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Ukraine Zelenskyy AP Interview
Title:
HD
Summary: AP Interview: Zelenskyy seeks peace despite atrocities
Story No: 4375048
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 04/09/2022 10:16 PM
People: Ursula Von Der Leyen , Boris Johnson , Vladimir Putin , Volodymyr Zelenskyy
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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kyiv - 9 April 2022

1. Various of Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy arriving and greeting Associated Press journalist

2. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Volodymyr Zelenskyy, Ukrainian President: ++CLOSE SHOT++

"People will accept peace in any case. People want this war to be over on our terms. Terms of independence. But nevertheless, I am sure there are people - every family lost something, children - and I'm not sure that they will be satisfied with any kind of peace under any conditions at any time. Because it's a huge wound and a huge tragedy to lose your loved ones."

3. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Volodymyr Zelenskyy, Ukrainian President: ++WIDE SHOT++

"But if we speak without emotions, however hard it is, we have to understand that every war should end in peace or it will end with millions of victims. And even then, if there are millions of victims, eventually peace will come, the war will end. So from this, we have to draw conclusions. Yes we have to fight, but fight for life. You can't fight for dust when there is nothing and no people. That's why it's important to stop this war. It's difficult, emotionally difficult. It's hard from the point of view of wanting. No one wants to negotiate with a person or people who tortured this nation. It's all understandable. And as a man, as a father, I understand this very well. We should not lose. This is not a wish. We don't want to lose opportunities, if we have them, for a diplomatic solution of this matter. We should not lose them. We cannot afford to decide for millions of people who want to stop the war. Decide for them and say, 'no we are not ready to speak with murderers'."  

4. Cutaway of camera viewfinder

5. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Volodymyr Zelenskyy, Ukrainian President: ++CLOSE SHOT++

"Mariupol is, you know, the heart of this war today. It's beating. We're fighting. We're strong. And if it stops beating we will be in a weaker position. They (defenders) are people who are distracting a big part of the enemy forces."

6. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Volodymyr Zelenskyy, Ukrainian President: ++WIDE SHOT++

"The stronger our position in Mariupol, the stronger our position in the east of the country will be, the stronger the opposition will be in the joint forces operation. And if they are stronger, the negotiation table will be closer. And we will have advantages in the dialogue with the Russian Federation. If our situation is weak in all these directions, then the talks will not happen because Russia will make all these steps which will lead to coming back to those cities which we liberated now. They may go for it. And our situation in talks will be weaker. And probably not even interesting for the Russian side. It can happen. Unfortunately, we see this. We believe in another outcome. We believe in our victory."

7. Cutaway of Zelenskyy speaking to AP journalist

8. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Volodymyr Zelenskyy, Ukrainian President: ++WIDE SHOT++

"If we were in NATO this war wouldn't have happened. Or it would unfold differently. We would have the shoulder of close neighbours, strong neighbours (to lean on) and we could all fight together. And probably war would not happen."

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Volodymyr Zelenskyy, Ukrainian President: ++STARTS ON WIDE WITH JOURNALIST ENDS ON CLOSE SHOT++

(Reporter question: The weapons you are seeking, requests are finally coming through. Is it enough to make a difference in this war? Or is it, do you feel that there is still much more to be done?)

"Not yet. Not yet... Because all they sent, all this equipment, all these weapons they sent already. I think, I think, it's for some of this kind of equipment it's too late. Because it's too late, because when we speak about for example about Mariupol where we lost thousands of people. For what now? Yes, but of course, it's not enough. Not yet, like I've said already. And I see from some countries, some leaders, I see all 100 percent support. I see it. It's real. And some of European leaders they changed the position. But you see the cost of these changes."

10. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Volodymyr Zelenskyy, Ukrainian President: ++WIDE SHOT++

"Why is it like this? Why couldn't they do it earlier? Why we have to (hear) every time: 'well, you understand, complicated politics, complicated situation, there needs to be agreements, it cannot be decided so quickly' - all this bla-bla-bla. It's everywhere. It's the same for all the countries and their bureaucracies."

11. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Volodymyr Zelenskyy, Ukrainian President: ++CLOSE SHOT++

"Very often we look for answers in someone else but I often look for answers in myself. Did we do enough to get them (weapons)? Did we do enough for these leaders to believe in us? Did we do enough? Are we the best for this place and this time? Who knows? I don't know. You question yourself. Because when you see there are victims, you look for answers in yourself. I think any normal person is looking for mistakes and corrects them not only in someone else. You need to look within yourself."

12. Zelenskyy sitting on stairs

STORYLINE:

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said Saturday that he is committed to pressing for peace despite Russian attacks on civilians that have stunned the world, and he renewed his plea for countries to send more weapons ahead of an expected surge in fighting in the country’s east.

He made the comments in an interview with The Associated Press a day after at least 52 people were killed in a strike on a train station in the eastern city of Kramatorsk, and as evidence of civilian killings came to light after Russian troops failed to seize the capital where he has hunkered down, Kyiv.

“No one wants to negotiate with a person or people who tortured this nation. It’s all understandable. And as a man, as a father, I understand this very well,” Zelenskyy said. But “we don’t want to lose opportunities, if we have them, for a diplomatic solution.”

Wearing the olive drab that has marked his transformation into a wartime leader, he looked visibly exhausted yet animated by a drive to persevere. He spoke to the AP inside the presidential office complex, where windows and hallways are protected by towers of sandbags and heavily armed soldiers.

“We have to fight, but fight for life. You can’t fight for dust when there is nothing and no people. That’s why it is important to stop this war,” he said.

Russian troops that withdrew from northern Ukraine are now regrouping for what is expected to be an intensified push to retake the eastern Donbas region, including the besieged port city of Mariupol that Ukrainian fighters are striving to defend.

Zelenskyy said he is confident Ukrainians would accept peace despite the horrors they have witnessed in the more than six-week-long war.

Those included gruesome images of bodies of civilians found in yards, parks and city squares and buried in mass graves in the Kyiv suburb of Bucha after Russian troops withdrew. Ukrainian and Western leaders have accused Moscow of war crimes.

Russia has falsely claimed that the scenes in Bucha were staged. It also put the blame on Ukraine for the attack on the train station as thousands of people rushed to flee ahead of an expected Russian offensive.

Despite hopes for peace, Zelenskyy acknowledged that he must be “realistic” about the prospects for a swift resolution given that negotiations have so far been limited to low-level talks that do not include Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Zelenskyy displayed a palpable sense of resignation and frustration when asked whether the supplies of weapons and other equipment his country has received from the United States and other Western nations was enough to turn the tide of the war.

“Not yet,” he said, switching to English for emphasis. “Of course it’s not enough.”

Still, he noted that there has been increased support from Europe and said deliveries of U.S. weapons have been accelerating.

Just this week, neighboring Slovakia, a European Union member, donated its Soviet-era S-300 air defense system to Ukraine in response to Zelenskyy's appeal to help “close the skies” to Russian warplanes and missiles.

Some of that support has come through visits by European leaders.

After meeting Zelenskyy in Kviv earlier Saturday, Austrian Chancellor Karl Nehammer said he expects more EU sanctions against Russia even as he defended his country’s opposition so far to cutting off deliveries of Russian natural gas.

The U.S., EU and United Kingdom responded to the images from Bucha with more sanctions, including targeting Putin's adult daughters.

While the EU went after the Russian energy sector for the first time by banning coal, it has so far failed to agree on cutting off the much more lucrative oil and natural gas funding Putin's war chest but that Europe relies on to generate electricity, fill fuel tanks and keep industry churning.

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson also made an unannounced visit to meet Zelenskyy, with his office saying they discussed Britain's “long-term support.”

In Kyiv, European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen presented Ukraine's leader Friday with a questionnaire marking the first step for applying for EU membership. The head of the bloc’s executive arm said the process for completing the questionnaire could take weeks - an unusually fast turnaround - though securing membership would take far longer.

Zelenskyy turned introspective when asked what impact the pace of arms deliveries had for his people and whether more lives could have been saved if the help had come sooner.

“Very often we look for answers in someone else, but I often look for answers in myself. Did we do enough to get them?” he said of the weapons. “Did we do enough for these leaders to believe in us? Did we do enough?”

He paused and shook his head.

“Are we the best for this place and this time? Who knows? I don’t know. You question yourself,” he said.

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Ukraine War Bucha Mass Grave
Title:
HD
Summary: Mass grave with nine bodies uncovered in Bucha
Story No: 4375131
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 04/10/2022 05:52 PM
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++CLIENTS PLEASE NOTE: MATERIAL CONTAINS IMAGES OF DEAD BODIES++

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bucha, Ukraine - 10 April 2022

1. AERIAL of church surrounded by residential buildings ++MUTE++

2. AERIAL of people in white hazmat suits working on mass grave ++MUTE++

3. People in hazmat suit placing body on crane lift

4. AERIAL showing crane lifting body ++MUTE++

5. Crane lifting body on a platform

6. Various of war crimes prosecutors standing near bodies

7. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Ruslan Kravchenko, war crimes prosecutor:

"At the moment, an inspection of the place of the event and the bodies of people who died during the Russian occupation is being carried out by the troops."

8. Various of people in hazmat suits loading bodies onto crane platform, bodies being lifted

9. People in hazmat suits working on mass grave site

10. AERIAL of works underway ++MUTE++

11. People in hazmat suits exhuming body

12. People in hazmat suits moving a body in a black bag

13. Various of bodies in black bags lined in row

STORYLINE:

Specially-designated Ukrainian war crimes prosecutors and forensic experts have on Sunday exhumed another nine bodies from the mass grave uncovered on local church grounds, taking the total to 30 people hurriedly buried by retreating Russian forces.

Walking through Bucha, a reporter encountered two dozen witnesses of the Russian occupation.

Almost everyone said they saw a body, sometimes several more.

Civilians were killed, mostly men, sometimes picked off at random.

Many, including the elderly, say they themselves were threatened.

The question that survivors, investigators and the world would like to answer is why.

Ukraine has seen the horrors of Mariupol, Kharkiv, Chernihiv and nearby Irpin.

But the images from this town an hour's drive from Kyiv -- of bodies burned, bodies with hands bound, bodies strewn near bicycles and flattened cars -- have seared themselves into global consciousness like no others.

The residents of Bucha, as they venture out of cold homes and basements, offer theories.

Some believe the Russians weren't ready for an extended fight or had especially undisciplined fighters among them.

Others believe the house-to-house targeting of younger men was a hunt for those who had fought the Russians in recent years in separatist-held eastern Ukraine and had been given shelter in the town.

Sometimes, they say, the Russians themselves explained why they killed.

In one backyard in Bucha there are three graves, dug by neighbours too scared to put them elsewhere.

One of the dead was killed on March 4, struck in the head with the butt of a rifle.

On March 15, a friend of the dead man was approached by Russians demanding his documents.

They're at home, he said.

On the way there, they passed the grave.

He pointed it out.

The next moment, witness Iryna Kolysnik says, the soldiers shot him.

"He was talking too much," one said, adding an expletive.

By the end, any shred of discipline broke down.

"They went from normal soldiers to much, much worse," said Roman Skytenko, 24, who saw four civilian bodies on the street near his house.

Grenades were tossed into basements, bodies thrown into wells.

An elderly man at a nursing home was found dead in his bed, apparently of neglect, while a younger person, perhaps a caregiver, lay outside, shot to death.

Women in their 70s were told not to stick their heads out of their houses or they'd be killed.

"If you leave home, I'll obey the order, and you know what the order is. I'll burn your house," Tetyana Petrovskaya recalls one soldier telling her.

Now that the Russians have left, bodies are being collected by searchers wary of booby traps and mines.

The body bags are placed in rows at a cemetery.

Some bags aren't fully closed.

A glimpse shows the bloodied face of a young person.

Another shows a pair of white sneakers.

Mayor Anatoliy Fedoruk said the count of dead civilians was 320 as of Wednesday.

Most died from gunshots, and some corpses with their hands tied were "dumped like firewood" into mass graves.

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Ukraine War Bucha Bodies
Title:
HD
Summary: Dozens of bodies seen by AP journalists in Bucha
Story No: 4374767
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 04/07/2022 08:13 PM
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++PLEASE NOTE EDIT CONTAINS FOOTAGE OF A GRAPHIC NATURE++

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bucha - 6 April 2022

1. Various aerials of houses destroyed by shelling

2. Entrance to destroyed church

3. Close-up of statue of saint damaged by shelling

4. Top of church lying on street

5. Pedestrian crossing sign damaged by shelling

6. Body of elderly woman killed at entrance of her house

7. Dog walks next to body of elderly woman killed inside house

8. Plates on table

9. Photos on table

10. Wide of destroyed street with body lying on pavement

11. Close-up of body

12. Wide of graves in yard

13. Close-up of cross

14. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Natalia Kovkrak, Bucha resident:

"He opened the door (to Russian soldiers). They were knocking down the doors. He opened it and was killed by the butt of the rifle."

15. Close-up of improvised cross

16. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Iryna Kolisnyk, Bucha resident:

"This is Loenya, his good friend. They lived near each other on the first floor. Leonya was killed in front of us."

17. Crosses

18. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Iryna Kolisnyk, Bucha resident:

"He was near the bomb shelter, smoking, sitting and waiting for Kolya to open the door for him. Two Russian soldiers come. Here near us. We could see everything clearly. He got up and said: 'Guys, I'm not the enemy, I just got out to go to the toilet. Because there is no light, no water at home. I went out to the toilet and went to see friends'."

19. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Iryna Kolisnyk, Bucha resident:

"He turns and says: 'This is my friend's grave. He was killed. Soldiers walked behind him. And immediately after he said it about the killing we heard the clic (clap) and Leonya is on the ground. Leonya is gone. One of the soldiers asked: 'Why did you do it?' And the reply was: 'He was talking too much'." ++EXPLICIT LANGUAGE++

20. Iryna Kolisnyk shows the place where her neighbour Leonid (Leonya) was killed by Russian soldiers. UPSOUND (Ukrainian) "No one walks here. Leonya was killed here."

21. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Iryna Kolisnyk, Bucha resident:

"It's a nightmare. I wish no one would live through this. When all of this is happening in front of you. Shelling, house is shaking (from explosions), people you know get shot in front of you. It cannot be expressed. When you live by schedule - they allow you to go out only when they want. Sometimes they just wouldn't let us out. And men did not go out at all. We didn't let them. Because we saw bodies of men on the streets. Men, men, men..."

22. Wide of backyard

23. Unexploded shell in playground near sandbox

24. Aerial of the mass grave next to the church

25. Various of the mass grave

26. Various of police officers inspecting bodies

27. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Vitaliy Chaika, Volunteer:

"These are all killed and tortured people. Shot at the close range, with their arms and legs tied. Some were blindfolded. There, in the end, are six people shot and burned all together."

28. Close-up of female body

STORYLINE:

Authorities in the Ukrainian town of Bucha were still gathering bodies of civilians killed by Russian forces.

Two dead elderly women were found by AP journalists in their house on Wednesday.

Neighbours said the cause of death could be either shelling or sniper fire.

Many civilians have been buried in back yards, with their neighbours witnessing Russian soldiers killing them.

There were three men buried in the backyard of Iryna Kolisnyk's and Natalia Kovkrak's house.

All of them they said were killed by Russian soldiers.

The first one they said was beaten to death.

The second one - his friend, Leonid - was shot in the head, and the third was shot seven times.

Meanwhile, police in Bucha had the gruesome task of inspecting dead bodies as outrage grows over alleged atrocities carried out by Russian forces in areas near Kyiv.

Volunteers brought the bodies to the local cemetery, where a team of Associated Press journalists counted at least 61 remains in body bags.

Police officers opened each bag and took notes that may help with the identification of the victims.

AP journalists saw 25 body bags being loaded onto a refrigerated truck and moved to a morgue where autopsies will be carried out.

The cemetery manager said they had collected around 300 bodies so far, but added that many remained in makeshift graves in gardens and yards.

One of the volunteers helping to collect the bodies said he had brought around 30 bodies in one day to the cemetery.

He told the AP that some of the victims he retrieved had been shot in the head, while others were still wearing a blindfold and had their hands tied.

Ukraine said the bodies of at least 410 civilians have been found in areas outside the capital, including Bucha, after last week's withdrawal of Russian troops.

The grisly images of what appeared to be civilian massacres carried out by Russian forces in Bucha have led to a global outcry.

They led Western nations to expel scores of Russian diplomats and introduce further sanctions.

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Subjects: Media , News media , Journalists , Russia Ukraine war , War casualties , General news , War and unrest
Organisations: Russia government, Russian armed forces
Locations: Ukraine , Europe , Eastern Europe , Russia
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Ukraine War Bucha Aftermath
Title:
HD
Summary: Aftermath of Russian occupation of Bucha
Story No: 4374681
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 04/07/2022 12:36 PM
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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bucha - 6 April 2022

1. Aerial of destruction on the way to Bucha

2. Cars drive on destroyed bridge

3. Close of destruction on the bridge

4. Destroyed truck on the road to Bucha

5. Road sign on the way to Bucha

6. Aerial of road to Bucha

7. Ukrainian soldiers walking through wreckage of Russian military vehicles in Bucha

8. Ukrainian soldier look inside destroyed Russian tank

9. Close of wreckage of Russian tank

10. Boot and hat of Russian soldiers

11. Various of Bucha residents walking through the destroyed city

12. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Vladyslava Liubanets, Bucha resident:

"We were in the basement for 35 days. There was shelling all the time. Sometimes there was no water, sometimes there was no food. There was no light all the time. There was no information, phones did not work. There were shots all the time. They (the children) were cold, I hugged them all the time. We slept like one body and warmed each other. I told them that everything would be fine, and Ukrainian soldiers would come. Yes, Nastya? We will definitely be freed. I explained to them how to fall, how to run, how to defend. Show me. Close your ears with your hands. That's right, Zhenya. They fired very hard."

13. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Vladyslava Liubanets, Bucha resident:

"We had one wall without windows (to hide from shelling). But anyway they (the children) saw how the windows were broken, the doors fell out, the chandeliers and the closet crashed. They saw it all"

14. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Vladyslava Liubanets, Bucha citizen:

"My strength, the help of people who were nearby. There were 25 people"

15. Vladyslava Liubanets meeting her sister

16. Sisters crying and hugging

17. Close of hands

18. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Vladyslava Liubanets, Bucha resident:

"Two sisters. I live there, they live here. How long have we not seen each other? 42 days. I did not see. She was sitting here in the shelter, and I was sitting in a completely different place in the shelter. There was no connection. This is the first time we met and today we heard each other for the first time."

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Irpin - 6 April 2022

19. Wide of destroyed Ukrainian tank and building damaged by shelling in Irpin

20. Closeup of destroyed Ukrainian tank

21. Wide of destroyed building and wreckage of car

22. Closeup of broken windows

23. Ukrainian soldiers walking near the building damaged by shelling

24. Ukrainian soldiers walking near the destroyed building in Irpin

25. Closeup of broken windows

26. Wide of destroyed buildings

27. Burned car

28. Irpin residents walking in destroyed city center

29. Close of Ukrainian, EU, and other flags pieced by shrapnel

STORYLINE:

Residents of Bucha have spoken of their trauma and anguish as they returned to their homes on Wednesday to survey catastrophic damage done to the city.

Vladyslava Liubanets wept as she recounted how she was confined to living in a basement for 35 days with her children.

"There was no information, phones did not work. There were shots all the time. They (the children) were cold, I hugged them all the time. We slept like one body and warmed each other. I told them that everything would be fine, and Ukrainian soldiers would come," she said.

Her sister lives in a nearby neighbourhood and, like Vladyslava, was forced to shelter in a basement.

The two were separated for 42 days and on Wednesday were reunited for the first time.

Ukrainian authorities are working to identify hundreds of bodies found in Bucha and other towns after Russian troops withdrew, they are documenting evidence of possible war crimes.

Some of the bodies found strewn across Bucha have been buried in a mass grave in the grounds of a church in the centre of town.

But many more were buried wherever relatives could because it was too dangerous to move the remains to the church.

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Subjects: General news , War and unrest , Russia Ukraine war
Organisations: Russia government, Russian armed forces
Locations: Ukraine , Europe , Eastern Europe , Russia
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Ukraine War Aftermath Aerials
Title:
HD
Summary: Drone video of damage in Trostyanets and Kharkiv
Story No: 4373203
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/29/2022 06:19 AM
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++MUTE++

++PLEASE NOTE - KHARKIV MATERIAL STARTS AT TIMECODE 01:04:19++

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Trostyanets - 28 March 2022

1. Various of destroyed Russian Army tanks and fences in Trostyanets

2. Various of destroyed Russian army trucks, tanks and buildings

3. Various of destroyed building and destroyed tank

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kharkiv - 27 March 2022

1. Various of aerial shots of destroyed buildings central Kharkiv

STORYLINE

The fighting in Ukraine looks increasingly like a stalemate on the ground, with the two sides trading control of a town in the east.

Ukrainian forces retook control of Trotsyanest, in the eastern region of Sumy, on Monday as another round of talks aimed at stopping the war is scheduled for Tuesday

Dozens of destroyed Russian army vehicles, including tanks and heavy artillery, were either abandoned behind by the retreating forces or destroyed.

Meanwhile, in the besieged northeastern city of Kharkiv, Russian attacks left buildings and streets destructed.

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Subjects: Russia Ukraine war , General news , War and unrest
Organisations: Russia government, Russian armed forces
Locations: Kharkiv , Russia , Europe , Eastern Europe , Ukraine
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Ukraine War Damaged Tanks
Title:
HD
Summary: Ukraine says it destroyed Russian tanks near Kyiv
Story No: 4373689
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/31/2022 08:12 PM
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++CLIENTS NOTE - EDIT CONTAINS GRAPHIC IMAGES++

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Near Kyiv, Ukraine - 31 March 2022

++INCLUDES GRAPHIC IMAGES++

1. Various aerials of what Ukraine says is destroyed convoy of Russian tanks ++MUTE++

2. Pan of Ukrainian soldier to destroyed tank with "V" sign painted on

3. Destroyed tanks

4. Ukrainian soldier showing helmet, purportedly of Russian tank driver, kicking helmet away

5. Destroyed tanks

6. Сlose of hand of man said to be killed Russian soldier ++GRAPHIC IMAGE++

7. Destroyed tanks

8. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Serhii (last name not given), Ukrainian soldier:

"These people came to 'help' us, but for some reason they are running away from us. They got what they deserved because of what they did to people here. You haven't seen yet how many buildings they burnt here."

9. Destroyed tanks

10. Various of smoke coming from destroyed tank

11. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Ruslan (last name not given), Ukrainian soldier:

"Everyone who thought that it's possible to recreate Soviet Union 2.0 according to Putin's ambitions, is getting destroyed. There is a new history of Ukraine behind us."

12. Various of damaged tanks

13. SOUNDBITE (English) Yevgen Naydenko, Ukrainian reservist:

"When the war started, we joined the Territorial Defense. They gave us guns. And we defend our territory. I can tell you about my uncle who is from Russia, and he supports this war, that these Russian pigs kill us. My uncle from Russia."

14. Damaged tanks

STORYLINE:

Ukrainian armed forces claim to have destroyed a convoy of Russian tanks near Kyiv.

Around eight Russian tanks with 'V' signs were seen burnt out, with smoke still coming out of some of them.

Ukrainian soldiers claimed Russian forces had destroyed many houses in the area and "got what they deserved".

One of the reservists from the Territorial Defence Unit said his relatives in Russia wish for him to be killed.

Early this week, the Russians said they would significantly scale back operations in areas around Kyiv and the northern city of Chernihiv to increase trust between the two sides and help negotiations along.

But in the Kyiv suburbs, regional governor Oleksandr Palviuk said on social media that Russian forces shelled Irpin and Makariv and that there were battles around Hostomel.

Pavliuk said there were Ukrainian counterattacks and some Russian withdrawals around the suburb of Brovary to the east.

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Poland Ukraine War Refugees Aerials
Title:
HD
Summary: Drone view of refugees arriving at Polish crossing
Story No: 4370632
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/13/2022 10:18 AM
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Poland Ukraine War Refugees Aerials

SHOWS

Drone view of refugees arriving at Polish crossing

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Ukraine War Brovary Fire
Title:
HD
Summary: Clouds of smoke rising from destroyed food depot
Story No: 4370702
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/13/2022 07:13 PM
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Smoke could be seen on Sunday still hanging over a food depot north of Kyiv, a day after it was hit by shelling.

Ukrainian Emergency Services said in the statement that there were no victims or injured.

Around the capital, a major political and strategic target for the invasion, fighting also intensified, with overnight shelling in the northwestern suburbs and a missile strike Sunday that destroyed a warehouse to the east.

Kyiv Region police said on its official website that Russian troops opened fire on a car carrying two American journalists.

The force said Brent Renaud died and Juan Arredondo was wounded.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Brovary, Kyiv region, Ukraine - 13 March 2022

1. Aerials of smoke over food depot ++MUTE++

2. Pan of burnt depot

3. Fire at debris

4. Various of firefighters preparing to extinguish fire

5. Firefighters distinguishing fire

6. Various of burnt packs of milk

7. Security guard running out of depot

8. Firefighters outside the depot

9. Aerials of smoke over food depot ++MUTE++

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UKRAINE WAR
Title:
HD
Summary: Ukrainian prosecutor office: 410 bodies recovered north of Kyiv
Story No: efe041147
Source: Agencia EFE
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 04/04/2022 05:04 AM
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ATTENTION EDITORS: GRAPHIC CONTENT. CONTAINS FOOTAGE SHOWING DEAD BODIES IN THE STREETS OF BUCHA, UKRAINE.Bucha/Dmitrivka, Apr 3 (EFE/EPA).- Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba said Sunday that "hundreds" of civilians' bodies had been found in Bucha and Kyiv's northern suburbs.Kuleba added that he has asked the International Criminal Court to send an investigative mission to document and prosecute the alleged atrocities committed.Local media reported the discovery of mass graves and streets strewn with civilian bodies in towns like Bucha, on the outskirts of Kyiv. (Camera: ATEF SAFADI).SHOT LIST: SITUATION IN BUCHA AND DMITRIVKA; DESTROYED RUSSIAN MILITARY MACHINERY IN THE CITY OF BUCHA; AND BURNED TANK IN THE VILLAGE OF DMITRIVKA NEAR KYIV, UKRAINE.

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Keywords: UKRAINE WAR
Subjects: Russia Ukraine war
Locations: Kyiv , Europe , Eastern Europe , Ukraine
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Satellite Images Show Long Trench at Ukrainian Mass Grave Site in Bucha
Title:
HD
Summary: Satellite Images Show Long Trench at Ukrainian Mass Grave Site in Bucha
Story No: stltd006374
Source: Storyful Ltd
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 04/04/2022 01:03 AM
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STORYLINE:

Satellite images show a 45-foot-long trench on the grounds of a Ukrainian church in the town of Bucha, Ukraine, where a mass grave was earlier found, according to Maxar Technologies. Maxar said imagery reveals the first signs of excavation on the grounds of the Church of St. Andrew and Pyervozvannoho All Saints were on March 10. While images from March 31 show the grave site with a long trench in the southwestern section of the area near the church. Footage verified by Storyful shows bags that sources described as filled with human remains being lowered into a mass grave site next to the church in Bucha. Ukraine’s Ministry of Defence released video on April 3 showing destruction in Bucha following the retreat of Russian forces from the area. Bucha was recently retaken by Ukraine after Russian forces pulled back from areas near Kyiv. Credit: Maxar Technologies via Storyful

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Ukraine War Bucha Destruction
Title:
HD
Summary: Destruction, burnt out Russian equipment in Bucha
Story No: 4374079
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 04/03/2022 05:46 PM
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Bucha - 3 April 2022

1. Close of damaged building, soldier passing by, damaged Russian tank in foreground

2. Ukrainian solders walking among destroyed Russian army column of vehicles

3. Various of destroyed Russian tanks

4. Close of ammunition on ground

5. Top shot of destroyed Russian army column on street

6. Wide of destroyed house

7. Destroyed fuel truck

8. Tank turret on side of street, destroyed house in background

STORYLINE:

Streets in the northern Ukrainian town of Bucha were littered with the burnt out wrecks of Russian military equipment on Sunday.

The town, on the outskirts of the capital, Kyiv, was controlled by Russian soldiers for about a month.

They had moved into Ukraine from three sides on February 24, and soldiers who entered from the north in Belarus spent weeks trying to clear a path to Kyiv.

Their advance stalled in the face of resolute defiance from Ukraine’s defenders, and Moscow said this week it would concentrate the invasion elsewhere going forward.

As Ukrainain soldiers retook control of the area, signs of fierce fighting were everywhere in the wake of Russian troops retreating north to back to Belarus.

In Bucha, destroyed armoured vehicles lay in streets and fields, along with scattered military gear.

The Ukrainian military said its troops continued to comb areas outside of the capital for mines and for any lingering Russian fighters.

They also found a number of bodies, some with bound hands and signs of torture, and wearing civilian clothes.

It was not clear who the victims were or why they were shot.

Residents have given harrowing accounts of how Russian troops shot and killed civilians without any apparent reason.

AP has no independent means of verifying the claims made by the residents.

The discovery of the bodies has sparked new calls for a war crimes investigation and sanctions against Russia.

Ukrainian authorities said they were documenting evidence of alleged atrocities to add to their case for prosecuting Russian officials for war crimes.

Russia’s Defense Ministry has rejected the claims of atrocities against civilians in Bucha and other suburbs of Kyiv as a “provocation”.

===========================================================

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Subjects: Russia Ukraine war , General news , War and unrest , War crimes
Organisations: Russia government, Russian armed forces
Locations: Kyiv , Belarus , Russia , Europe , Eastern Europe , Ukraine
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Ukraine War Bucha Graves
Title:
HD
Summary: Bodies buried in several mass graves in Bucha
Story No: 4374075
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 04/03/2022 05:17 PM
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++PLEASE NOTE THIS EDIT CONTAINS FOOTAGE OF A GRAPHIC AND DISTRESSING NATURE++

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bucha - 3 April 2022

1. Close of hand and arms protruding from ground

2. Bodybags and bodies buried and dumped in mass grave

3. Various of bodybags and covered bodies in mass grave

4. Wide of Church of St. Andrew and All Saints, mass grave in the foreground

5. Various of mass grave

6. Pallets of pavement bricks in churchyard, mass grave on the left, cross on top of another grave on the right

7. Close of sign nailed on cross reading "Lytvynenko Anastasiya Pavlovna - Died on March 20"

8. Wide of graves among pallets of pavement bricks  

9. Grave where three members of the same family are buried covered by pavement bricks   

10. Close up of cross bearing names of those buried, reading "Chikmar'ovy Margaryta, Matviy, Klym, (died on) 6 March 2022"

11. Various of damaged car hit by bullets, with an identified civilian dead inside, abandoned on main road into Bucha

12.  Various of dead man and bicycle on side of road

STORYLINE:

An unknown number of bodies found in the Ukrainian city of Bucha, on the outskirts of Kyiv, have been buried in mass graves.

The remains were committed to a grave in the yard of a church in the centre of the city, some in bodybags, others only in their plain clothes.

It was one of several graves dug in the churchyard, some carrying multiple names written on a single, improvised cross.

One cross read the names of three members of the same family, who all died on the same day.

Ukrainian troops have found several bodies, some with bound hands and signs of torture, after retaking areas around the capital following the withdrawal of Russian forces.

Associated Press journalists on Sunday saw the remains of at least nine people in civilian clothes who appeared to have been killed at close range.

At least two had their hands tied behind their backs.

It was not clear who the victims were or why they were shot.

Local officials have put the number of killed in Bucha at around 280, though the real number is not yet known.

The city was controlled by Russian soldiers for about a month and experienced heavy fighting.

Residents have given harrowing accounts of how Russian troops shot and killed civilians without any apparent reason.

The told AP Russian troops would go from building to building, and take people out of the basements where they were hiding from the fighting.

They said they would check their phones for evidence of anti-Russian activity and take them away - or shoot them.

AP has no independent means of verifying the claims made by the residents.

The discovery of the bodies has sparked new calls for a war crimes investigation and sanctions against Russia.

Ukrainian authorities said they were documenting evidence of alleged atrocities to add to their case for prosecuting Russian officials for war crimes.

Russia’s Defense Ministry has rejected the claims of atrocities against civilians in Bucha and other suburbs of Kyiv as a “provocation”.

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Subjects: War and unrest , War crimes , General news , Russia Ukraine war
Organisations: Russia government, Russian armed forces
Locations: Kyiv , Russia , Europe , Eastern Europe , Ukraine
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Ukraine War Bucha Bodies
Title:
HD
Summary: Bucha locals recount killing of civilians GRAPHIC
Story No: 4374069
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 04/03/2022 04:05 PM
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++PLEASE NOTE THIS EDIT CONTAINS FOOTAGE OF A GRAPHIC AND DISTRESSING NATURE++

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bucha - 3 April 2022

1. Wide of bodies in yard

2. Mid of dead man with hands tied behind his back

3. Close of dead man with tied hands and wound to the back of his head

4. Close of dead man

5. Mid of bodies, one with legs tied

6. Close of bodies of three men, one with wound to the chest

7. Mid of bodies of two men, one with hands tied behind his back

8. Close of hand tied behind back

9. Wide of dead man on ground

10. Mid or Russian crate with sign in Russian bearing acronym for 7th Paratrooper Unit

11. Close of sign in Russian military crate with acronym in Russian for 7th Paratrooper Unit

12. Close of face painted on door

13. Mid of dead man on stairs, covered in blanket

14. Close of legs

15. Tracking shot of residents walking to place where they placed bodies of killed civilians

16. Wide of locals uncovering shaft

17. Various of two bodies wrapped by locals and put into shaft for later burial

18. UPSOUND (Ukrainian) Bucha resident who declined to be identified:

"The last day when they came (the Russians) one man stayed in Stekovka (neighbourhood) close to a nine-storey building. He put his hands up and they shot him. The woman went into her house and they also shot her without any reason."

19. Various of bodies

20. Wide of residents standing

21. Wide of grave of man buried by residents in front yard

22. Wide of residents standing

23. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Hanna Herega, Bucha resident:

"He went to get some wood when all of a sudden they (Russians) started shooting. They hit him a bit above the heel, crushing the bone, and he fell down. The shooter shouted: 'Don't scream or I will shoot!' and they turned away. Then they shot off his left leg completely, with the boot. Then they shot him all over this side (the chest.) And another shot went slightly below the temple. It was a controlled shot to the head."

24. Various of body of man lying by road

STORYLINE:

Residents of the Ukrainian city of Bucha on Sunday accused Russian troops of shooting and killing civilians without any apparent reason before they withdrew from the Kyiv region.

Ukrainian troops found a number of bodies, some with bound hands and signs of torture, after retaking areas around the capital.

Associated Press journalists on Sunday saw the bodies of at least nine people in civilian clothes who appeared to have been killed at close range.

At least two had their hands tied behind their backs.

They were located in the yard of a logistics compound, which was used in the Soviet-era to store trucks.

The body of another man lay on the stairs inside the building.

Residents said the compound was used as a base by the Russian forces, and AP saw abandoned crates bearing the acronym for 7th Paratrooper Unit.

It was not clear who the victims were or why they were shot.

The AP also saw two bodies wrapped in plastic, bound with tape and thrown into a ditch in Bucha, a small city northwest of the capital.

Local officials have put the number of killed at around 280, though the real number is not yet known.

Residents said Russian troops would go building to building and take people out of the basements where they were hiding from the fighting.

They would check their phones for any evidence of anti-Russian activity and take them away, or shoot them, the residents said.

Another resident, Hanna Herega, said Russians shot her friend who had gone to gather wood.

She said neighbours buried the body in the front yard of the building because they could not give him a proper burial.

AP has no independent means of verifying the claims made by the residents.

Another two bodies, that of a man and a woman, were recovered by locals.

The remains were wrapped in plastic and bound with tape, and placed in a shaft until a proper funeral could be arranged.

The discovery of the bodies has sparked new calls for a war crimes investigation and sanctions against Russia.

Ukrainian authorities said they were documenting evidence of alleged atrocities to add to their case for prosecuting Russian officials for war crimes.

To convict, International Criminal Court prosecutors will need to show a pattern of indiscriminant deadly assaults on civilians during Russia's invasion.

===========================================================

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Subjects: Russia Ukraine war , General news , War and unrest , War crimes
Organisations: Russia government, Russian armed forces
Locations: Ukraine , Europe , Eastern Europe , Russia
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Bucha town center in ruins in Ukraine
Title:
HD
Summary: Bucha town center in ruins in Ukraine
Story No: dia000340
Source: dia images
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 04/03/2022 12:00 AM
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STORYLINE:

Many places were abandoned in Bucha, one of the cities that fell into ruins after the Russian attacks. Markets and houses were bombed and those who left the city took shelter in cities and European countries.

(Emre Kinaci/ dia images)

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Bucha town center in ruins in Ukraine
Title:
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Summary: Bucha town center in ruins in Ukraine
Story No: dia000339
Source: dia images
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 04/03/2022 12:00 AM
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STORYLINE:

Many places were abandoned in Bucha, one of the cities that fell into ruins after the Russian attacks. Markets and houses were bombed and those who left the city took shelter in cities and European countries.

(Emre Kinaci/ dia images)

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Ukraine War Aid
Title:
HD
Summary: Bucha residents get aid after Russian forces leave
Story No: 4373982
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 04/02/2022 09:21 PM
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Bucha, Ukraine - 2 April 2022

1. Various of people gathered near aid truck packed with food

2. Elderly woman carrying food

3. People gathered around ambulance, aid worker handing out medicines

4. Various of aid worker handing out medicines

5. Track of military walking single file on side of road

6. Wide of Irpin Mayor Oleksandr Mercushyn getting into moving car

7. Mercushyn in car

8. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Oleksandr Mercushyn, Irpin Mayor:

"The Russian occupiers were thrown out of here and they are running towards Belarus. Of course, they leave many corpses, many destroyed houses, many booby trapped places after themselves."

9. Various of people receiving aid

10. Close up of dog being held

11. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Anatoliy Ivanovych, Bucha resident:

"Everyone had some kind of cereal, water was brought from a reservoir. Then they sent us some bread as well. We didn't see it, only yesterday they gave us bread. And so only porridge, porridge, porridge - and that was all."

12. Elderly couple putting away food package near bonfire

13. Elderly woman eating

14. Various tracking shots of damaged buildings and debris

15. Wide of damaged residential block

STORYLINE:

Residents of the Ukrainian city Bucha received deliveries of aid Saturday as they recoiled from the conflict which had engulfed he region.

Many locals gathered to collect food and medicines being distributed in the street.

"The Russian occupiers were thrown out of here and they are running towards Belarus," said Irpin Mayor Oleksandr Mercushyn as he surveyed the damaged created by the fighting.

His claims could not be independently verified.

Associated Press journalists saw Ukrainian soldiers, backed by a column of armored vehicles, using cables to drag bodies off of a street from a distance, fearing they might have been rigged with explosives.

Locals said the dead - the AP counted at least six - were civilians who were killed by departing Russian soldiers without provocation.

Ukrainian troops moved cautiously to retake territory north of the country's capital on Saturday.

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Ukraine War Victims
Title:
HD
Summary: GRAPHIC: Bodies dot streets on outskirts of Kyiv
Story No: 4373964
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 04/02/2022 06:14 PM
People: Volodymyr Zelenskyy
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RESTRICTION SUMMARY:

++THIS EDIT CONTAINS GRAPHIC AND DISTURBING IMAGES++

++CONTAINS SHOTS OF BODIES OF VICTIMS++

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bucha - 2 April 2022

1. Tracking shot showing bodies lying in street

2. Close of body

3. Close of body

4. Ukrainian soldiers next to body

5. Wide of body in street by abandoned cars

6. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) no name given, Bucha resident:

"Those people were just walking and they shot them without any reason. Bang. In the next neighbourhood, Stekolka, it was even worse. They would shoot without asking any questions."

7. Close of hand

8. Wide of body in yard

9. Soldiers pulling body with cable, wary of the body being booby-trapped

10. Wide of soldiers next to body

11. Various of soldiers pulling body with cable, wary of the body being booby-trapped

12. Wide of tank pushing car, body lying on the ground

13. Close of hand

14. Man next to crushed car

15. Wide of tank passing by crushed car

16. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Yuri (no last name given), Bucha resident:

"He was a resident, he worked in landscaping. A peaceful honest person. A smart man who loved to work. And they simply, shamelessly, and in full knowledge, crushed him to death with a Russian APC (armoured personnel carrier)."

17. Wide of man walking bike through debris and burnt out cars

18. Tracking shot of destroyed buildings

STORYLINE:

Ukrainian troops moved further north from the capital Kyiv on Saturday, taking up positions in the town of Bucha after retaking territory from Russian forces.

Associated Press journalists counted six bodies of civilians scattered along a street and in the front yard of a house.

The Ukrainian soldiers, backed by a column of tanks and armoured vehicles, attached cables to the bodies and pulled them off the street, fearing they may be booby-trapped with explosive devices.

Residents of the town said the civilians were killed by Russian soldiers.

"Those people were just walking and they shot them without any reason. Bang," said a Bucha resident who declined to give his name.

As Russian forces pull back from Ukraine's capital region, retreating troops are creating a "catastrophic" situation for civilians by leaving mines around homes, abandoned equipment and "even the bodies of those killed," President Volodymyr Zelenskyy warned Saturday.

Ukraine and its Western allies reported mounting evidence of Russia withdrawing its forces from around Kyiv and building its troop strength in eastern Ukraine.

Ukrainian fighters reclaimed several areas near the capital after forcing the Russians out or moving in after them, officials said.

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Ukraine War Irpin Damage
Title:
HD
Summary: Irpin scarred by combat after Russian troops withdraw
Story No: 4373860
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 04/01/2022 05:39 PM
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Irpin - 1 April 2022

1. Wreckage of destroyed Russian tank on the side of the street

2. Ukrainian police officer standing by the destroyed tank

3. Various of damaged and burnt house

4. Burnt car

5. Destroyed Russian tank

6. Car damaged by bullets and fighting on the side of the street, Russian tank behind

7. Police officer standing by destroyed Russian tank seen through broken car's windows

8. Destroyed Russian truck

9. Police officers and car moving down the road littered by debris

10. Close of heavy machine gun cartridges on the ground

11. Graves of a mother and her son

12. Close of wooden crosses reading (left) "Met Ivan - born 4 December 2009 - died 5 March 2022" and (right) "Met Maryna - born 14 February 1980 -  died 5 March 2022"

13. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Lila (full name not given), 39-year-old Irpin resident:

"On the 24th (of February) we heard a lot of fighting in Bucha and on the 5th (March) our home was hit and this family was killed in front of that building, we don't know what they were doing, if they were running or what, all of them were buried here after they burnt. The mother and her son, and another man. Who he is, we don't know."

14. Wooden crosses, damaged building in background

15. Graves

16. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Lila (full name not given), 39-year-old Irpin resident:

"They were hit by artillery and they were burnt alive, it was in the morning, tanks were moving and they were running."

17. Various of rescuers carrying evacuees on stretchers, crossing Irpin river at destroyed bridge

STORYLINE:

On the outskirts of Kyiv, the withdrawal of Russian troops has left behind scarred streets littered with destroyed vehicles and debris.

Video from The Associated Press captured the once-quiet suburban area of Irpin, popular with young families, now in ruins after weeks of heavy fighting and shelling.

Emergency workers carried elderly people on stretchers over a destroyed bridge to safety.

Three wooden crosses next to a residential building that was damaged by shelling marked the graves of a mother, a son and an unknown man.

A woman, who gave her name only as Lila, said she helped hurriedly bury them on March 5, just before Russian troops moved in.

“They were hit with artillery and they were burned alive,” she said.

Russian troops continued to be seen withdrawing from areas around Kyiv, three days after Moscow said it would reduce military activity near the Ukrainian capital.

Ukrainian forces exploited the pullback by mounting counterattacks and retaking towns and villages.

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Subjects: Troop withdrawals , General news , War and unrest , Russia Ukraine war
Organisations: Russia government, Russian armed forces
Locations: Europe , Eastern Europe , Ukraine
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Ukraine War Hats
Title:
HD
Summary: Ukraine hat designers return to work in Lviv
Story No: 4372862
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/26/2022 03:59 PM
People: Miley Cyrus
Subscription:

Just days ago, Artem Gorelov was trying to survive in one of the most brutal parts of Ukraine, the Russian-occupied Kyiv suburb of Bucha.

Now he stands in a quiet room in the late afternoon sunlight, hand-making hats for a local fashion brand worn by Madonna and Ukraine's first lady.

Gorelov has joined Ukrainians' massive migration west to the city of Lviv, near Poland.

And, unusually, the 100-employee company he works for arrived with him. Searching for safety but determined not to leave Ukraine, the brand Ruslan Baginskiy is among the businesses that are uprooting amid war.

Two months ago, first lady Olena Zelenska was in the hat-maker's showroom in Kyiv.

Now the company operates in two borrowed classrooms of a school, its workers delicately piecing together materials near students' decades-old sewing machines.

It is a slower process, but clients like Nieman Marcus and Bloomingdale's have expressed support, said co-owner Victoria Semerei, 29.

She was among the Ukrainians who didn't believe Russia would invade. She recalled being in Italy the day before the invasion and telling partners that war wasn't possible. Two hours after her plane landed back in Kyiv, the bombardment began.

Daily bombings led the company's three co-founders to make the decision to flee. While some employees scattered to other parts of Ukraine or to other countries, about a third moved the company's essentials to Lviv two weeks ago.

"Normal life will resume one day," Semerei said. "We need to be prepared."

"We need to save the company, we need to save salaries for people, we need to support them and we need to support the business because that's what our government asked us to do. They asked us to resume work, to do everything to support Ukraine economics," Semerei said.

The company threw itself into the national wartime effort that has seized Ukraine, donating money to the army and turning its Instagram feed from brand promotion to updates on the war.

As part of that spirit, Semerei rejected the idea of moving the company to a safer location outside Ukraine.

"It's not easy to resume working full. Now it's just impossible because even Lviv which is more safe place now, it's not 100% safe," she said.

Past brand campaigns for the company have identified closely with Ukraine, photographed in placed like Kherson, now under Russian occupation. Cities that the hat-maker's employees once called home have been torn apart.

In another corner of the makeshift workspace, Svetlana Podgainova worried about her family back in the separatist-held territory of Luhansk in eastern Ukraine, where pro-Moscow separatists have been fighting for control for nearly eight years.

It was already difficult to visit with family even before the invasion. Now her brother can't leave the region.

She feels horrible seeing her colleagues from other parts of Ukraine pulled into the war and wishes that normal life would return for them all.

Until then, "I wanted to come back to work so much," she said. It occupies her mind and makes her feel less alone in a new city, and she calls her colleagues a "big family."

The hat-maker's employees are among the estimated 200,000 displaced people now living in Lviv, with the co-founders now sharing an apartment with several other people.

Considering the challenges, this year probably will be the worst in the company's six-year history, Semerei said. But "this is something we'll go through and hopefully be even stronger."

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Lviv - 25 March 2022

1. Women at sewing machines in temporary workshop in school

2. Close of hand stitching

3. Designer for brand Ruslan Baginskiy, Artem Gorelov, making hat in corner of workshop

4. Close of hat in hand

5. Co-owner Victoria Semerei walking into workshop

6. Hats piled up on table

7. UPSOUND (English) Victoria Semerei, co-owner of Ruslan Baginskiy as she shows hat "…and for example you'll see this hand, and this thing (pointing at branding) is handmade."

8. Close of RB branding on hat

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Victoria Semerei, co-owner of Ruslan Baginskiy:

"So on February 25th we had to be in Paris to set up our showroom, and start the Fall/Winter sales campaign, but on February 24th the war entered our country, our business, our lives and lives of our employees, so we had to stop everything there. More than 100 people were employed in Ruslan Baginskiy brand, we had our own production in Kyiv, which is empty now.(she sighs) It's not easy to say. And all people from our team moved just everywhere."

10. Two women in workshop removing lint from hats

11. Close of hand ironing hat

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Victoria Semerei, co-owner of Ruslan Baginskiy:

"In week or two, we decided that we need to resume work, because we all believe in our victory and we know that we'll come back to the normal life one day and we need to be prepared, we need to save the company, we need to save salaries for people, we need to support them and we need to support the business because that's what our government asked us to do. They asked us to resume work, and to do everything to support Ukraine economics."

13. People sitting in bomb shelter after sirens went off in Lviv

14. Mid shot of people sitting in bomb shelter

15. SOUNDBITE (English) Victoria Semerei, co-owner of Ruslan Baginskiy:

"It's not easy to resume working full. Now it's just impossible because even Lviv which is more safe place now, it's not 100%  safe and we can't just say people 'you need to be here', but we are ready to, you know, to help them to find a place to live, we're ready to pay them salaries here and we are ready to keep working."

16. RB employee, Svetlana Podgainova working at sewing machine

17. Close of hat in hands

18. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Svetlana Podgainova, RB employee whose family is in separatist-held territory of Luhansk:

"I wanted to come back to work very much, as soon as possible. These 10 days (of not working at the start of the war) were horrible. Of course I'm very glad to be back to work."

19. Wide of workshop

20. Mid of designers

21. Cotton on spools

22. Label for brand reading: "Made in Ukraine"

23. Co-owner and public relations director Petro Yasinskiy, showing image of Ukraine's first lady Olena Zelenska meeting the pope. Zelenska was apparently wearing one of RB's headbands

24. Close of image of first lady with pope on phone screen

25. Various of workshop

26. Close hat worn by Miley Cyrus

27. Worker at sewing machine

28. Worker at table in workshop with Lviv skyline behind

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Ukraine War Surrogacy Babies
Title:
HD
Summary: Babies born to surrogates await parents in Kyiv
Story No: 4371744
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/19/2022 09:50 PM
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More than 20 newborns wait for surrogate parents to collect them in Ukraine capital Kyiv while under the care of nurses in a makeshift nursery.

Some born just a few days ago, their parents are either unable to travel or not willing to risk a journey in the war-torn country.

The babies, who rely on nurses who care for them as their own, are sheltered in a basement in a location which must remain undisclosed for safety concerns, one carer told the Associated Press on Saturday.

Some parents are European, others from Latin America or from China. Few have so far come to claim their child since the war started.

As the occasional sound of shelling reaches the basement, one nurse said they have become hostages of circumstance.

Some nurses came to work never to leave since the war began.

The infants need constant care and since many nurses cannot return to homes that have now become a fighting ground, they sleep and work there.

They come from towns around Kyiv such as Bucha or Irpin where Ukrainians have been resisting the Russian attempt to encircle the city for days.

They are mothers themselves, as much as they also would like to be close to their own family and children, they are too scared to commute and risk not being able to come to work anymore.

In some cases, their children are not even home anymore as they are now on the frontlines.

The 30-year-old and 22-year-old sons of nurse Lyudmila Yashchenko are now fighting to protect their country.

Exhausted by the many days of uninterrupted work, she said she is only able to get a few hours of sleep, and even less fresh air as she doesn't dare venture outside for too long.

The occasional sound of artillery could be heard coming from not too far away by an AP reporter visiting the nursery on Saturday.

Yashchenko would not reveal figures on how many parents have so far come to collect their child, or how many babies are waiting, or how many more mothers are expected to deliver soon.

She and her colleagues said a paediatrician comes to check on the health of the babies, that there is enough food and everything the babies need and everything is done to provide a quiet and peaceful environment to protect these fragile new lives.

All they can do is hope this won't last for too long.

They hope and wait for parents to come, just as they wait for other pregnant surrogate mothers to deliver, and for the war to end soon.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kyiv - 19 March 2022

1. Newborn baby's hand holding nurse's hand during feeding

2. Nurse feeding baby in stroller

3. Nurse holding baby

4. Tilt down from note with number to baby's face in the cradle

5. Various of babies in cradles

6. Nurse Lyudmila Yashchenko, preparing formula milk

7. Feeding bottles, nurse in background feeding baby

8. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Lyudmila Yashchenko, 51, Nurse:

"We are here to take care of the newborn babies because their parents can't come from abroad to take their children. We will stay here until the time when the parents can come and take them."

9. Various of babies in cradles

10. Various of nurse changing three day old baby

11. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Lyudmila Yashchenko, 51, Nurse:

"We have very well equipped rooms to provide comfort for children (in surrogacy centre), there is everything for them to be safe and for them to be taken care of, but now we are staying here (in this basement) to preserve ours and the babies' lives, we are hiding here from the bombing and this horrible misery."  

12. Various of babies, nurses

13. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Lyudmila Yashchenko, 51, Nurse:

"We have been staying here for almost a month. We stay here in this place 24 hours a day. We go out to get some fresh air only for a couple of minutes and we are always here because children require our attention and care constantly. We sleep you can see in what condition, we are almost not sleeping at all, we are working round the clock."

14. Pacifier put in baby's mouth

15. Nurse watching babies in cradles

16. Baby's hand playing with toys

17. Nurses rocking babies to sleep

18. Close of baby in rocking cradle

19. Tilt up from baby in cradle to nurses attending to babies in the room

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Brave dog has cleared more than 90 explosive devices from Ukrainian soil during Russian invasion
Title:
HD
Summary: Brave dog has cleared more than 90 explosive devices from Ukrainian soil during Russian invasion
Story No: vrp009744
Source: ViralPress
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/23/2022 12:00 AM
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STORYLINE:

Meet Patron, the brave pooch who has cleared more than 90 explosive devices since Russia invaded Ukraine, saving countless lives and avoiding further bloodshed.

The State Emergency Service of Ukraine released footage showing the adorable pooch hopping onto his human colleague's lap in the passenger seat of their work car and ends with the diminutive dog in action in the field on March 19.

The country's civil defence and rescue agency said: 'News from Patron. Our militant dog - the mascot of Chernihiv pyrotechnicians continues to serve.

'Since the beginning of the war, he and SES sappers have cleared almost 90 explosive devices.

'Thank you, friend, for your tireless work.'

Russia has been accused of using illegal and fearsomely destructive weapons against not only soldiers but also civilians in Ukraine since it launched its invasion on February 24.

Many governments have condemned Russia's use of thermobaric weapons and cluster bombs, which will feature in the investigation into possible war crimes in Ukraine by the International Criminal Court.

The United Nations has confirmed 902 civilian deaths during the invasion so far. However, the real figure is believed to be in the thousands.

Russia has occupied territory in the north, east and south of Ukraine, but has so far failed to take its largest cities, such as Kyiv and Kharkiv, in part due to the strength and determination of the Ukrainian resistance, which the Kremlin is believed to have underestimated.

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Locations: Ukraine , Europe , Eastern Europe , Russia
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errifying moment Russia strikes shopping centre in Kyiv killing at least eight people
Title:
HD
Summary: errifying moment Russia strikes shopping centre in Kyiv killing at least eight people
Story No: vrp009742
Source: viralpress
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/23/2022 12:00 AM
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STORYLINE:

Footage shows the moment Russia hits a shopping centre in Kyiv with a ballistic missile, killing at least eight people.

The footage was released by the Russian Ministry of Defence which claimed that Ukrainian forces were using the building to reload their own missiles.

The Retroville shopping centre blast took place on the night of March 21 showing the moment a missile hit the building, causing a huge blaze.

In the attack, at least eight people were reported to have died and the shopping centre was destroyed.

After the incident, the Mayor of Kyiv, Vitali Klitschko, declared the start of another 35-hour-long curfew, which is supposed to end at 7 am on Wednesday, March 23.

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Mariupol, Ukraine In Ruins after Shelling intensifies
Title:
HD
Summary: Mariupol, Ukraine In Ruins after Shelling intensifies
Story No: sth004584
Source: StringersHub
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/23/2022 12:00 AM
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STORYLINE:

This footage was filmed and produced 23 March 2022. As the Russia-Ukraine war enters its fourth week, the majority of the population of Mariupol remains trapped in the besieged city, under near-constant bombardment, cut off from electricity, heating and phone coverage, and with food, water and medications fast running out. Earth-shattering shelling and aerial bombardments have directly damaged countless apartment buildings and blown out the windows in many more. Translation of the interviews with the residents of the city: [0:48-1:41] – Tell me, please, about these destructions here, do you know who fired it? – Azov from Krasnopolsk. – How long ago did this shelling happen? – From the very beginning. – What was the goal? Has the DPR military been here already? – No, there was no one. The DPR entered Novoselok on the 16th. And so it's purely the shooting of the city. They were kidding. They shot in 4 directions, in a circle. 5 shells to the airport, 5 shells to the old Crimea, 2 shells to the city, and so on in a circle. What's it? This is lawlessness, I think. [1:54-2:55] – Hello, and tell me, please, where are we now? – On Kuprin, 17th microdistrict. – Tell me, what is the situation now? – Here, look what's being done. Here, please, I show you, there is a "Zhiguli" house. Ah, everything is broken at all, there, the 5th floor is broken further. So that's the way things are. Let them think for themselves. We are mortal people, but I hesitated to sit in the cellar. – And when did the shelling happen here? – It's been going on for about a week. It was on the 13th. Why should we suffer? I'm retired. – Did you have the opportunity to leave the city? Have you heard about the humanitarian corridor? – I can't leave my parents. How will I leave my parents? And that's it, that's what I'm saying, goodbye, that's it.

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Ukraine War Odesa
Title:
HD
Summary: Musicians play by barricades in Odesa as people flee
Story No: 4372192
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/22/2022 10:49 PM
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Street musicians played under cloudless skies in the Ukrainian seaside city of Odesa on Tuesday, as barricades lined the streets and couples parted ways at the station in tears, fearful of what the coming weeks may bring.

The southern city, fondly known as the Pearl of the Black Sea, was awash with a bittersweet air — sandbags and security forces clashing with romantic jazz rippling from the train station speakers.

"I can't understand what has happened," said Igor Topsi, a 56-year-old musician who's been playing the drums on the streets of Odesa for over three decades.

At the central station, a young man on the platform said goodbye by phone to his girlfriend, who was sitting inside the train. Only a pane of glass separated the couple.

Ludmila, a middle-aged woman who'd seen her grandchildren off at the station, said it felt "simply terrible."

"I have taken a part of my heart from my chest, sending them away," she lamented.

More than 3.5 million people have fled Ukraine since the war began Feb. 24, and millions more have been displaced within the country, according to the United Nations.

On Tuesday, a senior U.S. defense official the U.S. hadn't seen indications that ships in the northern Black Sea were firing on Odesa, as they did over the weekend.

The official said the U.S. believes Russia has about 21 ships in the Black Sea and about seven in the Azov Sea.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Odesa - 22 March 2022

1. Tilt down from Ukrainian flag to Maksim (no surname given), a musician playing the flute

2. Mid of Maksim playing flute

3. Various of woman with dog passing by a barricade in downtown Odesa

4. Various of Igor Topsi playing music beside a barricade, near a wall with Ukrainian flag painted on it

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Igor Topsi, musician:

"I can't understand for myself, first for myself, I can't understand what has happened. What just now - really - having (doubts) about our country and so about our city, because it was not possible (to think something like this might happen). Maybe 20 years ago it wasn't possible, but for this time is really…you can't understand, you don't understand (why it is happening)."

6. Wide of luggage at train station

7. People boarding train to evacuate city

8. Close of sign in train window reading (Ukrainian) "Odesa - Uzhhorod - Khust"

9. Close of hands of a couple on the window of train, man outside and woman inside, saying goodbye to each other

10. Mid of couple speaking on the phone and looking at each other through glass

11. Various of couple looking at each other and and saying goodbye, UPSOUND Leonid Utesov's iconic "At the Black Sea" playing on train station speakers

12. Couple saying goodbye to each other as train leaves

13. Mid of train leaving

14. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Ludmila (no surname given), local resident whose family left on the train:

"You know, well, it is simply terrible for me. I, you see, have taken a part of my heart from my chest, sending them (family) away. I don't know how it will be, what it will be."

15. Wide of Ludmila leaving the train station

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UKRAINE WAR
Title:
HD
Summary: Volunteers in Kharkiv prepare food for Ukrainian soldiers
Story No: efe040329
Source: Agencia EFE
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/22/2022 08:06 PM
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STORYLINE:

Kharkiv (Ukraine), March 22 (EFE/EPA).- (Camera: Vasiliy Zhlobsky) Nearly 1000 buildings have been destroyed by Russian bombing in the city of Kharkiv, in northeastern Ukraine, according to the press service of the Kharkiv City Council.FOOTAGE OF UKRAINIAN VOLUNTEERS PREPARING FOOD FOR THE UKRAINIAN MILITARY IN THE CITY OF KHARKIV.

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UKRAINE WAR
Title:
HD
Summary: Young Ukrainian women train self-defense techniques in Lviv
Story No: efe040324
Source: Agencia EFE
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/22/2022 06:25 PM
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STORYLINE:

Lviv (Ukraine), March 22 (EFE/EPA).- (Camera: Mykola Tys) Young Ukrainian women train self-defence techniques in the western city of Lviv during the 27 day of the Russian invasion.FOOTAGE OF YOUNG UKRAINIAN WOMEN IN A SELF-DEFENCE TRAINING IN THE CITY OF LVIV.

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Keywords: UKRAINE WAR
Subjects: Russia Ukraine war
Locations: Europe , Eastern Europe , Ukraine
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Poland Ukraine War UNHCR
Title:
HD
Summary: UNHCR: almost 3.6 million have fled Ukraine
Story No: 4372129
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/22/2022 03:57 PM
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The U.N. refugee agency said on Tuesday that almost  3.6 million people have fled Ukraine since Russia’s invasion, passing another milestone in an exodus that has led to Europe’s worst refugee crisis since World War II.

Andreas Kirchhof, a communication officer for UNHCR, said more than 2.1 million people have fled to Poland alone, creating "enormous strain on the country."

The number of people arriving daily is equivalent to the population of a mid-sized town, he said.

He added that internal displacement has been rising sharply and that the UNHCR is shipping urgently needed relief items, mattresses and blankets to Ukraine.

But the needs are far bigger than "what humanitarian assistance can cover," Kirchhof said.

Russia's invasion has driven more than 10 million people from their homes, almost a quarter of Ukraine's pre-war population, according to the United Nations.

The U.N. has confirmed 953 civilian deaths while saying the real toll is probably much higher.

Jorge Galindo, the  International Organization for Migration's Poland spokesperson, said the people fleeing Ukraine include third-country nationals.

Galindo said 187-thousand third-country nationals have left Ukraine since the war began including over 90-thousand who have been documented in Poland.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Medyka - 22 March 2022

1. Refugees arriving from Ukraine to Medyka border

2. Luggage being pulled

3. Refugees at Medyka border

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Andreas Kirchhof, UNHCR communication officer:

"Almost 3.6 million refugees have fled to neighbouring countries from Ukraine so far, and more than half of them, 2.1 million, have fled to Poland. And that means there's an enormous strain on the country. The arrivals each day is the equivalent of the inhabitants of a of a mid-sized town. We had figures almost up to 100-thousand. Now it has decreased a bit, but we don't really know what will happen. The arrivals may go up again and there are big humanitarian needs in the country."

5. Refugees arriving at Medyka border

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Andreas Kirchhof, UNHCR communication officer:

"What we hear from our colleagues in Ukraine is that the internal displacement has been rising steeply in over the days. And for instance, in western Ukraine, where most of my colleagues have access to displaced populations, there are hundreds of thousands in the cities, primarily. So UNHCR is shipping urgently needed relief items, mattresses, warm blankets, tarpaulins to fix buildings, to Ukraine - but the needs are far higher. The needs are far above what humanitarian assistance can cover so far and a lot of support is given by the cities and by local communities."

7. Various of refugees at Medyka border

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Jorge Galindo, IOM (International Organization for Migration) Poland spokesperson:

"We have already documented just in Poland over 90-thousand third-country nationals coming to the country, mostly moving onwards to other cities. In Poland, the majority don't stay in these facilities at these reception points. And again, it's important to highlight the situation of these people, not just the Ukrainians fleeing - which very much need all our help and support - but also that people from over 130 nationalities that have had to leave their homes in Ukraine due to the war."

9. Refugees at Medyka border

10. Ukrainian flag

11. SOUNDBITE (English) Jorge Galindo, IOM Poland spokesperson:

"So far, not only in Poland, but in other neighbouring countries, there has been over a 187-thousand third-country nationals that have had to flee Ukraine due to the war. So the situation is not going to improve any time soon, unfortunately. And even when the war ends, people that have had to leave their homes will need all our help and support because the situation back home won't change overnight."

12. Refugees at the border

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Turkey Russia Yacht
Title:
HD
Summary: Ukrainians try to stop Abramovich yacht in Bodrum
Story No: 4372125
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS (UGC)
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/22/2022 03:40 PM
People: Roman Abramovich
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A yacht belonging to Chelsea soccer club owner and sanctioned oligarch Roman Abramovich has docked in the Aegean coastal resort of Bodrum, Turkish media reports said Monday, amid international moves to freeze assets belonging to top Russian businessmen with close links to the Kremlin.

Turkey's private NTV television said the Bermuda-flagged luxury yacht "Solaris" docked at the port in Turkey _ which has not joined sanctions on Russia _ after departing Montenegro.

A group of Ukrainians, carrying Ukrainian flags with the words "No War" emblazoned on them, boarded a small motor boat and tried to prevent the yacht from docking, the Sozcu newspaper reported.

It was not known if Abramovich was aboard or if the yacht has been moved to Turkey to avoid sanctions.

Last week, the European Union imposed sanctions on Abramovich as it updated a list of individuals facing asset freezes and travel bans over their role in the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

Abramovich had already been punished in Britain.

NATO-member Turkey has close ties to both Russia and Ukraine.

It has criticized Moscow's invasion of Ukraine but has also positioned itself as a neutral party trying to mediate between the two.

It has closed the Turkish Straits connecting the Black Sea to the Mediterranean to most Russian warships but has not imposed sanctions on Russia or shut down its airspace to Russian flights.

Last week, Abramovich arrived in Istanbul from Jerusalem aboard his private jet before departing for Moscow the next morning.

ASSOCIATED PRESS (UGC) - MUST COURTESY PAVLO DONTSOV

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Bodrum, Mugla province -21 March 2022         

1. Demonstrators on small boat, holding Ukrainian flag with 'No War' written on it UPSOUND (Ukrainian) ''Glory to Ukraine. Glory to heroes. Glory to the nation. Death to enemies'; Russian oligarch Roman Abramovich's yacht, Solaris, in the background

2. Demonstrators on a small boat UPSOUND (English) 'No war in Ukraine' ; pan to dock

3. Close of Ukrainian flag with 'No War' written on it, pan left to yacht UPSOUND (English) 'Go away Russian ship, go away'

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Poland Ukraine Refugees Train Station
Title:
HD
Summary: Ukrainians continue to arrive at Poland border station
Story No: 4372093
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/22/2022 12:25 PM
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At Przemyśl train station near Poland's border with Ukraine, the flow of women and children fleeing Ukraine continues.

The number of arrivals has dropped from last week.

"We have about 8-thousand or maybe less refugees a day," explained the Mayor of Przemyśl, Wojciech Bakun. "So it's nearly six or seven times less than on the higher point."

A well established system is now in place to help new arrivals, providing them with immediate assistance and helping arranging their onward passage to other parts of Poland and further into Europe.

But for those arriving, the trauma is ever present.

"We fled when they started bombing, that's why we decided to leave our home," said Natalia Shabadash, a 45-year-old Ukrainian from Mykolaiv.

"500 metres away from us there was rocket explosion. It was very scary", she said.

Despite the drop in the number of arrivals, Bakun said Poland and the EU need to prepare for the long term.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Przemyśl, Poland - 22 March 2022

1. Wide interior of train station

2. Pan of small lines of people at ticket office

3. Close of ticket office sign

4. SOUNDBITE (Russian): Natalia Shabadash, 45, from Mykolaiv

"We fled when they started bombing, that's why we decided to leave our home. 500 metres away from us there was rocket explosion. It was very scary, that's why we decided to leave our home. My husband stayed at home, I left him. We were very well received in Poland. I'm so grateful to the Polish people. We are going to France now."

5. Shabadash's luggage

6. Shabadash leaving train station

7. Various of Ukrainians in the train station

8. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian): Angela Martyn, 49, from Dnipro region

"It is very scary to leave one's homes. I took a risk and fled with my daughter, but they (our relatives) are too scared to leave their homes. My older daughter with her child was too scared to leave. How could she manage? He is only 4-years-old. But it's scary not only there (in Ukraine), but also here (in Poland). We don't now where to go now."

9. Martyn leaving train station

10. Various of Ukrainians at train station

11. Setup of Wojciech Bakun, Mayor of Przemyśl

12. SOUNDBITE (English): Wojciech Bakun, Mayor of Przemyśl

"It's very calm at this moment, you know. We have about 8-thousand, maybe less, refugees a day. So it's nearly six or seven times less than on the higher point. So that looks very calm, it looks nearly like in a normal day in Przemyśl. That's good, because if we think about the situation, it means something good is on the Ukrainian side, we have a better situation on the Ukrainian side if less people leave Ukraine."

13. Cutaway

14. SOUNDBITE (English): Wojciech Bakun, Mayor of Przemyśl

"To be honest, we have to prepare for the longer stay, the situation is like a marathon. We always said that. After one month, a lot of people are very tired, so we have to think about next month, or maybe, hopefully not, but maybe about years. So that's the main thing at this moment. Not only for Poland, but also for EU countries."

15. Wide exterior of train station

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UKRAINE WAR
Title:
HD
Summary: Center of Odesa is filled with trenches
Story No: efe040295
Source: Agencia EFE
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/22/2022 12:10 PM
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Odesa (Ukraine), Mar 22 (EFE).- (Camera: Manuel Bruque) Life before the war is blurred with the reality of the sandbags placed in numerous streets in the center of the Ukrainian city of Odesa, as trenches.FOOTAGE OF THE TRENCHES WITH SANDBAGS IN THE STREETS OF ODESA.

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Keywords: UKRAINE WAR
Subjects: Russia Ukraine war
Locations: Europe , Eastern Europe , Ukraine , Odessa
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Poland Ukraine Border Refugees
Title:
HD
Summary: Ukrainians on Polish border: Mariupol almost destroyed
Story No: 4372087
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/22/2022 11:59 AM
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Ukrainian refugees arriving in the Polish border town of Medyka on Tuesday said cities like Mariupol and Kharkiv had sustained extensive damage under constant bombardement

Viktoria Totsen, a 39 year old Ukrainian refugee from Mariupol who arrived to Poland on Tuesday with her two daughters, said Mariupol was almost entirely destroyed.

"During the last five days the planes were flying over us every 5 seconds and dropped bombs everywhere," Totse, who lived near a theatre bombed by Russian forces, said.  

"It was horrible and we took a risk and we left," she explained.

Olena Almazova, a 54 year-old refugee from Kharkiv who also arrived at Medyka on Tuesday said they were bombed almost 60 times a day.

"It is very difficult situation in Kharkiv," Almazova said.

Ukrainian forces said they retook a strategically important suburb of Kyiv early Tuesday, as Russian forces squeezed other areas near the capital and their attack on the embattled southern port of Mariupol raged unabated.

The U.N. refugee agency says more than 3.5 million people have fled Ukraine since Russia's invasion, passing another milestone in an exodus that has led to Europe's worst refugee crisis since World War II.

UNHCR reported Tuesday that 3.53 million people have left Ukraine, with Poland taking in the lion's share — more than 2.1 million — followed by Romania with more than 540,000 and Moldova with more than 367,000.

The International Organization for Migration estimates that nearly 6.5 million people are internally displaced within Ukraine, suggesting that some if not most of them might to flee abroad if the war continues.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Medyka - 22 March 2022

1. Various refugees arriving from Ukraine to Medyka

2. Refugees carrying bags

3. A woman being pushed in a wheelchair

4. Women refugees

5. Cutaway luggage

6. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Viktoria Totsen, 39 year-old from Mariupol:

"Mariupol is almost 99% destroyed. They bombed us for the past 20 days. During the last five days the planes were flying over us every 5 seconds and dropped bombs everywhere, on residential buildings, kindergartens, art schools, everywhere. We live near the theater in the city center, and, as you know, they damaged the theater. It was horrible and we took a risk and we left. They city is under blockade, and when we left we got (mobile phone) connection and we manage to find the route to Zaporizhia."

7. Various of Totsen leaving with her two daughters

8. Child holding a toy

9. Mid of refugees

10. Mid of child

11. Mid of refugees

12. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Olena Almazova, 54 year-old refugee from Kharkiv:

"It is a very difficult situation in Kharkiv. Every day they bomb, 40, 50, 60  times a day. They bombed suburbs and city center. They damaged the culture center, they damaged ancient architecture. So far, 700 buildings have been destroyed."

13. Dogs at border

14. Refugees at border

15. Refugees pulling their luggage

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UKRAINE WAR ELDERLY
Title:
HD
Summary: Disability, mental health issues force many elderly Ukrainians to stay
Story No: efe040286
Source: Agencia EFE
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/22/2022 09:45 AM
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Odesa (Ukraine), March 22 (EFE).- (Camera: Isaac J. Martín) While the Russian forces intensify their attacks against Odesa, southwestern Ukraine, elderly Ukrainians sit quietly in the park to play chess, faced with the physical, mental and economic impossibility of fleeing the war.FOOTAGE OF ELDERLY PEOPLE PLAYING CHESS IN SOBORNA SQUARE, IN THE CENTER OF ODESA (UKRAINE).

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Satellite Imagery Shows Damage to Civilian Areas in Mariupol, Kyiv, Chernihiv
Title:
HD
Summary: Satellite Imagery Shows Damage to Civilian Areas in Mariupol, Kyiv, Chernihiv
Story No: stltd006152
Source: Storyful Ltd
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/22/2022 05:48 AM
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STORYLINE:

Satellite imagery released by Maxar Technologies shows damage to civilian infrastructure in Ukrainian cities from March 18 to March 21 as Russia continues its attack on the country. These images show damage in the cities of Mariupol, Irpin, Hostomel and Chernihiv. Other images also show troops near the Belarusian town of Dublin. On March 21, city officials said 4,384 Mariupol residents were evacuated from Berdyansk. Ukraine said on Monday it would not obey ultimatums from Russia to stop defending Mariupol. Credit: Maxar Technologies via Storyful

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Ukraine War Theater Kitchen
Title:
HD
Summary: Ukrainian theatre turned to volunteer kitchen
Story No: 4372037
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/22/2022 03:00 AM
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A theatre in western Ukraine has been transformed into a volunteer kitchen where actors and backstage staff make food for soldiers and people displaced by the fighting.

In the warmly-lit theatre cafe in the city of Drohobych, artists accustomed to performing on the big stage were instead rolling and filling dough to make dumplings to be sent to the front line or shared with people in need.

"There is a saying that when the guns sound, the muses are silent," said actress Alla Shkondina. "But we are not silent."

Shkondina has retreated from the spotlight and now, alongside her fellow artists, makes food for the troops.  

It's her part in a collective war effort by defiant volunteers across the country.

"We did more than 3,000 pounds of meatballs," said the theatre's director, Mykola Hnatenko, as he listed the many meals made by the volunteers over the past few weeks.

In the courtyard, soot-handed men chopped wood for the cooking fires, overseen by the theatre's deputy director, Sergei Havdjak.

The operation involves about 150 volunteers, including artists who have been displaced from other parts of Ukraine and now live at the theatre, Hnatenko said.

He seemed especially proud of the borscht the volunteers were sending to soldiers in places like the capital, Kyiv, where some areas have collapsed into brutal street-to-street fighting in near-freezing weather.

Despite being far from the frontlines, they are together in this fight, the volunteers said.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Drohobych – 21 March 2022

1. Wide of volunteers making food

2. Close of woman making dough

3. Close of volunteer making varenyky (dumplings)

4. Close of theatre posters

5. Various of actress Alla Shkondina making varenyky

6. Wide of cafe turned into volunteer kitchen

7. Close of varenyky

8. Various of theatre cafe

9. Various of empty theatre auditorium

10. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Alla Shkondina, actress and volunteer:

"I'm an actress whose job is to be on stage, to create characters, but now our muses are silent. Here is our theater, which is now empty. This is our stage, which is now resting. There is a saying that when the guns sound, muses are silent. But we are not silent. We are in the rear. We are engaged in volunteer work because Ukraine is in a difficult situation now."

11. Various of volunteers making varenyky

12. Wide of theatre director, Mykola Hnatenko, talking

13. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Mykola Hnatenko, theatre director:

"During this period (from February 26th) we made more than 3,000 meatballs, 150kg of stewed cabbage with meat, more than 10,000 varenykys with potato, 70kg of filling for borsch, 80kg of fried fish, 2,000 pancakes with meat and 500 sweet pancakes. Now we have decided to do more food with protein, like meat."

14. Various of food being cooked in theatre backyard

15. Close of flag

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Ukraine War Actor Commander
Title:
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Summary: Ukrainian fighters' lives take on sudden new meaning
Story No: 4372030
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/22/2022 01:40 AM
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For many Ukrainian men, Russia's invasion of their country meant life taking an unexpected new direction, having to abruptly bid their families goodbye and take up arms.

Since the invasion on February 24, thousands have voluntarily signed up to join as reservists in the Territorial Defence Forces.

Among them is 30-year-old Sergiy Volosovets, now a commander.

In what seems to have been a different life, Volosovets played roles in theatres, movies, and TV series, some of them award-winners at national and international film festivals.

He now talks to a different audience and everybody in this force has taken on a different role.

"They never thought that they would have a gun in their hands, but all of them are with all their intentions determined to resist, and this desire just brought all of them here," Volosovets said.

He now commands a unit of 11 men and oversees the military training of volunteers in a base north-east of Kyiv, a few kilometres away from the frontlines where Ukraine's army is trying to block Russia's advance towards the capital.

In the units, Volosovets has met all kinds of people, including some of his artist friends who left showbusiness and turned to fighters.

After finishing the last stage of their training, these Ukrainians might soon join their comrades in the fight or guard checkpoints.

Volosovets said that at the beginning of the war, men were sent to the frontlines after just two days of quick training.

Now they are getting trained more thoroughly.

"We need self-conscious people who know what they are doing and are ready to defend the country," Volosovets said.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Near Kyiv - 21 March 2022

1. Volunteer of the Ukrainian Territorial Defence Forces turning and pointing his rifle during military training

2. Various of Territorial Defence Forces volunteers in training

3. Close of Sergiy Volosovets, 30, Ukrainian actor-turned-commander

4. Various of Volosovets with volunteers

5. Close of rifle wrapped in Ukrainian flag colours  

6. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Sergiy Volosovets, actor-turned-commander with the Territorial Defence Forces of Ukraine:

"So far all, people are volunteers who basically never had a gun in their hands, never served in the army, they never thought that they would have a gun in their hands, but all of them are with all their intentions determined to resist, and this desire just brought all of them here."

7. Volosovets shouting orders to volunteers  

8. Volunteers advancing with rifles during training

9. Volosovets shouting orders to volunteers taking shooting positions

10. Various of volunteers training and Volosovets supervising them

11. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Sergiy Volosovets, actor-turned-commander with the Territorial Defence Forces of Ukraine:

"There is a lot of very different people here, I met a lot of my friends here, as well as artists. I think maybe their artistic spirit just broke the fear and that allowed them to come and be here. For example, in my units there were actors, singers, cameramen, photographers, people related to showbusiness in various ways. Those people are artists, they believe they could change their country for better as well as defeat the enemy."

12. Volunteers simulating an advance while taking cover during training

13. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Sergiy Volosovets, actor-turned-commander with the Territorial Defence Forces of Ukraine:

"Some of them are nervous, fear is natural. The main thing with fear is that one should not try to escape from it. You should feel it, understand it, and if you think you can overcome it, you just stay and continue training here. If you don't want to be here, we do not force you to be here, we allow you to go back to (rear) base if needed, train more there, and come back later. We are not forcing you to stay, we are not screaming at you: 'Go fight right away,' we don't do that. We need self-conscious people who know what they are doing and are ready to defend the country."  

14. Volunteers listening to instructor

15. Volosovets oversees training  

16. Various of instructor in front of volunteers explaining how to use rifles and move during combat

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Ukraine-War-Refugees
Title:
HD
Summary: Some 3.5 million refugees have already left Ukraine since the beginning of the invasion
Story No: lana001683
Source: Latin America News Agency
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/22/2022 12:00 AM
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1. Various of refugees on the border with Poland

STORYLINE:

Some 3.5 million people have left Ukraine since Russia launched its invasion on February 24, according to data from the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), which estimates that more than ten million have had to leave their homes in less than four weeks.

Poland has already received more than two million refugees, although it is not clear how many have remained on Polish territory. Romania has more than 535,000 arrivals, compared to 365,000 from Moldova, 312,000 from Hungary and 250,000 from Slovakia.

UNHCR also has nearly 232,000 registered refugees in Russia, a destination largely for those living in eastern Ukraine, in areas controlled by separatist rebels. In addition, some 3,700 people have crossed the border into Belarus, a country allied with Moscow in this conflict.

"Among the responsibilities of those who wage wars around the world, is the suffering inflicted on civilians who are forced to flee their homes," UNHCR chief Filippo Grandi lamented on Sunday, announcing that the threshold had been crossed. ten million refugees and internally displaced persons.

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UKRAINE WAR RUSSIA
Title:
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Summary: Refugees from Ukraine arrive in Russia's Rostov region
Story No: efe040271
Source: Agencia EFE
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/21/2022 11:09 PM
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Tagarong (Russia), March 21 (EFE), (Camera: Arkady Budnitsky).- People from Mariupol rest in the temporary accommodation center for refugees at the Taganrog sports school, Rostov region, Russia.In three days, almost 60,000 residents, including 139 foreign citizens, were transferred from Mariupol to the territory of Russia. In total, during the invasion, the Russian military evacuated more than 330,000 people from Ukraine, including almost 69,000 children.

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UKRAINE-CRISIS/
Title:
HD
Summary: Ukrainian volunteers prepare to defend the city of Odesa
Story No: edf006286
Source: EditorialFootage
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/21/2022 08:06 PM
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Ukrainian volunteers fill bags with sand along the beach of the Black Sea as prepare to defend the city of Odesa, Ukraine on 21 March 2022.

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Locations: Odessa , Europe , Eastern Europe , Ukraine
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UKRAINE-CRISIS/
Title:
HD
Summary: Russian missile strike on shopping center in Kyiv
Story No: edf006285
Source: EditorialFootage
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/21/2022 08:06 PM
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Fire burns at the site of a military strike on a shopping center in the Podilskyi district of Kyiv, as Russia's invasion of Ukraine continues, in Kyiv, Ukraine March 21, 2022

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Locations: Europe , Eastern Europe , Ukraine , Kyiv
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Ukraine Donetsk Mariupol Displaced
Title:
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Summary: Displaced from Mariupol shelter in rebel-held region
Story No: 4371976
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/21/2022 05:52 PM
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Displaced Ukrainians from Mariupol on Monday sought shelter in a temporary camp in the rebel-held region of Donetsk.

According to the rebel Donetsk government, about 5,000 Mariupol residents have camped in the settlement since the beginning of the invasion.  

Mariupol authorities have said only about 10% of the city’s population of 430,000 has managed to flee over the past week.

The Mariupol City Council has asserted that several thousand residents were taken into Russia against their will.

Yulia, one of the residents who managed to flee to the Bezimenne settlement in eastern Ukraine, said she made a narrow escape.

"A bomb fell from an aircraft behind our house and destroyed six houses. That's why we got in the car, at our own risk, and left in 15 minutes," she said.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bezimenne, Ukraine – 21 March 2022

1. Wide of Ukrainians, rows of cars

2. Pan left of queue of cars

3. Various of sign on cars reading (Russian): "Children."

4. Various of people gathering near cars

5. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Yulia (last name not given), Displaced Ukrainian from Mariupol:

"A bomb fell from an aircraft behind our house and destroyed six houses. That's why we got in the car, at our own risk, and left in 15 minutes, because everything is destroyed there, dead bodies are lying around. They don't let us pass through everywhere - there are shootings."

6. Wide of people crossing street

7. Wide of cars queuing

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WAR UKRAINE
Title:
HD
Summary: Ukrainian city of Odesa continues to resist Russian attacks
Story No: efe040250
Source: Agencia EFE
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/21/2022 04:47 PM
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Odesa (Ukraine), Mar 21 (EFE/EPA) - (Camera: Stepan Franko/ Manuel Bruque) Dozens of volunteers continued today to fill sandbags to defend the port city of Odesa, in southern Ukraine. In recent days several missiles hit a residential area in front of the Black Sea, a little more than ten kilometers from the center of Odesa.Russian troops entered Ukraine on February 24, prompting the country's president to declare martial law and triggering a series of announcements by Western countries to impose severe economic sanctions on Russia.FOOTAGE OF SANDBAGGING IN ODESA SQUARE AND DAMAGE CAUSED BY MISSILES HITTING A RESIDENTIAL AREA FACING THE BLACK SEA.

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Ukraine War Kyiv Destruction
Title:
HD
Summary: Kyiv residents return to homes damaged by shelling
Story No: 4371956
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/21/2022 04:18 PM
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Residents of a building in the western part of Kyiv which was damaged in shelling were left devastated when they returned to survey the damage on Monday.

Natasha and Slava Chikovs were in the building when it was hit by Russian shelling.

They spent the night outside and returned the next day to close the windows with plastic sheets and wooden boards.

"Russian brothers gave us the 'motivation' to do a flat renovation," said Slava.

Russian troops are shelling Kyiv for a fourth week now and are trying to surround the capital, which had nearly 3 million people before the war.

Kyiv Mayor Vitali Klitschko announced a curfew extending from Monday evening through Wednesday morning.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sviatoshynskyi district, Kyiv - 21 March 2022

1. People walking outside damaged building

2. Damaged residential building

3. Tracking shot of Slava Chikov walking inside his apartment with pieces of timber

4. Various of Chikov covering broken window with plastic sheet

5. Natasha Chikova helping her husband to cover broken window

6. Pan of burnt cars and destroyed building

7. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Slava Chikov, resident of damaged building:

"Russian brothers gave us the 'motivation' to do a flat renovation."

8. Various of Chikov closing window

9. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Natasha Chikova, resident of damaged building:

"We are very frightened. The gas is cut off. There is no heating and electricity. There is only cold water. I'm not sure if we have hot water. Everything is destroyed completely. We've started cleaning up a little bit, but everything is demolished."

10. Chikova walking near crater

11. Woman washing floor UPSOUND (Ukrainian): "Both elderly and children are suffering"

12. Burnt car outside building

13. Toys on floor

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Subjects: Russia Ukraine war
Locations: Europe , Eastern Europe , Ukraine , Kyiv
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Poland Ukraine War Refugees Mariupol
Title:
HD
Summary: Elderly refugee claims 90% of Mariupol destroyed
Story No: 4371950
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/21/2022 03:50 PM
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An elderly Ukrainian refugee who arrived in Poland on Monday said 90% of Mariupol "has been destroyed."

Arriving at Medyka border crossing, Maria Fiodorova, who traveled for 5 days and arrived in a wheelchair, added "there are no buildings there any more."

Ukrainian refugees were also still arriving in Przemysl, near Poland's border with Ukraine.

Ludmila Bila, who fled Mykolayiv, said of the invasion: "They are shooting and the children are nearby and we can't protect them."

"It is very scary but we have hope."

Russia's war in Ukraine, now in its 26th day, shows no signs of abating.

The invasion has wreaked devastation and destruction, exacting a heavy toll on civilians.

The UN says that almost 3.5  million people have fled Ukraine.

More than 2 million people arrived in Poland  since the beginning of the war.

According to the UN Refugee Agency, ten million people  have now fled their homes in Ukraine, either as displaced or as refugees abroad.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Medyka border crossing - 21 March 2022

1. Maria Fiodorova, 77 years old from Mariupol, arriving in a wheelchair at Medyka border crossing

2. Close up of Fiodorova

3. Close up of hands

4. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Maria Fiodorova, 77-year-old refugee from Mariupol from Mariupol:

"We arrived from Mariupol. Almost 90% (of the city) has been destroyed. There are no buildings there any more."

5. Fiodorova at border crossing

6. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Maria Fiodorova, 77-year-old refugee from Mariupol from Mariupol:

"We left Mariupol, we stopped (for a while), and then continued to Hmelnitskiy, and then from there we arrived here. (We traveled) for 5 days."

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Przemysl - 21 March 2022

7. Refugees arriving from train station

8. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Viktoria Mishenko, 47-year-old refugee from Mykolayiv:

"On March 7, when there was heavy shelling, my son was injured, and he had an operation on March 8. His leg was in a plaster cast until today. He did not want to come to Poland."

9. Refugees arriving from the train station

10. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Ludmila Bila, refugee from Mykolayiv:

"I want peace for us. It is very scary. They are shooting and the children are nearby and we can't protect them. It is very scary but we have hope."

11. Police at train station

12. Wide of train station

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