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US House Impeach Resolution (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: House votes to send Trump impeachment to Senate
Story No: apus129458
Source: HOUSE TV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/15/2020 07:23 PM
People: Kevin McCarthy , Nancy Pelosi , Joe Biden , Donald Trump , Adam Schiff , Jerrold Nadler , Doug Collins , Dr. Seuss
Subscription:

The U.S. House voted Wednesday to send two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump to the Senate and approve House prosecutors for only the third impeachment trial in American history.

The nearly party-line vote moved Trump's impeachment from Speaker Nancy Pelosi's Democratic-run House to the Republican-majority Senate, where Trump expects acquittal, even as new evidence is raising fresh questions about his Ukraine dealings.

The vote was 228-193, coming at the start of a presidential election year and one month after the House impeached Trump. The president is charged with abuse of power over his pressure on Ukraine to investigate Democratic rival Joe Biden, using military aid to the country as leverage. Trump was also charged with obstructing Congress’ ensuing probe.

The seven-member prosecution team will be led by the chairmen of the House impeachment proceedings, Reps. Adam Schiff of the Intelligence Committee and Jerry Nadler of the Judiciary Committee, two of Pelosi’s top lieutenants for only the third presidential impeachment in the nation’s history.

Later Wednesday, the House managers are to walk the articles across the Capitol to the Senate in a dramatic procession. The Senate trial is set to start Thursday.

HOUSE TV

Washington, DC - 15 January 2019

1. Wide of House floor

2. SOUNDBITE (English): Rep. Jerrold Nadler, (D) New York, Chairman Judiciary Committee:

"This trial is necessary because President Trump gravely abused the power of his office when he strong armed a foreign government to announce investigations into his domestic political rival. He betrayed our country when he used the powers of his office, including withholding vital U.S. military assistance to pressure that government to help him win reelection. He invited foreign interference into our elections again. He jeopardized our national security. He did all this for his personal political gain. And then he violated the Constitution by stonewalling Congress's efforts to investigate, ordering an absolute blockade of evidence."

3. Wide of House floor

4. SOUNDBITE (English): Rep. Doug Collins, (R) Georgia, Ranking Member Judiciary Committee:

"This impeachment process has been flawed from the outset. It resembles not a congressional action. It resembles more a Dr. Seuss book, knowing not which way it goes."

5. Wide of House floor

6. SOUNDBITE (English): Rep. Doug Collins, (R) Georgia, Ranking Member, Judiciary Committee:

"For those 71 out of 78 days from the time it was announced at a press conference to the time we finished, the president was not permitted to participate in these meetings. Think of it - 71 days out of 78 in which we actually did something on impeachment. He was not presented with the ability to cross-examine fact witnesses, present counter arguments. No due process at all in those 71 days."

7. SOUNDBITE (English): Rep. Adam Schiff, (D) California, Chairman Intelligence Committee:

"He withheld hundreds of millions of U.S. dollars in vital military aid to Ukraine, a close ally at war with Russia, and withheld a coveted White House meeting critical to the Ukrainian leader's international legitimacy until Ukraine would commit to help President Trump cheat, cheat in the next election."

8. Wide of House floor

9. SOUNDBITE (English): Rep. Kevin McCarthy, (R) California, House Minority Leader:

"I have three questions for my friends on the other side of the aisle, the Democrats. What happened to impeachment being urgent? What happened to Congress being on the clock? What happened to saying the House would be derelict in our duty if we did not act immediately? These were all the assertions Democrats made over the past several months. I guess it turns out none of them are true."

10. Speaker Nancy Pelosi walking to podium

11. SOUNDBITE (English): Rep. Nancy Pelosi, House Speaker:

"My colleagues on both sides of the aisle, we are here today to cross a very important threshhold in American history."

12. Wide of Pelosi at podium

13. SOUNDBITE (English): Rep. Nancy Pelosi, House Speaker:

"When he acted the way he did in relationship to withholding funds from Ukraine in return for a benefit to him that was personal and political. He crossed a threshold. He gave us no choice."

14. Wide of House floor +++OVERLAID WITH GRAPHIC SHOWING VOTE+++

15. UPSOUND (English): Presiding officer reads vote results

"On this vote, the yeas are 228, the nays are 193. The resolution is adopted and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table."

16. Wide of House floor

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Subjects: Impeachments , Political issues , Government and politics , Political corruption , Judiciary , Presidential elections , National elections , Elections , Legislature
People: Kevin McCarthy , Nancy Pelosi , Joe Biden , Donald Trump , Adam Schiff , Jerrold Nadler , Doug Collins , Dr. Seuss
Organisations: United States military, United States government, United States Congress, United States Senate, United States House of Representatives
Locations: Ukraine , Eastern Europe , Europe , United States , North America , District of Columbia
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US House Vote Results (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Trump impeached on abuse of power, obstruction
Story No: apus128346
Source: HOUSE TV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 12/19/2019 02:02 AM
People: Donald Trump , Nancy Pelosi , Jerrold Nadler
Subscription:

President Donald Trump was impeached by the U.S. House of Representatives Wednesday night, becoming only the third American chief executive to be formally charged under the Constitution's ultimate remedy for high crimes and misdemeanors.

The historic vote split along party lines, much the way it has divided the nation, over the charges that the 45th president abused the power of his office by enlisting a foreign government to investigate a political rival ahead of the 2020 election.

Then a majority of the House approved a second charge, that he obstructed Congress in its investigation.

The articles of impeachment, the political equivalent of an indictment, now go to the Senate for trial.

If Trump is acquitted by the Republican-led chamber, as expected, he would have to run for reelection carrying the enduring mark of impeachment on his purposely disruptive presidency.

HOUSE TV

Washington - 18 December 2019

1. Wide, House floor with graphic of first article vote tally over

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Rep. Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the House:

"On this vote, the yays are 230, the nays are 197, present is 1, Article 1 is adopted."

3. Wide of House floor as members react

4. UPSOUND (English) Pelosi over wide shot of House floor:

"The question is on adoption of Article 2, the question is on adoption of Article 2. Those in favor, say aye, those opposed nay. The ayes have it. The ayes have it. For what purpose does the gentleman from New York seek recognition?"

5. UPSOUND (English) Rep. Jerrold Nadler, (D) New York:

"Madame Speaker, I ask for a roll call...

(Pelosi, off camera) For what purpose does the gentleman from New York seek recognition?

I ask for a roll call vote."

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Rep. Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the House:

"A recorded vote is requested, those favoring a recorded vote will rise (bangs gavel). The House will be in order. A sufficient number have risen, a recorded vote is ordered, members will record their votes by electronic device. This is a 5-minute vote."

7. Wide shots of House floor  ++SHOTS ARE MUTE++

8. Wide shot of House floor with graphic of second article vote tally over

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Rep. Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the House:

"On this vote, the yays are 229, the nays are 198, present is 1, article 2 is adopted."

10. Wide shot of House floor immediately after vote

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Subjects: Government and politics , Impeachments , Political issues , Political corruption
People: Donald Trump , Nancy Pelosi , Jerrold Nadler
Organisations: United States House of Representatives, United States Congress, United States government
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US House Pelosi (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Pelosi: Trump 'gave us no choice' on impeachment
Story No: apus128298
Source: HOUSE TV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 12/18/2019 05:44 PM
People: Nancy Pelosi , Donald Trump
Subscription:

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has opened debate in the House on the impeachment of President Donald Trump, arguing his actions have left lawmakers with "no choice" but to act.

Pelosi said she opened debate "solemnly and sadly," insisting if the House does not act now, "we would be derelict in our duty.''

The Speaker argued that Trump used his office to obtain an "improper political benefit" from Ukraine at the expense of the nation's security.

She said the House was forced to add a second article of impeachment against the president, obstruction of Congress, because "never before in the history of our nation have we seen a president declare and act as he is above the law."

Following a day of debtate, the House will vote on the two articles of impeachment against the Republican president later Wednesday evening.

The Republican-controlled Senate is expected to acquit him in a trial next year.

HOUSE TV

Washington, DC - 18 December 2019

1. Wide shot of House floor as Speaker Nancy Pelosi walks up to podium

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Rep. Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the House:

"We gather today under the dome of this temple of democracy to exercise one of the most solemn powers that this body can take: the impeachment of the President of the United States. No member, regardless of party or politics, comes to Congress to impeach a president. But every one of us, as our first act as a member of Congress, stood on this historic House floor before our beautiful American flag and raised our hands in this sacred oath. I do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic, so help me God. For 230 years, members have taken that sacred oath, which makes us custodians of the Constitution. When our founders declared independence and established a new nation, they crafted a system of government unlike one ever seen before, a republic starting with the sacred words 'We the People.' For centuries, Americans have fought and died to defend democracy for the people. But very sadly now our founders' vision of a republic is under threat from actions from the White House. That is why today, as Speaker of the House, I solemnly and sadly open the debate on the impeachment of the President of the United States. If we do not act now, we would be derelict in our duty. It is tragic that the president's reckless actions make impeachment necessary. He gave us no choice. What we are discussing today is the established fact that the president violated the Constitution. It is a matter of fact that the president is an ongoing threat to our national security and the integrity of our elections, the basis of our democracy. Hundreds of historians, legal scholars and former prosecutors, regardless of party, had stated that the president committed impeachable offenses. Since today is a national civics lesson, though a sad one, I submit these documents for the record and commend them for students to study.

(Speaker pro tempore: Without objection. So ordered.)

Thank you, Madam Speaker."

++BLACK BETWEEN SOUNDBITE++

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Rep. Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the House:

"The president used the power of his public office to obtain an improper personal political benefit at the expense of America's national security. When a president weakens a democratic ally that is advancing American security interests by fighting an American adversary, the president weakens America. This abuse of power also jeopardizes the integrity of our elections. All Americans agree that American voters should choose our president, not some foreign government. The founders understood that it is profoundly corrosive for our democracy for a president to invite interference in our elections. As George Washington, our nation's patriarch, under whose gaze we stand today warned, history and experience prove that foreign influence is one of the most painful foes of Republican government. George Washington. Sadly, the American people have witnessed further wrongs of the president, which necessitate the second article of impeachment: obstruction of Congress. When the president's wrongdoing was revealed, he launched an unprecedented, indiscriminate and categorical campaign of defiance and obstruction. Never before in the history of our nation have we seen a president declare and act as if he is above the law. The president goes even so far as to say and act on this absurdity when he says, 'Article 2 says I can do whatever I want.' No, it doesn't. That recklessness is a profound violation of the Constitution and our republic, which endure because of our system of separation of power, three coequal branches each a check and balance on the other. A republic again, if we can keep it. The founders great fear of a rogue or corrupt president is the very reason why they enshrined impeachment in the Constitution."

++BLACK BETWEEN SOUNDBITE++

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Rep. Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the House:

"Today, we are here to defend democracy for the people. May God bless America. I yield back the balance of my time."

5. UPSPOUND: Members on floor applaud as Pelosi walks away from podium

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Subjects: Separation of powers , Political issues , Government and politics , Legislature , Impeachments , Political corruption , Constitutions
People: Nancy Pelosi , Donald Trump
Organisations: United States House of Representatives, United States Congress, United States government
Locations: District of Columbia , United States , North America
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US Trump Impeachment (NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: House starts historic session to impeach Trump
Story No: apus128297
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS , HOUSE TV , ABC , US POOL
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 12/18/2019 05:30 PM
People: Donald Trump , Jerrold Nadler , Nancy Pelosi , Diana DeGette , Kevin McCarthy
Subscription:

The US House gaveled in for a historic session Wednesday to impeach President Donald Trump on charges that he abused his power and obstructed Congress, votes that will leave a lasting mark on his tenure at the White House.

As soon as the session opened, Republicans tried to halt it.

“So we can stop wasting America's time on impeachment, I move that the House dp now adjourn,” said Rep. Andy Biggs, R-Ariz., the chairman of the conservative House. Freedom Caucus.

He forced a roll call vote - the first of several procedural efforts expected during the day to try to delay the proceedings. It was defeated on a party-line vote. Then Republicans then tried to force a vote condemning the actions of Democratic committee leaders, based on objections to the way the Democrats conducted hearings leading to Wednesday's votess

Early Wednesday, Trump tweeted his outrage: “Can you believe that I will be impeached today by the Radical Left, Do Nothing Democrats, AND I DID NOTHING WRONG! A terrible thing.”

The president, who is expected to depart later for a rally in the election battleground state of Michigan, fired off a  furious letter to Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Tuesday denouncing the “vicious crusade” against him but acknowledging he was powerless to stop the expected outcome.

“When people look back at this affair, I want them to understand it, and learn from it, so that it can never happen to another president again,” he wrote.

The rare undertaking to impeach a president, set to unfold over more than six hours of debate Wednesday, has split the lawmakers in Congress much the way Americans have different views of Trump's unusual presidency and the articles of impeachment against him.

ABC - NO ACCESS US

Washington DC - 18 December 2019

++MUTE++

1. Wide of Capitol building at dawn

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Washington DC - 18 December 2019

2. Various of protester holding placard reading (English): "Your vote is the only antidote"

HOUSE TV

Washington DC - 18 December 2019

3. Wide of House of Representatives, Democratic congresswoman Diana DeGette, House speaker pro tempore, presiding over the House debate on the impeachment resolution, UPSOUND (English) Off camera: "A message from the president of the United States."

4. Letter from the US President Donald Trump being delivered, UPSOUND (English) "Madam Speaker, I'm directed by the president of the United States to deliver to the House of Representatives a message in writing."

5. UPSOUND (English) Diana DeGette, House speaker pro tempore, Democratic congresswoman:

"For what purposes does gentleman from Arizona seek recognition?"

UPSOUND (English) Republican representative Andy Biggs (R-AZ) making motion to adjourn (off camera):

"Madam Speaker, so we can stop wasting America's time on impeachment. I move that the House do now adjourn."

UPSPOUND (English) Diana DeGette, House speaker pro tempore, Democratic congresswoman:

"Question is on the motion to adjourn all in favor say I, oppose say no. The no's have it. The motion is not adopted."

6. Mid of Biggs, UPSOUND (English) "The nays, please? Can I ask for the yays and nays?"

7. UPSPOUND (English) Diana DeGette, House speaker pro tempore, Democratic congresswoman: ++OVER VARIOUS ANGLES++

"The yeas and and nays are requested. Those favoring a vote by the yeas and nays will rise. A sufficient number having risen, the yeas and nays are ordered. Members will record their vote by electronic device."

8. Graphic showing votes on motion to adjourn

9. UPSPOUND (English) Diana DeGette, House speaker pro tempore, Democratic congresswoman:

"This vote, the yeas are 188, the nays are 226. The motion is not adopted."

10. UPSPOUND (English) Diana DeGette, House speaker pro tempore, Democratic congresswoman:

"What purpose does the gentleman from California seek recognition?"

11. UPSPOUND (English) Kevin McCarthy, Republican Representative and House Minority leader:

"Madam Speaker, I rise to a question of the privilege of the House and send to the desk a privileged resolution."

12. UPSPOUND (English) Diana DeGette, House speaker pro tempore, Democratic congresswoman:

"The clerk will report the resolution."

13. UPSOUND (English) House clerk: ++READING RESOLUTION++

"Whereas chairman Schiff and Chairman Nadler willfully and intentionally violated the rules of the House of Representatives by abusing and exceeding their powers as chairman of committees. Whereas on September 9th, 2019, without consultation of the ranking minority member in violation of rule nine of the rules of the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, Chairman Schiff in coordination with the Committees on Oversight and Reform and Foreign Affairs, announced a wide ranging investigation into the Trump Giuliani Ukraine scheme. Whereas on September 26, 2019, in an unprecedented action, Chairman Schiff unilaterally released a redacted version of the August 2019 whistleblower complaint. Whereas on September 26, 2019, in his opening statement at a public hearing, Chairman Schiff engaged in a false retelling of the July 25th, 2019 telephone conversation between President Trump and President Zelenskiy."

14. Mid of House of Representatives

15. UPSOUND (English) House clerk: ++READING RESOLUTION++

"The House of Representatives strongly condemns Chairman Adam B. Schiff, for repeated and blatant abuse of power in a way that is not befitting an elected member of the House of Representatives, nor his position as chairman, and two, the House of Representatives strongly condemns the manner in which Chairman Jerrold Lewis Nadler has failed to respond to the minority's requests for an additional day of hearings to consider impeachment of President Donald John Trump."

US POOL

16. Various of Speaker of the House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi arriving, UPSOUND Reporter: "Speaker how are you feeling this morning?"

Pelosi: "Sad."

ASSOCIATED PRESS

17. Wide of Capitol building

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Subjects: Legislature , Government and politics , Impeachments , Political issues , Political corruption , Historic homes , Home and garden , Lifestyle , Trump impeachment
People: Donald Trump , Jerrold Nadler , Nancy Pelosi , Diana DeGette , Kevin McCarthy
Organisations: U.S. Democratic Party, United States Congress, United States government, United States House of Representatives
Locations: District of Columbia , United States , North America
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US Senate Impeach Vote 2 (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Senate acquits Trump on obstruction of Congress
Story No: apus130595
Source: SENATE TV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/05/2020 09:55 PM
People: Mitch McConnell , Nancy Pelosi , Donald Trump , John Roberts
Subscription:

The U.S. Senate voted 53-47 Wednesday to aquit President Donald Trump on the second article of impeachment, obstruction of Congress, just moments after it acquitted him of the first, abuse of power.

The two impeachment votes brought to a close only the third presidential trial in American history with votes that split the country, tested civic norms and fed the tumultuous 2020 race for the White House.

A majority of senators expressed unease with Trump's pressure campaign on Ukraine that resulted in the two articles of impeachment. But the final tallies fell far short.

Two-thirds "guilty" votes would have been needed to reach the Constitution's bar of high crimes and misdemeanors to convict and remove Trump from office.

The outcome Wednesday followed months of remarkable impeachment proceedings, from Speaker Nancy Pelosi's House to Mitch McConnell's Senate, reflecting the nation's unrelenting partisan divide three years into the Trump presidency.

SENATE TV

Washington, DC - 5 February 2020

1. UPSOUND (English) Wide shot of Senate floor as second Article of Impeachment, obstruction of Congress, is read:

"Wherefore President Trump by such conduct has demonstrated that he will remain a threat to the Constitution if allowed to remain in office and has acted in a manner grossly incompatible with self governance and the rule of law. President Trump thus warrants impeachment and trial, removal from office and disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust or profit under the United States."

2. SOUNDBITE (English) John Roberts, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court:

"The question is on the second article of impeachment. Senators, how say you? Is the respondent, Donald John Trump guilty or not guilty? The clerk will call the roll."

3. UPSOUND: Various wide shots of Senate floor as clerk calls roll and Senators vote guilty or not guilty

4. SOUNDBITE (English) John Roberts, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court:

"On this article of impeachment, 47 senators have pronounced Donald John Trump, President of the United States, guilty as charged. Fifty three senators have pronounced him not guilty as charged. Two thirds of the senators present not having pronounced him guilty, the Senate adjudges that respondent, Donald John Trump, President of the United States, is not guilty as charged in the second article of impeachment."

5. Wide shot of Senate floor with slate reading "Guilty 47, Not Guilty 53."

6. SOUNDBITE (English) John Roberts, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court:

"The presiding officer directs judgment to be entered in accordance with the judgment of the Senate as follows: The Senate having tried Donald John Trump, president of the United States, upon two articles of impeachment exhibited against him by the House of Representatives and two thirds of the senators present not having found him guilty of the charges contained therein, it is therefore ordered and adjudged that the said Donald John Trump be and he is hereby acquitted of the charges in said articles."

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Mitch McConnell, Majority Leader:

"I move that the Senate sitting as a court of impeachment on the articles against Donald John Trump adjourn, sine die."

8. SOUNDBITE (English) John Roberts, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court:

"Without objection, the motion is agreed to, the Senate sitting as a court of impeachment stands adjourned. Sine die. (bangs gavel)"

9. Wide shot of Senate floor as it adjorns

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US Senate Impeach Vote (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Senate acquits Trump on abuse of power charge
Story No: apus130591
Source: SENATE TV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/05/2020 09:28 PM
People: Joe Biden , Donald Trump , John Roberts
Subscription:

President Donald Trump on Wednesday was found not guilty of the first article of impeachment, abuse of power, putting him on the verge of acquittal by the Senate as the third presidential impeachment trial in American history comes to a close.

Senators sworn to do "impartial justice" are rising to stand at their desks and state their votes for the roll call — "guilty" or "not guilty" — as Chief Justice John Roberts presided.

On the first article of impeachment, Trump is charged with abusing his power by pressuring Ukraine to investigate Democratic rival Joe Biden, in what House Democrats said political quid pro quo for personal political gain. He withheld U.S. security aid as leverage over the ally confronting a hostile Russia, though the money was eventually released.

The Senate is set to vote next on the second charge, obstruction of Congress, over the administration's defiance of the House's requests for testimony in the ensuing probe.

Trump insisted throughout the proceedings that he did nothing wrong, and the president is eager for vindication as he launches his reelection bid.

SENATE TV

Washington, DC - 5 February 2020

1. Wide shot of Senate floor as first Article of Impeachment is read

2. SOUNDBITE (English) John Roberts, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court:

"Each senator, when his or her name is called, will stand in his or her place and vote guilty or not guilty as required by Rule 23 of the Senate rules on impeachment. Article 1, Section 3 Clause 6 of the Constitution regarding the vote required for conviction on impeachment provides that no person shall be convicted without the concurrence of two thirds of the members present. The question is, on the first article of impeachment, senators, how say you? Is the respondent, Donald John Trump guilty or not guilty? A roll call vote is required. The clerk will call the roll."

3. UPSOUND: Various wide shots of Senate floor as clerk calls roll and Senators vote guilty or not guilty

4. SOUNDBITE (English) John Roberts, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court:

"This article of impeachment, 48 senators have pronounced Donald John Trump, president of the United States, guilty as charged. Fifty two senators have pronounced him not guilty as charged. Two thirds of the senators present not having pronounced him guilty. The Senate a judges that the respondent, Donald John Trump, president of the United States, is not guilty as charged in the first article of impeachment. The clerk will read the second article of impeachment."

5. Wide shot of Senate floor with slate reading "Guilty 48, Not Guilty 52."

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US Senate Romney Impeach (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Romney will vote to convict Trump
Story No: apus130580
Source: SENATE TV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/05/2020 07:39 PM
People: Joe Biden , Mitt Romney , Donald Trump
Subscription:

Utah Sen. Mitt Romney will vote to convict President Donald Trump. That makes him the first and likely only Republican in the Senate's impeachment trial who will break ranks and favor removing the president from office.

Romney was his party's 2012 presidential nominee, and he's clashed often with Trump.

Romney says he believes Trump was guilty of "an appalling abuse of public trust" when he pressured Ukraine's leaders to investigate political foe Joe Biden.

Trump is virtually certain to be acquitted by the GOP-run Senate, where a two-thirds majority, 67 votes, would be required to remove him.

The final votes are set for later Wednesday.

SENATE TV

Washington DC - 5 February 2020

1. Cutaway of Senate floor

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Mitt Romney, (R) Utah:

"The allegations made in the articles of impeachment are very serious. As a senator juror, I swore an oath before God to exercise impartial justice. I am profoundly religious. My faith is at the heart of who I am. (++pauses, gets emotional++) I take an oath before God as enormously consequential. I knew from the outset that being tasked with judging the president, the leader of my own party, would be the most difficult decision I have ever faced."

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Mitt Romney, (R) Utah:

"So the verdict is ours to render under our Constitution. The people will judge us for how well and faithfully we fulfill our duty. The grave question the Constitution tasked senators to answer is whether the president committed an act so extreme and egregious that it rises to the level of a high crime and misdemeanor. Yes, he did. The president asked a foreign government to investigate his political rival. The president withheld vital military funds from that government to press it to do so. The president delayed funds for an American ally at war with Russian invaders. The president's purpose was personal and political. Accordingly, the president is guilty of an appalling abuse of public trust."

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Mitt Romney, (R) Utah:

"What he did was not perfect. No, it was a flagrant assault on our electoral rights, our national security and our fundamental values. Corrupting an election to keep one's self in office is perhaps the most abusive and destructive violation of one's oath of office that I can imagine."

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Mitt Romney, (R) Utah:

"Were I to ignore the evidence that has been presented and disregard what I believe my oath and the Constitution demands of me for the sake of a partisan end, it would, I fear, expose my character to history's rebuke and the center of my own conscience. I'm aware that there are people in my party and in my state who will... strenuously disapprove of my decision, and in some quarters I will be vehemently denounced. I'm sure to hear abuse from the president and his supporters. Does anyone seriously believe that I would consent to these consequences other than from an inescapable conviction that my oath before God demanded of me?"

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Mitt Romney, (R) Utah:

"I acknowledge that my verdict will not remove the president from office. The results of this Senate court will in fact be appealed to a higher court, the judgment of the American people. Voters will make the final decision, just as the president's lawyers have implored. My vote will likely be in the minority in the Senate. But irrespective of these things with my vote, I will tell my children and their children that I did my duty to the best of my ability, believing that my country expected it of me."

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Mitt Romney, (R) Utah:

"I will only be one name among many, no more, no less to future generations of Americans who look at the record of this trial. They will note merely that I was among the senators who determined that what the president did was wrong, grievously wrong. We are all footnotes at best in the annals of history, but in the most powerful nation on earth, the nation conceived in liberty and justice. That distinction is enough for any citizen."

8. Cutaway of Senate floor

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US Senate Collins Impeach (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Maine Sen. Collins will vote to acquit Trump
Story No: apus130515
Source: SENATE TV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/04/2020 09:51 PM
People: Michael Pence , Donald Trump , Susan Collins
Subscription:

Maine Republican Senator Susan Collins announced Tuesday she will vote to acquit President Donald Trump on both Articles of Impeachment.

Collins announcement comes after her vote along with one other Republican Senator to call for witnesses and more evidence in the impeachment trial.

"I do not believe that the House has met its burden of showing that the president's conduct, however flawed, warrants the extreme step of immediate removal from office, nor does the record support the assertion by the House managers that the president must not remain in office one moment longer," Collins said.

She added that voters should have the final say. "We should entrust to the people the most fundamental decision of a democracy, mainly who should lead their country," Collins said.

It would take two thirds of the Senate to remove Trump from office and install Vice President Mike Pence.

SENATE TV

Washington DC - 4 February 2020

1. Cutaway of Senate floor

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Susan Collins, (R) Maine:

"As I concluded in the impeachment trial of President Clinton. I do not believe that the House has met its burden of showing that the president's conduct, however flawed, warrants the extreme step of immediate removal from office. Nor does the record support the assertion by the House managers that the president must not remain in office one moment longer."

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Susan Collins, (R) Maine:

"The fact that the House delayed transmitting the articles of impeachment to the Senate for 33 days undercuts this argument. For all of the reasons I have discussed, I will vote to acquit on Article 1."

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Susan Collins, (R) Maine:

"The House managers described impeachment as a last resort for the Congress. In this case, however, the House chose to skip the basic steps of judicial adjudication and instead leapt straight to impeachment as the first resort. Therefore, I will vote to acquit on Article 2."

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Susan Collins, (R) Maine:

"Madam President, this decision is not about whether you like or dislike this president, or agree with or oppose his policies, or approve or disapprove of his conduct in other circumstances. Rather, it is about whether the charges meet the very high constitutional standard of treason, bribery or other high crimes and misdemeanors."

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Susan Collins, (R) Maine:

"It is my judgment that except when extraordinary circumstances require a different result, we should entrust to the people the most fundamental decision of a democracy, namely who should lead their country."

7. Cutaway of Senate floor

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Subjects: Acquittals , Court decisions , Legal proceedings , Law and order , General news , Impeachments , Political issues , Government and politics , Political corruption , Legislature
People: Michael Pence , Donald Trump , Susan Collins
Organisations: United States Senate, United States Congress, United States government
Locations: Maine , United States , North America , District of Columbia
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US Senate Schumer Impeachment
Title:
HD
Summary: Schumer: Republicans hiding the truth for Trump
Story No: 4252876
Source: SENATE TV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/04/2020 04:27 PM
People: Donald Trump , Nancy Pelosi , Mitch McConnell , Charles Schumer
Subscription:

Top Senate Democrat Chuck Schumer of New York is accusing the Republican leader and his GOP colleagues of sweeping President Donald Trump's misconduct under the rug.

“The administration, its top people and Senate Republicans are all hiding the truth," Schumer said. The charges are extremely serious. To interfere in an election, to blackmail a foreign country, to interfere in our elections gets at the very core of what our democracy is about."

Schumer's comments came minutes after Majority Leader Mitch McConnell took to the Senate floor to blast the impeachment trial and announce he will vote to acquit Trump.

The Senate is scheduled to vote on the two impeachment articles Wednesday afternoon.

Trump is delivering his State of the Union address Tuesday night, a platform in which he appears before Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., the powerful House speaker who orchestrated last year's House impeachment drive.

Trump is virtually certain to be acquitted, and no member of either party has indicated yet that they will break with their party colleagues. Republicans hold 53-47 majority. A vote by two-thirds of the chamber would be necessary to convict Trump

SENATE TV

Washington DC - 4 February 2020

1. Senate floor

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Chuck Schumer, US Senate Minority Leader:

"The majority leader can come up on the floor and repeat his talking points, but there are some salient points that are irrefutable. The first, this is the first impeachment trial of the president or a trial impeachment trial of anybody else that was completed that had no witnesses and no documents. The American people are just amazed that our Republican friends would not even ask for witnesses and documents."

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Chuck Schumer, US Senate Minority Leader:

"I thought the House did a very good job. I thought they made a compelling case, but even if you didn't, the idea that that means you shouldn't have witnesses and documents when we're doing something as august, as important as an impeachment trial fails the laugh test. It makes people believe correctly, in my judgment, that the administration, its top people and Senate Republicans are all hiding the truth. They're afraid of the truth."

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Chuck Schumer, US Senate Minority Leader:

"The charges are extremely serious to interfere in an election, to blackmail a foreign country to interfere in our elections gets at the very core of what our democracy is about. If Americans believe that they don't determine who is president, who is governor, who is senator, but some foreign potentate out of reach of any law enforcement can join this on elections. That's the beginning of end of democracy. So it's a serious charge. The Republicans refused to get the evidence because they were afraid of what it would show. And that's all that needs to be said."

5. Senate floor

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Subjects: Legislature , Government and politics , Impeachments , Political issues , Political corruption , Political parties , Political organizations
People: Donald Trump , Nancy Pelosi , Mitch McConnell , Charles Schumer
Organisations: U.S. Republican Party, United States Senate, United States Congress, United States government
Locations: District of Columbia , United States , North America
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US Senate McConnell Impeachment
Title:
HD
Summary: McConnell blasts impeachment, will vote to acquit
Story No: 4252874
Source: SENATE TV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/04/2020 04:20 PM
People: Donald Trump , Mitch McConnell , Joe Biden
Subscription:

US Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday slammed House Democrats' drive to  impeach President Donald Trump as “the most rushed, least fair, and least thorough" in history and said he will vote to acquit Trump.

McConnell said the two impeachment charges against Trump, that he abused his power and obstructed Congress' ensuing investigation, are constitutionally incoherent and don't “even approach a case for the first presidential removal in American history."

The Kentucky Republican opened the Senate with a scathing assessment of the case presented by House Democrats, but he did not address whether Trump's actions were inappropriate or wrong, as some Senate Republicans have conceded.

McConnell has dodged question about whether Trump's actions,  pressuring Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy to announce an investigation into Trump's political rival Joe Biden, were inappropriate.

He led a drive last week to deny Democrats any opportunity to call witnesses before the Senate, and he has worked closely with the Trump White House in shepherding the case through the Senate.

McConnell argued that “concerns about whether the president’s motivations were public or personal, and a disagreement over whether the exercise of the power was in the national interests" are not enough to remove a president.

The Senate is scheduled to vote on the two impeachment articles Wednesday.

SENATE TV

Washington DC - 4 February 2020

1. Senate floor

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Mitch McConnell, US Senate Majority Leader:

"We've watched a major American political party adopt the following absurd proposition. We think this president is a bull in a china shop. So we're going to drive a bulldozer through the china shop to get rid of it. This fever led to the most rushed, least fair and least thorough presidential impeachment inquiry in American history."

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Mitch McConnell, US Senate Majority Leader:

"This does not even approach a case for the first presidential removal in American history, doesn't even approach it. Such an act cannot rest alone on the exercise, exercise of a constitutional power, combined with concerns about whether the president's motivations were public or personal and a disagreement over whether the exercise of the power was in the national interest."

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Mitch McConnell, US Senate Majority Leader:

"The framers gave our nation an ultimate tool for evaluating president's character and policy decisions. They're called elections. They're called elections. If Washington Democrats have a case to make against the president's reelection, they should go out and make it. Let them try to do what they've failed to do three years ago. And sell the American people on their vision for the country."

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Mitch McConnell, US Senate Majority Leader:

"Impeachment power exists for a reason. It is no nullity. But invoking it on a partisan whim to settle three year old political scores does not honor the framers design. It insults the framers design."

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Mitch McConnell, US Senate Majority Leader:

"Frankly, it's hard to believe that House Democrats ever really thought this reckless and precedent breaking process would yield 67 votes to cross the Rubicon. Was their vision so clouded by partisanship that they really believed, they really believed this would be anywhere near enough for the first presidential removal in American history? Or was success beside the point? Was this all an effort to hijack our institutions for a month long political rally?"

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Mitch McConnell, US Senate Majority Leader:

"Tomorrow, tomorrow, the Senate must do what we were created to do. We've done our duty. We considered all the arguments. We've studied the, quote, mountain of evidence. End quote. And tomorrow we will vote. We must vote to reject the House abuse of power. Vote to protect our institutions. Vote to reject new precedents that would reduce the framers designed to rubble. Vote to keep factional fever from boiling over and scorching our republic. I urge every one of our colleagues to cast a vote, the facts, the evidence, the constitution and the common good clearly require - vote to acquit the president of these charges."

8. Senate floor

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US Senate Impeachment Murkowski (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Murkowski: 'I cannot vote to convict' Trump
Story No: apus130457
Source: SENATE TV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/04/2020 12:40 AM
People: Lisa Murkowski , Donald Trump
Subscription:

Speaking shortly after House impeachment prosecutors and President Donald Trump's defense team wrapped up their closing arguments Monday, Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski of Alaska said the actions of President Donald Trump were "shameful and wrong."

But Murkowski also lambasted Congress and the highly partisan impeachment process and said on the Senate floor, she "cannot vote to convict."

"Removal from office and being barred from ever holding another office of honor, trust or profit under the United States is the political death penalty," she said.

Most senators acknowledge the House Democratic managers have essentially proven their case.

Trump was impeached in December on two charges: that he abused his power like no other president in history when he pushed Ukraine to investigate rival Democrats, and he then obstructed Congress by instructing aides to defy House subpoenas.

But key Republicans have decided the president's actions toward Ukraine do not rise to the level of impeachable offense that warrants the dramatic political upheaval of conviction and removal from office. His acquittal in Wednesday's vote is all but assured.

SENATE TV

Washington, DC - 3 February 2020

1. Wide shot of Senate floor as Sen. Lisa Murkowski prepares to speak

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska:

"The president's behavior was shameful and wrong. His personal interests do not take precedence over those of this great nation. The president has the responsibility to uphold the integrity and the honor of the office, not just for himself, but for all future presidents. Degrading the office by actions or even name-calling, weakens it for future presidents and it weakens our country. All of this rotted foundation of the process, all of this, led to the conclusion that I reached several days ago that there would be no fair trial."

++BLACK BETWEEN SOUNDBITES++

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska:

"The response to the president's behavior is not to disenfranchise nearly 63 million Americans and remove him from the ballot. The House could have pursued censure and not immediately jumped to the remedy of last resort. I cannot vote to convict. The Constitution provides for impeachment, but does not demand it in all instances."

++BLACK BETWEEN SOUNDBITES++

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska:

"Removal from office and being barred from ever holding another office of honor, trust or profit under the United States is the political death penalty. The president's name is on ballots that have already been cast. The voters will pronounce a verdict in nine months and we must trust their judgment. This process has been the apotheosis of the problem of congressional abdication. Through the refusal to exercise war powers or relinquishing the power of the purse, selective oversight and an unwillingness to check emergency declarations designed to skirt Congress, we have failed. We have failed time and again. We as a legislative branch, cannot continue to cede authority to the executive."

++BLACK BETWEEN SOUNDBITES++

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska:

"It's my hope that we finally found bottom here that both sides can look inward and reflect on the apparent willingness that each has to destroy not just each other, but all of the institutions of our government. And for what? Because it may help win an election. At some point, Mr. President, at some point for our country, winning has to be about more than just winning. Or we will all lose. With that Mr. President, I thank you. I yield the floor."

6. Wide shot of Murkowski ending her remarks

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Subjects: Government and politics , Impeachments , Political issues , Legislature , Political corruption
People: Lisa Murkowski , Donald Trump
Organisations: United States Senate, United States Congress, United States government
Locations: District of Columbia , United States , North America , Alaska
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US Senate Manchin Censure (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Manchin: Censure may be alternative to impeachment
Story No: apus130452
Source: SENATE TV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/03/2020 11:17 PM
People: Joe Manchin , Donald Trump
Subscription:

Democrat, Sen. Joe Manchin, West Virginia, says he is heavily weighing his vote in the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump and suggested censure may be a bipartisan alternative.

Governmental censure is a formal statement of disapproval.

In 1834, the Senate censured President Andrew Jackson, the first and only time the Senate censured a president.

Manchin's comments come on the same day closing arguments wrapped up in the trial.

The House Democratic prosecutors drew on the Founding Fathers and common sense to urge senators - and Americans - to see that Trump's actions are not isolated but a pattern of behavior that, left unchecked, will allow him to "cheat"' in the 2020 election.

The president's defense countered the Democrats have been out to impeach Trump since the start of his presidency, nothing short of an effort to undo the 2016 election and to try to shape the next one, as early primary voting begins Monday in Iowa.

Most senators acknowledge the House Democratic managers have essentially proven their case. Trump was impeached in December on two charges: that he abused his power like no other president in history when he pushed Ukraine to investigate rival Democrats, and he then obstructed Congress by instructing aides to defy House subpoenas.

But key Republicans  have decided the president's actions toward Ukraine do not rise to the level of impeachable offense that warrants the dramatic political upheaval of conviction and removal from office. His acquittal in Wednesday's vote is all but assured.

SENATE TV

Washington DC - 3 February 2020

1. Cutaway of Senate floor

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Joe Manchin, (D) West Virginia:

"As a moderate, centrist Democrat from West Virginia with one of the most bipartisan voting records in the Senate, I've approached every vote I have cast in this body with an open mind and pride myself in working across the aisle to bring my Republican and Democrat friends together to do what is best for our country. Where I come from, party politics is more often overruled by just plain old common sense. And I have never in over 35 years of public service approached an issue with premeditated thoughts that my Republican friends are always wrong and my Democrat friends are always right."

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Joe Manchin, (D) West Virginia:

"I supported President Trump's calls for a fair trial in the Senate, which he suggested himself would include witnesses. But instead, this body has short changed. This body was short changed with a majority of my Republican colleagues, led by the majority leader voting to move forward without relevant witnesses and evidence necessary for a fair trial as our Framers intended. History will judge the Senate harshly for failing in its constitutional duty to try this case and do the impartial justice to defend the Constitution and to protect our democracy. Sadly, this is the legacy we leave to our children and grandchildren."

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Joe Manchin, (D) West Virginia:

"Over the long days and nights of this trial, I have listened to both sides present their case and answer our questions. I remain undecided on how I will vote."

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Joe Manchin, (D) West Virginia:

"Of all the arguments we have heard from the House managers and White House counsel during the long days and nights that we have sat here, the most dangerous, the most troubling to me is the false claim that the president can do no wrong, that he is above the law. And if it's good for the reelection of the president, that it's good for our country. That is simply preposterous. That is not who we are as Americans, that is not how I was raised in the small coal mining town of Farmington, West Virginia."

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Joe Manchin, (D) West Virginia:

"Never before in the history of our republic has there been a purely partisan impeachment vote of a president. Removing this president at this time, would not only further divide our deeply divided nation, but also further poison our already toxic political atmosphere. In weighing these thoughts and of all the arguments brought forward in the case, I must be realistic. I see no path to the 67 votes required to impeach President Trump and haven't since this trial started."

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Joe Manchin, (D) West Virginia:

"However, I do believe a bipartisan majority of this body would vote to censure President Trump for his actions in this manner. Censure would allow this body to unite across party lines and as an equal branch of government to formally denounce the president's actions and hold him accountable. His behavior cannot go unchecked by the Senate, and censure would allow a bipartisan statement condemning his unacceptable behavior in the strongest terms."

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Joe Manchin, (D) West Virginia:

"I am truly struggling with this decision and will come to a conclusion reluctantly as voting whether or not to remove a sitting president is the most consequential decision that I or any U.S. senator will ever face."

9. Cutaway of Senate floor

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Subjects: Trials , Legal proceedings , Law and order , General news , Political corruption , Political issues , Government and politics , Impeachments , Legislature , Voting , Elections , Censures
People: Joe Manchin , Donald Trump
Organisations: United States Senate, United States Congress, United States government, U.S. Democratic Party
Locations: District of Columbia , United States , North America , West Virginia
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US Impeach Closing Schiff (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Schiff urges Senators to convict, remove Trump
Story No: apus130421
Source: SENATE TV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/03/2020 05:17 PM
People: Joe Biden , Adam Schiff , Donald Trump
Subscription:

Lead Impeachment Manager Adam Schiff urges senators during the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump to convict and remove the 45th president.

Schiff's comments came Monday during closing arguments.

This also comes after senators acknowledged the House Democratic managers have essentially proven their case, that Trump abused power and obstructed Congress, by leveraging U.S. military aid to push Ukraine to investigate political rival Joe Biden to thwart the 2020 election.

But key Republicans have decided the president's actions toward Ukraine do not rise to the level of impeachable offenses that warrant the dramatic upheaval of conviction and removal from office.

His acquittal in Wednesday's vote is all but assured.

SENATE TV

Washington DC - 3 February 2020

1. Cutaway of Senate floor

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Adam Schiff, Lead Impeachment Manager:

"We the managers are not here representing ourselves alone or even just the House. Just as you are not here making a determination as the president's guilt or innocence for yourselves alone. Now you and we represent the American people, the ones at home and at work who are hoping that their country will remain what it has always believed it to be, a beacon of hope, of democracy and of inspiration to those striving around the world to create their own more perfect unions, for those who are standing up to lawlessness and to tyranny."

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Adam Schiff, Lead Impeachment Manager:

"Donald Trump has betrayed his oath to protect and defend the Constitution, but is not too late for us to honor ours, to wield our power to defend our democracy. As President Abraham Lincoln said at the close of his Cooper Union address on February 27, 1860. Neither let us be slandered by from our duty, by false accusations against us, nor frightened from it, by menaces of destruction to the government nor of dungeons to ourselves. Let us have faith that right makes might. And in that faith led us to the end dare to do our duty as we understand it."

4. Graphic of President Abraham Lincoln quote

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Adam Schiff, Lead Impeachment Manager:

"Today, we urge you in the face of overwhelming evidence of the president's guilt and knowing that if left in office, he will continue to seek foreign interference in the next election to vote to convict on both articles of impeachment and to remove from office Donald J. Trump, the 45th president of the United States."

6. Cutaway of Senate floor

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US Impeach Witness Vote (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Senate rejects calling witnesses
Story No: apus130357
Source: SENATE TV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/31/2020 10:52 PM
People: Mitch McConnell , Donald Trump , John Roberts
Subscription:

Senate rejects calling witnesses in President Donald Trump's impeachment trial, pushing one step closer to acquittal vote.

Democrats' hopes of prolonging the trial dimmed after a late decision from key Republicans.

Timing of a final vote on acquittal is still up in the air.

But Trump wants it over before Tuesday's State of the Union Address.

SENATE TV

Washington DC - 31 January 2020

1. Cutaway of Senate floor

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Mitch McConnell, Majority Leader:

"I ask consent to further proceedings on the quorum call may be dispensed with.

(Chief Justice John Roberts: Without objection)

The Democratic leader and I had an opportunity to have a discussion and it leads to the following. We'll now cast a vote on the witness question and once that vote is complete, I would ask that the Senate stand in recess subject to call of the chair."

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Chief Justice John Roberts:

"Thank you. Without objection, so ordered. The question is, shall it be in order to consider and debate under the impeachment rules any motion to subpoena witnesses or documents? The yays and nays are required under Senate Resolution 483. The clerk will call the roll."

4. Various of Senate floor as they start roll call for votes

5. Cutaway of Senate

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Chief Justice John Roberts:

"Are there any senators in the chamber wishing to change his or her vote? If not, the yays are 49, the nays are 51. The motion is not agreed to. Under the previous order, the Senate stands in recess subject to the call of the chair."

7. Cutaway of Senate floor

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US Impeach Defense Closing (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Trump lawyers argue against impeachment witnesses
Story No: apus130347
Source: SENATE TV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/31/2020 09:30 PM
People: Donald Trump , John Bolton
Subscription:

While President Donald Trump's legal team was laying our their arguments to block calling additional witnesses to his impeachment trial, the Senate was considering pushing off final acquittal of Trump until next week, under a proposal being negotiated Friday by party leaders.

White House Deputy Counsel Patrick Philbin insisted that the impeachment trial had already heard from witnesses, citing video-taped remarks replayed from the House impeachment inquiry.

Further he said the process in the House was "unfair, " adding, "if this is the new normal, this is the very epitome of a partisan impeachment."

The situation in the Senate remained fluid, but senators have indicated they want more time to publicly debate the charges and air their positions on the coming vote, according to a Republican familiar with the proposal but unauthorized to discuss it. The person was granted anonymity.

Eager for a conclusion, the president and his allies in the Republican majority are brushing past new revelations from John Bolton, Trump's former national security adviser, as well as historic norms that could make this the first Senate impeachment trial without witnesses.

Voting on the witness question was expected late Friday after hours of debate, with other Senate votes stretching well into the evening.

Despite the Democrats' singular, sometimes-passionate focus on calling witnesses, the numbers are now falling short. It would take four Republicans to break with the 53-seat majority and join with all Democrats to demand more testimony.

SENATE TV

Washington - 31 January 2020

1. Wide, Senate floor

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Patrick Philbin, White House Deputy Counsel:

"Mr. Chief Justice, members of the Senate, the House managers have said throughout their presentation, throughout all of the proceedings here again and again, that you can't have a trial without witnesses and documents, as if it's just that simple. If you're gonna have a trial, there have to be new witnesses and documents. But it's not that simple. And that's really something that is a trope that's being used to disguise the real issues, the real decisions that you'd be making on this decision about witnesses, because there's a lot more at stake there. "

++SOUNDBITES SEPARATED BY BLACK++

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Patrick Philbin, White House Deputy Counsel:

"We actually heard from a lot of witnesses, we heard from a lot of witnesses in the proceeding so far. You've heard 192 two video clips, by our count, from 13 different witnesses, there were 17 witnesses deposed in closed hearings in the House, and 12 of them testified again in open hearings. You've got all of those transcripts so you can see the witnesses testimony there. The key portions have been played for you on the screens and you've got over twenty eight thousand pages of documents and transcripts. You've got a lot of evidence already. "

++SOUNDBITES SEPARATED BY BLACK++

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Patrick Philbin, White House Deputy Counsel

"They did a process that wasn't fair. They did a process that was arbitrary, that arbitrarily denied the president rights. They did a process that wouldn't allow witnesses. And then they came here on the first night, remember when we were all here until 2:00 o'clock. And in very belligerent terms, said to the members of this body - you're on trial. It will be treachery if you don't do what the house managers say. That's not right. When it was their errors, when they were arbitrary and they didn't provide fairness, they can't project that onto this body to try to say that you have to make up for their errors. And if you don't, the fault lies here."

++SOUNDBITES SEPARATED BY BLACK++

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Patrick Philbin, White House Deputy Counsel

"The new normal that would be created then is kind of an express path for precisely this sort of impeachments that the framers most feared. The framers recognized that impeachment could be done for illegitimate reasons. They recognized that there could be partisan impeachment. And if this is the new normal, this is the very epitome of a partisan impeachment. There was bipartisan opposition to it in the House and it was rushed through with unfair procedures, 78 days total of inquiry. Think about that."

++SOUNDBITES SEPARATED BY BLACK++

6.SOUNDBITE (English) Patrick Philbin, White House Deputy Counsel:

"So, the new normal would be slapdash. Get it done quickly. Unfair procedures in the House to impeach the president, then bring it to the Senate. And then all the real work of investigation and discovery is going to have to take place with that impeachment hanging over the president's head. And that's a particular thing that the framers also were concerned about."

7. Wide

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US Trump Impeach China (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Trump: Impeachment fight could go to Supreme Court
Story No: apus124884
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 10/09/2019 10:09 PM
People: Donald Trump , Joe Biden , Steve Kerr , Paul Ryan
Subscription:

President Donald Trump is predicting that his impeachment fight with House Democrats could end up at the Supreme Court.

Trump answered questions Wednesday on the White House's refusal to cooperate with the impeachment inquiry into his dealings with Ukraine.

His lawyers sent a letter to House Democratic leaders Tuesday declaring a full halt to cooperation with what the administration termed an "illegitimate" probe, in part because a formal vote has not taken place.

Officials declined to say Tuesday what it would take for the White House to change its mind.

But Trump told reporters he might consider cooperating if there is a vote, but only "if Republicans," who are a minority, "get a fair shake" and additional power.

Asked about the comments of former Vice President Joe Biden, who said for the first time Wednesday that Trump should be impeached, Trump brushed them off, saying Biden's presidential campaign is "dropping like a rock."

Trump said Biden is no longer the Democratic frontrunner, adding that he feels "badly for him," before continuing attacks on Biden's son Hunter.

Trump also blasted two NBA (National Basketball Association) coaches for "talking badly about the United States," but "pandering to China" amid the league's ongoing dispute with China regarding Hong Kong protests.

Several Chinese companies have cut ties with the NBA following a tweet from the general manager of the Houston Rockets supporting demonstrators in Hong Kong.

Asked whether he is ok with the Chinese government pressuring the NBA, Trump said, "They have to work out their own situation. The NBA, they know what they're doing."

Washington, DC - 9 October 2019

1. Wide shot of President Donald Trump in Roosevelt Room

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Donald Trump, U.S. President:

"The whole thing is a scam, it's a fix. And we wrote a letter yesterday and it probably ends up being a big Supreme Court case. Maybe it goes a long time, I don't know. But the Republican Party has been treated unbelievably badly and unfairly by the Democrats."

3. Wide shot of Trump

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Donald Trump, U.S. President:

"(Reporter question) If there were a vote in the full House and the vote...

Well yeah, that sounds ok.

(Reporter) When will you cooperate?

Well we would if they give us our rights. It depends. If they vote and say you can't have lawyers, you can ask questions, you can't have anybody present, all of these crazy things. And even some of the reporters said to me it really is an unfair situation."

5. Cutaway

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Donald Trump, U.S. President:

"(Reporter) If if Pelosi holds a vote on the floor on impeachment and commits to the rules of previous impeachment proceedings, you'll participate in that investigation?

Yeah. If the rules are fair, because I don't know. I don't know exactly your definition. If Republicans get a fair shake, because the Republicans have been, look, we were very nice to them. When Paul Ryan was the Speaker, he really wouldn't give subpoenas."

7. Cutaways

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Donald Trump, U.S. President:

"(Reporter) Joe Biden came out for the first time today and said you should be impeached. Your response?

So Biden is dropping like a rock. I don't think he's gonna make it. I didn't think he was gonna make it for a long time. I don't think he's gonna make it. And I guess this is one way he can do it. You know he didn't say that until right now and he sees what's happening to him. I guess he's no longer the front runner. But look, I feel badly for him because I know he's going through a lot. He's been hit and he's been caught red handed. I mean here's a man who is on tape saying exactly what he's going to do in terms of corruption and he gets away with it. If that ever happened to a Republican, they'd be getting the electric chair right now. They'd be right now being walked into the electric chair. It's a whole different standard. What Joe Biden said on tape this isn't like gee whiz we think. What he said on tape, and the fake media doesn't want to play the tape, they hardly play it. So I feel you know, that it's too bad what's happened to him. He's sinking and his campaign is sinking. But he walked away with hundreds of, I mean you look at the kind of numbers his son who is at best incompetent, got thrown out of the Navy. I don't even want to say why."

9. Wide shot of Trump speaking

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Donald Trump, U.S. President:

"Well the NBA is a different thing. I mean I watch this guy Steve Kerr (Golden State Warriors coach) He was like a little boy. He was so scared to be even answering the question, he couldn't answer the question, he was shaking, Oh I don't know. I don't know. He didn't know how to answer the question. And he had he'll talk about the United States very badly. I watched Popovich (San Antonio coach Greg Popovich), sort of the same thing but he didn't look quite as scared actually. But they talk badly about the United States but when it talks about China they don't want to say anything bad. I thought it was pretty sad actually. It'll be, it'll be very, it'll be very interesting. Excuse me?

(Reporter)  Are you OK then with the Chinese government pressuring the NBA over Hong Kong?

They have to work out their own situation. The NBA, they know what they're doing. But I watched the way that like Kerr and Popovich and some of the others were pandering to China and yet to our own country they don't, its like they don't respect it. It's like they don't respect it. I said, what a difference. Isn't it sad. It's very sad. To me it's very sad."

11. Wide shot of Trump speaking

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US House Intel Schiff (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Schiff: Sondland blocked from testifying to House
Story No: apus124778
Source: POOL
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 10/08/2019 02:21 PM
People: Adam Schiff , Joe Biden , Donald Trump
Subscription:

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff says the failure of a State Department official to show up at a deposition Tuesday as part of House Democrats' impeachment investigation is "yet additional strong evidence" of obstruction of Congress.

The Trump administration barred Gordon Sondland, the U.S. European Union ambassador, from closed-door testimony as several committees are investigating President Donald Trump's dealings with the president of Ukraine.

Text messages released last week revealed conversations between Sondland and other U.S. diplomats who were intermediaries as Trump urged the country to investigate political rival Joe Biden's family and the 2016 election.

Schiff and other Democrats have said that they will consider such obstruction if they draft articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump.

POOL

Washington - 8 October 2019

1. Pan, Rep. Adam Schiff walks to microphone

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Rep. Adam Schiff, Democrat - California, Chairman House of Intelligence Committee: ++CAMERA MOVES++

"Good morning, we were informed about an hour and a half ago that by the attorney for Ambassador Sondland that the State Department would refuse to allow him to testify today. This was after conversations well into yesterday afternoon and evening with the State Department legal adviser in which there was no indication that the ambassador would be a no show. Not only is the Congress being deprived of his testimony the American people are being deprived of his testimony today. But we are also aware that the ambassador has text messages or emails on a personal device which have been provided to the State Department although we have requested those from the ambassador and the State Department is withholding those messages as well. Those messages are also deeply relevant to this investigation and the impeachment inquiry. And I want to just explain for the public the significance of this witness and the significance of the decision evidently by the Secretary of State and president or president or both to withhold this key witness's testimony today. We know from the text messages that Ambassador Sondland was in discussion with Ukrainian counterparts, with fellow diplomatic personnel and the president, as well as at least one U.S. senator about the course of events that we are investigating. We know from those text messages that diplomatic personnel raised a concern with him that military assistance was being withheld to secure help from Ukraine in the president's re-election campaign. We know that. Ambassador Sondland had at least one discussion with a fellow diplomat on that very subject of why military assistance was being withheld. We know Ambassador Sondland was a key player in efforts to obtain a commitment from Ukraine to investigate a bogus conspiracy theory about the 2016 election as well as Joe Biden and his son. And we know that the ambassador has relevant evidence on whether the meeting with the president that the Ukrainians desperately sought, with President Trump, was being conditioned on these investigations that the president believed would help his re-election campaign. It is hard to overstate the significance of not just Ambassador Sondland's testimony and the documents but the testimony of others as well. The failure to produce this witness. The failure to produce these documents we consider yet additional strong evidence of obstruction of the constitutional functions of Congress, a coequal branch of government. There are four issues that we are looking at, at least four issues that we are looking at. All that go to the heart of our national security and by preventing us from hearing from this witness and obtaining these documents. The president and secretary of state are taking actions that prevent us from getting the facts needed to protect the nation's security."

++SOUND BITES SEPARATED BY BLACK++

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Rep. Adam Schiff, D- California, Chairman House of Intelligence Committee:

"This is one of the few impeachment inquiries in the history of our country. It goes to the core of whether the president abused his office to seek political help in his re-election campaign and did so to the detriment of our nation's security, did so by effectively coercing a country that has been invaded by Russia to investigate a rival and condition the relationship between this country and that country on whether they were willing to play ball. That is the gravity of the issues that we are investigating, that this impeachment inquiry is looking into. It is hard to imagine a set of facts more damaging to our national security and our standing in the world. But also more of a fundamental breach of the president's oath of office. The American people have the right to know if the president is acting in their interests, in the nation's interests with an eye towards our national security and not in his narrow personal political interests. They have a right to know indeed the American people have a need to know. And through this impeachment inquiry we are determined to find the answers. Thank you."

4. Schiff walks away

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US Vindman Removed
Title:
HD
Summary: Trump aide Vindman escorted out of White House
Story No: 4253472
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS , POOL
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/07/2020 10:00 PM
People: Adam Schiff , Joe Biden , Devin Nunes , Donald Trump
Subscription:

The decorated soldier and national security aide who played a central role in the Democrats' impeachment case against President Donald Trump was escorted out of the White House complex on Friday, according to his lawyer, who said he was asked to leave for “telling the truth.”

  

Vindman's status at the National Security Council, the foreign policy arm of the White House, had been uncertain since he testified that he didn't think it was “proper" for Trump to "demand that a foreign government investigate" former Vice President Joe Biden and his son’s dealings with the energy company Burisma in Ukraine.

Vindman's ouster seemed even more certain after Trump mocked him Thursday during his post-acquittal celebration with Republican supporters in the East Room and said Friday that he was not happy with him.

  

“I'm not happy with him,” Trump told reporters as he left the White House to head to North Carolina. “You think I'm supposed to be happy with him? I'm not. ... They'll make that decision.”

Vindman, a 20-year Army veteran, wore his uniform full of medals, including a purple heart, when he appeared late last year for what turned out to be a testy televised impeachment hearing.

Trump supporters raised questions about the Soviet Jewish immigrant's allegiance to the United States and noted that he had received offers to work for the government of Ukraine - offers Vindman said he swiftly dismissed.

POOL

ARCHIVE: Washington, DC - 19 November 2019

1. Various of Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman arriving to testify before House Intelligence Committee

2. Vindman at witness table with Pence aide Jennifer Williams

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Washington, DC - 7 February 2020

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Donald Trump, U.S. President

"Well, I'm not happy with him. You think I'm supposed to be happy with him? I'm not. They'll make that decision. You'll be hearing. They'll make a decision."

POOL

ARCHIVE: Washington, DC - 19 November 2019

4. Vindman and Williams being sworn in before testifying

5. Wide of hearing room with lawmakers and witnesses +++MUTE+++

6. Vindman testifying before committee

7. Mid of Rep. Adam Schiff and Rep. Devin Nunes

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ARCHIVE: Washington, DC - 7 November 2019

8. Wide of Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman arriving on Capitol Hill

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US Trump Acquittal (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Trump speaks after acquittal: We went through hell
Story No: apus130639
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/06/2020 06:07 PM
People: Barack Obama , Mitch McConnell , Chuck Grassley , Steven Mnuchin , Melania Trump , Devin Nunes , Jim Jordan , Donald Trump
Subscription:

Exulting in his impeachment acquittal, President Donald Trump took a scorched-earth victory lap Thursday, unleashing his fury against those who tried to remove him from office while looking ahead to his reelection campaign.

Trump, speaking to a room full of supporters at the White House, declared the impeachment proceedings a "disgrace" and complained anew that it was "a very unfair situation," echoing his broadsides hours earlier that stunned the crowd at an annual prayer breakfast.

"It was evil, it was corrupt," Trump declared at the White House. "This should never ever happen to another president, ever."

"We went through hell, unfairly. We did nothing wrong," he continued.

As Trump spoke, nearly every inch of the White House's East Room was packed with supporters. Among them: Republican senators who cast some of the votes to acquit him, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Rep. Chuck Grassley, several Cabinet members, including Attorney General William Barr and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, and staunch House allies including Reps. Jim Jordan, Devin Nunes and Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy.

Washington, DC - 6 February 2020

1. Wide shot of President Donald Trump walking into White House East Room

2. Side shot of Trump at podium

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Donald Trump, U.S. President:

"We've all been through a lot together and we probably deserve that hand for all of us because it's been a very unfair situation. I invited some of our very good friends and we have limited room. But everybody wanted to come. We kept it down to a minimum. And believe it or not, this is a minimum. But a tremendous thing was done over the last number of months. But really, if you go back to it, over the last number of years, we had the witch hunt. It started from the day we came down the elevator. Myself and our future first lady who is with us right now, thank you, Melania."

4. Cutaway of standing ovation for Melania Trump

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Donald Trump, U.S. President:

"And it never really stopped. We've been going through this now for over three years. It was evil. It was corrupt. It was dirty cops. It was leakers and liars. And this should never, ever happen to another president, ever. I don't know that other presidents would have been able to take it. Some people said, no, they wouldn't have. But I can tell you, at a minimum, you have to focus on this because it can get away very quickly no matter who you have with you. It can get away very quickly. It was a disgrace. Had I not fired James Comey, who was a disaster, by the way, it's possible I wouldn't even be standing here right now. We caught him in the act. Dirty cops, bad people. If this happened to President Obama, a lot of people would have been in jail for a long time already."

6. Wide side shot of Trump speaking

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Donald Trump, U.S. President:

"And this is really not a news conference, it's not a speech. It's not anything. It's just we're sort, of it's a celebration because we have something that just worked out. I mean, it worked out. We went through hell unfairly, did nothing wrong. Did nothing wrong. I've done things wrong in my life, I will admit, not purposely, but I've done things wrong. But this is what the end result is. (Trump holds up newspaper, crowd applauds)"

8. Trump holds up newspaper while crowd applauds

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Donald Trump, U.S. President:

"And we were treated unbelievably unfairly. And you have to understand, we first went through Russia, Russia, Russia. It was all bullshit. We then went through the Mueller report. And they should have come back one day later, they didn't. They came back two years later after lives were ruined, after people went bankrupt, after people lost all their money."

10. Wide side shot of Trump speaking

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US LA Impeachment Reaction (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: New Orleans residents react to Trump acquittal
Story No: apus130615
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/06/2020 01:10 AM
People: John Roberts , Joe Biden , Nancy Pelosi , Robert Mueller , Mitch McConnell , Donald Trump
Subscription:

President Donald Trump won impeachment acquittal Wednesday in the U.S. Senate, bringing to a close only the third presidential trial in American history with votes that split the country, tested civic norms and fed the tumultuous 2020 race for the White House.

With Chief Justice John Roberts presiding, senators sworn to do “impartial justice” stood at their desks to state their votes for the roll call - “guilty” or “not guilty” - in a swift tally almost exclusively along party lines. Visitors, including the president's allies, watched from the crowded gallery. Roberts read the declaration that Trump “be, and is hereby, acquitted of the charges.”

The outcome followed months of remarkable impeachment proceedings, from Speaker Nancy Pelosi's House to Mitch McConnell's Senate, reflecting the nation's unrelenting partisan divide three years into the Trump presidency.

Around the country there was reaction to the Trump acquittal and the Senate trial. "It cost me and you, the taxpayers, millions of dollars in wasted time. And I'm very upset with that," said Ken Gunter, a Republican and resident of New Orleans.

"I feel as though they felt he did something wrong but did not want to remove him from office and they want to allow the political process for an upcoming election," said Daniel Lewis, also of New Orleans and not affiliated with a political party.

What started as Trump's request for Ukraine to “do us a favor” spun into a far-reaching, 28,000-page report compiled by House investigators accusing an American president of engaging in shadow diplomacy that threatened U.S. foreign relations for personal, political gain as he pressured the ally to investigate Democratic rival Joe Biden ahead of the next election.

No president has ever been removed by the Senate.

A politically emboldened Trump has eagerly predicted vindication, deploying the verdict as a political anthem in his reelection bid. The president claims he did nothing wrong, decrying the “witch hunt” and “hoax” as extensions of special counsel Robert Mueller's probe into Russian 2016 campaign interference by those out to get him from the start of his presidency.

New Orleans – 5 February 2020

1. New Orleans neighborhood activity

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Daniel Lewis, New Orleans resident:

(No political party affiliation) "It's just like any other thing. If there is an action, we learn from the reaction. So, he's learned that he can get further away from the rule of law. That's my personal opinion."

3. Mardi Gras beads hanging on fence

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Daniel Lewis, New Orleans resident:

"Listening to the conversation and how some of the people got to that point, I feel as though they felt he did something wrong but did not want to remove him from office and they want to allow the political process for an upcoming election and make that decision. So I understand that and I can find some reasonable thought in that. But I do believe with....it's a country of rules and we are led by those rules. So, think there is some improvement in the process and how we can better explain what he did wrong and have some documentation and witnesses going forward just for historical context."

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Ken Gunter, New Orleans resident:

(Registered Republican) "It was a complete charade. It was a mockery of the law, and no matter who's in office, we don't want this to be pushed down our throats and to be railroaded because me as an everyday citizen, I've been railroaded. I know what happens. I know how it can be, that abuse of power can be put on you. And I saw that the Democratic Party was absolutely obsessed with nonsense. And it cost me and you, the taxpayers, millions of dollars in wasted time. And I'm very upset with that. And I wish that we had an accountability process for the ones that started this to be fined so heavily that they would think twice about going into a public domain to sue and to put people's character at risk and not have any kind of consequences for it and be paid while they're doing it. I think that is in total abuse of power."

6. Flowers along sidewalk

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Subjects: Legislature , Government and politics , Impeachments , Political issues , Legal proceedings , Law and order , General news , Elections , Acquittals , Court decisions
People: John Roberts , Joe Biden , Nancy Pelosi , Robert Mueller , Mitch McConnell , Donald Trump
Organisations: United States Senate, United States Congress, United States government
Locations: United States , North America
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US CA Impeachment Reaction (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: In San Francisco, viewers react to Trump acquittal
Story No: apus130611
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/05/2020 11:42 PM
People: Mitch McConnell , Nancy Pelosi , Joe Biden , Donald Trump
Subscription:

Democrats in liberal leaning San Francisco are expressing disappointment in the impeachment acquittal of President Donald Trump.

Trump was acquitted by the U.S. Senate Wednesday, bringing to a close only the third presidential trial in American history with votes that split the country.

A majority of Senators expressed unease with Trump's pressure campaign on Ukraine that resulted in the two articles of impeachment.

But the final tallies, 52-48 favoring acquittal of abuse of power, 53-47 of obstruction of Congress' investigation, fell far short.

Two-thirds "guilty" votes would have been needed to reach the Constitution's bar of high crimes and misdemeanors to convict and remove Trump from office.

Democrats at a small watch party at a cafe in San Francisco's Mission District say they expected Senate

Republicans to find Trump not guilty, but they said it was still difficult to watch.

The outcome Wednesday followed months of remarkable impeachment proceedings, from Speaker Nancy Pelosi's House to Mitch McConnell's Senate, reflecting the nation's unrelenting partisan divide three years into the Trump presidency.

What started as Trump's request for Ukraine to "do us a favor" spun into a far-reaching, 28 thousand-page report compiled by House investigators accusing an American president of engaging in shadow diplomacy that threatened U.S. foreign relations for personal, political gain as he pressured the ally to investigate Democratic rival Joe Biden ahead of the next election.

San Francisco - 5 February 2020

1. Election Countdown clock outside Manny's Cafe

2. "Impeach Trump" sticker on cafe window

3. Patrons work on laptops while listening to Senate vote

4. Woman stares at television while votes are cast

5. SOUNDBITE (English) David Acker, Oakland resident:

"It just makes me despondent and makes me want to cry. We're sitting here listening to this right now and overtime I hear not guilty I feel this pang of, this is not what Washington and Hamilton and Adams and Jefferson and Madison had in mind."

6. Woman stands in front of TV while votes are read

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Annie Anderson, visitor from Rhode Island:

"It's not a surprise but it's sickening and it's horrifying. I thought Collins, she always teases us and does the wrong thing. But I thought there might be some hope for a minute about a week ago that they would realize how fragile our Democracy is and they wouldn't do it, that they would wake up and get nervous and say this is beyond the pale. But I'm not surprised."

8. Close up of vote count on TV screen

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Manny Yekutiel, San Francisco resident:

"I absolutely think it was the right thing to do. It was a hard thing to do knowing that we likely didn't have the votes in the Senate. Yet still I had hope by some stroke of luck it would go in our favor but it didn't happen. We did just witness the first bipartisan vote in the Senate to remove a United States President. It is heavy and it does reflect on him and you've seen it in his poll numbers. His poll numbers should be also higher than they are right now. He's at 49 percent. Not that we should be doing this for any reason other than the crime itself but it is effecting this President."

10. Man watches impeachment vote on television

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Subjects: Legislature , Government and politics , Political corruption , Political issues , Acquittals , Court decisions , Legal proceedings , Law and order , General news , Impeachments
People: Mitch McConnell , Nancy Pelosi , Joe Biden , Donald Trump
Organisations: United States Senate, United States Congress, United States government
Locations: United States , North America , San Francisco , California
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US Senate Impeachment Reaction (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Democrats, Republicans disagree over witnesses
Story No: apus130236
Source: POOL
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/30/2020 05:35 AM
People: John Bolton , Mitch McConnell , Donald Trump , Alan Dershowitz , Joe Biden , Mark Warner , Richard Shelby , Nancy Pelosi , Debbie Lesko , Robert Casey , Mazie Hirono , Lisa Murkowski , Hakeem Jeffries
Subscription:

In a striking shift from President Donald Trump’s claim of “perfect” dealings with Ukraine, his defense asserted Wednesday at his Senate trial that a trade of U.S. military aid for political favors - even if proven - could not be grounds for his impeachment.

Trump's defenders relied on retired professor Alan Dershowitz, a member of their team, who told senators that every politician conflates his own interest with the public interest. "It cannot be impeachable,” he declared.

Democrats pressed hard to force the Senate to call more witnesses to testify, but Republicans appeared intently focused on bringing the impeachment trial to a vote of acquittal, possibly in a matter of days. Even new revelations from former national security adviser John Bolton were countered by the president's lawyers, who used Wednesday's unusual question-and-answer session to warn off prolonging the proceeding, insisting senators have heard enough.

Democrats argued Bolton's forthcoming book cannot be ignored. It contends he personally heard Trump say he wanted military aid withheld from Ukraine until it agreed to investigate Joe Biden and his son, Hunter Biden - the abuse of power charge that is the first article of impeachment.

The vote on calling witnesses is expected by Friday.

Trump faces charges from the House that he abused his power like no other president, jeopardizing Ukraine and U.S.-Ukraine relations by using the military aid as leverage while the vulnerable ally battled Russia. The second article of impeachment says Trump then obstructed the House probe in a way that threatened the nation's three-branch system of checks and balances.

Over two days, senators are grilling the House Democrats prosecuting the case and the Republican president's defense team. Dozens of questions were asked and answered Wednesday in five-minute clips, with senators under orders to sit silently without comment, submitting their questions in writing. They finished shortly past 11 p.m. and were expected to keep going Thursday.

POOL

Washington, DC - 29 January 2020

1. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell leaving

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Mark Warner, (D) Virginia:

"I could not abide the president's council saying foreign interference in a sense is OK if it doesn't fall into the classic definition of a campaign contribution and the whitewash DOJ investigation somehow makes anything and everything the president's done in terms of soliciting foreign interference legitimate. That is not the policy United States government. That is not what Mr. Trump's own director of the CIA, director of the NSA, director of national intelligence, director of the FBI, who've all said their top priority going to 2020 is to make sure that foreign interference does not continue and is not allowed. The president's council tonight, in a sense, gave a green light for that kind of behavior to continue."

3. Senate Minority Leader Chuch Schumer walking, speaking on phone

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Mark Warner, (D) Virginia:

"I cannot imagine there would be any Republican senator on the Intelligence Committee that would endorse the president's council's position that foreign interference, as long as it doesn't meet Bill Barr's contribution definition under this DOJ, is totally OK. That is not our policy. It is dangerous. It is against everything that our intelligence community and our law enforcement community is working on. And again, I'm going to call on my Republican colleagues as well to stand up and reinforce that we do not want, whether it be Russia, China, Iran, Ukraine or others, interfering in our election."

5. Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski of Alaska walking through crowd

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Bob Casey, (D) Pennsylvania:

"It seems like every question, if not every other question, gets back to the fundamental issue of relevant documents, relevant witnesses, and I think that the other side was having great trouble for days now explaining why there weren't for witnesses or documents and that got ever more difficult in light of the Bolton disclosures."

7. Democratic Senator Mazie Hirono of Hawaii rides down escalator

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Rep. Mike Johnson, (R) Louisiana:

"Remember this and you keep hearing this theme repeated over and over the abuse of power being a standard, the new standard apparently, to impeach a president, if we do that, we it's danger, danger, danger as Jay Sekulow emphasized on the on the Senate floor yesterday. You can not have that be the bar for impeachment. If we do, we're opening a Pandora's box for the country. If it had been that standard for the past,  every president since George Washington would have been going through this tirade, this charade just like this."

9. Democratic Rep. Hakeem Jeffries of New York, House Manager, walking with two police officers

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Rep. Debbie Lesko, (R) Arizona:

"Did the House tried to follow up on any of their witnesses or getting witnesses or subpoenas to the courts during that 33 days that Nancy Pelosi held on to their articles of impeachment? And the answer was no. And so now for them to claim they need witnesses when they didn't do their job in the House is just wrong. And I also just saw that video from John Bolton, which which is really interesting, saying that the phone calls were very good. And so, life is interesting now, isn't it?"

11. Republican Senator Richard Shelby of Alabama stops to speak to woman

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Subjects: Political corruption , Political issues , Government and politics , Political parties , Political organizations , Impeachments , Legislature
People: John Bolton , Mitch McConnell , Donald Trump , Alan Dershowitz , Joe Biden , Mark Warner , Richard Shelby , Nancy Pelosi , Debbie Lesko , Robert Casey , Mazie Hirono , Lisa Murkowski , Hakeem Jeffries
Organisations: United States military, United States government, U.S. Democratic Party, United States Senate, United States Congress, U.S. Republican Party
Locations: United States , North America , Ukraine , Eastern Europe , Europe , District of Columbia
Show story thumbnails
US Romney Warner Reaction (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Romney: I have confidence in John Bolton
Story No: apus130194
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/29/2020 07:11 PM
People: Joe Biden , Donald Trump , John Bolton , Mark Warner , Mitt Romney
Subscription:

As the senate continues to debate whether additional witnesses should be called during the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump, one senator he has a "great deal of confidence" in one potential witness, former national security adviser John Bolton.

Republican Sen. Mitt Romney continues to make his case for allowing Bolton to testify in the trial.

"There are things that I I'd like to get evidence on, that we haven't seen," Romney said.

"I mean John Bolton, for instance, may be able to tell us precisely when the decision was made not to provide the aid on an immediate basis to Ukraine and what the President's reasoning was at that point. He may be able to tell us that."

Democrat Sen. Mark Warner also said that Bolton's testimony could be helpful and said he doesn't think the White House will be successful in stopping the publication of his book.

Leaked passages from the manuscript of Bolton's soon-to-be published book are roiling Washington, including the revelation that he says Trump told him he was conditioning the release of military aid to Ukraine on whether its government would help investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and his son.

Washington – 29 January 2020

++EDIT STARTS AND ENDS ON SOUNDBITE++

1. SOUNDBITE: (English) Sen. Mitt Romney (R) Utah:

"I'm not going to describe the state of my party. Again, I'm going to tell you about my own state and the fact that I'm a senate juror is the responsibility that I have. And there are things that I, I'd like to get evidence on, that we haven't seen. I mean John Bolton, for instance, may be able to tell us precisely when the decision was made not to provide the aid on an immediate basis to Ukraine and what the President's reasoning was at that point. He may be able to tell us that. In addition, was there ever a time when the President himself communicated to Ukraine or to someone in the administration to tell Ukraine that the aid was being held up in order to encourage them to investigate the Bidens? These are questions that we've seen no evidence on at this stage and I'd like to get that answer.

(Reporter: Do you have any questions about John Bolton's credibility?)

I think any witness would be evaluated in terms of their credibility, but I have a great deal of confidence in John Bolton. I've known him for some period of time. He's a brilliant individual that I believe is a very strong and able person. And obviously he was selected to be part of the administration and that bodes well for him as well."

2. Romney departs.

3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Sen. Mark Warner, (D) Virginia:

"I've not seen the (John Bolton's) book. It's hard for me to imagine that the White House is going to be successful at stopping this book, a book that's supposed to be in the hands of the American public by the middle of March. Think how stupid the whole Senate is going to look if this book has critical pieces of information that don't get exposed now, and suddenly in the middle of March American say, 'Well these were relevant facts. Why didn't the senate consider it?' So my hope is that my Republican colleagues will find a way to Mr. Bolton's testimony, in a deposition, find some way. This notion that they don't want to simply extend the process if there's relevant information out there doesn't seem to hold a lot of water."

++SOTS SEPARATED BY WHITE FLASH++

4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Sen. Mark Warner, (D) Virginia:

"You don't have to be a legal commentator to draw the conclusion that if the president doesn't want this book out there, then there may be facts in this book that don't go along with the President's case."

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US Trump Bolton Debrief (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Bolton manuscript gives jolt to impeachment trial
Story No: apus130079
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/27/2020 11:22 PM
People: John Bolton , Joe Biden , Mick Mulvaney , Donald Trump
Subscription:

A single paper copy in a nondescript envelope arrived at the White House on Dec. 30. Four weeks later, news of John Bolton’s book manuscript about his time as President Donald Trump’s national security adviser has exploded into public view, sending a jolt through the president’s impeachment trial.

  

The book contains an account of an August conversation in which Bolton says Trump told him that he wanted to withhold hundreds of millions of dollars in security aid from Ukraine until it helped him with investigations into political rival Joe Biden.

  

It's a dramatic eyewitness rebuttal to claims by Trump and his legal team that the president didn’t hold up the aid for political reasons.

The account immediately gave Democrats new fuel in their pursuit of sworn testimony from Bolton and other witnesses, a question expected to be taken up later this week by the Republican-led Senate.

  

Bolton has already told lawmakers that he is willing to testify, despite the president's order barring aides from cooperating in the probe.

  

Within hours of the first report, a pre-order link was posted for “The Room Where It Happened; A White House Memoir." The homage to the song from the smash Broadway hit “Hamilton” is styled cheekily inside an oval on the image of the book cover released late Sunday.

  

Bolton's account was confirmed to The Associated Press by a person familiar with the manuscript on the condition of anonymity to discuss the book. It was first reported by The New York Times.

Bolton’s acrimonious departure from the White House came a day before Trump ultimately released the Ukraine aid on Sept. 11. Since leaving his post, he has avoided publicly commenting on his time in the administration, instead quietly writing the 528-page book, which is set to be published on March 17.

ARCHIVE: Washington, DC - 30 September 2019

1. Mid shot of John Bolton walking up to podium

Washington, DC - 27 January 2020

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Zeke Miller, Associated Press

"Well, we know that John Bolton has written a book about his time in the Trump White House. We know that the White House has had the book for about four weeks now for as part of a standard preclearance process. And we know what's in it. Some of it has leaked out. John Bolton providing his firsthand account of his conversations with the President Trump surrounding Ukraine, Ukraine military assistance, where John Bolton says the president told him back in August that he wanted to withhold Ukraine military assistance until it cooperated with investigations into his political rivals, directly contradicting the arguments put forward by the president's legal team on the Senate floor."

ARCHIVE: Washington, DC - 30 September 2019

3. John Bolton speaking about foreign policy and North Korea

Washington, DC - 27 January 2020

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Zeke Miller, Associated Press

"Well, obviously, this has been a bit of a surprise revelation in this Senate impeachment trial, which seemed to have been sort of coasting towards the conclusion that would have likely ended without witnesses. Now, that is a real open question. You're seeing some wavering from Republican senators and some real tensions and whether or not that will actually happen. That has been the Democratic priority since this trial started, to have witnesses like Bolton and Mick Mulvaney come forward and come testify under oath. The president has been trying to block that. And Republican senators seemed like they were going to go along with the White House on that. And now there seems to be a little at least a little bit of wiggle room."

ARCHIVE: Washington, DC - 1 May 2019

5. STILL of John Bolton speaking outside White House

Washington, DC - 27 January 2020

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Zeke Miller, Associated Press

"Well, there are two parallel tracks. One is going to be the White House effort to try to block John Bolton. There are indications from the White House that they are going to try to invoke executive privilege or other national security progressives in trying to block John Bolton's testimony here. And that will could find its way, winding its way through the courts or not. It sort of depends. It's a political issue. Some of this is really that this sort of confrontation between the White House and a Senate court of impeachment has really never been tested before. Secondarily, there is what is going to happen once if there are enough Republican senators to crossover with Democrats and bring witnesses and documents into this trial. What would come out of that is it's kind of like essentially opening Pandora's box here. Nobody really knows who will get called. We've seen indications from some Republicans that they would resist calling the Bidens in, as the president would like to, or the Intelligence Committee whistleblower that said, nobody really knows once that once the doors open to the witnesses and how long this trial can go on for."

ARCHIVE: Washington, DC - 8 July 2019

7. STILL of John Bolton making remarks about U.S. and Israel

Washington, DC - 27 January 2020

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Zeke Miller, Associated Press

"It really could go on for a few weeks. It's also not clear the format in which Bolton would testify if the Clinton trial is any guide. He met with the witnesses that were called in that trial, were deposed in in closed session, and then their testimony was made available to senators. Is that a model that that would be used here or would would Bolton testify in front of the full Senate? We don't really know the parameters of that debate yet. And we'll sort of we won't really get a sense of where the senators are on that until those votes later this week."

ARCHIVE: Washington, DC - 30 September 2019

9. Mid shot of John Bolton exiting stage

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US Dems Impeach Briefing (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Schumer calls on Bolton to testify
Story No: apus130035
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/27/2020 04:56 PM
People: Joe Biden , Charles Schumer , John Bolton , Donald Trump
Subscription:

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer is calling on John Bolton to testify at President Donald Trump's impeachment trial after the revelation that a draft of a book by Trump's former national security adviser undercuts a key defense argument - that Trump never tied withholding military aid to Ukraine to his demand the country help investigate political rival Joe Biden.

Schumer at a press conference on Monday called the reports of what's detailed in Bolton's book "stunning."  

"We are all staring a White House cover-up in the face," said Sen. Schumer.

"If senate Republicans are not going to vote to call Mr. Bolton and Mr. Mulvaney and the other witnesses now, if they're not going to ask for notes and emails, they're going to be part of the cover-up too."

Republican senators face a pivotal moment as the arrive on Capitol Hill to resume Trump's trial. Democrats are demanding sworn testimony from Bolton and other key witnesses, and pressure is mounting on at least four Republicans to buck GOP leaders and form a bipartisan majority to force the issue.

Washington - 27 January 2020

1. Sen. Chuck Schumer and others arrive for press conference

2. SOUNDBITE: (English) Sen. Chuck Schumer, Senate Minority Leader:

"This is stunning. It goes right to the heart of the charges against the president. Ambassador Bolton essentially confirms the president committed the offenses charged in the first article of impeachment. It boils down to one thing – we have a witness with firsthand evidence of the president's actions for which he is on trial. He is ready and willing to testify. How can senate Republicans not vote to call that witness and request his documents? Anyone, anyone who says the House case lacks eyewitnesses and then votes to prevent eyewitnesses from testifying is talking out of both sides of their mouth."

3. Various of press conference

4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Sen. Chuck Schumer, Senate Minority Leader:

"If there was ever, even a shred of logic left to not hear witnesses, and review the documents, Mr. Bolton's book just erased it. Ambassador Bolton's manuscript was sent to the White House over a month ago. The president ordered everyone with firsthand knowledge of his actions not to testify in the impeachment inquiry. We're all staring a White House cover-up in the face. It is so clear what's going on here. I don't need to spell it out for you. If senate Republicans are not going to vote to call Mr. Bolton and Mr. Mulvaney and the other witnesses now, if they're not going to ask for notes and emails, they're going to be part of the cover-up too, because we have this out in the open."

5. Various of press conference

6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Sen. Chuck Schumer, Senate Minority Leader:

"Of course the president denied Ambassador Bolton's account in a series of late night tweets. Already some Republicans are saying, 'Oh this is just a he said – he said affair, just a matter of conflicting accounts.' I would remind everyone between President Trump and Ambassador Bolton, only one of them is willing to testify in the senate under oath. Only Mr. Bolton is willing to swear that he is telling the truth."

7. Schumer leaves podium

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US GOP Impeach Briefing (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: GOP Senators: 'Voters should decide Trump's fate'
Story No: apus129941
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/24/2020 07:21 PM
People: Donald Trump , Lindsey Graham , Joe Biden , Adam Schiff , John Barrasso
Subscription:

Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham and his GOP colleague, Sen. John Barasso criticized the slow pace of how the Democratic impeachment managers have been presenting their case, and they said they trusted American voters to decide President Donald Trump's fate over the U.S. Senate.

"That decision needs to be made by the voters," Graham said.

"What we've heard from Adam Schiff is he doesn't trust the voters," Barrasso said.

"He didn't trust him in 2016, and doesn't trust him in 2020."

Graham also said he thinks former Vice President Biden and his son, Hunter, should both be investigated for their dealings with Ukraine.

"I think it's bad foreign policy, if you're going to be in charge of dealing with corruption in the Ukraine, that your son hook up with the most corrupt company in the Ukraine and turn Ukraine into A.T.M. machine," Graham said.

"When you put your family member in that situation, it's not good, folks. That's not good foreign policy."

Washington, DC - 24 January 2020

1. Mid of Republican senators walking to podium

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Lindsey Graham, (R) South Carolina:

"Schiff has done a good job, I think. I've said that. But his closing summary was different. He told me that I have to get rid of this president now because I can't trust him to do what's best for the country because he'll only do what's best for Donald Trump. That decision needs to be made by the voters. And here's how I'm gonna make that decision. I trust Donald Trump to do what's best for the country."

+++BLACK FRAMES+++

3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Sen. John Barrasso, (R) Wyoming:

"What we've heard from Adam Schiff is he doesn't trust the voters. He didn't trust him in 2016 and doesn't trust him in 2020, which is why he doesn't want to just eliminate and remove President Trump from office. He also wants to remove him from the ballot in 2020. And you're going to ask four Democrat senators who are still running for president to vote on that. To me, that is a conflict of interest on their part."

+++BLACK FRAMES+++

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. John Barrasso, (R) Wyoming:

"It seems to me their case is weaker today than it was yesterday. They're so little brought out that kind of every hour and a half bring out the same thing. They've rushed it through the house and now they say we want witnesses because we didn't have time in the house. We were going to, after the president's defense gets to present their case tomorrow and then Monday and Tuesday, we're going to 16 hours for questioning and then we're going to have a vote in the Senate. Do we need more information or have we heard enough so we can go to final judgment? We have heard plenty. They're sending the managers for the Democrats have said there is overwhelming evidence. There's a mountain of evidence. They said it's rock solid evidence. They shouldn't need any more information to make a final decision."

+++BLACK FRAMES+++

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Lindsey Graham, (R) South Carolina

"I don't know about you, but it became mind numbing after a while. I got the general point you're trying to make the fourth time you told me so. They're over-trying their case and I would just urge them to not do that because eventually it gets just hard to follow."

+++BLACK FRAMES+++

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Lindsey Graham, (R) South Carolina

"And from a foreign policy point of view, as much as I like Joe Biden. And I do respect him and I do admire him. I've traveled the world with him. I think it's bad foreign policy, if you're going to be in charge of dealing with corruption in the Ukraine, that your son hooked up with the most corrupt company in the Ukraine and turned Ukraine into A.T.M. machine. You worry about the Russians compromising us because of Burisma. When you put your family member in that situation, it's not good, folks. That's not good foreign policy."

+++BLACK FRAMES+++

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Lindsey Graham, (R) South Carolina

"That when it came to President Trump's insistence that somebody look at what happened with the Bidens in the Ukraine, I think he's right. I think somebody should. Not a partisan politician, because if you spend any time looking at the public record, this is not right. And I say this about a good friend. If you change the name to Pence or Trump or Barrasso or Graham, there'd be a completely different attitude by my friends on the other side. I can only imagine if a Republican vice president given the charge to clean up the Ukraine, and this happened."

8. Mid of Republican senators exiting briefing room

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US Impeach Arrivals (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: All eyes on Senate, as impeachment trial begins
Story No: apus129722
Source: POOL
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/21/2020 06:48 PM
People: Bill Clinton , John Roberts , John Roberts , Mitch McConnell , Kamala Harris , Lisa Murkowski , James Lankford , Bernie Sanders , Marco Rubio , Amy Klobuchar , Sherrod Brown , Patty Murray , Donald Trump , Patrick Leahy , Chris Van Hollen , Sheldon Whitehouse , Ted Cruz , Richard Blumenthal
Subscription:

President Donald Trump's impeachment trial quickly burst into a partisan fight Tuesday at the Capitol as Democrats objected strongly to rules proposed by the Republican leader for compressed arguments and a speedy trial.

With Trump's presidency on the line, and the nation deeply divided just weeks before the first Democratic primary contests, four senators who are also presidential candidates will be off the campaign trail, seated as jurors.

Senator Bernie Sanders told reporters he was balancing "with much difficulty," his campaign for the presidency along with his constitutional responsibilities to be a juror in the impeachment trial.

Chief Justice John Roberts gaveled open the session, senators having taken an oath last week to do "impartial justice" as jurors.

The first test was coming as senators prepared to begin debate and vote on Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell's proposed rules.

The package diverges in some ways from the most recent impeachment trial, of Bill Clinton, by condensing opening arguments into two days for each side. It pushes votes to consider whether or not to hear from witnesses later in the process.

The rare impeachment trial, unfolding in an election year, is testing whether Trump's actions toward Ukraine warrant removal at the same time that voters are forming their own verdict his White House.

POOL

Washington - 21 January 2020

1. Mid, pan protesters chanting "Trump is guilty," outside of Capitol Hill

2. Pan, Alaskan Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski surrounded by reporters in subway, going up escalator

3. Close-up Oklahoma Republican Senator James Lankford speaking to reporters

4. Pan, Democratic Senator Corey Booker from New Jersey walking through subway

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Bernie Sanders, Independent - Vermont:

"(Reporter: Senator Sanders, how are you balancing the trial with campaigning?)

With much difficulty, we have a great group of volunteers in Iowa and New Hampshire knocking on doors in very, very cold weather and we are going to be dependent on them.  I have to do my constitutional responsibility and I'm here.

(Reporter: And you have your surrogates out in Iowa as well?)

Yeah, I think we are going to have a number of surrogates out as well."

6. Pan Senators Chris Van Hollen, Democrat - Maryland, and Sheldon Whitehouse, Democrat - Rhode Island, walk past  

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Richard Blumenthal, Democrat - Connecticut:

"There will amendments that provide for a fairer, fuller proceedings than the McConnell rush and straight-jacketed process will provide. What Senator McConnell would do is essentially unfairly constrict and railroad the managers' case and there will be amendments to make it fuller, fairer."

8. Close-up Senator Amy Klobuchar, Democrat - Minnesota, speaking to reporters

9. Pan, Senate Leader Mitch McConnell walking into the Senate chamber

10. Pan Republican Senator Ted Cruz walking into the Senate chamber

11.  Pan Florida Republican Senator Marco Rubio walking

12. Pan Ohio Democratic Senator Sherrod Brown walking past

13. Pan, Washington State Democratic Senator Patty Murray walks into the Senate chamber

14. Pan, Senator Patrick Leahy, Democrat from Vermont walks by

15. Close-up pan California Democratic Senator Kamala Harris walks into Senate chamber

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US Senate Impeachment Animation (CR)
Title:
HD
Summary: AP Explains: US Senate impeachment trial process
Story No: apus129449
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/15/2020 05:17 PM
People:
Subscription:

What happens during an impeachment trial? Here's a look at some of the key players and what they will do during the rare event.

The trial includes Senators, House members who serve as prosecutors in the Senate and lawyers who defend the president. The president himself can also show up to answer the charges, too.

  

The Chief Justice of the United States presides over the trial and has the power under longstanding Senate rules to "rule on all questions of evidence." That means he could, in theory, allow House members to call the witnesses they want and decide what evidence gets introduced.

  

But the chief justice's rulings could be overridden by a majority of the Senate. The standing rules also give him the option of letting the Senate decide such questions in the first place.

It's possible the Senate also could vote on specific ground rules – rules that address witnesses and other issues – before the trial begins or while it's underway.

  

While most of the proceedings are public, the Senate could decide to hold its deliberations before final votes behind closed doors.

Both sides get to argue their case when the trial begins and at its close, before the Senate votes on each article of impeachment.

It takes 67 votes to convict at an impeachment trial, if all 100 senators vote. But, a simple majority could vote to end the trial.

If the president is acquitted, the trial ends and he or she remains in office.

If the president is convicted on any of the articles of impeachment, he or she is automatically removed from office and the vice president is sworn in.

Only two presidents have gone through impeachment trials in American history. Neither appeared in the Senate to answer charges or was removed from office. President Andrew Johnson narrowly escaped conviction by a single vote.

No Location - 15 January 2020

1. Animation illustrating what happens during a U.S. Senate impeachment trial.

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US Pelosi Impeach Managers (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Pelosi names impeachment managers for Trump trial
Story No: apus129443
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/15/2020 04:25 PM
People: Donald Trump , Adam Schiff , Val Demings , Jerrold Nadler , Hakeem Jeffries , Zoe Lofgren , Nancy Pelosi , Vladimir Putin , Mitch McConnell , Rudolph Giuliani , Joe Biden
Subscription:

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Wednesday named two House chairmen who led President Donald Trump's impeachment inquiry as prosecutors for Trump's Senate trial.

Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, who led the probe, and Judiciary Chair Rep. Jerrold Nadler, whose committee approved the impeachment articles, as among the managers of the prosecution.

"Today is an important day," said Pelosi, flanked by the team. "This is about the Constitution of the United States."'

Schiff and Nadler will lead the seven member team that includes a diverse selection of lawmakers, particularly those with courtroom experience.

They include Hakeem Jeffries of New York, Sylvia Garcia of Texas, Val Demings of Florida, Jason Crow of Colorado and Zoe Lofgren of California.

The House is set to vote later in the day to send the articles of impeachment to the Senate for a trial on whether the charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress are grounds for his removal. The managers will walk then walk the articles across the Capitol to the Senate.

Trump was impeached by the Democratic-led House last month on charges of abuse of power over his pressure on Ukraine to investigate Democratic rival Joe Biden as Trump withheld aid from the country. He was also charged with obstructing Congress' ensuing probe.

"This is about the Constitution of the United States and its important for the president to know and Putin to know the American voter, voters in America should decide who our president is, not Vladimir Putin and Russia," Pelosi said.

New details of Trump's efforts on Ukraine emerged late Tuesday, increasing pressure on senators to call witnesses in the trial, a step that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has been reluctant to take.

House investigators announced they were turning over a "trove" of new records of phone calls, text messages and other information from Lev Parnas, an associate of Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani.

Pelosi, who has been criticized by many Republicans for delaying turning over the articles of impeachment to the Senate, said Wednesday that "time has been our friend because it has yielded incriminating evidence."

Trump's trial will be only the third presidential impeachment trial in U.S. history, and it comes against the backdrop of a politically divided nation and an election year.

Washington, DC - 15 January 2020

1.  Mid shot of Nancy Pelosi walking into House Gallery with impeachment managers

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Rep. Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the House:

"Today is an important day because today is the day that we name the managers who go to the floor to pass the resolution to transmit the articles of impeachment to the Senate. And later in the day, when we have our engrossment, that we march those articles of impeachment to the United States Senate."

3. Cutaway of press

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Rep. Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the House:

"Time has been our friend in all of this because it has yielded incriminating evidence, more truth into the public domain."

5. Wide cutaway of Pelosi speaking

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Rep. Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the House:

"This is about the Constitution of the United States and it's important for the president to know and Putin to know the American voter, voters in America should decide who our president is, not Vladimir Putin and Russia. So today I'm very proud to present the managers who will bring the case, which we have great confidence in, in terms of impeaching the president and his removal. But this further evidence insist, and we wouldn't be in this situation had we not waited, insist that there be, that there be witnesses and that we see documentation."

7. Wide cutaway of Pelosi speaking

8. Wide shot of Pelosi and managers

9. Cutaway of managers

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Rep. Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the House:

"Well, let me just say that the, what is at stake here is the Constitution of the United States. This is what an impeachment is about. The president violated his oath of office, undermined our national security, jeopardized the integrity of our elections, tried to use the appropriations process as his private A.T.M. machine to grant or withhold funds granted by Congress in order to advance his personal and political advantage. That is what the senators should be looking into."

11. Cutaway of photographers

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Rep. Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the House:

"So this is a very serious matter and we take it to heart in a really solemn way, in a very solemn way. It's about the Constitution. It's about the Republic if we can keep it. And they shouldn't be frivolous with the Constitution of the United States, even though the president of the United States has. The president is not above the law. He will be held accountable. He has been held accountable. He has been impeached. He's been impeached forever. They can never erase that."

13. Wide shot of Pelosi speaking

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Archive US John Bolton (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Bolton willing to testify in impeachment trial if subpoenaed
Story No: apus129002
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/07/2020 07:29 AM
People: Bill Clinton , Mitch McConnell , Donald Trump , John Bolton
Subscription:

Former White House national security adviser John Bolton said he is “prepared to testify” if he is subpoenaed by the Senate in its impeachment trial  of President Donald Trump, a surprise statement that bolstered Democrats in their push for new witnesses.

Bolton, who left the White House in September, said Monday that he has weighed the issues of executive privilege and after “careful consideration and study” decided that he would comply with any Senate subpoena.

“If the Senate issues a subpoena for my testimony, I am prepared to testify," he said.

If Bolton were to appear, he could provide a first-hand account of events central to the impeachment case against the president. As a senior adviser, he was present for key moments that were investigated in the House's impeachment inquiry, including meetings with Ukrainian officials.

His willingness to comply with a subpoena could complicate the strategy of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who has expressed resistance to calling new witnesses. Bolton left a message for McConnell before he issued his statement on Monday morning, a person familiar with the matter confirmed to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity because he or she wasn't authorized to speak publicly.

McConnell has called for a swift impeachment trial, with a possible final vote after opening arguments. He has repeatedly referred to President Bill Clinton's impeachment, when leaders decided how to proceed after the trial had started. In that case, witnesses gave closed-door depositions and some excerpts of those interviews were played on the Senate floor.

Washington, DC - 30 September 2019

1. Mid shot of John Bolton walking up to podium

2. SOUNDBITE (English) John Bolton, former national security adviser:

"I am delighted to be here today. I'm also sure the leadership of North Korea is delighted that am here today in a private capacity. At least that's what I've read. Perhaps they'll be a little less delighted now that I can speak in unvarnished terms about the grave and growing threat that the North Korean nuclear weapons program poses to international peace and security."

3. Bolton walking off stage

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US Trump Impeachment Van Drew (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Trump: Don't feel like I'm being impeached
Story No: apus128404
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 12/19/2019 09:29 PM
People: Donald Trump , Barack Obama , Ronald Reagan
Subscription:

President Donald Trump says he doesn't feel like he's impeached 'because it's a hoax, it's a setup."

Trumps comments came during a meeting in the Oval Office Thursday with Rep. Jeff Van Drew, a New Jersey Democrat who broke with his party to vote against Trump's impeachment, is becoming a Republican.

"It's a horrible thing they did," said Trump.

"They put the arm on everybody. They tried to get him to do what they had to do. Many of those people were like Jeff, where they didn't want to vote that way. But it doesn't feel to me it doesn't feel like impeachment last."

Van Drew on Wednesday voted against the articles of impeachment as a Democrat, a move that aided GOP attempts to depict Democrats as divided on the matter while Republicans voted unanimously against impeachment.

“I believe that this is just a better fit for me,” Van Drew said of joining the GOP. Trump announced that he is endorsing Van Drew for reelection, calling him “a tremendous asset for the party."

The 66-year-old was a conservative state senator before he joined Congress, bucking Democrats on issues including gun control and gay marriage.

His district has become increasingly conservative, with Trump carrying it narrowly in 2016 after Barack Obama won it in 2008 and 2012.

Washington DC - 19 December 2019

1. President Donald Trump and Rep. Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey who is expected to switch party affiliation

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Donald Trump, U.S. President:

"(Reporter off camera: "What does it feel like to be the third president in U.S. history to be impeached?")

Well, I don't feel like I'm being impeached because it's a hoax. It's a setup. It's a horrible thing they did. They happened to have a small majority and they took that small majority and they forced people. And, you know, they said, oh, I watched Pelosi out there saying, oh, no, we don't want to talk to anybody. They put the arm on everybody. They tried to get them to do what they had to do. Many of those people were like Jeff, where they didn't want to vote that way. But it doesn't feel to me it doesn't feel like impeachment ."

3. Cutaway

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Donald Trump, U.S. President:

"Now I understand they're playing games. They don't want to put in their articles, their ridiculous, phony, fraudulent articles. And I think they're not allowed to do that. Hear it's unconstitutional and a lot of other things. But they don't want to put them in because they're ashamed of them, because it's what they've done is wrong. And it's bad for the country. Very, very bad for the country."

5. Cutaway

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Donald Trump, U.S. President:

"We have a very big announcement to me. I think it's been many years. I hear 10 years, maybe more where Jeff Van Drew highly respected. In fact, I didn't know as a Democrat how you could have won in that district. I know the district very well, but that is a great tribute to you. But Jeff will be joining the Republican Party, and we were very fortunate. He voted our way yesterday, as you probably know. And we had a totally unified party. I don't think there's ever been a time where the Republican Party was so united."

7. Mid, Trump and Van Drew shake hadns

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Rep. Jeff Van Drew, (R) New Jersey:

"I'm a capitalist. Socialism, in my opinion, has no place in the United States of America. And I think everyone should know that I believe that this country can afford people opportunity and give them that opportunity so that they can succeed. And we you all should know that as well."

9. Wide, Oval Office meeting

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Rep. Jeff Van Drew, (R) New Jersey:

"I believe that this is just a better fit for me. This is who I am, who I always was. But there was more tolerance of moderate Democrats, of Blue Dog Democrats, of Conservative Democrats and I think that's gone away. Two more things I want to say. One, you have my undying support. Thank you. Thank you. And always."

(Trump)

"And by the way, same way. Thank you. I'm endorsing him. Okay. We're endorsing him. I can't speak for these two gentlemen, but I can say I'm endorsing him."

11. Close-up Trump

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Rep. Jeff Van Drew, (R) New Jersey:

"I have a bipartisan wall that has a lot of different people in there. Ronald Reagan and when he said, I didn't leave my party, my party left me."

13. SOUNDBITE (English) Donald Trump, U.S. President:

"That's true. That's what he said. (Van Drew: And I'm saying the same thing.) He was a Democrat and he he moved over and he said exactly those words. It's fantastic. Thank you."

14. Mid, men shake hands

15. Wide

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US CA Impeachment Reaction (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: San Francisco Democrats: Impeachment vote makes a statement
Story No: apus128352
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 12/19/2019 03:21 AM
People: Donald Trump
Subscription:

Reaction amongst dozens of Democrats watching Wednesday's House impeachment hearing at a progressive cafe in San Francisco was solemn as most in attendance said they realize it's unlikely the Senate will follow suit.

Still, most said they believed it was important for Democrats to send an anti-corruption message with the vote.

Pro-impeachment stickers and posters could be seen all over Manny's Cafe in the city's Mission District.

An electric clock outside the cafe, which often hosts political discussions, counts down to the 2020 election.

President Donald Trump was impeached by the U.S. House of Representatives, becoming only the third American chief executive to be formally charged under the Constitution's ultimate remedy for high crimes and misdemeanors.

The historic vote split along party lines, much the way it has divided the nation, over the charges that the 45th president abused the power of his office by enlisting a foreign government to investigate a political rival ahead of the 2020 election.

The House then approved a second charge, that he obstructed Congress in its investigation.

San Francisco - 18 December 2019

1. Exterior of cafe with election countdown clock

2. "Impeach Trump" sticker on cafe window

3. "The People Have Spoken: Impeach" poster on cafe door

4. Group gathered in cafe watches impeachment vote

5. Independent voter Bo Sanders watches impeachment vote

6. Sanders side profile shot watching hearing

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Bo Sanders, Independent (29-year-old from San Francisco)

"When they were voting I actually felt nervous, kind of like, what's going to happen? I did expect the vote to pass for both the first article and the second article so that's pretty exciting but I kind of want to hold my excitement until the Senate happens because I think a lot of people are waiting to hear what happens there. But so for so good."

8. Another viewer watches impeachment vote

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Mary Anto, Democrat (25-year-old from San Francisco):

"I'm really happy the Democrats decided to make a statement and impeach Trump and not let him get away with all the things he's been doing. I think there's a danger of people being desensitized and the norm shifting, the moral ground shifting to things that are really unacceptable."

10. Impeachment vote on overhead TV at cafe

11. Another voter nods approval while vote is read

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Gardenia Zuniga-Haro, Democrat (29-year-old from San Francisco):

"I do hope that there's a better tomorrow for my future and my children but I also just hope that there's actually peace in our Congress because right now it's pretty embarrassing what's going on in our White House. But also traveling and saying you're American, they look down on us and I do not ever want to be looked down on for being an American."

13. More people watch impeachment vote

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Subjects: Legislature , Government and politics , Impeachments , Political issues , Political corruption , Political parties , Political organizations
People: Donald Trump
Organisations: United States Senate, United States Congress, United States government, U.S. Democratic Party, United States House of Representatives
Locations: San Francisco , California , United States , North America
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