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Pakistan Floods
Title:
HD
Summary: Flood-hit Pakistan set to face more monsoon rain
Story No: 4395533
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/05/2022 06:25 AM
People: Antonio Guterres
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Jaffarabad, Baluchistan - 5 September 2022

1. Various of flood

2. Children swimming

3. Various of flood

4. Various of tents on dry land

STORYLINE:

More than 1,300 people have died and millions have lost their homes in flooding caused by unusually heavy monsoon rains in Pakistan this year.

Several countries have flown in supplies, but the government has pleaded for even more help, faced with the enormous task of helping those affected, as well as protecting them from diseases.

In its latest report, Pakistan's National Disaster Management Authority put the death toll since mid-June - when monsoon rains started weeks earlier than is typical - at 1,314.

The number rose as more fatalities were reported from flood-affected areas of Sindh, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Baluchistan provinces.

The report said 458 children were among the dead.

Rescue operations continued over the weekend with troops and volunteers using helicopters and boats to get people stranded out of flooded areas to relief camps, the authority said.

Tens of thousands of people are already living in such camps, and thousands more have taken shelter on roadsides on higher ground.

Meteorologists are predicting more rain in the coming days, worsening a disaster that many experts have blamed on climate change.

In response to the unfolding disaster, United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres last week called on the world to stop “sleepwalking” through the climate change crisis.

He plans to visit flood-hit areas in Pakistan later this week.

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PAKISTAND FLOODS
Title:
HD
Summary: Heavy monsoon rains in Pakistan leave around 1,300 people dead since June
Story No: efe050536
Source: Agencia EFE
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/05/2022 01:37 AM
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Dera Ismail Khan/Hyderabad, Sep 4 (EFE/EPA).- Authorities in Pakistan breached the dike at the country’s largest lake on Sunday to protect two cities from an overflow of water, as the death toll following months of devastating floods rose to 1,300.The alarming water levels reached at lake Manchar in the worst-hit southern province of Sindh on Saturday prompted the authorities to open the dam to direct the excess water into the Indus River. (CAMERA: SAOOD REHMAN / NADEEM KHAWAR).SHOT LIST: PEOPLE CHECK THE DAMAGES AT THEIR HOUSES IN THE AFTERMATH OF FLOODS IN DERA ISMAIL KHAN DISTRICT, KHYBER PAKHTUNKHWA PROVINCE; AND PEOPLE AFFECTED BY FLOODS TAKE SHELTER IN A TENT CITY SETUP BY THE SINDH GOVERNMENT IN HYDERABAD, SINDH PROVINCE, PAKISTAN. INCLUDES DRONE FOOTAGE.

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PAKISTAN FLOODS
Title:
HD
Summary: Pakistan breaches largest lake's dike to protect cities from rising water
Story No: efe050535
Source: Agencia EFE
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/05/2022 01:14 AM
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STORYLINE:

Jamshoro, Sep 4 (EFE/EPA).- Authorities in Pakistan breached the dike at the country’s largest lake on Sunday to protect two cities from an overflow of water, as the death toll following months of devastating floods rose to 1,300.The alarming water levels reached at lake Manchar in the worst-hit southern province of Sindh on Saturday prompted the authorities to open the dam to direct the excess water into the Indus River. (CAMERA: REHAN KHAN).SHOT LIST: PEOPLE AFFECTED BY FLOODS WAIT FOR RELIEF IN JAMSHORO DISTRICT, SINDH PROVINCE, PAKISTAN.

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Pakistan Floods Aid
Title:
HD
Summary: Aid provided to flood victims in Sindh province
Story No: 4395478
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/04/2022 02:03 PM
People: Antonio Guterres
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Sukkur District, Sindh province - 4 September 2022

1. Various of boat carrying food and rations supplied by Alkhidmat Foundation for flood victims, moving past flooded areas

2. Children waiting on dry land

3. Various of man collecting timber from damaged home

4. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Shah Mohammad Meher, flood victim:           

"There is no place to live in tents, there is no food availability. Here, we have goats, buffaloes, how do I evacuate them (the cattle)?"

5. Alkhidmat Foundation volunteers distributing food among children

6. Children receiving biscuits, chips

7. Various of volunteers unloading rations and ready-made food from boat

8. Villager resident holding food packages

9. Boat moving towards tent village in Sukkur city

10. Pan of school set up by Alkhidmat Foundation in tent village

11. Various of flood-displaced children studying in tent school

12. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Zubair Hafeez, Head of Alkhidmat Foundation:

"The Alkhidmat foundation is providing shelter, food and rations and also health, medical facilities. Alkhidmat is also working on the relocation of displaced persons from flooded areas."

13. UK Islamic mission medical camp for flood victims

14. Various of doctors examining sick children

15. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Hira Ikram, Doctor:               

"Every patient visiting the medical camp, is suffering from scabies, along with that they have gastro...stomach illness, diarrhoea.  Other than that some are suffering with chest infections and cough, and fever is common."

16. Various of medicines being dispensed

17. Various of unwell people in medical tent

18. Various of flood-displaced people walking through tent village

STORYLINE:

Volunteers were on Sunday distributing aid to flood victims in Sukkur District, Sindh province, as well as running makeshift schools and medical facilities.

Around 250 residents of Karim Bukhsh Meher village are still managing to live on dry land, and say they are not yet ready to evacuate the area despite the flood water around them.

The volunteers from Pakistan's Alkhidmat Foundation carried ready-made food and rations via boat to the villagers.

Shah Mohammad Meher, was among those not willing to move his family to a tent village.  

He said: "We have goats, buffaloes, how do I evacuate them?"

Nearby, flood-displaced children studied at a makeshift school that had been set up by the Alkhidmat Foundation in a tent village, while an Islamic mission from the UK was running a medical camp.

More flooding was expected in southern Pakistan as Lake Manchar swelled from unprecedented monsoon rains that began in mid-June and have killed nearly 1,300 people, officials warned on Sunday.

Meteorologists predicted more rain in the region in the coming days and authorities urged villagers in the Jamshoro and Dadu districts of Sindh province near the lake to evacuate.

The rising waters reached dangerous levels and posed a threat to a protective dyke and embankment, they said.

The lake, located west of the Indus River, is the largest natural freshwater lake in Pakistan and one of the largest in Asia.

International attention to Pakistan's plight has increased as the number of fatalities and homeless have risen.

According to initial government estimates, the rain and flooding have caused $10 billion in damage.

Multiple officials and experts have blamed the unusual monsoon rains and flooding on climate change, including U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, who earlier this week called on the world to stop "sleepwalking" through the deadly crisis.

AP video shot by:  Mohammad Farooq

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Pakistan Floods
Title:
HD
Summary: Pakistan's Sindh province submerged by floodwaters
Story No: 4395430
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/04/2022 05:12 AM
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Sukkur, Sindh, Pakistan - 4 September 2022

1. Various of flooded river

2. Various of people wading through flood water

3. Wide of flood

4. Tents where flood victims are living

5. Various of people inside tents

6. Relief tent with banner reading (English) "Alkhidmat Tent Village City"

STORYLINE:

Pakistan appealed to the international community for an “immense humanitarian response” to unprecedented flooding that has left at least 1,265 people dead

Vasts areas of the country were still submerged under flood water on Sunday.

Earlier this week, the United Nations and Pakistan jointly issued an appeal for $160 million in emergency funding to help the millions of people affected by the floods, which have damaged over 1 million homes.

Pakistan's National Disaster Management Authority in its latest report Saturday counted 57 more deaths from flood-affected areas.

That brought the total death toll since monsoon rains began in mid-June to 1,265, including 441 children.

A military spokesman said the army has established 147 relief camps sheltering and feeding more than 50,000 displaced people while 250 medical camps have provided help to 83,000 people so far.

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Pakistan Floods Families
Title:
HD
Summary: Pakistan families face flood-ruined homes, illness
Story No: 4395400
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/03/2022 03:50 PM
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Shikarpur, Sindh – 3 September 2022

1. Various of flooded houses and fields

2. Pan of Zubaida Bibi's children sitting on dry land, floodwater around them, Bibi collecting remains of damaged house

3. Bibi along with husband and child collecting remains of damaged house

4. Close of them collecting timber

5. Bibi in damaged home

6. SOUNDBITE (Sindhi) Zubaida Bibi, floods victim:

"My house collapsed in floodwater, I am going through a hard time. When floodwaters hit, I took my children on the road. I come here to collect timber. I took all utensils from my home. No one from the government's side is helping us in this trouble."

7. Bibi's daughter looking towards camera

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Murad Khan, Jaffarabad, Baluchistan - 3 September 2022

8. Various Saddat Ali, father of 3 children in makeshift shelter

9. Various of Ali's mother and children sleeping inside makeshift shelter

10. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Saddat Ali, floods victim:

"My village is submerged in floodwater. We couldn't even get the stuff out. After facing hardships, I evacuated my children. You can see, we didn't receive ration, tent, we made a plastic sheet shelter and my children are inside and becoming sick."

11. Ali's daughter

12. Ali's wife washing clothes next to her daughter

13. Various of displaced people in makeshift shelters on road, floodwater around them

STORYLINE:

Displaced families in Pakistan were on Saturday facing wrecked homes and the risk of disease, after unprecedented flooding that has left at least 1,265 people dead.

Zubaida Bibi's house in Shikarpur, Sindh province collapsed when floodwater hit her village.

"When floodwaters hit, I took my children on the road," she said.

"No one from the government's side is helping us in this trouble."

International attention to Pakistan's plight has increased as the number of fatalities and homeless have risen.

Pakistan appealed Saturday to the international community for an "immense humanitarian response."

The request came even as planes carried supplies to the impoverished country across a humanitarian air bridge.

Saddat Ali is living at a makeshift shelter in Jaffarabad, Baluchistan province, along with his family.

"We didn't receive ration, tent, we made a plastic sheet shelter and my children are inside and becoming sick," he said.

According to initial government estimates, the rain and flooding have caused $10 billion in damage.

Multiple officials and experts have blamed the unusual monsoon rains and flooding on climate change.

Pakistan's National Disaster Management Authority in its latest report Saturday counted 57 more deaths from flood-affected areas.

That brought the total death toll since monsoon rains began in mid-June to 1,265, including 441 children.

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Pakistan Floods Displaced
Title:
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Summary: Displaced Pakistanis struggle in makeshift shelter
Story No: 4395368
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/03/2022 10:28 AM
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Jaffarabad, Baluchistan - 3 September 2022

1. Various of villager Mohammad Ali, along with other relative, wading through floodwater, carrying belongings on bed

2. Medium of villagers carrying their belongings on their back

3. SOUNDBITE (Sindhi) Mohammad Ali, villager displaced by floods:          

"Look, the floodwater is all around, all villages submerged. I am carrying out what is left of my house. Now we are living in a tattered tent. No one is going to ask (meaning that the government doesn't care and is not giving them any help), nothing to eat, we are just surviving in hard times."

4 . Various of displaced in makeshift shelter

5. Wide of houses inundated by flood waters

6. Various of displaced in makeshift shelters  

7. Wide of people carrying belongings on a motorbike pickup, and evacuating area

8. Various of woman in makeshift shelter

9. Close up of woman and child

10. Woman drinking water

11. Wide buffaloes in flood water, children playing around them

STORYLINE

More supplies were being sent to flood-ravaged areas in Pakistan on Saturday as the death toll surged past 1200 victims, with families and children at special risk of disease and homelessness.

Pakistan health authorities have expressed concern about the risk of water-born diseases spreading in flood-ravaged areas.

In Jaffarabad, Baluchistan, one of the ravaged areas, villager Mohammad Ali had to carry the belongings he could salvage from his house in a wooden bed frame through floodwater.

He said that he and his family are now reduced to live in a tattered tent with no food, and complained that the government is not giving them the proper care and that they are "just surviving in hard times".

So far, Pakistan has received aid from China, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, Uzbekistan, U.A.E. and some other countries. This week, the United States also pledged to provide $30 million worth of aid for the flood victims.

Pakistan blames climate change for the recent heavy monsoon rains that triggered floods.

According to initial government estimates, the devastation has caused $10 billion in damages.

Farah Naureen, the director for Pakistan at the international aid agency Mercy Corps, told The Associated Press that around 73,000 women will be giving birth within the next month, and they needed skilled birth attendants, privacy, and birth facilities. Otherwise, she said, the survival of the mother and the newborn will be at risk.

According to the military, rescuers, backed by troops, resumed rescue and relief operations early Friday.

Rescuers are mostly using boats, but helicopters are also flying to evacuate stranded people from remote flood-hit towns, villages and districts across Pakistan areas and deliver food to them.

Since mid-June, floods have also killed 733,488 goats, cows, and buffaloes apart from damaging crops.

AP video shot by Mohammad Farooq

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PAKISTAN-FLOODS/
Title:
HD
Summary: One-third of Pakistan underwater amid its worst floods in history
Story No: edf007631
Source: EditorialFootage
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/03/2022 09:20 AM
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According to the satellite images from the ESA, more than one third of Pakistan is underwater. Officials say flash floods triggered by heavy monsoon rains across much of Pakistan have killed nearly 1,200 people and around half a million people have been displaced.

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Locations: Asia , South Asia , Pakistan
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Pakistan-Floods/Death Toll
Title:
HD
Summary: Pakistan-Floods/Death Toll
Story No: cctv053092
Source: China Central Television (CCTV) , UNifeed
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/03/2022 07:23 AM
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The death toll from the devastating floods in Pakistan soared to 1,265 as heavy monsoon rains continued to batter the country, according to data released by the National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA) on Friday. As of Friday, the floods had affected more than 33 million people and injured at least 12,577 since mid-June. The country's disaster agency said 57 people were killed and 7,683 wounded in flood-related incidents in the previous 24 hours. The flooding has wreaked havoc on Pakistan's infrastructure. Throughout the country, 5,563 kilometers of roads and 243 bridges were damaged, and over 1.42 million houses were destroyed by the monsoon rains. Meanwhile, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) is mobilizing resources and staff to scale up its assistance to local communities and refugees in areas devastated by flooding. The UNHCR has already provided 10,000 tents and other relief supplies including plastic tarpaulins, sanitary products, cooking stoves, blankets, solar lamps, and sleeping mats. Thousands of sacks were distributed to help households build sandbag defenses to protect their homes.

Nowshera, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province, Pakistan - Sept 1, 2022 (UNifeed - No access Chinese mainland/Not for sale)

1. Various of staff wearing United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) vest, locals surveying damage from floods

2. Various of destroyed houses alongside river

3. Various of man clearing rubble from destroyed house

4. Destroyed house

5. People unloading supplies from trucks

6. Various of men carrying supplies, food

7. UNHCR tents in field

8. Various of family eating inside tent

9. Various of people carrying bags, food supplies from UNHCR warehouse to truck

10. People carrying UNHCR box

11. Items inside UNHCR box

Sukkur, Sindh Province, Pakistan - Sept 1, 2022 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)

12. Aerial shots of flooded villages

13. River

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PAKISTAN FLOODS
Title:
HD
Summary: Flood-affected people in Pakistan's Sindh province seek higher ground for shelter
Story No: efe050449
Source: Agencia EFE
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/02/2022 05:08 PM
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STORYLINE:

Dadu (Sindh, Pakistan), Sep 2 (EFE/EPA) - (Camera: Waqar Hussein) Geneva, Sep 2 (EFE) - The floods in Pakistan, which have captured the world's attention for their magnitude and consequences, will aggravate food insecurity within the country, as well as the already disastrous situation in Afghanistan, heavily dependent on food imports from its neighbor.FOOTAGE OF THE AFTERMATH OF THE FLOODS IN THE DADU DISTRICT OF SINDH PROVINCE.

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Keywords: PAKISTAN FLOODS
Locations: Asia , South Asia , Pakistan
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Pakistan Flooding Family
Title:
HD
Summary: Pakistan family salvage belongings in flooded home
Story No: 4395298
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/02/2022 04:30 PM
People: Antonio Guterres
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++CLIENTS: EDIT HAS SHOT OF DEAD DONKEYS ON ROADSIDE++

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Qambar Shahdadkot District, Sindh province - 2 September 2022

1. Pan of wall of a house wrecked by flooding, Ghulam Saeed and his family trying to rebuild it

2. Various of Saeed and family trying to salvage red bricks from debris of their house

3. Children's toys

4. SOUNBDBITE (Sindhi) Ghulam Saeed; 37, victim of flooding:

"I had worked very hard to build this house. I don't have the strength to rebuild it. It rained very heavily that night. It was terrifying. I took the children and ran out of house to safety. I am on the road. I appeal to the government to help me rebuild my house."

5. Family trying to salvage belongings from their damaged house

6. Various of flood victims wading through flood waters with their belongings

7. People setting up makeshift camp after evacuating from their flooded villages, their belongings being unloaded from trucks

8. Various of flood victims' belongings being unloaded  

9. Various of children in camp

10. SOUNDBITE (Sindhi) Rasool Bux, 27, flood victim:

"My village is 5 kilometers (3.1 miles) from here. I am now here on the road. I will make a camp here. I have 12 children. I need the government's help. We have nothing to eat. We are hungry."

11. Tracking shot of camps on the roadside, flood water

12. Donkeys lying dead with a dog standing over one

13. Various of sunset

STORYLINE:

A family in Pakistan's Sindh province on Friday tried to save whatever they could of their flood-ravaged house, hoping desperately it could be rebuilt.

Ghulam Saeed, 37, who lives in Qambar Shahdadkot District and has a wife and five children, said "I had worked very hard to build this house."

"I don't have the strength to rebuild it."

He recalled the moments the floods hit and wrecked their home.

"It rained very heavily that night. It was terrifying."

In May, some parts of Sindh were the hottest place in Pakistan.

Now people are facing floods there that have caused an outbreak of waterborne diseases.

Although flood waters continued to recede in most of the country, many districts in Sindh remained underwater.

The death toll from the flooding surged past 1,200, officials said Friday, with families and children at special risk of disease and homelessness.

Multiple officials have blamed the unusual monsoon and flooding on climate change, including U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, who earlier this week called on the world to stop “sleepwalking” through the deadly crisis.

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Pakistan Flooding Women
Title:
HD
Summary: Mothers and children hit hard by Pakistan floods
Story No: 4395229
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/02/2022 12:03 PM
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Fazalpur, Southern Punjab - 2 September 2022

1. Camp for internally displaced persons

2. Woman with her two children inside relief camp

3. Displaced woman, Shamshad Gul, walking along with other women inside camp

4. Wide of camp

5. Gul washing pot

6. Gul feeding children

7. SOUNDBITE (Saraiki) Shamshad Gul, 8-months pregnant woman who lost her home in floods:

"I am eight months pregnant, I have labor pain, I am facing problems here in the camp. We need a doctor, or at least a female nurse who can help us. There are more pregnant women in the camp, in these conditions. I don't know where to go."

8. Gul cooking

9. Various of another pregnant woman standing in front of tent

10. Wide of camp

11. Various of doctor assessing patient inside medical relief camp in school building

12. Various of patients on beds

13. Doctor with other staff inside ward

14. Various of woman holding sick child

15. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Saqlain Akhtar, doctor:

"We are receiving gynae and other patients here. Those patients need labor room services, we have an ambulance service for them and refer them to the DHQ (District Headquarter Hospital) where they are getting further treatment of labor and delivery."

16. Staff handing out medicine

17. Various of flood water in the area

STORYLINE

Shamshad Gul is among the 650,000 pregnant women trying to survive through devastating floods in Pakistan.

Gul is 42 years old and already a mother of five children.

At eight months pregnant, she is currently taking shelter in a relief camp on the outskirts of Fazalpur, one of the worst flood-hit areas in Punjab province.

She said she and other pregnant women in the camp are facing problematic conditions and appealed for assistance from qualified medical staff.

Gul left her flooded mud house with her five children along with other villagers when flood waters entered their homes.

Of the 650,000 pregnant women in Pakistan's flood-affected areas, some 73,000 are expected to deliver next month, according to the U.N. Population Fund.

But the survival of the mother and newborn will be at risk without access to birth attendants and proper facilities.

Saqlain Akhtar, a doctor treating patients at a makeshift hospital set up in a school building, said there are ambulances ready to take pregnant women to a nearby district hospital where they can get more specialised neonatal care.

Flood waters continued to recede in the most of the country, but many districts in Punjab remained underwater, forcing displaced people to stay at camps.

According to the UN, over 1,000 health facilities have been either partially or fully damaged in southeastern Sindh province.

The damage to roads and bridges has also compromised girls' and women's access to health facilities, it says.

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PAKISTAN-FLOODS/
Title:
HD
Summary: Over 1,061, dead since June amid heavy monsoon rains in Pakistan
Story No: edf007619
Source: EditorialFootage
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/02/2022 09:33 AM
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Aftermath of flood in Nowshera, Pakistan, Aug. 31, 2022. According to the National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA) on 27 August, flash floods triggered by heavy monsoon rains have killed over 1,000 people across Pakistan since mid-June 2022. More than 33 million people have been affected by floods, the country's climate change minister said.

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Pakistan Flooding
Title:
HD
Summary: Pakistan floods death toll surges past 1,200
Story No: 4395197
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/02/2022 09:12 AM
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Shahdadkot - 2 September 2022

1. Various of area affected by flood waters, people wading through water, buildings submerged

STORYLINE:

Pakistani authorities on Friday warned people in devastated southern Sindh province to move to safer places before more floodwater from the swollen Indus river is expected to hit the region this week.

The town of Shahdadkot in the province saw people moving their cattle through knee-deep water with many buildings also affected.

In May, some parts of Sindh were the hottest place in Pakistan. Now people are facing floods there that have caused an outbreak of waterborne diseases. Although flood waters continued to recede in most of the country, many districts in Sindh remained underwater.

The death toll from the flooding surged past 1,200, officials said Friday, with families and children at special risk of disease and homelessness.

Pakistan blames climate change for the recent heavy monsoon rains that triggered floods.

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PAKISTAN-FLOODS/
Title:
HD
Summary: Over 1,061, dead since June amid heavy monsoon rains in Pakistan
Story No: edf007614
Source: EditorialFootage
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/02/2022 09:12 AM
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Air force doctors check people who were evacuated due to floods, at a makeshift medical camp in Charsadda District, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, Pakistan, 29 August 2022. The death toll from monsoon flooding in Pakistan since June has reached 1,061, according to figures released on August 29, 2022, by the country's National Disaster Management Authority.

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PAKISTAN FLOODS
Title:
HD
Summary: Footage of people marching to high ground in Sehwan after floods in Pakistan
Story No: efe050383
Source: Agencia EFE
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/01/2022 05:56 PM
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STORYLINE:

Sehwan (Pakistan), Sep 1 (EFE/EPA) - (Camera: Rehan Khan) Pakistan's response capacity has been stretched to the limit to cope with the floods that have left more than a thousand dead, hundreds injured, and entire communities under water or swept by mud, devastation from which it will take a long time to recover.FOOTAGE OF FLOOD DAMAGE IN SEHWAN, SINDH PROVINCE, PAKISTAN.

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Pakistan Floods Women
Title:
HD
Summary: Women suffer in Pakistan's flood affected region
Story No: 4395088
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/01/2022 05:10 PM
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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Shikarpur - 1 September 2022

1. Various of flood victim Mundam Ali, 21, a seven months pregnant mother-of-four, making tea at a relief camp in Shikarpur and coughing badly

2. SOUNDBITE (Sindhi) Mundam Ali, pregnant flood victim.  

"I am seven months pregnant. I have a lot of pain in my back and a whooping cough. I am here because my house collapsed in the rain. Nobody takes care of the poor people, officials comes here only for photographs. And doctors came, gave medication for one day, and went away."

3. Mundam sitting with her children

4. Mundam rocking her child's makeshift cradle

5. Mundam's malnourished child

6. Swarm of flies on heap of garbage

7. Various of woman feeding her child at the camp

8. Tent where Mundam is living

9. Various of flood victims sitting at relief camps  

10. Various of gynecology department, Civil Government Hospital at Shikarpur, with pregnant woman on wheelchair being brought for checkup

11. Various of gynecology department, blood bag

12. Corridor of hospital, woman lying in bed  

13. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Dr. Ramesh Kumar, head of  pediatrics, Civil Government Hospital in Shikarpur:

"Most of the patients being brought have gastro diseases, including diarrhea, cholera, waterborne diseases, including typhoid, malaria. We are also seeing people with skin diseases. We are treating everyone. Many have been discharged after they recovered."

14. Various of Kumar examining child who has diarrhea

15. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Dr. Ramesh Kumar, head of  pediatrics, Civil Government Hospital in Shikarpur:

"The reason behind the rise in number of patients is that rainwater is standing everywhere. There is no sanitation arrangement. Contaminated material is lying on roads. We are advising people to use nets to prevent mosquito bites."

16. Tilt-down of children lying in beds

17. Child in bed

18. Drip

19. Pan of gynaecology department with patients in beds

20. Various of flooded village

STORYLINE:

Pregnant mother of four Mundam Ali was staying at her mudbrick home on the outskirts of Shikarpur district of Sindh Province, Pakistan when a flash flood hit.

She was forced to leave her home with her four children along with scores of residents, who are now living in relief camps in a safer area of the Shikarpur district.

She said she has a backache and cough.

Ali, 21, said she had no other choice except to live in the relief camp, as her village was still submerged.

According to the U.N. Population Fund, about 650,000 pregnant women in flood-affected areas, including 73,000 expected to deliver in the next month, need maternal health services.

Pakistani authorities and aid agencies also were working to secure medical facilities to thousands of pregnant women, who are among 33 million people affected by floods.

Flood waters continued to recede in the most of the country, but many districts in southern Sindh province remained underwater, forcing displaced people to stay at donated camps.

Pakistani health officials have also reported an outbreak of waterborne diseases in areas hit by floods.

Although they have stepped up efforts to ensure the provision of clean drinking water, thousands of cases of waterborne diseases are reported at hospitals that are functioning.  

Diarrhea, skin diseases and eye infections are spreading at relief camps set up by the government across the country.

Ramesh Kumar, a medical doctor and head of pediatrics at the Civil Government Hospital in Shikar Pur, said he is seeing patients with waterborne diseases.

"Most of the patients being brought have gastro diseases, including diarrhea, cholera, waterborne diseases, including typhoid, malaria," he said.

Over 90,000 diarrhea cases were reported from one of the worst-hit provinces, Sindh, in the past 24 hours, according to a report released by the health officials.

But the illnesses were also reported from other flood-hit areas.

Pakistan blames climate change for unusually early and heavy monsoon rains, which since June have caused flash floods that have killed 1,191 people and affected 33 million people.

About a million homes have also been damaged or destroyed

===========================================================

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PAKISTAN FLOODS
Title:
HD
Summary: Footage of flood damage in Pakistan
Story No: efe050371
Source: Agencia EFE
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/01/2022 04:32 PM
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STORYLINE:

Quetta (Pakistan), Sep 1 (EFE/EPA) - (Camera: Jamal Taraqai) Pakistan's response capacity has been stretched to the limit to cope with the floods that have left more than a thousand dead, hundreds injured, and entire communities under water or swept by mud, devastation from which it will take a long time to recover.FOOTAGE OF THE FLOOD DAMAGE IN QUETTA, BALUCHISTAN PROVINCE (PAKISTAN).

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Shocking before and after video shows devastating effects of Pakistan floods as one river bursts its banks
Title:
HD
Summary: Shocking before and after video shows devastating effects of Pakistan floods as one river bursts its banks
Story No: swns004789
Source: SWNS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/01/2022 12:34 PM
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STORYLINE:

<p>This video shows the devastating effects of flooding in Pakistan as a river bursts its banks causing widespread damage.</p><p>The before and after footage shows the drastic changes to the Duber River in northern Pakistan.</p><p>Recorded just 48 hours apart, it initially shows the river level low before a ferocious current causes severe damage to structures on the river bank.</p><p>Statistical assistant for the Pakistani Government's health department Saeed Anwar captured the footage in his native Baila Jijal on the Dubar River in Kohistan on the 26th of August.</p><p>He said: "In the flood, many people lost their homes, lives, markets and property.</p><p>"All the roads are finished, and there is no access for people to get food and medical supplies.</p><p>"Kids are dying of different diseases after the flood and locals are helping each other."</p><p>Reports have claimed that at least 1,136 people have died and the United Nations have dubbed the weather as a "monsoon on steroids."</p><p>The Disaster Emergency Committee said 33 million people have been affected by the floods with 2,000,000 acres of crops and 794,000 livestock succumbing to the extreme weather conditions.</p><p>One-third of the country is estimated to be underwater after five times the average rainfall hit the worst-affected areas.</p>

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Pakistan Floods
Title:
HD
Summary: Parts of Sindh devastated by flooding
Story No: 4394980
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/01/2022 07:16 AM
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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sindh - 1 September 2022

1. Various of flooded houses in a residential area of Sindh

2. Various of family wading through flood water

3. Various of house next to flooding, family outside

4. Various of family on dry land surrounded by flood

STORYLINE:

Officials in Pakistan raised concern Wednesday over the spread of waterborne diseases among thousands of flood victims as waters from powerful monsoon rains began to recede in many parts of the country.

Some doctors said initially they were seeing mostly patients traumatized by the flooding, but are now treating people suffering from diarrhea, skin infections and other waterborne ailments in the country's flood-hit areas.

Many pregnant women living in flood-affected areas were also exposed to risks.

The development has forced the government to deploy additional medical teams, dispatch medicine and provide clean drinking water to survivors, many of whom are living in tents and makeshift homes.

Dr. Azra Fazal Pechuho, health minister in the country's worst-affected province of Sindh, said officials have set up 4,210 medical camps in the province's flood-hit areas to treat victims now suffering from skin and waterborne diseases, which are common during floods.

The World Health Organization began aiding Pakistani authorities in their efforts to treat people injured in the rains and flooding.

The agency said in a statement it was working to increase surveillance for acute diarrhea, cholera and other communicable diseases to avoid their spreading further, and is also providing medicine and medical supplies to health facilities.

The flooding has been caused by unprecedented heavy and unrelenting monsoon rains, fueled they say by the world’s changing climate.

Millions in villages, towns and cities around Pakistan were caught off guard by the swiftness and power of the waters.

More than 1,160 people have been killed in flooding across Pakistan since mid-June, hundreds of them in the major surge that began last week.

More than 33 million people in the country of 220 million have been affected, including those left homeless by the destruction of more than 1 million homes.

Pakistani officials have put the economic damage at some $10 billion, including everything from collapsed bridges and roads to destroyed crops.

===========================================================

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HZ Pakistan Floods Wrap
Title:
HD
Summary: Experts examine causes and consequences of unprecedented floods
Story No: 4394910
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/01/2022 02:28 AM
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PAKISTAN FLOODS WRAP

SHOTLIST:

SOURCE: ASSOCIATED PRESS

RESTRICTION SUMMARY:

LENGTH: 6:51

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Osta Muhammad, Baluchistan, Pakistan - 29 August 2022

1. Various aerials of flooded village ++MUTE++

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kalam, Swat valley, Khyber Pakthunkhwa, Pakistan– 31 August 2022

2. Various of newly constructed Honeymoon Hotel damaged due to flooding

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bahrain, Khyber Pakthunkhwa, Pakistan - 31 August 2022

3. Various flood water on main street of Bahrain town of Swat valley

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bangor, UK - 30 August 2022

++VIDEO CALL++

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Helen Griffiths, natural hazards researcher, University of Reading:

"Pakistan has a very varied climate. So it can change from being very, very arid in the winter region and in the winter periods where they maybe have kind of snow in the northern regions to then getting these really intense monsoon rains over July and August. So it gets over half its rainfall in July and August. And what's unusual about this year is basically that amount of rainfall is way more than would usually be expected. So on average it's five times more than would be expected across the whole of Pakistan. In some regions, we may be seeing ten times more rain."

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Village Aaqil Lakhi, Shikarpur District, Sindh province, Pakistan  - 31 August 2022

5. Wide of flooded area

6. Various of people moving belongings, wading through chest-high flood water

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bangor, UK - 30 August 2022

++VIDEO CALL++

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Helen Griffiths, natural hazards researcher, University of Reading:

"The totals that we're seeing at the moment are unprecedented. That's kind of the key word and it's really important. We've seen this quite a few times over the summer. We're seeing things that we've never seen before in history."

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sukkur, Sindh Province, Pakistan - 28 August 2022

8. Right pan a man looking to flooded Sukkur barrage

9. Various of flooded barrage

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Islamabad, Pakistan - 31 August 2022

++VIDEO CALL+

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Adil Sheraz, Country Director, Care International:

"I'm one of that (those) aid workers who has worked in the 2010 flood also. And when I compare the 2010 flood with this flood, this is three or four times bigger than the 2010 flood."

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Village Aaqil Lakhi, Shikarpur District, Sindh province, Pakistan  - 31 August 2022

11. Various of buildings in flood water

12. Wide of compound, puddle and mud in foreground

13. Pan from water to tents by side of road

14. Various of woman and children inside makeshift tent

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Islamabad, Pakistan - 31 August 2022

++VIDEO CALL+

15. SOUNDBITE (English) Adil Sheraz, Country Director, Care International:

"The whole village is washed away. They don't have shelter, they're ready crops were destroyed. I'm even more concerned about the stagnant water which is in these locations now. It will not even allow the communities to plant for the next season, so they probably will miss out another planting season, which is due in October. And if they miss out that season, we will also have some more challenges related to food security in-country, not only for the affected population, but even for the general population."

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sukkur, Pakistan - 26 August 2022

16. Various of damaged crops in waterlogged fields

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Lakki Village, Shikarpur, Pakistan

17. Various of Lakki Village in Shikarpur submerged in flood water

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Islamabad, Pakistan - 31 August 2022

++VIDEO CALL+

18. SOUNDBITE (English) Adil Sheraz, Country Director, Care International:

"In some areas we already hear about diarrhoea, which is emerging. And I think if the clean water issue is not resolved sooner, we will be hearing more cases of diarrhoea as the first thing. People don't have clean drinking water, sanitation facilities and also hygiene facilities are limited. So this may also put people at risk for skin related diseases, which may also emerge. Then with this stagnant water, we can all understand that mosquitoes will increase and with their number, there will also be more diseases related to mosquitoes, which is malaria. It could be dengue also."

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dera Allah Yar, Baluchistan - 28 August 2022

19. Various of villagers wading through neck-deep floodwater with belongings and pets

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bangor, UK - 30 August 2022

++VIDEO CALL++

20. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Helen Griffiths, natural hazards researcher, University of Reading:

"We are certain that these are being driven by climate change. So just looking at the monsoon rains in particular, if we think of a warmer world, a warmer atmosphere, we get greater evaporation from the Indian Ocean, which fuels the the rains. And in combination then with the warmer atmosphere, the atmosphere can then hold more rain, hold more water. So we've got more water going into the atmosphere, more water being retained by the atmosphere."

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Village Aaqil Lakhi, Shikarpur District, Sindh province, Pakistan  - 31 August 2022

21. Wide of men rebuilding brick wall

22. Various of man digging close to damaged house

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Islamabad, Pakistan - 31 August 2022

++VIDEO CALL+

23. SOUNDBITE (English) Adil Sheraz, Country Director, Care International:

"It's not only a short term crisis, we are talking really about the short to medium and long term crisis. So every step is important. Not only like an emergency relief now, we also need to widely think about our intervention for the medium term support and long term support."

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dera Murad Jamali, Pakistan - 28 August 2022

24. Various of father, mother and baby girl standing in floodwater in front of their damaged home

LEADIN:

Pakistan's unprecedented floods have triggered a humanitarian crisis that could take years to fix.

And the extreme conditions could become more common as the warming climate brings more severe monsoon rains.

STORYLINE:

One third of Pakistan is underwater.

Floods have swept away buildings, business and farmlands - and killed more than 1,100 people since mid-June.

Flooding is not uncommon at this time of year - monsoon season typically starts in June and ends in September, bringing with it floods.

But the scale and severity this time is highly unusual.

"Pakistan has a very varied climate. So it can change from being very, very arid in the winter region and in the winter periods where they maybe have kind of snow in the northern regions to then getting these really intense monsoon rains over July and August. So it gets over half its rainfall in July and August," explains Dr Helen Griffiths, a natural hazards researcher at the University of Reading.

"What's unusual about this year is basically that amount of rainfall is way more than would usually be expected. So on average it's five times more than would be expected across the whole of Pakistan. In some regions, we may be seeing ten times more rain."

The deadly floods come amid a year that has seen extreme weather events across the globe.

"The totals that we're seeing at the moment are unprecedented. That's kind of the key word and it's really important. We've seen this quite a few times over the summer. We're seeing things that we've never seen before in history," says Griffiths

Pakistan also experienced devastating floods in 2010, which left around 1,700 people dead, and caused billions of dollars worth of damage.

But aid workers are braced for worse this year.

"When I compare the 2010 flood with this flood, this is three or four times bigger than the 2010 flood," says Adil Sheraz, Country Director for Care International, a charity that is providing aid to people affected.

The record-breaking floods have prompted the United Nations to formally issue an appeal for $160 million in emergency funding to the impoverished Islamic nation, where about a million homes have been damaged or destroyed.

Pakistan says it has received aid from some countries and others were dispatching aid, too.

Officials have put the economic damage at some $10 billion, including everything from collapsed bridges and roads to destroyed crops.

Sheraz says the provinces of Sindh and Baluchistan are particularly badly affected.

"The whole village is washed away. They don't have shelter, they're ready crops were destroyed. I'm even more concerned about the stagnant water which is in these locations now. It will not even allow the communities to plant for the next season, so they probably will miss out another planting season, which is due in October. And if they miss out that season, we will also have some more challenges related to food security in-country, not only for the affected population, but even for the general population," he warns

Although the rains stopped three days ago, large swaths of the country remain under water, and the main rivers, the Indus and the Swat, are still swollen.

Officials are now raising concerns over the spread of waterborne diseases among thousands of flood victims as waters began to recede in many parts of the country.

Some doctors said initially they were seeing mostly patients traumatized by the flooding, but are now treating people suffering from diarrhea, skin infections and other waterborne ailments in the country's flood-hit areas.

The development has forced the government to deploy additional medical teams, dispatch medicine and provide clean drinking water to survivors, many of whom are living in tents and makeshift homes.

"In some areas we already hear about diarrhoea, which is emerging. And I think if the clean water issue is not resolved sooner, we will be hearing more cases of diarrhoea as the first thing. People don't have clean drinking water, sanitation facilities and also hygiene facilities are limited. So this may also put people at risk for skin related diseases, which may also emerge. Then with this stagnant water, we can all understand that mosquitoes will increase and with their number, there will also be more diseases related to mosquitoes, which is malaria. It could be dengue also," says Sheraz.

These freak floods are likely to become more common as the world's climate warms.

The seasonal monsoons make Pakistan particularly vulnerable to the worst impacts of this global environmental catastrophe.

"We are certain that these are being driven by climate change. So just looking at the monsoon rains in particular, if we think of a warmer world, a warmer atmosphere, we get greater evaporation from the Indian Ocean, which fuels the the rains. And in combination then with the warmer atmosphere, the atmosphere can then hold more rain, hold more water. So we've got more water going into the atmosphere, more water being retained by the atmosphere," says Griffiths.

There are still concerns a further downpour in September could trigger yet more flooding.

But the monsoon season is drawing to a close.

That will not be the end of the crisis though.

More than 33 million people in the country of 220 million have been affected by the floods.

Sheraz estimates it would take between 18 month to two years to help people rebuild their lives after losing their homes and livelihoods.

"It's not only a short term crisis, we are talking really about the short to medium and long term crisis. So every step is important. Not only like an emergency relief now, we also need to widely think about our intervention for the medium term support and long term support," he says.

====

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Pakistan Aid Distribution
Title:
HD
Summary: Save the Children distribute aid in Pakistan
Story No: 4394912
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/31/2022 05:23 PM
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ASSOCIATED PRESS.

Shikarpur, Pakistan - 31 August 2022

1. Various of Save the Children's relief distribution at village Qaim Khan Vadyo in Shikarpur   

2. Rows of relief goods on ground

3. People taking relief goods on their backs

4. Various of relief distribution camp, people walking under banner reading: "Aid for flood victims"

5. Family members carrying relief items

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Imran Ali Shah, deputy team leader, Humanitarian Operation, Save the Children in Pakistan:

"We are distributing initially some relief items, like food aid which comprises of a food package for one month for a family of six to seven people. We are providing relief tents to the most deserving because in this village, almost 40 to 50 houses have been completely damaged. So we have initially provided 10 households with relief tents and along with that, some household items like kitchen items, some mats - plastic mats and coolers."

7. Various of camp at Garhi Yasee in Shikarpur, with some people sitting under tents and others under open sky beside their charpoys  

8. SOUNDBITE (Sindhi) Allah Dino, flood victim living in relief camp:

"We get rice every day at three in the afternoon. We appeal to the government to give us ration packs so we could cook and give food to children on time. The children are getting sick from eating rice every day. We don't have money to get medicine for them."

9. Various of families

10. Sunset

STORYLINE:

Save the Children on Wednesday started its relief operations in the village of Qaim Khan Vadyo in the district of Shikarpur in Pakistan, handing flood victims food packages, tents and water purification tablets.

The relief items include a food package that can last a family of six to seven for up to a month, said Imran Ali Shah of Save the Children in Pakistan.

Shah said 50 families had already received food aid for one month but added that there was a severe shortage of clean drinking water.

The organisation is also providing relief tents to people who need them the most because some 40 to 50 homes were destroyed, Shah said.

Pakistani officials say the flooding that has hit across the country over the past weeks is like nothing they have seen before.

It has been caused by unprecedented heavy and unrelenting monsoon rains, fueled they say by the world’s changing climate.

Millions in villages, towns and cities around Pakistan were caught off guard by the swiftness and power of the waters.

Allah Dino, a flood victim, said he was not satisfied with what the government has been providing, saying he receives rice every day.

"The children are getting sick from eating rice every day. We don't have money to get medicine for them," he said.

Shah said once the immediate needs of the flood victims were met, work would be done to provide education assistance and start providing health care services for which the government department has identified a few facilities where where they could work.

More than 1,160 people have been killed in flooding across Pakistan since mid-June, hundreds of them in the major surge that began last week.

More than 33 million people in the country of 220 million have been affected, including those left homeless by the destruction of more than one million homes.

Pakistani officials have put the economic damage at some $10 billion, including everything from collapsed bridges and roads to destroyed crops.

AP Video shot by: Muhammad Farooq.

===========================================================

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PAKISTAN FLOODS
Title:
HD
Summary: Pakistanis seek humanitarian aid during floods affecting country
Story No: efe050303
Source: Agencia EFE
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/31/2022 04:49 PM
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STORYLINE:

Tando Adam (Pakistan), Aug 31 (EFE/EPA) - (Camera: Nadeem Khawar) Pakistan, hit by the worst floods in years with at least 1,100 deaths, has lived since its independence from the British Empire under the yoke of weather catastrophes that have caused tens of thousands of deaths and immeasurable economic losses.FOOTAGE OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF HUMANITARIAN AID IN TANDO ADAM, SINDH PROVINCE.

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Pakistan Flood Disease
Title:
HD
Summary: Concern over spread of waterborne diseases in Pakistan
Story No: 4394857
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/31/2022 01:08 PM
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RESTRICTION SUMMARY:

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rojhan, Punjab - 31 August 2022

1. Various of displaced residents in camp

2. Various of doctors assessing patients and giving medicine

3. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Mehmood Azhar, doctor:

"Many of the patients we are receiving have gastrointestinal disease and the reason is a shortage of clean drinking water, children are aso suffering from diarrhea and gastroenteritis."

4. Various of displaced residents in camp, floodwater, residents travelling on boat

5. SOUNDBITE (Saraiki) Aslam Khan, displaced resident:

"We have a shortage of food, tents and clean drinking water. The water we are drinking is dirty ,causing stomach pain, no one cares about us."

6. Various of women in boat, boat leaving

7. Tracking of displaced residents in camp

8. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Ghulam Mujtaba, doctor:

"Mainly, people are suffering from skin disease as they walk through floodwater, we're trying to give them medicine. There are a lot of diarrhea cases, some diseases are being caused by water that is contaminated, we are trying to provide the best services to these people."

9. Various of displaced residents at food distribution location, residents receiving and carrying food, blankets and other aid

STORYLINE:

Doctors in Pakistan raised concern on Wednesday over the spread of waterborne diseases among thousands of flood victims as waters from powerful monsoon rains began to recede in many parts of the country.

Massive flooding from the rains since mid-June has killed at least 1,162 people, a phenomenon experts blame on climate change.

Some doctors said initially they were seeing mostly patients traumatised by the flooding, but are now treating people suffering from diarrhea, skin infections and other waterborne ailments in the country's flood-hit areas.

Mehmood Azhar is a doctor who has been treating patients in Rojhan in Punjab.

He explained that many residents were suffering from gastrointestinal diseases because of a shortage of clean drinking water.

The development has forced the government to deploy additional medical teams and dispatch medicine, besides providing clean drinking water to survivors, many of whom are living in tents and makeshift homes.

===========================================================

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Pakistan Floods Swat
Title:
HD
Summary: Aftermath of floods in Pakistan's Swat Valley
Story No: 4394838
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/31/2022 11:17 AM
People: Antonio Guterres
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Kalam, Swat valley - Khyber Pakthunkhwa– 31 August 2022

1. Various of newly constructed Honeymoon Hotel damaged due to flooding

2. Wide of a bridge washed away in flooding

3. Wide of Swat river

4. Collapsed building due to flooding

5. Wide of Swat river water passing through damaged buildings

6. Various aerials of Swat valley

Bahrain, Khyber Pakthunkhwa - 31 August 2022

7. Various flood water on main street of Bahrain town of Swat valley

8. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Merajuddin Khan, president of the Bahrain Hotel Association:

"Around 30 to 35 small and big hotels were washed away in the recent flooding. Today is the sixth day of flooding but you can still see 20-25 feet of water inside hotels. This is the situation here in our Bahrain."

9. Top of Swat river and damaged buildings

10. Low angle of damage main highway

11. Various of destroyed road

12. Machinery working on road, people around

13. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) No name given, loal resident:

"We were affected badly by the 2010 floods, and we rebuilt our houses with a lot of effort and difficulty, with blood and sweat. The village I come from, Jel, it had around 40-45 houses...they were completely destroyed."

14. Various of people crossing river through handmade bridge

15. People using man-powered cable trolly to cross fast flowing Swat river

16. Mid of broken bridge

17. Wide of another broken bridge

STORYLINE :

                        

Engineers are trying to repair roads in Pakistan's northwestern tourist resort of Kalam, where the raging Swat river destroyed dozens of homes and knocked down hotels, including the iconic New Honeymoon Hotel.

There were no casualties as tourists and staff left the hotel following government evacuation instructions, and residents in Kalam said many streets there were still flooded.

Footage on Wednesday showed floodwater passing through various residential and commercial areas in Kalam, where people are now using makeshift repaired bridges to cross the Swat river.

Residents in Kalam said many streets in their town were still flooded.

Merajuddin Khan, who is the president of a local association of hotels, told The Associated Press that floods in 2010 had damaged hotels too, but last week's floods were the worst ones in Pakistan.

"Around 30 to 35 small and big hotels were washed away in the recent flooding," Khan said. "Today is the sixth day of flooding but you can still see 20-25 feet of water inside hotels."

On Wednesday, Prime Minister Shahbaz Sharif visited the flood-hit Swat Valley, where he promised to ensure the rehabilitation of every person displaced by the flood.

In his televised comments, Shahbaz thanked U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres for responding to Pakistan's request and issuing an appeal for 160 million US dollars in emergency funding to help flood victims.

According to initial government estimates, the devastation caused 10 billion US dollars in damage to the economy.  

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Pakistan Flood Victims
Title:
HD
Summary: Grief and destruction in flood-hit Pakistan
Story No: 4394831
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/31/2022 10:54 AM
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Lakhi, Shikarpur District - 31 August 2022

1. Various of houses submerged in floodwater, people trying to salvage their belongings

2. Various of family inside tent

3. Various of Waryam Soomro working at his collapsed house

4. SOUNDBITE (Sindhi) Waryam Soomro, Lakhi resident:

"At around 7:30 in the morning water entered our homes, my house collapsed and all of my things were damaged and are useless now. Our request to the government is, if they want to help us they should come quickly and support us financially so we can rebuild our homes."

5. Girls standing at sit

6. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Kamal Soomro, father of flood victim:

"I had two sons and a nephew, and a wall collapsed on all three of them. My nephew and one of my sons were injured, and my other son, Muhammad Yousaf, died. I cannot describe the tragic moment when it all happened, and I don't have the words to describe what's going through my heart

++JUMP CUT++

7. Kamal Soomro weeping

8. Waryam consoles his brother Kamal

9. Various of Soomro's destroyed house

STORYLINE:

A father broke down in tears in Pakistan's Sindh province on Wednesday, as he mourned a son who was killed in the country's devastating floods.

A wall collapsed on Kamal Soomro's home in Shikarpur district, trapping two of his sons and a nephew underneath.

One of his sons, Muhammad Yousaf, died.

"I cannot describe the tragic moment when it all happened, and I don't have the words to describe what's going through my heart," said Soomro.

Paksitanis are visiting loved ones to share their grief and help them salvage what's left of their lives after what officials have called the country's worst ever flooding disaster.

Millions in villages, towns and cities around Pakistan were caught off guard by the swiftness and power of the waters.

More than 1,160 people have been killed since mid-June, hundreds of them in the major surge that began last week.

More than 33 million people in the country of 220 million have been affected, including those left homeless by the destruction of more than 1 million homes.

Pakistani officials have put the economic damage at some $10 billion, including everything from collapsed bridges and roads to destroyed crops.

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PAKISTAN FLOODS
Title:
HD
Summary: Flood victims in remote areas of Pakistan in need of relief aid
Story No: efe050279
Source: Agencia EFE
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/31/2022 10:31 AM
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Dera Ismail Khan, Aug 30 (EFE/EPA).- Torrential rains in Pakistan have claimed more than 1,100 lives and affected 33 million people, many of whom were still without basic aid on Wednesday because access to remote flooded areas was blocked. (Camera: SAOOD REHMAN).FOOTAGE SHOWS FLOOD DAMAGE IN DERA ISMAIL KHAN PROVINCE, PAKISTAN.

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Pakistan Flood Damage
Title:
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Summary: Pakistan flood victims try to salvage belongings
Story No: 4394798
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/31/2022 07:13 AM
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Village Aaqil Lakhi, Shikarpur District, Sindh province  - 31 August 2022

1. Wide of flooded area

2. Various of people moving belongings, wading through chest-high flood water

3. Various of man and woman rolling round container through flooded area

4. Wide of damaged house

5. Debris in water

6. Drinking water tap nearly covered by flood water

7. Wide of damaged house

8. Various of people recovering belongings

9. Pan from belongings to tents

10. Various of woman with children inside makeshift tent

11. Pan of belongings in pile by the side of flood water

12. Damaged house

13. Various of flooded area

14. Mid of men building brick wall

15. Various of men digging mud outside of damaged house

STORYLINE:

Villagers in Pakistan's Shikarpur district tried to salvage their belongings from their destroyed homes and flooded land on Wednesday.

Shikarpur is in Sindh province, one of the areas worst-hit by flooding that has wrought destruction across the country over the past few weeks.

It has been caused by unprecedented heavy and unrelenting monsoon rains, that Pakistani officials say is fueled by the world’s changing climate.

Millions in villages, towns and cities around Pakistan were caught off guard by the swiftness and power of the waters.

More than 1,160 people have been killed in flooding across Pakistan since mid-June, hundreds of them in the major surge that began last week.

More than 33 million people in the country of 220 million have been affected, including those left homeless by the destruction of more than 1 million homes.

Pakistani officials have put the economic damage at some $10 billion, including everything from collapsed bridges and roads to destroyed crops.

AP Video shot by: Muhammad Farooq

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Pakistan-Flood/Displaced Residents
Title:
HD
Summary: Pakistan-Flood/Displaced Residents
Story No: cctv053044
Source: China Central Television (CCTV)
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/31/2022 06:16 AM
People:
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Many residents in Balochistan, the westernmost province of Pakistan have been displaced after devastating floods hit the region and destroyed their homes.The rarely seen floods in the dry region have also destroyed roads toward neighboring provinces and cut off natural gas and power supplies and telecommunication services in most parts of the region.Government departments of Pakistan are airlifting affected residents and conducting rescue operations, according to China Media Group correspondent Fazal Tawab. Locals were seen searching the ruins of their houses for lost items. They are in urgent need of aid from the government as their years of savings have been submerged by the floods. "The floods damaged the foundation of our house first and then washed away our furniture and other things. In just 15 or 20 minutes, our house was completely destroyed," said Haji Ishfaq Hamid, a local resident.As of Tuesday, the flood in Balochistan had killed more than 200 people and over 500,000 livestock, and destroyed more than 60,000 houses and around 1,000 kilometers of roads. Sindh Province and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province are also hit hard by the floods. Flood relief for the affected residents is conducted in full swing by people of all walks of life across the country.

Balochistan Province, Pakistan - Aug 30, 2022 (CCTV - No access Chinese mainland)

1. Aerial shots of flooded houses

2. Various of houses

3. Various of ruins of houses

4. Various of residents searching ruins

5. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Haji Ishfaq Hamid, resident:

"The floods damaged the foundation of our house first and then washed away our furniture and other things. In just 15 or 20 minutes, our house was completely destroyed."

6. Children at distribution site

7. Various of medical workers treating affected residents

8. Soldier distributing supplies

9. Damaged road

10. Bulldozer repairing road

11. Truck moving

12. Damaged road

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PAKISTAN-FLOOD
Title:
HD
Summary: Over 900 dead since June amid heavy monsoon rains in Pakistan
Story No: edf007596
Source: EditorialFootage
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/30/2022 08:09 PM
People:
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People wade through a flooded area following heavy rains in Charsadda District, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, Pakistan, 27 August 2022. According to the National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA) on 26 August, flash floods triggered by heavy monsoon rains have killed over 900 people across Pakistan since mid-June 2022. More than 33 million people have been affected by floods, the country's climate change minister said.

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PAKISTAN FLOODS
Title:
HD
Summary: Pakistan continues to suffer from floods that already leave more than 1,000 dead
Story No: efe050230
Source: Agencia EFE
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/30/2022 07:41 PM
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STORYLINE:

Sindh/Dera Ismail Khan (Pakistan), Aug 30 (EFE), (Camera: Waraq Hussein / Saood Rehman).- Pakistan and the United Nations requested this Tuesday 160 million dollars to help the victims of the serious floods registered in the country, which since mid-June have caused more than 1,100 deaths and affected 33 million.

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Pakistan Displaced Families
Title:
HD
Summary: Displaced Pakistan families lose everything in floods
Story No: 4394744
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/30/2022 06:15 PM
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Charsadda, Khyber Pukhtoonkhwa - 30 August 2022

1. Pan right of displaced people in tents

2. Displaced in tents

3. Displaced children, girl sleeping on ground and others sitting outside tent, mother in background with face covered

4. Woman fanning children sleeping on ground

5. Mid children sleeping in tent

6. Close-up baby girl sleeping

7. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Rubina Bibi, displaced person:

"The floodwater suddenly entered our house. We didn't have enough time to take anything out with us when we were leaving, my five-month-old granddaughter was lying on a coat and swept away by the flood. We came because we don't have a choice."

8. Left pan of camp

9. Displaced old woman sitting outside tent

10. Mid displaced old woman sitting outside tent

11. Safoor Khan showing mobile with footage of his flooded home

12. SOUNDBITE (Pashto) Saifoor Khan, displaced person:

"An announcement echoed from a nearby mosque's loudspeaker, warning us to immediately move to safer places because floodwater was going to hit the area. We evacuated our women first, and left all the household things behind including furniture."

13. Various women and children in medical camp

14. Medical camp of the 1122 rescue service

15. Various of medical staff checking sick children

16. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Farhat Khan, District health officer in Charsadda:

"Mostly we are treating patients with stomach issues, skin disease and scabies here, also we are treating chronic disease patients of hyper tension and 'sugar' (sic) here as they did not bring their medicine with them."

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Nowshera, Khyber Pukhtoonkhwa - 30 August 2022

17. People wading through flooded street

18. Wide homes submerged, people wading through floodwater

19. Two men cleaning mud from shop

20. Close-up of cleaning

21. Tractor cleaning mud from street

22. Flooded Kabul River

23. Wide left pan of mosque to bridge

STORYLINE:

Rubina Bibi was cooking food for her family in her mud brick home in the village of Majooki in northwest Pakistan when an announcement echoed from a nearby mosque's loudspeaker, warning people to move to higher ground because floodwater was going to hit the area.

She didn't take the warning seriously for hours until floodwater started entering her village, inundating farm fields and homes and forcing villagers to run toward a highway in the district in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa last Friday.

From there, she later walked for another five kilometers (three miles) and finally ended up reaching a sprawling state-owned sports complex, where the local government has set up hundreds of tents for flood victims.

Recalling the day when she fled her village, Bibi said it all happened so fast that her five-month-old granddaughter was swept away by the flood.

She said she waded through waist-high floodwater with her two sons and her daughter-in-law, as they tightly held two grandchildren in their laps.

"The floodwater suddenly entered our house. We didn't have enough time to take anything out with us when we were leaving," Bibi said, as she stood outside a donated tent.

She said when she was asking everyone to leave the house, the deluge entered the building and swept away her granddaughter.

Bibi said it all happened last Friday, and since then she has been living in donated tents.

Bibi said she didn't know whether floods had destroyed her house or if it was still intact.

Like Bibi, many other people from her village have no idea what happened to their homes, as authorities have asked them not to go back until the floodwater completely recedes.

Saifoor Khan, who's also from Majooki village, said the government had alerted them to vacate their homes as floods could hit the district of Charsadda soon.

He said he regretted ignoring announcements made from the mosque's loudspeaker, which is normally used for the call to prayer.

Khan, who is a cab driver, also waded through the water in his village when he fled to safety.

"We evacuated our women first, and left all the household things behind including furniture," he told The Associated Press, as he sat in a tent with eight members of his family, including his wife, six sons and a daughter.

He recalled that the village was also hit by floods in 2010 but they didn't leave their homes then, as the flood water quickly receded.

Majooki village has a population of 2,500 and several people died there, while crops were destroyed in last week's floods.

Villagers in Pakistan usually store wheat and rice at home to meet the whole year's needs.

Hundreds of thousands of villages across Pakistan lost grains and more than one million homes were destroyed, affecting 33 million people, according to the National Disaster Management Authority.

On Tuesday, the death toll from rains and floods from mid-June jumped to 1,162.

According to Pakistani officials, the record-breaking floods have caused US$10 billion in damage to the country's economy.  

Although international aid has started arriving in the impoverished Islamic nation, the government of Prime Minister Shahbaz Sharif warned on Tuesday that any delay in the provision of help to flood victims from the world community could further worsen the ordeal of people who have been displaced by the floods, which experts say was caused by climate change.

Sharif has thanked the United Nations and Pakistan for issuing an appeal Tuesday for US$160 million in emergency funding to help millions affected by record-breaking floods.

U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Gutteres said Pakistan's flooding, caused by weeks of unprecedented monsoon rains, were a signal to the world to step up action against climate change.  

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Pakistan UN Funding
Title:
HD
Summary: UN, Pakistan appeal for US$160M in emergency funding
Story No: 4394724
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/30/2022 03:59 PM
People: Bilawal Bhutto Zardari
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Islamabad - 30 August 2022

1. Various of Pakistani Foreign Minister Bilawal Bhutto Zardari and UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator for Pakistan Julien Harneis arriving at news conference, officials and media

2. SOUNDBTIE (English) Bilawal Bhutto Zardari, Pakistani Foreign Minister:

"I want to emphasise here that the scale and magnitude of the current floods is unprecedented, whereby the country received rainfall equivalent to three times the national 30-year average. This is a grave manifestation of climate change-induced disaster."

3. Cutaway of news conference

4. SOUNDBTIE (English) Julien Harneis, UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator for Pakistan:

"The appeal is to provide nutrition services for the children who will be getting severe acute malnutrition, is to provide health services and emergency food for the first weeks, shelter and, very important, livestock vaccination, because so many animals are the banks of our people. You lose a cattle, you lose a buffalo, you've lost your savings. So the appeal will cover those issues, $160 million."

5. Cutaway of news conference

6. SOUNDBTIE (English) Bilawal Bhutto Zardari, Pakistani Foreign Minister:

"It will need the support of our development partners and IFI's (international financial institutions) for reconstruction and rehabilitation. It is our shared responsibility to do utmost to assist the millions of affected return back to normal lives, livelihoods in a sustainable manners. It is a long way ahead but we are committed to achieving our goal."

7. Reporters and officials at news conference

8. SOUNDBTIE (English) Julien Harneis, UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator for Pakistan:

"Pakistan's voice has not been sufficiently heard on climate change, how it impacts this country and therefore what needs to be done."

9. Officials at news conference

10. SOUNDBTIE (English) Julien Harneis, UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator for Pakistan:

"That river system which starts in Gilgit Baltistan at Jammu and Kashmir goes all way through your country and how climate change is affecting that. Now the UN is working with your government, with the Ministry of Climate Change on (inaudible), an approach which will together look at these issues - and I think this is...not right now because now we need to be focusing on saving lives. In the coming weeks or months, we will still be putting that forward at the General Assembly and at COP27. Thank you."

11. Audience leaving news conference

STORYLINE:

The United Nations and Pakistan appealled on Tuesday for $160 million in emergency funding to help millions affected by record-breaking floods that have killed more than 1,150 people since mid-June.

The money is needed to provide nutrition for children and give people shelter among other forms of assistance that include livestock vaccination, said UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator for Pakistan Julien Harneis.

He spoke at a news conference in Islamabad alongside Pakistani Foreign Minister Bilawal Bhutto Zardari.

"It is our shared responsibility to do utmost to assist the millions of affected return back to normal lives," the Pakistani foreign minister said.

More than 33 million people, or one in seven Pakistanis, have been affected by the catastrophic flooding, which has devastated a country already trying to revive a struggling economy.

More than 1 million homes have been damaged or destroyed in the past two and half months, displacing millions of people.

Around a half million of those displaced are living in organised camps, while others have had to find their own shelter.

  

According to initial government estimates, the devastation caused $10 billion in damage to the economy.  

Although rains stopped three days ago, large swaths of the country remain underwater, and the main rivers, the Indus and the Swat, are still swollen.   

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PAKISTAN FLOODS
Title:
HD
Summary: Pakistan, UN request $160 million for flood victims
Story No: efe050215
Source: Agencia EFE
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/30/2022 02:33 PM
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STORYLINE:

Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (Pakistan) Aug 30 (EFE/EPA).- (Camera: Arshad Arbab/Bilawal Arbab).- The Pakistan government and the United Nations on Tuesday jointly launched a flood response plan making a flash appeal of $160 million for more than 33 million victims of the natural disaster.FOOTAGE OF THE FLOODS IN KHYBER PAKHTUNKHWA, PAKISTAN.

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Keywords: PAKISTAN FLOODS
Subjects: Floods , General news , Accidents and disasters
Organisations: United Nations
Locations: Asia , South Asia , Pakistan
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Pakistan Flood Victim 2
Title:
HD
Summary: Pakistan widow tells of mud house collapse in floods
Story No: 4394698
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/30/2022 01:47 PM
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Shikarpur - 30 August 2022

1. Various of 51-year-old Muktyar Bibi trying to salvage her belongings from the ruins of her house which collapsed in rains and floods in Shikarpur district of Sindh province

2. Bibi sitting on the collapsed roof of her house, her belongings lying around

3. SOUNDBITE (Sindhi) Muktyar Bibi, 51, flood victim:

"Rain and flood together struck us at the same time. I had to save my children. I ran with the children but where could I go? My house has collapsed. I am now on the road with my children. We don't have a roof over our heads."

4. Cutaway of Bibi, tears rolling down her cheeks

5. SOUNDBITE (Sindhi) Muktyar Bibi, 51, flood victim:

"What can I do except cry? I don't know where to go. I am helpless. I have fever. We have nothing to eat. My son is sick. I have to take care of my children and my grandchildren too. We have no roof over our heads. I have no one but God to help me."

6. Various of Bibi's hands and feet covered in mud

7. Various of Bibi calling children to carry her belongings

8. Various of Bibi walking, wading through water towards the road

9. Bibi sitting on a donkey cart with her children, daughter in law and grandchildren  

10. Close up of children

11. Various of makeshift shelter under donkey cart on roadside

STORYLINE:

Tears roll down the sunken cheeks of Muktyar Bibi, a 51-year-old widow, as she narrates what she and her family went through when her mud house in Shikarpur district of Sindh province collapsed due to rain and flood.

"Rain and flood together struck us at the same time. It was so sudden I couldn't take anything out. I had to save my children first," she says. "My house has collapsed. I am now on the road with my children. We don't have a roof over our heads."

Her life had already been a tough one before this tragedy. She had lost one of her sons to drug addiction. She used to work on farms to feed her family.

"I can't help crying. I don't know where to go. I am helpless. We have nothing to eat. My son is sick. I have fever too, but I have to take care of my children as well as my grandchildren. I have no one but God to help me," she says.

Her donkey cart is now their home. It can barely accommodate her family members and is hardly any protection against the weather.

There is a relief camp at some distance where food is being distributed but she has no one to send there.

Meanwhile the United Nations and Pakistan issued an appeal Tuesday for 160 million US diollars in emergency funding to help millions affected by record-breaking floods that have killed more than 1,150 people since mid-June.

United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Gutteres said Pakistan's floods, caused by weeks of unprecedented monsoon rains, were a signal to the world to step up action against climate change.  

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Pakistan Flood Victim
Title:
HD
Summary: Widow finds safety from Pakistan floods at relief camp
Story No: 4394678
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/30/2022 11:27 AM
People: Ahsan Iqbal
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Lakki Village, Shikarpur, Pakistan

1. Various of Lakki Village in Shikarpur submerged in flood water

2. Various of 60-year-old widow, Noor Khatoon at a camp for flood victims based in a government building

3. SOUNDBITE (Sindhi) Noor Khatoon, flood victim:

"As heavy monsoon rain started and flood water entered in our village, everyone including women and children ran away and left everything behind. We left the village by foot, our houses collapsed, there's nothing left. We have stored food items drained in flood water. We were only able to save our children."

4. Khatoon standing with other women

5. SOUNDBITE (Sindhi) Noor Khatoon, flood victim:

"We lost our houses, and we are living here in this camp with our children. We have a cooler but no clean drinking water. We have to go far away to find water."

6. Various of children in the camp

7. Various of a little girl sleeping with flies on her face

8. Wide of children in the camp

9. Flood victims receiving cash at aid distribution center inside camp

10. Close-up of cash being handed out, tilt up to women

11. Wide of crowd waiting for aid

STORYLINE:

Nearly a half million people have crowded into camps in Pakistan after losing their homes in record-breaking floods.

One of those is Noor Khatoon, a 60-year-old widow. She's lucky to be alive but has lost everything in the flooding.

Her village, Lakki - located in the southern Sindh province – is largely submerged.

"We left the village by foot, our houses collapsed, there's nothing left," she explained.

Khatoon fled along with her family members, and like other villagers, ended up reaching a relief camp, where she is totally relying on donated supplies.

However, conditions aren't ideal.

"We have a cooler but no clean drinking water. We have to go far away to find water," she said.

The United Nations and Pakistan are set to appeal Tuesday (30 August) for $160 million (U.S. dollars) in emergency funding for the nearly a half million displaced victims of the floods that have killed more than 1,150 people since mid-June.

According to the National Disaster Management Authority, at least 498,000 people in the country of 220 million are in relief camps after being displaced.

Many more displaced flood victims are believed to be living with relatives, friends or out in the open, without shelter.

Although the rains stopped three days ago and floods in some areas are receding, several areas in Pakistan remain underwater.

According to initial government estimates, the devastation has inflicted $10 billion in damage to the economy.

"It is a preliminary estimate likely to be far greater," Planning Minister Ahsan Iqbal told The Associated Press.

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Pakistan Floods
Title:
HD
Summary: Waters remain high after flooding in Pakistan
Story No: 4394638
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/30/2022 06:17 AM
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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sindh - 30 August 2022

1. Various of residents in floodwater, residents collecting objects, flooded properties

2. Various of residents living in tents

3. Various of child and woman retrieving clothes from suitcases

4. Wide of floodwater

STORYLINE:

Nearly a half million people crowded into camps after losing their homes in widespread flooding and the climate minister warned on Monday that Pakistan is on the "front line" of the world's climate crisis after unprecedented monsoon rains wracked the country since mid-June, killing more than 1,130 people.

The rains stopped more than two days ago, and floods in some areas were receding.

But Pakistanis in many parts of the country were still wading through waters that filled their homes or covered their town's streets as they struggled with how to deal with the damage to homes and businesses.

In the southern city of Sindh, residents were seen walking through waist-deep floodwater as they went to retrieve items from their properties.

The National Disaster Management Authority said floods this summer have killed more than 1,136 people and injured 1,636 as well as damaging 1 million homes.

At least 498,000 people in the country of 220 million are in relief camps after being displaced, it said.

Many more displaced are believed to be living with relatives, friends or outside.

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PK Monsoon Floods KPK 3
Title:
HD
Summary: Pakistan: Monsoon Rains Bring Devastating Floods Across Country 3
Story No: spt018271
Source: Spectee
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/30/2022 04:30 AM
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RESTRICTIONS AND USAGE TERMS: Please credit “@sajidullah123 via Spectee”. Please Note this material is supplied by Spectee for the purpose of licensing to AP customers. This content is not produced or verified by the Associated Press. ******************************************************************* NOTE: 6 clips Video Location: Nowshera, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan Video Recording Date/Time: August 29, 2022 at about 11:00h Monsoon rains have battered Pakistan making one-third of the country underwater and killing more than 1,000 people since June. These clips show severely flooded areas in Nowshera, northern Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province. The videos were shot on Monday, August 29.

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Pakistan Floods Food
Title:
HD
Summary: Pakistan charity provides free food to flood victims
Story No: 4394604
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/29/2022 06:43 PM
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Sukkur, Sindh province - 29 August 2022

1. Various of workers for the charity Saylani cooking rice for flood victims

2. Various of a man stirring a large cauldron

3. Various of food being loaded on to vehicle  

4. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Muhammad Rehan, Saylani Welfare Trust worker:

"At five locations in Sukkur, we are offering free food to 5,000 people, twice a day. We are distributing meal cooked in Hyderabad to 45,000 people all over Sindh, twice a day. We are also providing dry ration packs as well as tents to flood victims."

5. Various of men serving food in platters

6. Close of cooked rice

7. Saylani workers serving food at a relief camp

8. Various of flood victims eating

9. Wide of flood victims eating in hall

STORYLINE:

A Pakistani charity called Saylani has been providing free food to flood victims in southern Sindh province.

The move was widely praised by those in need who said Saylani was doing an excellent job by helping those displaced by the floods.

A large number of non-governmental organizations have stepped forward to help the flood victims, offering shelter, food and clothing.

"At five locations in Sukkur, we are offering food to 5,000 people, twice a day," said Muhammad Rehan, who works for Saylani Welfare Trust, a charity based in Karachi.

"We are distributing cooked meal to 45,000 people all over Sindh, twice a day. We are also providing dry ration packs as well as tents to flood victims," he added.

Such charity organizations are collecting cash, food, clothing and other necessary items all over the country and transporting them to the flood-hit areas.

The volunteers associated with the charities have also joined rescue work.

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Pakistan Floods Minister 2
Title:
HD
Summary: Pakistan climate minister on widespread flooding
Story No: 4394602
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/29/2022 06:25 PM
People: Sherry Rehman
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Osta Muhammad, Baluchistan - 29 August 2022

1. Various aerials of inundate village ++MUTE++

Bolan dhadar, Baluchistan - 29 August 2022

2. Aerial of destroyed highway between Baluchistan and Sindh province ++MUTE++

Islamabad - 29 August 2022

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Sherry Rehman, Pakistan's Climate Minister:

"What we saw recently in the last eight weeks is an unrelenting cascade of torrential rain that no monsoon has ever brought with it ever before. Pakistan is not unused to monsoons. We do expect them spread out, usually over three months or two months, and the sporadic monsoons are fairly strong. But the cycle is never, no.1 one without respite, nor is it in this volume and scale of water that comes down. Neither is it so prolonged."

Shikarpur, Sindh province - 29 August 2022

4. Various of flood waters around destroyed houses

Islamabad - 29 August 2022

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Sherry Rehman, Pakistan's Climate Minister:

"The water is now at maximum levels. The soil is unable to absorb anymore. We have, I mean, although most relief efforts in terms of evacuating and retrieving people have been completed, 72 districts of the country are calamity-hit, which is one out of every seven Pakistanis affected, in the (region) 33 million (people)."

Sukkur - 29 August 2022

6. Various of women and children at camp for flood victims collecting cooked food

Islamabad - 29 August 2022

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Sherry Rehman, Pakistan's Climate Minister:

"Clearly we are in the front line of... the ground zero of this crisis and for us it's been a catastrophe of unprecedented proportions. It's overtaken the 2010 floods in every sense of the word."

Bolan Dhadar, Baluchistan - 29 August 2022

8. Various of people crossing main highway between Baluchistan and Sindh, blocked due to broken roads and bridges

Islamabad - 29 August 2022

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Sherry Rehman, Pakistan's Climate Minister:

"Climate knows no borders and its effects can be disproportionately felt, certainly across the global South because we are closer to the equator. So when you see low pressure systems coming from the Bay of Bengal, they hit us before anyone else. So we're on the front line of a global crisis."

Bolan Dhadar, Baluchistan - 29 August 2022

10. Aerial shot of trucks and oil tankers parked due to closed highway between Baluchistan and Sindh provinces ++MUTE++

STORYLINE:

Pakistan's climate minister warned on Monday that her country is on the "front line" of the world's climate crisis after unprecedented monsoons caused flooding that killed more than 1,136 people.

Climate Minister Sherry Rehman and meteorologists told The Associated Press that new monsoons were expected in September.

Monsoons have hit earlier and more heavily than usual since the start of summer, officials say, most recently with massive rains last week that effected nearly the entire country.

Pakistan is accustomed to monsoons, Rehman said, but not like this.

"What we saw recently in the last eight weeks is unrelenting cascades of torrential rain that no monsoon has ever brought with it ever before," she said.

The rains stopped more than two days ago, and floods in some areas were receding.

But Pakistanis in many parts of the country will still wading through waters that filled their homes or covered their town's streets as they struggled with how to deal with the damage to homes and businesses.

Nearly a half million people have crowded into camps after losing their homes.

The heavy rains are the latest in a series of catastrophes that Rehman said are exacerbated by climate change, including heatwaves, forest fires and glacial lake outbursts.

The damage reflects how poorer countries often pay the price for climate change largely caused by more industrialized nations.

Since 1959, Pakistan is responsible for only 0.4% of the world's historic CO2 emissions.

The US is responsible for 21.5%, China for 16.5% and the EU 15%.

"Climate knows no borders and its effects can be disproportionately felt," Rehman said.

"When you see low pressure systems coming from the Bay of Bengal, they hit us before anyone else. So we're on the front line of a global crisis."

International aid was starting to flow into Pakistan, and the military was helping distribute aid to remote areas and evacuate those who had lost their homes.

Authorities were starting the long effort of rebuilding roads and restarting railways.

The floods destroyed more than 150 bridges and numerous roads have been washed away, making rescue operations difficult.

At least 6,500 soldiers were deployed to help, and authorities said they were using military planes, helicopters, trucks and boats to evacuate people from marooned people and deliver aid to them.

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PAKISTAN FLOODS
Title:
HD
Summary: Pakistani province of Sindh, also affected by floods
Story No: efe050165
Source: Agencia EFE
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/29/2022 04:50 PM
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Larkana (Pakistan), Aug 29 (EFE/EPA).- (Camera: Waqar Hussain) The population of Larkana in the Pakistani province of Sindh is affected by the heavy rains and floods that devastated the country.FOOTAGE OF THE FLOODS IN LARKANA, PAKISTAN.

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PAKISTAN FLOODS
Title:
HD
Summary: Pakistan estimates that damage caused by floods rises to 10,000 million dollars
Story No: efe050159
Source: Agencia EFE
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/29/2022 03:07 PM
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STORYLINE:

Karachi/Quetta/Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (Pakistan) Aug 29 (EFE/EPA).- (Camera: Rehan Khan/Bilawal Arbab/Fayyaz Ahmed).- Pakistani Finance Minister Miftah Islmail said on Monday that the economic losses caused by the severe floods ravaging the country could amount to $10 billion and urged the International Monetary Fund to release around $1.2 billion of an ongoing bailout package to help deal with the crisis.FOOTAGE OF THE FLOODS IN KARACHI, QUETTA AND KHYBER PAKHTUNKHWA, PAKISTAN.

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Keywords: PAKISTAN FLOODS
Subjects: General news , Property damage
Locations: Asia , South Asia , Pakistan
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PK Monsoon Floods KPK 2
Title:
HD
Summary: Pakistan: Monsoon Rains Bring Devastating Floods Across Country 2
Story No: spt018265
Source: Spectee
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/29/2022 01:00 PM
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RESTRICTIONS AND USAGE TERMS: Please credit “@WasimZia14 via Spectee”. Please Note this material is supplied by Spectee for the purpose of licensing to AP customers. This content is not produced or verified by the Associated Press. ******************************************************************* Video Location: Kalam, Swat Valley, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan Video Recording Date/Time: August 27, 2022 at 14:00h As monsoon rains have battered Pakistan, the death toll has reached 1,000 across the country. This video shows a road in Kalam destroyed by the severe flood.

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Pakistan Flood
Title:
HD
Summary: Pakistan floods wash away a lifetime's hard toil
Story No: 4394527
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/29/2022 10:20 AM
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Shikarpur - 29 August 2022

1. Various of flood affected resident Rehan Ali and family friends sorting through debris from collapsed house

2. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Rehan Ali, flood affected resident:

"I don't know how to rebuild my destroyed house, even I don't have anything to feed my family. I lost everything. I don't know where to go. God help me."

3. Rehan removing his belongings from house

4. Cutaway of children

5. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Rehan Ali, flood affected resident:

"On my own, I don't think I can rebuild a shack. I am worried about food. Because of flooding, I don't think I can find any job. I am extremely upset."

6. Various of Rehan's destroyed house, floodwater in background

7. Various of Rehan's wife washing clothes with their daughter standing next to her

8. Woman inside destroyed house

9. Various of flooded neighbourhood, children walking around

10. Various of displaced families making shelter

11. Various of buffalos in Indus River

STORYLINE:

Pakistani residents were counting the cost of damage on Monday as international aid was being delivered to the country which has suffered "monster monsoons" that have claimed more than 1,000 lives this summer.

24-year-old Rehan Ali, is a laborer in the country's southern Sindh province, whose house was destroyed by the heavy monsoon rain.

He said he cannot rebuild his home without government help, and right now he was unable to work to get food for his family.

So, Ali said, he was relying on donations.

The exceptionally heavy rain that triggered flash floods across the country have affected 33 million Pakistanis, damaged nearly 1 million homes and killed at least 1,061 people.

Pakistani authorities say this year's devastation is worse than in 2010, when floods killed 1,700 people.

Floods and rains have caused devastation in Pakistan at a time when the country is facing one of the worst economic crises.

Pakistan said it recently narrowly avoided a default, and later on Monday IMF's executive board was expected to approve the release of the much-awaited $1.7 billion for this Islamic nation.

On Sunday, cargo planes from Turkey and the United Arab Emirates began the international rush to assist the impoverished nation, landing in Islamabad carrying tents, food and other daily necessities.

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