit to the European Union, a feeling of uncertainty amongst the UK public who voted on both sides of the referendum remained on Wednesday.

The European Union's Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier, who saw the proposals, said they constituted progress but that the gap between both sides remains daunting.

In London, a supporter of leaving the EU said a delay to Brexit would be "nonsense" and will not make any difference to negotiations.

"We have to be out by the 31st (of October)," said Steven Morgan.

Rhiannon Taylor, who wants the UK to remain in the EU, alleged Johnson's "main policy point" had always been to leave the bloc without a deal.

The border on the island of Ireland remains the key sticking point in negotiations and the EU is insistent it remains transparent and open.

Dr Alan Wager, Research Associate at the UK in a Changing Europe initiative, said this was impossible "given the current red lines of the UK government".

"What Boris Johnson's plan has come up with is a border that will exist both on the island of Ireland and between the UK and Ireland. So actually it's two borders. So there's actually no way of getting around this," Wager said.

Johnson has said in a letter to European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker that the UK proposes to achieve an open border by keeping Northern Ireland closely aligned to EU rules for trade in goods, possibly for an extended period.

London - 2 October 2019

1. Exterior of King's College London

2. Various of Research Associate at the UK in a Changing Europe initiative, Dr Alan Wager, watching British Prime Minister Boris Johnson's speech

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Alan Wager, Research Associate at the UK in a Changing Europe initiative:

"So Boris Johnson's speech to the Conservative Party conference was, principally about putting the Conservative Party on a footing for a general election on which he'll fight as the candidate that's protecting the will of the people from the referendum in 2016 against Parliament, which is trying to block Brexit. So it was quite light on policies. It was all about politics and positioning for an election to come."

4. Cutaway of banner

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Alan Wager, Research Associate at the UK in a Changing Europe initiative:

"Boris Johnson has made a promise that there will be no checks or border on the island of Ireland or between Northern Ireland and the UK. This is impossible given the current red lines of the UK government. So what Boris Johnson's plan has come up with is a border that will exist both on the island of Ireland and between the UK and Ireland. So actually it's two borders. So there's actually no way of getting around this without increasing the amount of economic checks and increasing the amount of border posts that will exist on the island of Ireland."

6. Cutaway office

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Alan Wager, Research Associate at the UK in a Changing Europe initiative:

"So, extending Article 50 on the premise of getting a deal with the European Union in the end costs the UK nothing. This is already money that's been paid into the withdrawal agreement and the future framework. This is all money that is already got out of the UK's account, if you like. And no deal will cause a lot of significant economic damage in the short, medium, and long term. Approximately, sort of, 9% of GDP over a decade would be lost and there would be a lot of short term disruption to supply chains and so on."

8. Various beauty shots of London, Houses of Parliament and London Eye

9. Various of group of pro-Brexit demonstrators in street

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Steven Morgan, pro-Brexit demonstrator:

"I do not believe that he will go back and ask for an extension for three months. And even if he did, I'm not sure the EU will want an extension for three months. Because what's that going to achieve? Then at the end of three months it could be another three months. Nobody knows. So it's a complete and total nonsense. So we have to be out by the 31st (of October)."

11. Various of pro-Brexit demonstrators

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Rhiannon Taylor, anti-Brexit demonstrator:

"Honestly, I think we're just headed down the same path we were headed down before the speech. It gave nothing new for us to take any sort of hope from or any direction from. It's just more of the same. We all know what Boris wants to do. Boris wants a no-deal Brexit. That is his main policy point."

13. Low-angle shot of anti-Brexit sign with Houses of Parliament tower in background

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Subjects: Brexit referendum , Brexit , Parliamentary elections , Elections , Government and politics , Referendums , Legislature , Economy , Business
People: Jean-Claude Juncker , Michel Barnier , Boris Johnson
Organisations: Ireland government, European Union, European Commission, United Kingdom government
Locations: Ireland , Western Europe , Europe , London , England , United Kingdom
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UK Corbyn
Title:
HD
Summary: UK opposition leader reacts to Brexit plan
Story No: 4232843
Source: UK POOL
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 10/02/2019 03:24 PM
People: Jeremy Corbyn , Boris Johnson , Theresa May
Subscription:

UK opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn on Wednesday said the proposal for a Brexit deal sent by the British government to the EU was "worse" than the agreement negotiated by former UK prime minister Theresa May.

Britain has sent its proposals to leaders of the European Union, with Prime Minister Boris Johnson urging "rapid negotiations towards a solution."

The proposals submitted on Wednesday focus on maintaining an open border between the UK’s Northern Ireland and EU member Ireland - the key sticking point to a Brexit deal.

Corbyn said the prime minister's suggestions would "undermine" the Good Friday Agreement and take Britain into a "regime of deregulation".

He added he was sure Johnson "knew full well" what he had set out would not be agreed with the EU before the UK's potential departure from the bloc at the end of October.

UK POOL

London - 2 October 2019

1. SOUNDBITE (English) Jeremy Corbyn, UK opposition Labour Party leader:

(Reporter question: What do you make of what the prime minister is proposing?)

"It's worse than (former UK prime minister) Theresa May's deal. I can't see it getting the support that he (UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson) thinks it will get. And it will take us into a regime in Britain of deregulation, of undercutting and I think will also undermine the Good Friday Agreement."

(Reporter question: What is it that's worse than Theresa May's proposals?)

"Well what's worse is particularly the section on Northern Ireland, which is very unspecific how the Good Friday Agreement can be upheld within the terms of the letter that he's sent. But also much worse is a specific intention to deregulate alongside Europe, whereas infact when we were negotiating with Theresa May's government they did agree to some degree of regulation - our talks broke down because they were not strong enough on environmental regulation. But this prime minister seems to want to lead to a deregulated Britain with a race to the bottom."

(Reporter question: We were briefed that this was going to be a final offer, doesn't seem that it is a final offer now. What's your view of the sort of language that the prime minister's A, been using, and B, not been using?)

"Well at the end of his letter he says 'And I'm sure this can all be agreed by the 31st of October. I'm sure he knows full well that what he's put forward is unlikely to be agreed. What he hasn't acknowledged is that he has a duty under the EU No. 2 Act, the Act of Parliament that requires him to apply for an extension in the event of no agreement being reached."

++ENDS ON SOUNDBITE++

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UK Johnson Brexit 3
Title:
HD
Summary: UK's Johnson pledges to "get Brexit done"
Story No: 4232811
Source: UK POOL
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 10/02/2019 12:41 PM
People: Jeremy Corbyn , Boris Johnson
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British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said the UK will offer the European Union a proposed Brexit deal on Wednesday that represents a compromise for both sides, as he urged the bloc to meet Britain halfway and allow for the country's orderly departure after years of wrangling.

Johnson's speech to Conservative Party members at their annual conference had been billed by his office as a take-it-or-leave-it "final offer" to the EU.

Yet as delivered, it was more like a plea to the bloc, and to Britons, to end more than three years of acrimonious wrangling over the terms of the UK's exit from the EU.

"Let's get Brexit done," was the repeated refrain to delegates at the conference in Manchester, northwest England.

Johnson, who has had a tumultuous 70 days in office, delivered a speech that was almost Boris-by numbers, peppered with puns, grand claims about Britain's greatness and jokes at the expense of his opponents - chiefly left-wing Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn, whom he said would "foul up the economy".

It was also, pointedly, a pre-election speech, with a grab-bag of promises: more money for hospitals and police, unspecified tax cuts, greener buses and faster internet access.

UK POOL

Manchester - 2 October 2019

1. SOUNDBITE (English) Boris Johnson, British Prime Minister: ++STARTS ON WIDE OF JOHNSON ON STAGE, PARTLY OVERLAID WITH VARIOUS OF AUDIENCE++

"A country that leads the way with clean green technology in reducing the greenhouse gases that cause climate change. A country that is happy and confident about its future, that is the vision for the country we love. And when the opposition finally screw their courage to the sticking point and agree to have an election, when the chlorinated chickens finally waddle from the hen coop where they are hiding, that is the vision for the country that we will put to the British people. And the choice is clear. We put up wages with the biggest expansion of a living wage for a generation. (UK opposition leader, Jeremy) Corbyn would put up taxes for everyone. We back our superb armed forces around the world and look after our veterans. Corbyn has said he wants the armed forces disbanded. We want an Australian-style points-based system for immigration, Corbyn has said he doesn't even believe in immigration controls. If Jeremy Corbyn were allowed into Downing Street he would whack up your taxes, he would foul up the economy, he would rip up the alliance between Britain and the United States and he would break up the United Kingdom. We cannot allow it to happen."

2. Various of audience applauding

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Boris Johnson, British Prime Minister:

"But it is worse than that because it's become absolutely clear that he's now determined to frustrate Brexit. What do we want and need? Do we want more dither and delay? Do we want to spend another billion pounds a month on EU membership when that could be going on the NHS? No. Let's get Brexit done. Let's finally believe in ourselves and what we can do. This country has long been a pioneer. We inaugurated the steam age here in Manchester, we inaugurated the atomic age, the age of the genome, we led the way in parliamentary democracy, in female emancipation. And when the whole world had succumbed to a different economic fashion, this country and this party under a female prime minister pioneered ideas of free markets and privatization that spread across the planet."

4. Mid of leader of the House of Commons Jacob Rees-Mogg applauding

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Boris Johnson, British Prime Minister: ++STARTS ON WIDE OF JOHNSON ON STAGE, PARTLY OVERLAID WITH MID OF AUDIENCE APPLAUDING++

"Every one of those ideas, every one of those ideas was controversial, every one of them was difficult. But we always had the courage as a country to be original, to do things differently. And now we are about to take another giant step to do something no one thought we could do to reboot our politics, to relaunch ourselves into the world, and to dedicate ourselves again to the simple proposition that we are here to serve the democratic will of the British people. If we do that with optimism and confidence then we all tell you we will not go wrong. So let's get on with sensible, moderate one-nation but tax-cutting Conservative government and figuratively if not literally, let us send Jeremy Corbyn into orbit where he belongs. Conference, let's get Brexit done and let's bring this country together. Thank you very much."

6. Various of Johnson walking off stage and greeting colleagues

7. Johnson greeting his partner Carrie Symonds and his father Stanley Johnson

8. Various of Johnson and Symonds leaving

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UK May Reax
Title:
HD
Summary: MPs, analyst on incoming UK PM Theresa May
Story No: 4045215
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 07/13/2016 01:54 PM
People: Theresa May , David Cameron , Queen Elizabeth II , Chris Grayling , Boris Johnson , Michael Gove , Margaret Thatcher , Angela Merkel
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David Cameron is formally tendering his resignation on Wednesday to Queen Elizabeth II and will then hand over to his successor, Theresa May.

After Cameron formally resigns, the 59-year-old May will later visit the palace, where the queen will ask her to form a new government.

The new leader - Britain's Home Secretary in charge of immigration and law and order for the past six years - has the tough task of calming the country, and the financial markets, after the massive upheaval that has followed the June 23 referendum.

She is expected to quickly unveil a new Cabinet line-up, including a minister in charge of implementing Brexit, a British exit from the EU.

May, who backed remaining in the EU, will also be expected to reward prominent campaigners for a "leave" vote with key jobs.

"I think people can expect a strong leader, a determined leader, somebody who is very single-minded about getting things done but somebody who is also very focused on compassionate conservatism", said Chris Grayling, May’s campaign manager.

Observers are keen to see if she appoints former London Mayor Boris Johnson and Justice Secretary Michael Gove, one-time Conservative leadership contenders who jointly headed the "leave" campaign but then turned on one another.

There is also speculation that May, Britain's second female prime minister - after Margaret Thatcher - will boost the number of women in top posts.

Tony Travers from the LSE described May as "a cautious person” and said that when it came to triggering Article 50 "the British political establishment needs to come to terms with this massive decision and how to make".

London - 13 July 2016

1. Tilt down of Westminster

2. Various of journalists on College Green

3. Set up shot of Chris Grayling, Conservative MP and Theresa May’s campaign manager

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Chris Grayling, Conservative MP and Theresa May’s campaign manager:

“I think people can expect a strong leader, a determined leader, somebody who is very single-minded about getting the job done but somebody who is also very focused on compassionate conservatism, on building an inclusive society, and somebody who I think they’ll find very straight and decent to deal with."

5. Cutaway of Grayling

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Chris Grayling, Conservative MP and Theresa May’s campaign manager:

“She is the kind of person who having been given a mandate by the British people will fulfil that mandate, she will do it carefully, we will all do it carefully, to try to make sure we deliver the best deal for Britain. But also that we can remain good neighbours, good friends - this is about an issue between the United Kingdom and the political structure that is the European Union, it’s not about us suddenly retreating from the world and becoming an inward-focused nation that's disengaged, that is absolutely not what we want to be."

7. Cutaway of Grayling

8. Westminster from College Green

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Tony Travers, professor at the London School of Economics:

“Theresa May is a moderate, mainstream British Conservative politician. The British Conservatives are a highly pragmatic party almost all of the time, which is why they are one of the oldest political parties in the world. And she is a one-nation Conservative, that means she believes in a Conservative Party that is not just for the rich but for people on ordinary incomes as well. She herself is not somebody who is a visible presence on the Westminster party circuit, she keeps herself to herself, she’s been the Home Secretary - Britain’s Interior Minister - dealing with security and immigration. She’s done that toughly, but she’s definitely seen as a moderate within the Conservative Party and, of course, she did vote to stay in the EU so it gives her a lot of angles to come to the new job."

10. Cutaway of Travers

11. SOUNDBITE (English) Tony Travers, professor at the London School of Economics:

“Doesn’t sound to me as if Article 50 is about to be invoked imminently, in fact, Theresa May herself has suggested the need for a bit of time to gather the troops, to think about what this means and how it can be done. I mean I don’t detect Theresa May being an impulsive person, I think she’s a cautious person and the British political establishment needs to come to terms with this massive decision and how to make it and needs friends in Europe and they don’t want to aggravate them either for the time being, possibly as little as possible. So, I think that Mrs Merkel (German Chancellor Angela Merkel) and Mrs May are people who will probably need to meet each other relatively soon, to try to bring an orderly process to bear here, rather than one which is dogged by years of disagreement and potentially chaos."

12. Pan from Westminster to artist

13. Close of painting

14. Various of Houses of Parliament

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Subjects: Government and politics , Campaigns , Elections
People: Theresa May , David Cameron , Queen Elizabeth II , Chris Grayling , Boris Johnson , Michael Gove , Margaret Thatcher , Angela Merkel
Organisations: United Kingdom government, European Union
Locations: London , England , United Kingdom
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Instant Library - Jul-Sep 2016
Title:
SD
Summary: UK - Fallout from Brexit / Thousands rally in London against Brexit vote / Farage resigns as UK Independence Party leader / UK PM Cameron departs Downing Street / New UK PM Teresa May arrives at 10 Downing Street / UK FM Johnson meets French FM / Jeremy Corbyn wins UK Labour leadership contest
Story No: G12505
Source: AP TELEVISION, UK POOL
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/24/2016 12:00 AM
People: Jeremy Corbyn , Jean-Marc Ayrault , Boris Johnson , David Cameron , Nigel Farage , Theresa May , Owen Smith
Subscription:

Thousands of European Union supporters are singing, dancing and marching through the streets of London to protest the United Kingdom's vote to leave the EU.

July 2nd's two-mile (three-kilometre) "March for Europe" from Hyde Park to Parliament was organised on social media.

Many of the marchers say they expect lawmakers to block any moves to leave the 28-nation bloc, a move backed by 52 percent of voters in the June 23rd referendum.

***

UK Independence Party (UKIP) leader Nigel Farage on July 4th said he is resigning as the head of the party, arguing his political ambition to have Britain leave the European Union (EU) had now been achieved.

Farage said he will retain his seat in the European Parliament to see out the negotiations for Britain's exit from the EU, following the country's June 23rd vote to leave the bloc.

It is the second time Farage has resigned as leader of the party, but he said this time it would be permanent.

***

British Prime Minister David Cameron left Number 10 Downing Street on July 13th to attend his last session of Prime Minister's Questions in the House of Commons.

Theresa May will replace him as Prime Minister later in the day.

***

British Prime Minister Theresa May arrived to No. 10 Downing street on July 14th in her first full day in the new position.

May is expected to continue the process of appointing ministers to her new administration.

***

The UK's Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson held talks with his French counterpart Jean-Marc Ayrault in Paris on July 28th.

***

Jeremy Corbyn was re-elected leader of Britain's Labour Party on September 24th.

Increasing his margin from the 2015 leadership contest, Corbyn was elected with 61.8 percent of the membership's vote, receiving a total of 313,209 ballots.

His sole opponent, Owen Smith - who was Corbyn's Shadow Secretary of State for Work and Pensions until 27 June - received the remaining 193,229 votes.

The left-wing incumbent was strongly favoured to defeat challenger Smith and retain leadership of the party, after a so-called 'coup' was launched against Corbyn by sitting Labour lawmakers following the Brexit vote in June.

The leadership contest was fraught with online name-calling and allegations that the leadership of the strongly pro-Palestinian Corbyn has fostered anti-Semitic abuse in the party.

Since his first election as Labour leader just over a year ago, tens of thousands more new members have flocked to Labour, many of them young and enthusiastic.

Corbyn draws big crowds to rallies and meetings, and his supporters are a formidable force on social media.

01:20:15

00:00:00

Thousands rally in London against Brexit vote

4043472

AP TELEVISION

London - 2 July 2016

1. Various of people marching through London to protest the United Kingdom's vote to leave the EU

00:07:18

Farage resigns as UK Independence Party leader

4043647

UK POOL

London - 4 July 2016

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Nigel Farage, UK Independence Party (UKIP) leader:

" My aim in being in politics was to get Britain out of the European Union. That is what we voted for in that referendum two weeks ago and that is why I now feel that I've done my bit2. Audience

00:21:08

UK PM Cameron departs Downing Street

4045145

UK POOL

London - 13 July 2016

3. British Prime Minister David Cameron leaving Number 10 Downing Street for the House of Commons for his last session of Prime Minister's Questions

4. Wide of Downing Street with Cameron's car pulling away

00:28:05

New UK PM arrives at 10 Downing Street

4045390

UK POOL

London - 14 July 2016

5. Police officer in front of No. 10 Downing street

6. Various of Prime Minister Theresa May arriving, being greeted by media and entering Downing Street, pull out

00:40:24

UK FM Johnson meets French FM

4048018

AP TELEVISION

Paris - 28 July 2016

7. British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson and French Foreign Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault shaking hands and walking up stairs

00:46:24

Jeremy Corbyn wins UK Labour leadership contest

4057019

UK POOL

Liverpool - 24 September 2016

8. Various of Jeremy Corbyn, Leader of the UK Labour Party, and leadership challenger Owen Smith on stage

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Paddy Lewis, Chair of the National Executive Committee of the Labour Party: ++INCLUDES CUTAWAYS++

"The votes cast for each candidate are as follows: Jeremy Corbyn, 313,209

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Ukraine Brexit Cameron
Title:
HD
Summary: Cameron: I fought as hard as could on Brexit
Story No: 4088593
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/29/2017 04:55 PM
People: Theresa May , David Cameron
Subscription:

Former British Prime Minister David Cameron said on Wednesday that he "fought as hard as I could" for the argument that Britain should remain in the European Union.

Speaking as a guest of honour at the Viktor Pinchuk Foundation in Kiev, Cameron added he knew that if he lost the argument for the United Kingdom to remain as part of the bloc, "I would have to think about resigning."

Cameron confirmed in his general election victory speech in 2015 that there would be an in/out referendum on European Union membership.

He said on Wednesday he knew during the subsequent referendum campaign that "there was a danger that my side would lose."

Cameron said British Prime Minister Theresa May was doing an "excellent" job and was taking the UK forward.

Kiev - 29 March 2017

1. Former British Prime Minister David Cameron walks up on podium

2. Various of students and audience members

3. SOUNDBITE (English) David Cameron, former British Prime Minister:

"I, you know, thought throughout the referendum campaign, I always knew there was a danger that my side would lose and the other side would win, and I suppose I could have fought the referendum as the prime minister saying 'well, it's a big decision for the country, you decide' on the one hand. On the other hand, and stood back from it, but that's not what I'm like. I was passionate about my side of the argument, I threw myself into the argument, I made every argument I could, I fought as hard as I could. But I knew that if I lost, I would have to think about resigning."

4. Wide of Cameron and moderator on stage

5. Close up of cell phone recording video

6. Students in audience

7. SOUNDBITE (English) David Cameron, former British Prime Minister:

"I would argue that while it was a difficult decision to resign. Actually I think you can see in the new Prime Minister Theresa May someone who believes very much in what they are doing, is doing an excellent job, is taking the country forward and I think will deliver what's required, which is to be out of the European Union but working very closely with our friends and our allies, France and Germany and Italy and all the countries of the European Union, and also staying with our friends including here in the Ukraine. So a difficult decision but the right one because credibility and passion are what you need in politics and I realised, having lost the referendum, the right thing to do was to allow someone else to come forward and take Great Britain forward."

8. Cameron walks off stage

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Subjects: Brexit referendum , Government and politics
People: Theresa May , David Cameron
Organisations: United Kingdom government, European Union
Locations: Kiev , Kyiv City , Ukraine
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UK PM 5
Title:
HD
Summary: May sets resignation date; different angle
Story No: 4212465
Source: UK POOL
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 05/24/2019 01:30 PM
People: Boris Johnson , Theresa May , George Osborne , David Cameron , Nicholas Winton
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Theresa May on Friday announced she would step down as UK Conservative Party leader on 7 June, sparking a contest to become Britain's next prime minister.

  

She will stay as caretaker prime minister until the new leader is chosen, a process likely to take several weeks.

  

May made her announcement after coming under relentless pressure from her party to quit over her failure to take Britain out of the European Union on schedule.

Britain is currently due to leave the EU on 31 October, but parliament has yet to approve divorce terms.

  

May's departure will trigger a party leadership contest in which any Conservative lawmaker can run.

The early frontrunner is Boris Johnson, a former foreign secretary and strong champion of Brexit.

UK POOL

London - 24 May 2019

1. UK Prime Minister Theresa May walking out of 10 Downing Street, approaching microphone and speaking

UPSOUND (English) Theresa May, UK Prime Minister

"Ever since I first stepped through the door behind me as prime minister I have striven to make the United Kingdom a country that works, not just for a privileged few, but for everyone, and to honour the result of the EU referendum. Back in 2016 we gave the British people a choice. Against all predictions the British people voted to leave the European Union. I feel as certain today as I did three years ago that in a democracy, if you give people a choice you have a duty to implement what they decide. I have done my best to do that. I negotiated the terms of our exit and a new relationship with our closest neighbours that protects jobs, our security and our union. I have done everything I can to convince MPs to back that deal. Sadly, I have not been able to do so. I tried three times. I believe it was right to persevere even when the odds against success seemed high. But it is now clear to me that it is in the best interests of the country for a new prime minister to lead that effort. So I am today announcing that I will resign as leader of the Conservative and Unionist Party on Friday the 7th of June so that a successor can be chosen. I've agreed with the party chairman and with the chairman of the 1922 Committee that the process for electing a new leader should begin in the following week. I have kept Her Majesty the Queen fully informed of my intentions and I will continue to serve as her prime minister until the process has concluded. It is and will always remain a matter of deep regret to me that I have not been able to deliver Brexit. It will be for my successor to seek a way forward that honours the result of the referendum.To succeed, he or she will have to find consensus in Parliament where I have not. Such a consensus can only be reached if those on all sides of the debate are willing to compromise. For many years, the great humanitarian Sir Nicholas Winton, who saved the lives of hundreds of children by arranging their evacuation from Nazi occupied Czechoslovakia through the Kinder-transport, was my constituent in Maidenhead. At another time of political controversy a few years before his death, he took me to one side at a local event and gave me a piece of advice. He said, 'Never forget that compromise is not a dirty word. Life depends on compromise.' He was right. As we strive to find the compromises we need in our politics, whether to deliver Brexit or to restore devolved government in Northern Ireland, we must remember what brought us here. Because the referendum was not just a call to leave the EU, but for profound change in our country, a call to make the United Kingdom a country that truly works for everyone. I am proud of the progress we have made over the last three years. We have completed the work that (former UK Prime Minister) David Cameron and (former UK Chancellor) George Osborne started. The deficit is almost eliminated. Our national debt is falling and we are bringing an end to austerity. My focus has been on ensuring that the good jobs of the future will be created in communities across the whole country, not just in London and the south east, through our modern industrial strategy. We have helped more people than ever enjoy the security of a job. We are building more homes and helping first time buyers onto the housing ladder, so young people can enjoy the opportunities their parents did. And we are protecting the environment, eliminating plastic waste, tackling climate change and improving air quality. This is what a decent, moderate and patriotic Conservative government, on the common ground of British politics, can achieve, even as we tackle the biggest peacetime challenge any government has faced. I know that the Conservative Party can renew itself in the years ahead, that we can deliver Brexit, and serve the British people with policies inspired by our values. Security, freedom and opportunity - those values have guided me throughout my career. But the unique privilege of this office is to use this platform to give a voice to the voiceless, to fight the burning injustices that still scar our society. That is why I put proper funding for mental health at the heart of our NHS long term plan. It's why I am ending the postcode lottery for survivors of domestic abuse. It is why the race disparity audit and gender pay reporting are shining a light on inequality so it has nowhere to hide. And it is why I set up the independent public inquiry into the tragedy at Grenfell Tower, to search for the truth so nothing like it can ever happen again, and so the people who lost their lives that night are never forgotten. Because this country is a union, not just a family of four nations, but a union of people. All of us, whatever our background, the colour of our skin, or who we love - we stand together, and together we have a great future. Our politics may be under strain but there is so much that is good about this country, so much to be proud of, so much to be optimistic about. I will shortly leave the job that it has been the honour of my life to hold - the second female prime minister, but certainly not the last. I do so with no ill will, but with enormous and enduring gratitude to have had the opportunity to serve the country I love."

2. Various of "Larry" the cat out the front of 10 Downing Street

3. Police officer picking up cat and returning him inside 10 Downing Street

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Subjects: Brexit referendum , Brexit , Government and politics
People: Boris Johnson , Theresa May , George Osborne , David Cameron , Nicholas Winton
Organisations: European Union, United Kingdom government
Locations: London , England , United Kingdom
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