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US SC Biden Rally (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Biden moves on to SC: Fight is 'just beginning'
Story No: apus130879
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/12/2020 03:22 AM
People: Bernie Sanders , Tom Steyer , Donald Trump , Joe Biden , Nelson Mandela
Subscription:

Predicting early on that he would "take a hit" in New Hampshire's primary after a distant fourth-place finish in Iowa, Joe Biden moved on to South Carolina Tuesday, a state critical to his campaign's success.

With the New Hampshire primary results still coming in, Joe Biden held a rally in Columbia, telling the crowd he is only getting started.

"We just heard from the first two of fifty states, two," Biden said. "Where I come from, that's the opening bell, not the closing bell," he added.

Speaking to a diverse crowd of supporters, Biden said 99 percent of African Americans and 98 percent of Latinos have not yet had the chance to vote yet.

"So when you hear all these pundits and experts and cable TV talkers talked about the race, tell them it ain't over, man. We're just getting started. Our votes count, too," Biden said to applause.

The former vice president has a lot at stake in South Carolina, where he has led polling and has long relationships with the heavily black electorate. But other candidates including Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and billionaire Tom Steyer have been campaigning hard in the state.

Biden says in a release he plans to travel later in the week to Nevada, which holds its caucus vote later this month.

Columbia, South Carolina - 11 February 2020

1. Wide shot of Joe Biden walking into rally

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Joe Biden, Democratic presidential candidate:

"There's so many people here for me to say thank you, thank you, thank you to. I just spoke to our folks up and up in New Hampshire and they did a good job. But I want to tell you, the people of Nevada are watching. And I want to make it clear we praise their diversity as a state. And I'm going to be out there seeing them very soon. Tonight, though, we just heard from the first two of 50 states, two of em. Not all the nation. Not half the nation, not a quarter of the nation, not 10 percent, two, two. Now where I come from, that's the opening bell, not the closing bell.  And the fight to end Donald Trump's presidency is just beginning, just beginning."

++BLACK BETWEEN SOUNDBITES++

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Joe Biden, Democratic presidential candidate:

"Look, we're moving (to) an especially important phase because up till now we haven't heard from the most committed constituency in the Democratic Party, the African-American community. And the fastest growing segment of society, the Latino community. I want you all to think of a number - 99.9 percent - That's the percentage of African-American voters who have not yet had a chance to vote in America. And one more number - 99.8. That's the percent of Latino voters who haven't had a chance to vote. So when you hear all these pundits and experts and cable TV talkers talk about the race, tell them it ain't over, man. We're just getting started. Our votes count, too."

++BLACK BETWEEN SOUNDBITES++

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Joe Biden, Democratic presidential candidate:

"You know, when they ask me, am I going to hold a grudge with Trump, what he's trying to do to my only living son, to going after me with lies and all the rest, well, you know, what I said is it's not about me and my son. That makes me angry. But presidents, presidents can't just fight. They got to heal. We've got to heal this country. And we have to do the same kind of courage and conviction. And by the way, I'm no Nelson Mandela. I'm not making that comparison. But his heart, his heart. All you ministers know what I'm talking about. His heart. It's not enough just to fight. We got to heal. The country so desperately needs it. Folks, that's the kind of courage and conviction we need in the Trump era and move this nation forward to a more perfect union. I know there's going to be the fight of my life, but this old song goes, 'Lord, don't move my mountain. Give me the ability to climb.' I can't do it alone. I need your help to climb that mountain. And together, we're going to beat Donald Trump so we can chip in and support those of us. Now listen to this, chip in and support our campaign. Text Joe 2 3, excuse me, I gotta get this right. Joe to 30330. All right. Let's get to work. Thank you. May God bless you all and may God protect our troops. Let's go do this."

5. Pull out to wide shot of rally, supporters holding signs

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US CA 2020 Bloomberg Climate (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Bloomberg talks climate in Calif. campaign trip
Story No: apus128020
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 12/12/2019 01:39 AM
People: Jerry Brown , Michael Bloomberg , Barack Obama , Kamala Harris , Donald Trump
Subscription:

Michael Bloomberg made his first presidential campaign trip to California Wednesday.

The former New York Mayor and billionaire publisher spoke at an environmental science conference alongside former California Governor and climate activist Jerry Brown.

Speaking at the American Geophysical Union convention, the 77-year-old Democratic candidate touted his history of supporting climate research and environmental causes.

He also criticized the Trump administration for its lack of support for worldwide efforts to fight climate change, including the decision to back out of the Paris Climate Agreement.

Bloomberg is bypassing early voting states like Iowa and New Hampshire and instead focusing on California and other states voting on Super Tuesday in March.

Bloomberg recently received an endorsement from San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo, who some say can help connect the candidate to powerful Silicon Valley companies.

Bloomberg also hopes to pick up more endorsements from California officials who had planned on supporting Senator Kamala Harris who recently dropped from the race.

San Francisco - 11 December 2019

1. Michael Bloomberg walks on stage, shakes Jerry Brown's hand

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Bloomberg, Democratic Presidential Candidate:

"When scientific research meets smart public policy, anything is possible and that includes beating climate change. I gave a commencement speech at M.I.T. this year and I said climate change is not a science problem. It is a political problem. You all know what to do and if you haven't finished the job, you're at least going in the right direction. Unfortunately, the politics are not yet going in the right direction. We have to do something by getting a president who will understand we are in jeopardy of destroying everything that we know."

3. Conference attendee takes mobile phone picture

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Bloomberg, Democratic Presidential Candidate:

"I don't think there's a more exciting time to be working in science or a more important time than today. That's because climate change is the greatest scientific challenge the world has ever faced. If we're going to overcome it, we need the best and the brightest scientists. And I might add, we also need elected officials who believe in science, not alternative facts."

5. Audience members applaud

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Bloomberg, Democratic Presidential Candidate:

"The Sierra Club, with funding from Bloomberg Philanthropies, has gotten the industry to close 299 coal fired power plants out of 530 in America, and we have a commitment to get them all gone by 2030. We just started funding similar organizations in Europe and I think we've closed 67 or 68 out of 325 already and we've only been at it for a few months. The older, dirtier ones are the easier ones to do. On the other hand, those are the ones that are more important to do."

7. Conference logo on big screen

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Bloomberg, Democratic Presidential Candidate:

"The interesting thing is we have been closing coal fired power plants in the United States as fast if not faster under Donald Trump than we did under Barack Obama. So it just shows you that the federal government, even if they're not helpful, even if they try to be an annoyance and get in the way, there is a demand for people to do the right thing. If you own a coal fired power plant and your family lives downstream and your kids say, daddy, I don't want to die, you go back and you start looking at renewables in a very different way."

9. Bloomberg sits with Jerry Brown for post-speech Q&A

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Bloomberg, Democratic Presidential Candidate:

"You guys can all be leaders and you've got to convince the general public to talk to their congressmen and their senators and say, I want something done about this. This is my life. This is my family's life and hold their feet to the fire. But the power of this organization is partly for the science. But I think the ability to lead the country, given you have credibility that nobody else has, is an obligation you have and that would be a great contribution if you do it."

11. Moderator thanks Bloomberg and Brown, audience applauds

12. One audience member holds up "Tax the Rich" protest sign

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US VA Election 2020 Bloomberg (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Bloomberg says can beat 'existential threat' Trump
Story No: apus127275
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 11/25/2019 11:16 PM
People: Donald Trump , Michael Bloomberg
Subscription:

Presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg attacked US President Donald Trump Monday saying America "cannot afford four more years of President Trump's reckless and unethical actions."

Speaking on the first stop of his presidential campaign in Norfolk, Virginia, the former New York City Mayor said he was a problem solver who can unite America and defeat Trump who he branded a "threat to our country, to our values and our national security."

And the locale offered the billionaire more than just the latest controversy in Washington to promote his platform.

The neighbouring city of Virginia Beach suffered a mass shooting on May 31 that killed 12 people at a municipal complex.

Bloomberg, 77, said that such shootings have become “almost routine” and that “we have to put an end to this madness.”

Gun control is a hallmark of Bloomberg’s political identity.

His group, Everytown for Gun Safety, has pumped more than 6 million US dollars into Virginia campaigns alone in recent years to support like-minded Democrats, according to the Virginia Public Access Project.

Bloomberg also criticized Trump over the recent ouster of the Navy Secretary Richard Spencer.

Virginia is a critical Super Tuesday state that is key to Bloomberg’s campaign strategy of bypassing early states to focus on the crush of states that vote later in the cycle.

Bloomberg plans to bypass the first four states on the primary calendar — Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina — and focus instead on the crush of states that vote on Super Tuesday and beyond.

It's a strategy that acknowledges the limitations of entering the race at this late stage and the opportunities afforded by his vast personal wealth.

He plans to go to Phoenix, Arizona, on Tuesday.

Norfolk, Virginia – 25 November 2019

1. Various of Michael Bloomberg arriving

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Bloomberg, (D) Presidential candidate:

"And today, I'm glad to announce that I am running for president to defeat Donald Trump and to unite and rebuild America. We cannot afford four more years of President Trump's reckless and unethical actions. He is an existential threat to our country, to our values and our national security. And every day it seems to bring another example of just how unfit he is to serve as our president and commander in chief. And this week was no exception. Yesterday, many of you read the president forced out the secretary of the Navy, a Marine veteran, for upholding the military's commitment to the rule of law."

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Bloomberg, (D) Presidential candidate:

"Now I know how to take on the powerful special interests that corrupt Washington. I know how to win because I've done it time and again. We need a president who is ready to lead us where we need to go, in ways that we can be proud of. Someone with the experience to hit the ground, ready to go."

++SEPARATED BY BLACK++

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Bloomberg, (D) Presidential candidate:

"Over the course of this campaign, I will tell you what I will do as president and how I will do it. I'll outline plans for creating good paying jobs, providing quality health care for every American, stopping gun violence, reducing incarceration. Fighting climate change. Fixing our broken immigration system. Raising taxes on wealthy individuals like me. Protecting women's and LGBTQ rights. Supporting our veterans."

5. Various of Bloomberg at event

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ARCHIVE US Bloomberg (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Bloomberg opens door to 2020 run for president
Story No: apus126402
Source: POOL
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 11/08/2019 05:19 AM
People: Elizabeth Warren , Joe Biden , Donald Trump , Howard Wolfson , Michael Bloomberg
Subscription:

Michael Bloomberg, the billionaire former mayor of New York City, is opening the door to a 2020 Democratic presidential campaign, warning that the current field of candidates is ill equipped to defeat President Donald Trump.

Bloomberg, who initially ruled out a 2020 run, has not made a final decision on whether to jump into the race. If he were to launch a campaign, it could dramatically reshape the Democratic contest less than three months before primary voting begins.

The 77-year-old has spent the past few weeks talking with prominent Democrats about the state of the 2020 field, expressing concerns about the steadiness of former Vice President Joe Biden's campaign and the rise of liberal Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren, according to people with knowledge of those discussions. In recent days, he took steps to keep his options open, including moving to get on the primary ballot in Alabama ahead of the state's Friday filing deadline.

In a statement on Thursday, Bloomberg adviser Howard Wolfson said the former mayor believes Trump "represents an unprecedented threat to our nation" and must be defeated.

With immense personal wealth, Bloomberg could quickly build out a robust campaign operation across the country. Still, his advisers acknowledge that his late entry to the race could make competing in states like Iowa and New Hampshire, which have been blanketed by candidates for nearly a year, difficult. Instead, they previewed a strategy that would focus more heavily on the March 3 "Super Tuesday" contests, including in delegate-rich California.

POOL

Washington, DC - 25 January 2019

+++MULTIPLE CAMERA ANGLES FROM SOURCE VIDEO+++

1. Mid of former NYC mayor Michael Bloomberg entering room

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Bloomberg, Former NYC Mayor:

"The shutdown has been going on for 35 days and nearly all of you have seen the effects in your cities and towns. Can you imagine shutting down your city governments for 35 days. Inconceivable."

3. Wide of Bloomberg speaking

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Bloomberg, Former NYC Mayor:

"And as bad as all this has been and it is really bad. Imagine what would happen at the local level if we shut down. The garbage would pile up and schools and libraries would close, after school programs and day care centers closed, businesses couldn't get permits to open, families couldn't get access to benefits? Need to call 911 to report a crime or a fire or a heart attack. Good luck."

5. Cutaway of audience

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Bloomberg, Former NYC Mayor:

"In government the buck stops at the executive's desk. That's true at the local level as all of you know. But let's not also forget it is true at the federal level. Mayors could never get away with closing the government. And I don't believe we should let this president get away with it either."

7. Wide of Bloomberg on stage

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US NH Voters Trust (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: After Iowa, many NH Dems worry about fairness
Story No: apus130871
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/12/2020 02:20 AM
People: Peter Bartlett , Amy Klobuchar , Elizabeth Warren , Bernie Sanders , Joe Biden , Pete Buttigieg
Subscription:

Only 14% of New Hampshire Democrats said they were "very confident" that the process for picking a presidential nominee would be fair, a sign of possible doubts lingering in voters minds ahead of the state's Tuesday primary.

The trouble in tabulating results after last week's Iowa caucuses, an issue that has yet to be fully resolved, may have rattled the faith of some voters amid uncertainty about who is the Democratic front-runner.

Close to half of New Hampshire Democrats were "somewhat confident" that the selection process was fair, while about 4 in 10 were not confident about the fairness of the primaries and caucuses, according to preliminary results from AP VoteCast.

AP VoteCast is a wide-ranging survey of more than 3,000 Democratic primary voters in New Hampshire conducted for The Associated Press by NORC at the University of Chicago.

A muddled field of candidates came out of the nation's first nomination contest in Iowa, with Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg running neck and neck in state delegate equivalents.

The New Hampshire primary is an opportunity to provide some clarity regarding their status, as well as the viability of the campaigns of former Vice President Joe Biden, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar.

Concord - 11 February 2020

1. Mid, Klobuchar supporter Michelle Tyler taking photo of TV monitor

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Michelle Tyler, Klobuchar supporter, triage nurse from Manchester, New Hampshire:

"Obviously, Iowa did not go the way any of us would like it to have gone and the organization behind it lacked much. But, I think if we continue forward and stand together, I think we'll, we'll make it."

3. Pan, Tyler in Klobuchar room

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Michelle Tyler, Klobuchar supporter, triage nurse from Manchester, New Hampshire:

"Not to be biased because it's going to sound biased, but I think different organization (in Iowa) and I think I'm going to just say it, get a bunch of women in there and we'll, run the show and we'll do it right. That's just how I feel."

5. Mid, Pignatelli with children

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Debora Pignatelli, Klobuchar supporter from Nashua, New Hampshire

"Well, certainly everyone wishes that Iowa had been run differently and that the votes were counted properly and released right away. So, I don't know whether we still know exactly who won in Iowa, but I can tell you with absolute certainty that New Hampshire will know at about 11:00 or 11:30 tonight all of the results from our election here."

7. Wide, room of Amy Klobuchar

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Peter Bartlett, 72, retiree from Concord, New Hampshire

"Well, I know that in New Hampshire, we have a primary and it's much simpler to operate. And I know we'll get an accurate vote from it. I'm not a big fan of caucuses where you have much smaller turnouts and not necessarily representative of the whole state."

Manchester - 11 February 2020

9. Wide, Sanders rally

10. News crews at Sanders rally

11. SOUNDBITE (English) Daniel Brennan, Sanders supporter from New Hampshire answering question of whether he thought the Democrat's system was fair:

"No, no, not at all. I think if you were to make it fair, I think we'd have to be on one day, make one primary day where everybody gets to vote. I think it's kind of a loaded, coming from New Hampshire's first in the nation primary. You have the very select group of voters that isn't a dissection of the rest of the country. So..."

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Eric Zulaski,Sanders supporter from New Hampshire:

"OK, so here we are, first in the nation primary. Right? And well, does New Hampshire deserve to decide who the candidate is? You know, I mean, we know of course we don't, there is a sequence to it, but it's such a convoluted process. It's not straightforward at all. And the fact that we have super delegates who could still potentially decide things is really disconcerting."

13. SOUNDBITE (English) Jonathan Cross, Sanders supporter from New Hampshire:

"We dealt with Iowa, very shady. Oh, no. Not clear. It. It's not ... it's not a clear answer. We won't know for several weeks, perhaps what the real truth is on Iowa with, with the recanvass that they've got to recanvassing going on out of certain districts."

14. SOUNDBITE (English) Eric Zulaski,Sanders supporter from New Hampshire:

"Iowa, it's not even one person, one vote."

15. SOUNDBITE (English) Jonathan Cross, Sanders supporter from New Hampshire:

"That's a total mess. But you can't have two states leading off that are both majority white states. You need to counterbalance it with North Carolina, South Carolina or, you know, Nevada. Places that are more racially diverse, that have different demographics. But I will say one thing going for New Hampshire. We do have the higher even though we have the highest voter turnout in the country, I think we have the higher voter turnout for the primaries and the elections."

Nashua - 11 February 2020

16. Various, supporters in Pete Buttigieg rally

17. SOUNDBITE (English) Dave Scalera, Buttigieg supporter from Nashua, New Hampshire:

"I do have faith in the democratic system. I think it goes back and forth. You see, you know, not one political party has kept office for more than, you know, 18 years in in our government. So, I think that proves that there's some stability. I think a lot of it is at risk right now with a lot of the things that Trump's been doing. But I have faith that democracy will win the day."

18. SOUNDBITE (English) Nick Scalera, Buttigieg supporters from Nashua, New Hampshire, son of Dave Scalera who came back from college to vote:  

"With this, I think Pete is the guy to bring it all back together. Right, after all, the wrongs that have happened in the past."

19. Close-up Buttigieg t-shirt

20. SOUNDBITE (English) Margaret Flynn, Buttigieg supporter from Nashua, New Hampshire:

"I felt he (Pete Buttigieg) had the best chance of defeating Trump. I felt he was very level headed, well-spoken and had a stance that could attract a lot of voters from both sides.

(Reporter: Is that the most important thing for you?)

Oh, hands down, yes. Because I think it's getting him out of the office is the most important thing for the future of our country."

21. Close-up Buttigieg badges

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US NH Primary Debrief (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: AP analysis: Biden downplaying New Hampshire
Story No: apus130795
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/10/2020 09:53 PM
People: Joe Biden , Pete Buttigieg , Bernie Sanders , Donald Trump
Subscription:

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden and his top backers are downplaying expectations on the eve of New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation primary, while his rivals for the nomination look to the Granite State for a new springboard.

An Associated Press analysis of the former Vice President's readiness finds Binden "hasn't spent as much time here" as some of the other candidates.

"Right after Iowa, he said, OK New Hampshire, help me come back. And almost a few days later, he started lowering those expectations a little bit. So, it's not clear really what they're expecting out of New Hampshire," AP's political reporter, Hunter Woodall said.

Yet Biden's challenge in the opening states highlights a larger concern for Democrats as they look for a standard-bearer to take on President Donald Trump. No would-be nominee has proved their ability to build a strong coalition across the party's various racial, ethnic and ideological factions. That situation is muddled further by the vote-tabulation melee in last week's Iowa caucuses that left both Bernie Sanders and Pete Buttigieg claiming victory.

Trump, meanwhile, is eager to cast a shadow over the entire Democratic field as he heads to Manchester for a Monday evening rally to continue his victory-and-vengeance tour following the Senate votes that acquitted Trump on two impeachment charges last week. Trump lost New Hampshire in 2016 by fewer than 3,000 votes out of more than 743,000 cast, and the state is among several his reelection campaign believes it can flip in November.

Biden also faces a potential money crunch if donors are spooked by the results Tuesday in New Hampshire.

++SOUNDBITES SEPARATED BY A FRAME OF BLACK++

Gilford, New Hampshire, 10 February 2020

1. SOUNDBITE (English) Hunter Woodall, The Associated Press:

"Well, it's interesting because Biden has not spent as much time here as some of the other leading candidates in recent months, he has been out campaigned by folks like, you know, former South Bend Mayor, Pete Buttigieg, Senator Sanders, Senator Warren. So it's interesting. He just hasn't spent as much time here as some of them, he hasn't put the resource in the state. So last week, right after Iowa, he said, OK New Hampshire, help me come back. And almost a few days later, he started lowering those expectations a little bit. So, it's not clear really what they're expecting out of New Hampshire. He's trying to say, because there's a neighboring advantage from Senator Sanders and Senator Warren from Massachusetts, Vermont, that it's gonna be hard to do well here. But if somebody like Mayor Buttigieg does well, or Senator Klobuchar, the expectations sort of gets thrown out the window."

++BLACK++

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Hunter Woodall, The Associated Press:

"The point Biden has continued to make is, you know, look at the first four, as one set, you know, you can't just say Iowa, and New Hampshire. You have to look at Nevada. You look at South Carolina. So you seem to be having an expectation of look at that as one separate game and then go from there. But I think that's going to be tougher voters if they see, you know, fourth place finish in Iowa, maybe a sluggish finish here. How does that show that you are the most electable candidate, which is what Biden's hard and center, you know, this campaign has been. I'm electable. I can beat Trump. What happens when you're losing to Buttigieg or Sanders in some states or even if you lose to Buttigieg or even Klobuchar here?

++BLACK++

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Hunter Woodall, The Associated Press:

"I mean, obviously, in these last few days, you have a lot of political tourists come into New Hampshire. You know, you have folks from Massachusetts and other places. So crowd size can be a somewhat wonky indicator in the last few days. But it does show enthusiasm. And again, you know, people vote in Massachusetts at some point, you know, in the primary process, too. So it's interesting when you see these candidates who came into this race with lesser name I.D., less organization, and now, you know, they're having larger events than the former Vice President of the United States."

++BLACK++

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Hunter Woodall, The Associated Press:

"Well, it's interesting. I mean, you know, obviously, Iowa and New Hampshire are overwhelmingly white states. And he you know, I talked to voters here are saying, maybe New Hampshire does not deserve that privilege because it doesn't reflect the diversity of the Democratic Party. Though, you look at those first two states, when candidates do well and they win them, they tend to have a fast track to the nomination in some cases. So for Senator Sanders, if he comes out and you know, obviously the result in Iowa, he comes out and does well here, he has that big base here. And that's not only going to build momentum as he goes into Nevada and South Carolina."

++BLACK++

5 . SOUNDBITE (English) Hunter Woodall, The Associated Press;

"When you look at Iowa with that result, obviously above Klobuchar and Biden who really have tried to make that centrist moderate lane key to them. You know, if you're if you look obviously to the left you have Senator Sanders, Senator Warren, Pete has become that, you know, that moderate candidate that voters seem both excited about and they say is more centrist then his fellow rivals."

++ENDS ON SOUNDBITE++

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US IA Democrat Caucus Briefing
Title:
HD
Summary: Iowa Dem chair: Delayed results unacceptable
Story No: 4252922
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/04/2020 11:10 PM
People: Amy Klobuchar , Pete Buttigieg , Joe Biden , Bernie Sanders
Subscription:

Clouded by doubts on a chaotic day-after, the Iowa Democratic Party began releasing partial results of the state's first-in-the-nation presidential caucus on Tuesday.

Pete Buttigieg and Bernie Sanders were ahead in the initial results released by the Iowa Democratic Party, with Elizabeth Warren, Joe Biden and Amy Klobuchar trailing behind in the tally of State Delegate Equivalents.

The data, made public for the first time nearly 24 hours after voting concluded, reflected the results of 62% of precincts in the state.

It was unclear when Iowa's full results would be released.

During an afternoon news conference, Iowa Democratic party chairman Troy Price called the delay "unacceptable," and said he apologizes "deeply" for the situation.

Price declined to answer pointed questions about the specific timeline -- even whether it would be a matter of days or weeks, saying only, "We have been working day and night to make sure these results are accurate."

The party's caucus crisis was an embarrassing twist after months of promoting the contest as a chance for Democrats to find some clarity in a jumbled field with no clear front-runner. Instead, after a buildup that featured seven rounds of debates, nearly $1 billion spent nationwide and a year of political jockeying, caucus day ended with no winner, no official results and many fresh questions about whether Iowa can retain its coveted "first" status.

Iowa marked the first contest in a primary season that will span all 50 states and several U.S. territories, ending at the party's national convention in mid-July.

Des Moines, Iowa - 4 February 2020

1. Wide shot of Troy Price walking onto stage

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Troy Price, Iowa Democratic party chair:

"Good afternoon and thank you all so much for taking a little time today to chat a little bit about what happened last night. The reporting of the results and circumstances surrounding the 2020 Iowa Democratic Party caucuses were unacceptable. As chair of the party, I apologize deeply for this. Last night, we were faced with multiple reporting challenges and decided out of an abundance of caution to protect the integrity of the Iowa caucuses and their results by taking the necessary steps to review and confirm the data. A thorough, transparent and independent examination of what occurred yesterday will follow. But let me be clear, my number one priority has been on ensuring the accuracy and integrity of the results. And we have been working all night to be in the best position to report results."

++BLACK BETWEEN SOUNDBITES++

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Troy Price, Iowa Democratic party chair:

"This is personal to me. I'm a lifelong Iowan. I have caucused for 20 years and I know how important it is for to our party, to our state and to everyone from our neighbors to new voters to be able to come together all across this state. We want Iowans to be confident in the results and in the process. And we are going to take the time that we need to make sure that we do just that."

++BLACK BETWEEN SOUNDBITES++

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Troy Price, Iowa Democratic party chair:

"We have been working day and night to make sure that these results are accurate. The one thing I will say is that the underlying data, the raw data is secure. It was always secure. This was a coding error in in one of the pieces on the back end. But the raw data, the data that has come in is secure and I can assure Iowans of that."

++BLACK BETWEEN SOUNDBITES++

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Troy Price, Iowa Democratic party chair:

"We have always said all along that throughout this process that we have backups to this system, that we have redundancies built in. And one of the ways that we do that is through the paper trail. Now, the fact is, is that as we started doing this last night, it took longer than we expected. And so but the my paramount concern is making sure that these results are accurate and reflect what happened last night in caucuses across the state. We're going to do just that. And that's going to take the time we need to do."

++ENDS ON A SOUNDBITE++

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US IA Caucus Analysis (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: AP Analysis: No clear winner amid caucus confusion
Story No: apus130484
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/04/2020 08:27 AM
People: Pete Buttigieg , Donald Trump
Subscription:

Problems with a mobile app appeared to force a delay in reporting the results of the Iowa caucuses Monday, leaving the campaigns, voters and the media in election limbo and pressing for an explanation.

The Iowa Democratic Party said it expects to release data later Tuesday after manually verifying its data against paper backups. Chairman Troy Price said the delays were the result of a reporting issue, not a hack or intrusion.

But other caucus organizers put the blame squarely on a new technology used to report results from some 1,700 caucus meetings across the state. Glitches with a new mobile app caused confusion, they said, and some caucus organizers were forced to call in results for the state party to record manually, introducing human error and delays.

Des Moines County Democratic Chair Tom Courtney said he heard that in precincts across his county, including his own, the mobile app was "a mess."

Precinct leaders were instead phoning in their results to the Democratic Party headquarters, and “they weren't answering the phones," Courtney said.

The problems were an embarrassment for a state that has long sought to protect its prized status as the first contest in presidential primaries and the nation's first vetter of candidates. The delay was certain to become fodder for critics who argued that the caucuses - party meetings that can be chaotic, crowded and messy - are antiquated and exclusionary.

The Iowa Democratic Party pressed forward with the new reporting system amid warnings about the possibility of hacking and glitches. Party officials said they took numerous security precautions and maintained that any errors would be easily correctable because of backups and a paper trail.

But organizers running precincts in Iowa didn’t get to test the app beforehand. Iowa party officials had said they would not be sending the new mobile app to precinct chairs for downloading until just before the caucuses to narrow the window for any interference.

Some precinct chairs said they had trouble downloading or logging into the app and didn't use it.

The apps were barely working Monday night, according to a person involved in processing the data who requested anonymity to discuss the party's internal system. That forced party aides to record results from the precincts via phone and enter them manually into a database. Officials were left using photos of results to validate results and ensure accuracy.

The slowdown was exacerbated by the fact that the party was for the first time attempting to report three different sets of data - an initial headcount of each candidates' support, a count after supporters had realigned, and the state delegate winners.

President Donald Trump's campaign quickly seized on the issue to sow doubt about the validity of the results.

“Quality control  rigged?” Trump campaign manager Brad Parscale tweeted Monday evening, adding a emoji with furrowed brows.

Richard L. Hasen, an election expert and professor at University of California, Irvine School of Law, cautioned against jumping to conclusions about the integrity of the election.

“Most of the time when there is a problem with an election it turns out to be the result of administrative incompetence rather than someone cheating or some outside interference,” Hasen said.

Washington, DC - 4 February 2020

1. SOUNDBITE (English) Julie Pace, Associated Press Washington Bureau Chief:

"We're in a really unusual situation right now where the Iowa caucuses were held and we have no results. The state party says that they have had some issues. They've had some inconsistencies in their reporting. We've been told by precinct chairs and by the campaigns that there were some issues in the mobile app that the precincts were supposed to be using to report their data. And so we've ended up in this situation where many hours after the caucuses actually happened, we really don't know what what the results are."

++BLACK FRAMES++

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Julie Pace, Associated Press Washington Bureau Chief:

"No one really is the winner from this. We don't know who actually won the caucus. Certainly the party looks bad right now. Anytime you launch a big important process like this and you're not able to to put results forward, it's a big failure. And certainly they're going to be a lot of questions going forward about how this happened, why it happened, and what the future of the Iowa caucuses really is."

++BLACK FRAMES++

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Julie Pace, Associated Press Washington Bureau Chief:

"We saw a lot of the campaigns really trying to spin the night in their favor. Pete Buttigieg came out and declared that he was victorious, which was a bit funny considering there were no results to base that on. We had other campaigns that were releasing what they said were were their own internal numbers. We had a lot of campaigns trying to argue that they had a lot of momentum coming out of Iowa."

++BLACK FRAMES++

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Julie Pace, Associated Press Washington Bureau Chief:

"All of the campaigns were collecting their own information, but it's all incomplete. Anything that you were seeing from a campaign right now is missing some pieces, doesn't tell the full story of what happened. So certainly campaigns are trying to use this as an opportunity to keep going to declare that they have momentum going forward. But the reality is, we just don't know what happened on the ground."

++BLACK FRAMES++

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Julie Pace, Associated Press Washington Bureau Chief:

"The Iowa Democratic Party says that they expect to have results out later Tuesday. They weren't any more specific than that. Certainly we know that they're going to be scrambling in the early hours of Tuesday to try to get a complete picture. But it really is unclear if people will believe the results once they are put out. There are so many questions now about this process. So many questions about why things seem to have gone so wrong. And it really is certainly an opportunity for campaigns that didn't do quite as well to question the results and to raise doubts about them. And I think the real takeaway from this is that no matter what the results end up being, no one is going to really get the momentum that they were hoping for out of this caucus. That attention really just shifts to New Hampshire."

++ENDS ON SOUNDBITE++

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US New Hampshire Analysis (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: AP Analysis Sanders tops Buttigieg in NH primary
Story No: apus130892
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/12/2020 06:51 AM
People: Bernie Sanders , Elizabeth Warren , Amy Klobuchar , Joe Biden , Hillary Clinton , Pete Buttigieg
Subscription:

Bernie Sanders won New Hampshire’s presidential primary Tuesday night, edging moderate rival Pete Buttigieg and scoring the first clear victory in the Democratic Party’s chaotic 2020 nomination fight.

In his win, the 78-year-old Sanders, a self-described democratic socialist, beat back a strong challenge from the 38-year-old former mayor of South Bend, Indiana. The dueling Democrats represent different generations, see divergent paths to the nomination and embrace conflicting visions of America's future.

As Sanders and Buttigieg celebrated, Amy Klobuchar scored an unexpected third-place finish that gives  her a road out of New Hampshire as the primary season moves on to the string of state-by-state contests that lie ahead.

Elizabeth Warren and Joe Biden posted disappointing fourth and fifth place finishes respectively and were on track to finish with zero delegates from the state.

But the former vice president is promising a vigorous comeback as the primary race moves beyond the overwhelmingly white opening states to Nevada, South Carolina and a Super Tuesday slate where African Americans and Latinos will hold considerable sway.

Washington, DC - 12 February 2020

1. SOUNDBITE (English) Julie Pace, Associated Press Washington Bureau Chief:

"What we saw was a pretty narrow victory for Bernie Sanders in New Hampshire, but a victory nonetheless. After the results of Iowa were quite muddled, leaving the race unable to be called, this is really the first win of the 2020 Democratic primary, and Sanders can claim rightly so, that that victory is his. What's really notable about this, though, is that Sanders is far below where he was in 2016 when he won New Hampshire by 22 points over Hillary Clinton. This was a much narrower victory, currently less than 2 percent. And it does raise some questions about whether Sanders is able to build his coalition in this crowded field."

++BLACK++

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Julie Pace, Associated Press Washington Bureau Chief:

"What we saw is two moderate candidates from the Midwest who were at nipping at Bernie Sanders' heels. Pete Buttigieg in particular, who is just behind Sanders in the vote in New Hampshire. Klobuchar was much more of a surprise. She had a really strong pre-New Hampshire debate, really a standout performance that that seems to have brought a lot of new voters into her camp just in the last few days before the primary. What's notable about this is that that Klobuchar and Buttigieg are both moderates, and it suggests that there is a large percentage of the electorate, at least in New Hampshire, who was interested in a candidate that is more moderate, someone who's not the liberal firebrand that Bernie Sanders is. The problem for the moderates, of course, is that they're choosing between a big group of candidates right now. So while Sanders' margin from 2016 may be lower, he's still able to surpass his rivals because they're splitting up a lot of the vote."

++BLACK++

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Julie Pace, Associated Press Washington Bureau Chief:

"Joe Biden really just had a dismal night. Then it comes after a really dismal night in Iowa. He was fourth in Iowa. Fifth here in New Hampshire. His campaign will try to tell you that, look, they are going to keep fighting on as this race turns toward more diverse states, Nevada and certainly South Carolina, which votes at the end of the month. But the problem for Joe Biden is that the crux of his argument right now is that he is the most electable candidate and electable candidates have to win. And he's not only not winning, he is placing far below expectations. So he has a real challenge ahead of him in terms of trying to keep his donors sending checks to his campaign and trying to keep his support in those those states that come next in his column and try to avoid sort of the stain of defeat that we're seeing here."

++BLACK++

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Julie Pace, Associated Press Washington Bureau Chief:

"Elizabeth Warren is the other candidate that I would really watch right now. She is from neighboring Massachusetts, right next door to New Hampshire. These are voters who are pretty familiar with her. And she was getting good crowds, enthusiastic crowds in the lead up to the primary. And it just simply didn't come together. And you really just have a sense that Warren is a candidate who is on the decline. She doesn't have an obvious next place to win. It's unclear where she would get a victory. And she's a candidate who hasn't had a big wealthy group of donors that has been backing her campaign, that has been a calling card for her. But it does mean that she needs to energize grassroots supporters, people who are willing to chip in just a little bit of money and without a clear pathway to the nomination, bringing in that money consistently in the coming weeks as is going to be difficult."

++BLACK++

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Julie Pace, Associated Press Washington Bureau Chief:

"It's interesting to compare where we are now to where we were at this point in the 2016 Democratic primary, Bernie Sanders had virtually tied Hillary Clinton in Iowa. He had won big in New Hampshire. And then the race moved on and it moved into more diverse states. And the bottom really fell out of his campaign. But Bernie Sanders has spent the last four years really trying to deepen his relationships with Latino voters, with black voters. And we're about to see if that work has paid off as he gets into this more diverse part of the primary calendar. The challenge, though, is particularly acute for someone like a Pete Buttigieg and an Amy Klobuchar. They are less known among diverse communities. They don't have as much of a connection there. They haven't had to spend as much time working on some of the issues that are particularly relevant to Latino voters or black voters. And they both argue that as voters get to know them more, as they have more success in these early states, that will translate throughout the country. But it's undoubtedly a challenge for them."

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US NH Bernie Sanders Rally (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Sanders wins New Hampshire primary
Story No: apus130887
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/12/2020 05:07 AM
People: Joe Biden , Bernie Sanders , Donald Trump , Amy Klobuchar , Pete Buttigieg
Subscription:

Bernie Sanders won New Hampshire's presidential primary election Tuesday night, narrowly edging moderate rival Pete Buttigieg and scoring the first clear victory in the Democratic Party's chaotic 2020 nomination fight.

In his win, the 78-year-old Sen. Sanders, a self-described democratic socialist, beat back a strong challenge from the 38-year-old former Midwestern mayor -- two men representing different generations and wings of their party.

"This victory here is the beginning of the end for Donald Trump," Sanders declared.

Trump easily won the state's Republican primary against token opposition. Sen. Amy Klobuchar finished a strong third in the Democratic contest with Elizabeth Warren and Joe Biden far behind.

Manchester, New Hampshire - 11 February 2020

1. Bernie Sanders and family go on stage

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Bernie Sanders, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"Let me let me take this opportunity to thank the people of New Hampshire for a great victory tonight."

3. Bernie Sanders and wife kissing

4.  SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Bernie Sanders, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"This victory here is the beginning of the end for Donald Trump."'

5. Crowd chanting

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Bernie Sanders, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"And this is a movement from coast to coast which is demanding that we finally have an economy and a government that works for all of us, not wealthy campaign contributors."

7. Sanders shaking hands

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Bernie Sanders, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"But make the point that in this point in the campaign, we are taking on billionaires and we're taking on candidates funded by billionaires. But we are going to win because we have the agenda that speaks to the needs of working people throughout this country. Health care is a human right, not a privilege. The wealthy and powerful will start paying their fair share of taxes. We will make public colleges and universities tuition free and cancel all student debt."

9. People taking photos of Sanders

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Bernie Sanders, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"Unlike Donald Trump, we know that climate change is very real and an existential crisis for our planet. We are prepared to tell the fossil fuel industry that their short term profits are not more important than the future of our planet."

11. Sanders smiling

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Bernie Sanders, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"It's on to Nevada. It's on to South Carolina. It's on to win the Democratic nomination. And together, I have no doubt that we will defeat Donald Trump. Thank you all very much."

13. Sanders greeting crowd

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US NH Klobuchar Rally (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Klobuchar: We're 'steady, strong' and 'never quit'
Story No: apus130882
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/12/2020 03:44 AM
People: Amy Klobuchar , Donald Trump
Subscription:

Democratic presidential candidate Amy Klobuchar says she has redefined the word "grit" and beaten the odds once again on the campaign trail.

"What we've been is steady, we've been strong and we've never quit," she said, adding, "I think that sounds pretty good for a president."

Speaking to supporters in Concord, New Hampshire on Tuesday night, the Minnesota senator thanked New Hampshire voters before turning her focus to a broader audience.

She said, "Hello, America, I'm Amy Klobuchar, and I will beat Donald Trump."

After lagging in the polls for much of the year and finishing fifth in Iowa, Klobuchar gained momentum in the days before the New Hampshire primary in part because of a strong debate performance Friday night.

Concord - 11 February 2020

1. Pan, Democratic presidential candidate Amy Klobuchar walks onto the stage

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Amy Klobuchar, Democratic presidential candidate:

"Thank you, New Hampshire. We love you, New Hampshire. Hello, America. I'm Amy Klobuchar and I will beat Donald Trump. My heart my heart is full tonight, my heart is full tonight. While there are still ballots left to count. We have beaten the odds every step of the way. We have done it on the merits. We have done it with ideas and we have done it with hard work because we are resilient and strong as the people of this great nation."

3. Wide, Klobuchar speaking

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Amy Klobuchar, Democratic presidential candidate:

"Because of you, we are taking this campaign to Nevada. We are going to South Carolina and we are taking this message of unity to the country. We know in our hearts that in a democracy, it is not about the loudest voice or the biggest bank account. It is about the best idea and about the person who can turn those ideas into action. We know that we cannot win big by trying to out divide the divider in chief. We know that we win by bringing people with us and instead of shutting them out. Donald Trump's worst nightmare is that the people in the middle, the people who have had enough of the name calling and the mudslinging have someone to vote for in November. "

5. Wide, Klobuchar speaking

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Amy Klobuchar, Democratic presidential candidate:

"What we've been is steady, we've been strong and we've never quit. I think that sounds pretty good for a president. But, across across the months and months and miles of this race, we redefined the word grit. You see it with our happy, scrappy campaign. You saw it in our 10-county, 30-hour tour in the middle of a Nor-Easter. Let's not forget that you saw it in our early morning diner stops and our late night rallies. And yes, you saw it on that debate stage."

6. Wide, Klobuchar speaking

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Amy Klobuchar, Democratic presidential candidate:

"But most of all, I need your hearts. I don't have that big bank account. I don't have that big name that some of the other people that are in this race and I am not a newcomer with no political record, but what I do is get things done. What I have is your back. So I ask you to join us at Amy Klobuchar.com. Join our campaign, join our campaign."

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Amy Klobuchar, Democratic presidential candidate:

"We are so excited. We're going to take this show on the road with all of this great New Hampshire good. Well, the best is yet to come. Let's get to work, everyone. Thank you. "

9. Wide, audience cheers

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US NH Sanders
Title:
HD
Summary: Sanders rails against money in politics
Story No: 4253454
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/07/2020 06:43 PM
People: Michael Bloomberg , Bernie Sanders , Donald Trump
Subscription:

US Senator Bernie Sanders lashed out against big money in politics on Friday as he addressed students at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire.

Sanders said many wealthy corporations and individuals would side with US President Donald Trump because he gave them huge tax breaks.

He also targeted billionaire Michael Bloomberg who is spending huge sums of money on his campaign.  

Sander's comments came just hours before Friday's debate and four days before the New Hampshire primary.

Manchester, New Hampshire - 7 February 2020

1. US Senator Bernie Sanders approaches podium

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Bernie Sanders, Senator and US Democratic Presidential Candidate:

"Money in politics. So right now, you have a billionaire president who is a pathological liar. Who is corrupt. Who is a racist. A sexist, a homophobe, a xenophobe and a religious bigot. The big money interests are not unhappy with this guy. He's OK. Many of these corporations are not unhappy with him. He gave them huge tax breaks."

3. Sanders at podium

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Bernie Sanders, Senator and US Democratic Presidential Candidate:

"I mean, you talk about money in politics. We got a former mayor of New York City who has a record every reason in the world he's entitled to run for president." No problem with that. Smart guy." But he is spending hundreds and hundreds of millions of dollars to buy the election. There is something wrong with that as a candidate, let him run. That's fine. Everybody, want to run for president? Run for president. How do we feel about living in a so-called democracy when a billionaire, multi-billionaire, fifty five billion can spend unlimited sums of money."

5. Sanders at podium

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Bernie Sanders, Senator and US Democratic Presidential Candidate:

"I am most proud that at this particular moment in this campaign, we have received more campaign contributions, over 6 million contributions from more people, over a million and a half people averaging 18 dollars apiece than any candidate in the history of American politics. And I'm enormously proud of that. What does that say? What that says, and I say this with enormous pride, is that this is a campaign of the working families of America. We are funded by the working class of this country."

7. Sanders at podium

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Bernie Sanders, Senator and US Democratic Presidential Candidate:

"Which side are you on? Are you on the side of a working class of this country, which has been batted for the last 45 years? Are you willing to take on the greed and corruption of the billionaire class and the 1 percent? Or will you continue to stand with the big money interests? That is what this campaign is about."

9. Sanders exits podium

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US NH Buttigieg Veterans (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Buttigieg pitches military service to veterans
Story No: apus130668
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/06/2020 11:40 PM
People: Pete Buttigieg
Subscription:

Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg is pitching his military service to voters in New Hampshire, a state where nearly 10% of residents are veterans.

Buttigieg, an Afghanistan War veteran, said at a packed American Legion hall in Merrimack on Thursday that the country could learn from military members who work together regardless of different backgrounds, experiences and political parties.  

He's also promising to put more resources into veterans' mental and physical health. He says too many veterans can't access the care they need.

New Hampshire doesn't have a full-service veterans hospital.

He's also proposing allowing military spouses who move around a lot to delay repayment of their student loans. And he proposed changing how the military deals with cases of sexual assault.  

It was Buttigieg's only public event in New Hampshire on Thursday ahead of the state's Feb. 11 primary.

Merrimack, New Hampshire - 6 February 2020

1. Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg being introduced to the American Legion hall in Merrimack, New Hampshire

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Pete Buttigieg, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"It has been an extraordinary week and we are absolutely electrified by the energy that we are coming here with and by the extraordinary validation of this campaign's vision that we had in Iowa on Monday. I'm also mindful and humbled by the fact that New Hampshire is New Hampshire and New Hampshire is not the kind of place to let Iowa or anybody else tell you what to do."

3. Buttigieg speaking in front of the veterans at the American Legion hall

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Pete Buttigieg, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"The reality is our country's got a long way to go when it comes to doing right by those who serve and doing right by those who serve both during and after their time on active duty. I've been reminded that in the conversations that I have had with veterans of each generation across New Hampshire."

5. Buttigieg speaking in front of the veterans at the American Legion hall

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Pete Buttigieg, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"Because the people who put on the uniform of this country will do whatever is required and expected of them by the United States of America. That is why they deserve both during and after their time of service the support, the respect and the care of a commander in chief who knows what it means to hold a set of orders in your hand. And we'll never let our veterans down."

7. Buttigieg speaking in front of the veterans at the American Legion hall

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Pete Buttigieg, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"We need to suspend student loan repayment for spouses who are experiencing unemployment because of the moving around that they have had to do because they are married to somebody in the service of this country. Just one example of the steps we could take to better honor that service."

9. Buttigieg speaking in front of the veterans at the American Legion hall

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Pete Buttigieg, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"When it comes to sexual assault. This is not something that should be handled by short circuiting the process. There must be an official, a legal process for dealing with that that takes it out of the chain of command and puts it in the hands of prosecutors who can do the right job of ensuring that there is accountability."

11. Buttigieg speaking in front of the veterans at the American Legion hall

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ARC US DeBlasio Withdraws (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Mayor Bill de Blasio drops 2020 presidential bid
Story No: apus123854
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/20/2019 02:18 PM
People: Bill de Blasio , Kirsten Gillibrand , Tom Vilsack , Jay Inslee , Seth Moulton , John Hickenlooper
Subscription:

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio ended his campaign for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination Friday after struggling to gain traction in a sprawling field of candidates.

De Blasio joins New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, Washington Sen. Jay Inslee, Massachusetts Rep. Seth Moulton, former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper and California Rep. Eric Swallwell, who have all left the Democratic primary race.

De Blasio launched his bid in May but his campaign largely failed to take off.

He never achieved higher than 1% in a national poll and was ridiculed in the media.

He qualified for the first two rounds of debates but failed to make the September debate stage and appeared unlikely to qualify for the October debates.

Gowrie, Iowa - 17 May 2019

++AUDIO AS INCOMING++

1. Various of Mayor Bill de Blasio touring ethanol facility

2. Various exteriors of ethanol facility

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Mayor Bill de Blasio, (D) Former Presidential Candidate:

"I mean, this is really, really exciting. Governor, just want to give you a chance to weigh-in."

4. Tom Vilsack, Former Secretary of Agriculture, UPSOUND (English): "We're happy to have the mayor here. Very appreciate the fact that his first visit is to a rural community and an ethanol facility."

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Mayor Bill de Blasio, (D) Presidential Candidate/ (D) New York:

"What we've got to do is get away from fossil fuels - that's the bottom line. We need fossil fuels to be a part of our future."

Churdan, Iowa - 17 May 2019

6. Various of de Blasio meeting with Greene County small family farmers

Independence, Iowa - 4 July 2019

7. Former Democratic presidential candidate New York Mayor Bill de Blasio walking in the Independence Fourth of July parade

Miami — 26 June 2019

8. STILL image of De Blasio on stage during

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Mayor Bill DeBlasio, (D) Former Presidential Candidate:

"I'm going to go up there every time and say, 'This party better get it right, we better stand for something.' And I don't care if there's moderates on the stage. God bless the moderates. That's not the point. We're going to lose again if we don't stand for something. People used to have not a doubt in their mind – for decades – that Democrats were the party of working people."

10. STILL image of Democratic presidential candidates on stage

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US Debate Analysis (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Debate Analysis: Trio of Democrats lead field
Story No: apus123458
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/13/2019 05:39 AM
People: Donald Trump , Bernie Sanders , Amy Klobuchar , Beto O'Rourke , Pete Buttigieg , Joe Biden
Subscription:

Thursday night's Democratic presidential debate in  Houston, Texas made clear that there are three main candidates leading the field, Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders , according to Associated Press Washington Bureau Chief Julie Pace.

"That was clear from the opening minutes of the debate, when those candidates got into a substantive and contentious conversation about health care," Pace commented, noting that former Vice President Biden  representated the Democratic party's moderate wing on the issue with his defense of Obamacare, while Senator's Warren and Sanders advocated wholesale health care reform.

Pace says Biden mounted a vigorous defense of his positions. "He seemed more confident, he was crisper in his answers than he has been on this subject throughout the summer." She noted that Warren and Sanders also had strong showings and that supporters of the three candidates are not likely to waver based on this debate.

Washington, DC - 12 September 2019

1. SOUNDBITE (English) Julie Pace, Associated Press Washington Bureau Chief:

"This was the first time that we got an opportunity to see 10 Democratic presidential candidates all on one stage in one night for a debate. "And what this debate really did is it clarify that there is a a trio of candidates that are at the top of this field Joe Biden Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders."

++BLACK FRAMES++

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Julie Pace, Associated Press Washington Bureau Chief:

"What this debate really made clear is that there is a clear trio of candidates at the top of the field, Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders. And that was clear from the opening minutes of the debate, when those candidates got into a substantive and contentious conversation about health care, with Warren and Sanders representing the liberal position and Joe Biden representing the more moderate wing of the Democratic Party, who wants to build on Obamacare, who wants to continue on largely with that model instead of blowing the whole thing up and starting over again."

++BLACK FRAMES++

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Julie Pace, Associated Press Washington Bureau Chief:

"You saw Biden really try to, try to be more forceful in representing his views, putting those liberal senators more on the defensive about how exactly they are going to pay for something like a government-run program, a fully government-run program. It was probably one of Biden's best moments of this campaign. He seemed more confident, he was crisper in his answers than he has been on this subject throughout the summer."

++BLACK FRAMES++

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Julie Pace, Associated Press Washington Bureau Chief:

"The ultimate thing that you want to know though out of these debates is did anybody change their standing? And I think among those three candidates, the answer is probably not really. If you're a fan of Joe Biden. If you think that his more moderate positions are the direction that the party should be taking in that that's the best way to beat Donald Trump, he gave you enough there to feel confident in him as a candidate. But if you think that he is out of step with the party, if you think that he is not bold enough in his ideas there are certainly other options on that stage for you tonight. Warren and Sanders being among those and they had strong enough showings in their own right that their supporters are unlikely to be looking for other options at this point."

++BLACK FRAMES++

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Julie Pace, Associated Press Washington Bureau Chief:

"I think the other big takeaway from this debate is that it was a moment for some of these lower tier candidates who have been struggling to really break through to introduce themselves to voters."

++BLACK FRAMES++

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Julie Pace, Associated Press Washington Bureau Chief:

"One of the candidates who I think undoubtedly had a strong night on that front was Beto O'Rourke. He's the former Texas congressman who burst into this Democratic primary with a lot of enthusiasm and a lot of interest and he really faded. It was after the shooting in his hometown of El Paso Texas that he has started to get a little more attention. He started to take a different approach to this primary, leaning really hard into the issue of gun violence. And one of his strongest moments on the stage was when he made abundantly clear that as president of the United States, he would move to take away a AR-15s, an assault weapon, away from people who currently have them. He did not flinch in that answer. He leaned into it aggressively and I think that's going to be a moment you're going to see replayed over and over again."

++BLACK FRAMES++

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Julie Pace, Associated Press Washington Bureau Chief:

"Amy Klobuchar the senator from Minnesota ended the night with a deeply personal story about how she got involved in politics in the first place. She tried to lighten the mood at times with some of her, her signature jokes. You also had a compelling closing argument from Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, who talked about coming home from Afghanistan where he was fighting for the for the United States military and coming out, telling his constituents in South Bend that he was gay. And again a personal story that that will likely resonate with a lot of people."

++BLACK FRAMES++

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Julie Pace, Associated Press Washington Bureau Chief:

"There were a lot of discussions in this debate about immigration. The debate was held in Texas and Texas is a border state. And a lot of discussion about how Democrats would try to roll back some of what we've seen from the Trump administration on that front."

++BLACK FRAMES++

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Julie Pace, Associated Press Washington Bureau Chief:

"Also a lot of discussion about race in America and how whoever is the Democratic nominee tries to tries to address some of these racial tensions that didn't necessarily start under Donald Trump it seemed to have been exacerbated by his by his presidency. This is a tough question for Democrats. They are all united certainly on their feelings that Donald Trump should be out of office. You heard candidates saying that Trump is a racist that Trump is a white supremacist. They are very forward leaning in their language."

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ARC US Gillibrand Withdraws (Lon) (NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand ends 2020 presidential bid
Story No: apus122713
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/28/2019 11:24 PM
People: Andrew Yang , Hillary Clinton , Al Franken , Kirsten Gillibrand
Subscription:

Democrat Kirsten Gillibrand dropped out of the presidential race Wednesday, abruptly ending a campaign that once looked poised to ride strong #MeToo credentials to formidability but instead collapsed amid surprisingly low polling and major fundraising struggles.

The decision came as Gillibrand failed to qualify for a debate coming next month in Houston by not hitting 2% in at least four approved public opinion polls while securing 130,000 unique donors - despite spending millions on online and TV ads to woo people contributing as little as $1. That proved especially embarrassing since candidates who began the race with far lower national profiles, including businessman Andrew Yang, made it.

On the eve of Wednesday's qualifying deadline, Gillibrand met with her family and decided that if a pair of polls set to be released the following morning didn't help her meet the polling threshold, she'd drop out.

Both ultimately showed her at 0%.

To get to the U.S. House, Gillibrand had topped an incumbent Republican in a conservative part of upstate New York in 2007, and she was appointed to the Senate two years later, filling the seat vacated by Hillary Clinton. She later retained the seat during a 2010 special election, as well as in 2012 and 2018.

Vocal in the Senate on curbing sexual harassment and military sexual assault, as well as promoting equal pay for women and family leave, Gillibrand made those and her staunch defense of abortion rights the core of her presidential bid.

She stood out in the crowded Democratic presidential field by becoming the first to declare she'd only appoint judges to the Supreme Court who consider the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion nationwide settled law, though most of her competitors quickly followed suit.

Gillibrand also used her run to highlight systemic racism and white privilege, speaking on the subject frequently on issues such as mass incarceration, urban gun violence and maternal mortality rates for black women.

She initially hoped to stay in the race in a bid to qualify for October's debates, but her financial situation made that impossible. Gillibrand finishes with just $800,000 left in her campaign bank account. That means she spent well over $7 million, just since June 30.

New York - 24 March 2019

1. ARCHIVE: Various of Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand kicking off her campaign with a rally

Homestead, Florida - 28 June 2019

2. ARCHIVE: Candidate Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand visiting child migrant camp

Atlanta - 16 May 2019

3. ARCHIVE: Various of candidate Gillibrand speaking at Georgia state capitol building about abortion rights

New York - 5 April 2019

4. ARCHIVE: Presidential candidate Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand speak at National Action Network event during primary campaign

Detroit, Michigan - 31 July 2019

5. ARCHIVE: Presidential candidate Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand speaking to reporters after debate

New York -  22 July 2019

6. ARCHIVE: Presidential candidate Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand talks to reporter about resignation of Sen. Al Franken from U.S. Senate

Lansing, Michigan - 12 July 2019

7. ARCHIVE: Presidential candidate Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand greets people at tables

Flint, Michigan - 12 July 2019

8. ARCHIVE: Flint Mayor Karen Williams Weaver gives presidential candidate Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand a tour of a now-defunct water treatment plant.

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ARCHIVE US Hickenlooper (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: AP source: John Hickenlooper to end 2020 bid on Thursday
Story No: apus122062
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/15/2019 09:13 AM
People: John Hickenlooper , Cory Gardner
Subscription:

John Hickenlooper will drop out of the Democratic presidential primary on Thursday, according to a Democrat close to him.

The two-term former Colorado governor, who ran as a moderate warning of the perils of extreme partisanship, struggled with fundraising and low polling numbers. His planned departure from the 2020 race was confirmed Wednesday night by a Democrat who wasn't authorized to speak publicly before the announcement and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

Hickenlooper, 67, is not expected to announce a decision Thursday on whether he will run for Senate in Colorado, though he has been discussing the possibility with advisers. Republican Sen. Cory Gardner, up for reelection in 2020, is considered one of the most vulnerable senators in the country because of Colorado's shift to the left.

Positioning himself as a common-sense candidate who couldn't be labeled a socialist by Republicans, Hickenlooper couldn't make his voice heard in the crowded Democratic presidential field, which includes nearly two dozen candidates.

Homestead, Florida -  28 June 2019

1. Former Colorado Governor JohN Hickenlooper with binoculars, looking into migrant detention facility

2. SOUNDBITE (English) John Hickenlooper, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"Let's make sure we get these kids back into homes where they really are home and not essentially. Well there's no other way forward for it, essentially prison facilities."

Miami, Florida - 27/28 June 2019

3. John Hickenlooper walks into room, reporter asks how debate went

UPSOUND John Hickenlooper: "Oh, I thought it was great."

(Reporter: "Any surprises out there?")

Hickenlooper: "No real surprises. It's intense, it's fast."

Miami, Florida - 21 June 2019

4. Hickenlooper walking on to the podium

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Gov. John Hickenlooper, Democratic presidential candidate:

"We should be talking to Japan which is obviously very involved in this incident and see what their counsel is. I haven't seen any indication that Japan is asking for us to make a military intervention, so why would we needlessly escalate a situation which could lead to a much greater conflict."

6. Hickenlooper exit

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US CO Dem Debate Reax
Title:
HD
Summary: Democrats at watch party find Biden falls short
Story No: 4223093
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/01/2019 08:00 AM
People: Barack Obama , Joe Biden , Kirsten Gillibrand , Tulsi Gabbard
Subscription:

US Democratic Party faithful gathered in Denver, Colorado, to watch Wednesday night's second primary debate at a party sponsored by the Denver Young Democrats.

There were 10 candidates on the stage in Detroit, Michigan, the second straight night of debates.

Democratic presidential candidate and former US vice president Joe Biden spent a good part of the debate responding to criticism from his opponents.

"I like Joe but it's like, 'Dude, you know, you're yesterday's news'," said Paul Brown, a retired government computer services worker.

Computer scientist Shrujan Cheruk said he had noticed a shift towards more progressive policies and ideas from candidates, whereas in the past these would have been "drowned out".

Denver, Colorado - 31 July 2019

1. Various of people clapping, reacting to second Democratic debate at a party sponsored by the Young Denver Democrats

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Emily Sandoval, city government worker, Democrat:

"The first president I ever got to vote for it was (former US president) Barack Obama and I really appreciated his message of hope and change. And I don't agree with members of the party who think we have to be pragmatic, who think we have to compromise. I think we win more people and more people like me when we're out there promoting an optimistic, hopeful vision for the American people."

3. Sandoval and friends reacting to the debate

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Emily Sandoval, city government worker, Democrat:

"What's interesting is how they seem to be attacking (Democratic presidential candidate and former US) vice president (Joe) Biden. I understand it because he's the front runner but I also think he has a really incredible record to run on and I do respect that he was vice president for Barack Obama, a president I love. At the same time, the party has moved on since 2016, and I think, he's got to be better at standing up on his record and also painting a vision that's a lot more expansive than maybe we would have ever imagined back in 2016."

5. Wide of room with debate on two screens

6. Close-up of Democrat voter and retired computer services worker Paul Brown

7. Rear shot of people reacting to debate

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Paul Brown, retired computer services worker, Democrat:

"I've been I've been pleased to see both (Democratic presidential candidates) Tulsi Gabbard and Kirsten Gillibrand be more, I think their performances this evening were better than in the first debate."

9. Person drinking a beer

10. Front view of room during the debate

11. Brown drinking a beer

12. Close up of "PETE" T-shirt

13. SOUNDBITE (English) Paul Brown, retired computer services worker, Democrat:

"Certainly there are a number of pot shots being taken at the poll leader, that being Joe Biden. I like Joe but it's like, 'Dude, you know, you're yesterday's news'."

14. Various of Democrat and computer scientist Shrujan Cheruk watching debate with friends

15. Sign for Denver Young Dems

16. SOUNDBITE (English) Shrujan Cheruk, computer scientist, Democrat:

"I feel like this is the first time that we have multiple candidates talking about a range of progressive ideas, whereas (in the past) we would have one or two sort of outlier candidates with more progressive ideas about the environment or about health care and then they would be just be drowned out by a more centrist argument. Whereas now it feels like if you're not progressive you're not going to be successful just because of how polarized it's become."

17. Various of people watching debate

18. Entrance to private room where debate was being shown

19. People watching debate, Biden on screen

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US MI Dem Candidate Reax (NR Lon)
Title:
HD
Summary: Debate clashes over 'Medicare for All'
Story No: apus121240
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 07/31/2019 08:19 AM
People: Bernie Sanders , Joe Biden , Elizabeth Warren , Donald Trump , Kamala Harris , Amy Klobuchar , Beto O'Rourke , Pete Buttigieg , Marianne Williamson , John Delaney , Steve Bullock , John Hickenlooper , Tim Ryan
Subscription:

The signature domestic proposal by the leading progressive candidates for the Democratic presidential nomination came under withering attack from moderates Tuesday in a debate that laid bare the struggle between a call for revolutionary policies and a desperate desire to defeat President Donald Trump.

Standing side by side at center stage, Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren slapped back against their more cautious rivals who ridiculed "Medicare for All" and warned that "wish-list economics" would jeopardize Democrats' chances for taking the White House in 2020.

A full six months before the first votes are cast, the tug-of-war over the future of the party pits pragmatism against ideological purity as voters navigate a crowded Democratic field divided by age, race, sex and ideology. The fight with the political left was the dominant subplot on the first night of the second round of Democratic debates, which was notable as much for its tension as its substance.

Twenty candidates are spread evenly over two nights of debates Tuesday and Wednesday. The second night features early front-runner Joe Biden, the former vice president, as well as Kamala Harris, a California senator.

The marathon presidential primary season won't formally end for another year, but there was an increasing sense of urgency for many candidates who are fighting for survival. More than a dozen could be blocked from the next round of debates — and effectively pushed out of the race — if they fail to reach new polling and fundraising thresholds implemented by the Democratic National Committee.

Perhaps no issue illustrates the evolving divide within the Democratic Party more than health care.

Sanders' plan to provide free universal health care, known as Medicare for All, has become a litmus test for liberal candidates, who have embraced the plan to transform the current system despite the political and practical risks. Medicare for All would abandon the private insurance market in favor of a taxpayer-funded system that would cover all Americans.

In targeting Medicare for All, the more moderate candidates consistently sought to undermine Sanders and Warren. The moderates variously derided Medicare for All as too costly, ineffective and a near-certain way to give Republicans the evidence they needed that Democrats supported socialism.

Meanwhile, Trump said earlier in the day that he would watch Tuesday's primetime affair from the White House. But his Twitter feed was uncharacteristically silent throughout the debate.

Detroit, Michigan – 30 July 2019

1. STILL From left, Marianne Williamson, Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke, former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, former Maryland Rep. John Delaney and Montana Gov. Steve Bullock take the stage

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Senator Elizabeth Warren, (D) Presidential Candidate: "Donald Trump has a vision Of how to win and he's gotten out there and done it. He said if there is something wrong in your life. If your life is not working. If you're under a lot of economic pressure, blame them. Blame people who don't look like you. Blame people who don't sound like you. Blame people who weren't born where you were born. Blame people who don't worship like you. I have a very different story about what is wrong. What's wrong right now is that we have a government. We have a Washington that works great for the wealthy,  for the well-connected. People with money. This is not working for anyone else. But in a Democracy we got a chance to change that and that's what 2020 is all about."

3. STILL From left, Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke on stage

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Senator Bernie Sanders , (I) Presidential Candidate:

"Here is the irony and I hope everybody in America knows this. We are right now in Detroit Michigan. You and I can take a walk in 15 minutes we could be in Canada. In Canada when you have major surgery, which would cost hundreds of thousands of dollars in this country, in Canada you don't take out your wallet. In Canada you can go to any doctor you want. Any hospital that you want. Meanwhile in this country we have over 80 million people who are either uninsured or underinsured. And that has everything to do with the fact that the drug companies and the insurance companies last year made a hundred billion dollars in profits. The function of health care is to provide quality care to all. Not to see the drug companies and insurance companies. make billions of dollars in profits."

5. Marianne Williamson walking into the spin room after the debate

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Rep. Tim Ryan, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"How are you gonna go to tell people in my congressional district in Youngstown Ohio that they're working their rear ends off to provide health care for their families, that an undocumented person in the country is going to get free health care. That, that is not going to work. And it's not fair, quite frankly. They should, the undocumented workers should be able to pay for health care. It just shouldn't be free."

7. STILL Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., and South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg participate in the first of two Democratic presidential primary debates

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Senator Amy Klobuchar, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"Look I'm a capitalist. I worked in the private sector for 14 years and I believe that you need a check and balance on capitalism. But that debate is not what people are talking to me about when I'm in Michigan or in Minnesota or in Iowa, Wisconsin. They want to know what's going to happen to their mom whose going into long term care. And that is being this big elephant in the room as everyone relitigates the Affordable Care Act. We haven't been talking about long term care or Alzheimer's or mental health or or chemical dependency. None of those things have been discussed and I'm really going to push for them on the next..."

9. STILL Gov. Steve Bullock on stage

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Gov. Steve Bullock, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"I did want to get both my message out we have to win back places we lost and not make a false distinction when a whole lot of folks often feel like these debates are disconnected from people's lives. I wanted to make sure not only did I win in a Trump state but to be able to get things done not just talking about it."

11. Exterior of Fox Theater in Detroit

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Beto O'Rourke, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"I will not criminally prosecute and will change the law to reflect this, anyone seeking refuge or asylum or shelter in this country. But if we rewrite this country's immigration laws, give you a safe orderly lawful path to work a job here or join your family, if we help those countries in Central America that are having such a hard time then I expect you to respect our laws and we will reserve the right to criminally prosecute those who do not follow our laws or who try to defraud the government of the United States."

13. Exterior of the Fox Theater

14. SOUNDBITE (English) John Delaney, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"No one on that stage has shown an ability to turn big ambitions into reality more than I have. So when people can't defend their positions, they say things like well you're not being ambitious enough. It would be like saying to John Kennedy when he called for us to put someone on the moon at the end of the century by the end of the decade. Well you didn't call for it to happen by the end of the year so it's not a big enough idea. I mean it's it's just an intellectually dishonest response."

15. STILL From left, former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, former Maryland Rep. John Delaney and Montana Gov. Steve Bullock on stage

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US Democratic Debate Analysis (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: AP analysis: For Democrats, big government is back
Story No: apus119522
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 06/28/2019 07:08 AM
People: Kamala Harris , Barack Obama , Joe Biden , Kirsten Gillibrand , Donald Trump , Julian Castro , Pete Buttigieg , Beto O'Rourke
Subscription:

The Democratic Party is in no mood for a coronation.

Joe Biden stepped onto the debate stage Thursday as a fragile front-runner and walked away facing new questions about whether he can maintain his standing atop the field.

His rivals showed little deference to the former vice president, who has cast himself as the rightful heir to the legacy of Barack Obama, the president he spent eight years serving alongside.

Instead, Biden found himself under withering attack from Sen. Kamala Harris over his past opposition to school busing and recent statements about working with segregationists.

The questions over Biden's stature cut to the heart of the Democratic Party's debate over who is best to take on President Donald Trump in next year's election.

Liberals are pressing for sweeping government intervention in the economy and health care system, while moderates warn that approach could further alienate working class voters who abandoned the party for Trump in 2016.

Veteran politicians are touting their years of experience, while a new generation of candidates is agitating to take power, unwilling to wait its turn.

Miami - 27 June 2019

1. Various stills of debate

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Alexandra Jaffe, Associated Press reporter:

"Night two of the debates were far more contentious than night one I think we all came in wondering how the candidates were going to go after the front runner Vice President Joe Biden and the stand out moment. There was Kamala Harris who went after Biden on race in very personal terms. She criticized his comments defending his relationship with segregationists as hurtful. And she criticized his opposition to busing because she said that she was part of one of the first classes to integrate California's schools. Now Biden's aides told reporters earlier today that they were expecting attacks, that he was going to respond to them and then pivot to his own message. But I think he struggled to do that tonight because he got so many attacks from so many different angles."

3. Various stills of debate

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Alexandra Jaffe, Associated Press reporter:

"You know there's been a lot of focus on his relationship with segregationists over the past few weeks and the fact that he still didn't quite have a response is notable and suggests that these controversies will continue for the vice president."

5. Various stills of debate

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Alexandra Jaffe, Associated Press reporter:

"It did seem like the candidates tonight had watched last night's debate which was much calmer and learn some lessons format from it. All realized that to have their moment they had to sort of jump in and make their moment. I think we did see Kirsten Gillibrand for instance interject herself into the debate very strongly. We saw Pete Buttigieg have a couple of strong moments where he admitted that he had some failures in dealing with race in South Bend. So, I think that those could expand some of their audience, expand some of their support going forward.

7. Various stills of debate

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Alexandra Jaffe, Associated Press reporter:

"It's hard to say that Joe Biden has lost his frontrunner status just based on a sort of middling debate performance. But I think that candidates do see an opportunity here. I think Kamala Harris really did knock him down a peg. And so, we could see some reordering, both in support in the polls and in candidate strategies going forward and how they tackle some of these issues."

9. Various stills of debate

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Alexandra Jaffe, Associated Press reporter:

"One interesting moment from tonight's debate that contrasts with the first debate was on immigration. The candidates all seemed in agreement on decriminalizing illegal border crossings. Whereas that was a big debate last night between Julian Castro and Beto O'Rourke. So it's just that the field is more unified on immigration than I think we realized before."

11. Various stills of debate

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Alexandra Jaffe, Associated Press reporter:

"I think it was pretty clear tonight that the party is quite far left in the primary. I mean a lot of these arguments that they made tonight make a lot of sense for our Democratic primary electorate like decriminalizing border crossings, like offering health care to undocumented immigrants. But they may be tougher to defend in a general election debate against Donald Trump. So if this is where the party is right now, we're still months out from the first actual primary election. So you might continue to see the party go farther left and it's going to make it tougher for them in the general election."

13. Various stills of debate

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US Democratic Debate Spin Room (NR Lon)
Title:
HD
Summary: Democrats clash over health insurance, economy
Story No: apus119441
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 06/27/2019 06:56 AM
People: Elizabeth Warren , Amy Klobuchar , Donald Trump , Tulsi Gabbard , Joe Biden , Beto O'Rourke , Jay Inslee , Julian Castro , Cory Booker
Subscription:

Ten Democrats railed against a national economy and Republican administration they argued exist only for the rich as presidential candidates debated onstage for the first time in the young 2020 season, embracing inequality as a defining theme in their fight to deny President Donald Trump a second term in office.

Health care and immigration, more than any other issues, led the debate. And Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, more than anyone else, stood out — on her own at times — in calling for "fundamental change" across the nation's economy and government to address a widening gap between the rich and the middle class.

The debate marked a major step forward in the 2020 presidential campaign as Democrats fight to break out from a crowded field that has been consumed by one question above all: Who's best positioned to defeat Trump? The candidates will spend the next eight months before primary voting scrapping over that question and the broader fight for the direction of their political party.

Another 10 candidates, including early front-runner Joe Biden, take their turn debating Thursday night.

While Trump is the ultimate target of many Democratic voters, the president wasn't a major feature for most of Wednesday night. Washington Gov. Jay Inslee was one of the few to go hard after Trump, declaring, "The biggest threat to the security of the United States is Donald Trump."

Instead of Trump, Democrats leaned into the issue that helped deliver the party the House majority last year: Health care. All supported the concept of providing universal health care, but they differed on how they would reach that goal.

Immigration was also on the candidates' minds as they pointed to the searing photos of a drowned Salvadoran father and his toddler daughter at the Rio Grande and blamed Trump and his policies concerning migrants crossing into America illegally.

Democrats waged a largely civil debate with few instances of the type of bitter confrontation that has dominated politics in the Trump era. The candidates — at least for one night — were content to focus on their views of what America is and should be. No one openly stumbled.

Absent the ugly attacks or missteps of debates in past elections, the two-hour discussion allowed the party to show off its extraordinary diversity. Wednesday's lineup featured three women —

Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard in addition to Warren and Klobuchar — one black man and another man of Mexican heritage. Three candidates and a moderator spoke Spanish at times, while New Jersey

Sen. Cory Booker, an African American, talked about the violence that left seven people in his own urban neighborhood shot last week.

Miami — 26 June 2019

1. Various stills of Democratic presidential candidates

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Mayor Bill DeBlasio, (D) Democratic Presidential Candidate:

"People of color, young people, women. They did not feel the party represented them. They didn't feel the party was fighting for them. I'm going to go up there every time and say, 'This party better get it right, we better stand for something.' And I don't care if there's moderates on the stage. God bless the moderates. That's not the point. We're going to lose again if we don't stand for something. People used to have not a doubt in their mind – for decades – that Democrats were the party of working people. And Democrats had their back. And then they lost that faith. We have a chance to restore it now."

3. Still of Amy Klobuchar

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Amy Klobuchar, (D) Democratic Presidential Candidate:

"I would have liked to talk about Russia at more length and, the, and the interference in the elections. I would like to talk about rural America. And I'm on the Ag Committee and I think we need to have a serious discussion about the effects of Donald Trump's trade war where he's treating the farmers and workers in the Midwest like they're basically poker chips in one of his bankrupt casinos. So there was a lot we didn't discuss."

5. Still of Julian Castro

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Julian Castro, (D) Democratic Presidential Candidate:

"On Twitter and here in the hall you could tell that I did a great job. A lot of people didn't expect this kind of performance tonight. But the people that I've been traveling and seeing in Iowa New Hampshire and other places know that I'm a strong candidate. The media have been paying attention only to certain candidates so far. I think that's going to change after tonight."

7. Still of John Delaney

8. SOUNDBITE (English) John Delaney, (D) Democratic Presidential Candidate:

"I think on health care I told the truth. I think on climate I told the truth. They asked about a carbon tax bill. I'm the only one who has actually done a carbon tax – and I did it on a bipartisan basis. Question: 'You think the others were lying?' No, but I just think they talk about how they want to deal with climate, but no one says, 'How are you going to do it?' Like, I don't want to be in eight years talking about climate, I want us to be doing things."

9. Still of Elizabeth Warren.

Miami — 27 June 2019

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Elizabeth Warren, (D) Democratic Presidential Candidate:

"This work I've been doing pretty much all my life. I've been studying why hardworking families go broke ever since I started in teaching. I never thought I was going to be in politics. But I'll tell you this, I came to understand what was wrong in this economy and come to understand that it starts with corruption in our politics. It starts with the fact that the 75,000 richest have so much more influence in Washington than our 12 million children, than 43 million people dealing with student loan debt. But, here's the deal. People are waking up to that, and all around this country we are building a grassroots movement to take back our country, to take back our economy, to take back our democracy, and make it start working for the people again. We have a real chance to do this. This is such an exciting night."

Miami — 26 June 2019

11. Still of Elizabeth Warren and Beto O'Rourke

Miami — 27 June 2019

12. Medium of Beto O'Rourke

Miami — 26 June 2019

13. Various stills of Democratic presidential candidates

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US Sanders (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Bernie Sanders defends democratic socialism
Story No: apus118635
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 06/12/2019 08:39 PM
People: Donald Trump , Bernie Sanders
Subscription:

Bernie Sanders on Wednesday mounted a strong defense of democratic socialism, the economic philosophy that has guided his political career, even as Republicans and some of his Democratic presidential opponents have seized on it to brand him as too radical.

Sanders' speech, two weeks before the first debates of the Democratic primary, is his most aggressive attempt yet to reframe the debate about his political views. It also comes at a time when Sanders is no longer the sole progressive in the presidential race and in an environment in which President Donald Trump has tried to paint Sanders and other Democrats as "crazy" and outside the mainstream of most Americans' views.

"Let me be clear: I do understand that I and other progressives will face massive attacks from those who attempt to use the word 'socialism' as a slur," Sanders said Wednesday. "But I should also tell you that I have faced and overcome these attacks for decades, and I am not the only one."

During the speech at George Washington University, Sanders said "Trump and his fellow oligarchs attack us for our support of Democratic Socialism they don't really oppose all forms of socialism."

"They may hate Democratic Socialism because it benefits working people but they absolutely love Corporate socialism that enriches Trump and other billionaires."

Sanders' ability to define the debate around his core political philosophy will be crucial if he is to convince voters that his embrace of democratic socialism isn't a barrier to winning the White House.

He's argued that his populist appeal could help win back the working-class voters across the Midwest who swung from Democrats to Trump in 2016.

Sanders is fond of noting that many of his Democratic rivals now back policies he has championed, such as "Medicare for All," that were seen as too costly and too liberal in previous elections.

But few of the other Democrats seeking the White House share his support for democratic socialism.

Washington DC - 12 June 2019

1. Democratic Presidential Candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders walks on to stage

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Bernie Sanders, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"Today we have a demagogue in the White House who for cheap political gain is attempting to deflect the attention of the American people away from the real crises that we face and instead is doing what demagogues always do and that is to divide people up and legislate hatred."

3. Cutaway

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Bernie Sanders, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"It is my very strong belief that the United States must reject that path of hatred and divisiveness and instead find the moral conviction to choose a different path, a higher path, a path of compassion, justice and love."

5. Cutaway

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Bernie Sanders, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"And that is the path that I call democratic socialism."

7. Cutaway

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Bernie Sanders, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"I do understand that I and other progressives will face massive attacks from those who attempt to use the word socialism as a slur. But I should also tell you that I have faced and overcome these attacks for decades and I am not the only one."

9. Cutaway

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Bernie Sanders, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"Now let us be very clear. While President Trump and his fellow oligarchs attack us for our support of democratic socialism they don't really oppose all forms of socialism. They may hate democratic socialism because it benefits working people but they absolutely love corporate socialism that enriches Trump and other billionaires."

11. Cutaway

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Bernie Sanders, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"Our job 75 years later is to complete what Roosevelt started and that is why today I am proposing a 21st century economic Bill of Rights."

13. Cutaway

14. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Bernie Sanders, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"A Bill of Rights that establishes once and for all that every American regardless of his or her income is entitled to the right to a decent job that pays a living wage. The right to quality health care. The right to a complete education. The right to affordable housing. The right to a clean environment and the right to a secure retirement."

15. Cutaway

16. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Bernie Sanders, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"These are my values and that is why I call myself a democratic socialist. At its core is a deep and abiding faith in the American people to peacefully and democratically enact the transformative change that will create shared prosperity, social equality and true freedom for all."

17. Sanders waves as he leaves stage

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US PA Biden Rally (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Biden rejects anger in call for national unity
Story No: apus117252
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 05/18/2019 09:37 PM
People: Donald Trump , Joe Biden , Kim Jong-un
Subscription:

His party may be enraged by Donald Trump's presidency, but Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden insisted Saturday that Democrats will not defeat the Republican president if they pick an angry nominee.

Facing thousands of voters in his native Pennsylvania for the second time as a 2020 contender, the former vice president offered a call for bipartisan unity that seemed far more aimed at a general election audience than the fiery Democratic activists most active in the presidential primary process.

He acknowledged, however, that some believe Democrats should nominate a candidate who can tap into their party's anti-Trump anger.

"That's what they are saying you have to do to win the Democratic nomination. Well, I don't believe it," Biden declared. "I believe Democrats want to unify this nation. That's what the party's always been about. That's what it's always been about. Unity."

Biden's moderate message highlights his chief advantage and chief liability in the early days of the nascent presidential contest, which has so far been defined by fierce resistance to Trump on the left and equally aggressive vitriol on the right.

Biden's centrist approach may help him win over independents, but it threatens to alienate liberals who favor a more aggressive approach in policy and personality to counter Trump's turbulent presidency.

Philadelphia – 18 May 2019

1. Presidential candidate Joe Biden comes on stage greeted by his wife Jill

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Joe Biden, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"Our politics today traffics in division. And our president is the divider in chief. Look he's not the only one. Far from it. He's just the worst practitioner of politics that singles out,scapegoats and demonizes. He holds out the other as the source of all the problems. You hear it. The immigrant, the Muslim. Anyone different in creed or color or conviction. They're the problem. That's what he says. That's been a scheme used by unscrupulous politicians for decades."

3. Wide of Biden at podium

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Joe Biden, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"One America may be a simple notion. But it doesn't -- It doesn't make it any less profound. This nation needs to come together. It has to come together. Folks. We started this campaign, when we did. I said I was running for three reasons. The first. Is to restore the soul of the nation. The essence of who we are. I mean it.  And the second, is to rebuild the backbone of this nation and the third to unite this nation. One America, one America."

5. Wide of Biden at podium

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Joe Biden, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"I believe Democrats want to unify this nation. That's what our party's always been about. That's what it's always been about, unity.  If American people want a president to add to our division, lead with a clenched fist a closed hand, a hard heart, to demonize your opponent to spew hatred. They don't need me. They've got President Donald Trump."

7. Wide of Biden at podium

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Joe Biden, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"I know there are times as only a bare knuckle fight will do. I know we have to take on Republicans. To do what's right. Without any help from them. That's what it took to pass the Affordable Care Act. That was a tough fight. Then it was a big big deal."

9. Wide of Biden at podium

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Joe Biden, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"President Trump likes to take credit for the economy and the economic growth and the low unemployment numbers. Just look at the facts, not the alternative facts. President Trump inherited an economy from a Obama - Biden administration, that was given to him. Just like he inherited everything else in his life. Just like everything else he's been given in his life he's in the process of squandering that as well."

11. Biden ropelining

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Joe Biden, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"But people are not divided. It's our politics that's divided and that gap and that gap that's causing the failure to act. It's giving rise to the worst elements in our society. People coming out from under the rocks out of fields carrying torches. Folks. If you'd asked me a few years ago. If our democracy was at stake, I would have smiled and laughed a little bit. But no more, no more. The threat to this nation to our democracy is real. It's clear and it's present. You've watched the president now for three years. Look at what he's doing. Instilling fear. I mean not not joking. Instilling fear, sowing divisions, stroking racial division, undercutting every institution that was designed to check the abuse of power by the president or anyone else."

13. Biden ropelining

14. SOUNDBITE (English) Joe Biden, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"Are we a nation that believes there's is a moral equivalence between the white supremacists, neo-Nazis the Ku Klux Klan and those with the courage to stand against them? Well, we don't but Trump does. Trump says there's a moral equivalent.  Are we a nation that believes ripping children from the arms of their parents at the border?  No. We don't, but Trump does. Are we a nation that embraces dictators and tyrants like Putin and Kim Jong Un?  We don't but Trump does. Look. Every day we're reminded about this in this election about we have to be remembered about who we are. What we stand for -- what we believe. And every day we're reminded there's nothing guaranteed about our democracy. We have to fight for it. We have to defend it. We have to earn it. We have to earn it."

15. Biden ropelining

16. SOUNDBITE (English) Joe Biden, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"Everybody knows who Donald Trump is. Even his supporters know who he is but I've got to let you know here's the deal. We have to let them know who we are. What we stand for. We choose hope over fear, truth over lies, and yes unity over division."

17. Joe Biden and wife, Jill on stage

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US OH Debate Spin Room (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: 2020 Dems take aim at Trump, make their case
Story No: apus125174
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 10/16/2019 07:41 AM
People: Julian Castro , Kamala Harris , Donald Trump , Andrew Yang , Atatiana Jefferson , Beto O'Rourke , Bernie Sanders , Tom Steyer , Joe Biden
Subscription:

A dozen Democratic presidential candidates participated in a spirited debate Tuesday over health care, taxes, gun control and impeachment. in a three-hour forum in Westerville, Ohio.

After the debate, the candidates made their case for why they should be president and attacked President Donald Trump in the process.

The debate sponsored by CNN and The New York Times was the largest in modern history.

It was the first time the White House hopefuls gathered in a little more than a month. In that time, the political landscape has changed with Trump facing an impeachment inquiry in the House centered on his quest to get Ukraine to dig up unflattering details about Biden, another front-runner among the Democrats hoping to unseat the president.

Westerville, Ohio – 15 October 2019

1. Elizabeth Warren walking away from reporters

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Yang, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"Most everyone on the stage was aligned that we need to take a much harder stance with Putin. The fact is we need to let people know that election interference is an act of aggression hostility and that if we have creditable data that they're hacking our democracy again we should respond very, very aggressively."

3.Cory Booker walking away from reporters

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Senator Cory Booker, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"Anybody who knows Washington the people to get things done and the people that know how to build coalitions and relationships that are bigger than even just one party. We're not going to, we're not going to move this country forward in the way that we need to do big things on climate change, the big things on driving on prescription drugs, even infrastructure, broadband access, environmental justice. All of these things necessitate a person that can build new coalitions that don't exist right now. And that means fighting hard in campaigns. If I'm the nominee I'm going to go to states people won't expect me because I know we've got to pick up a Senate seat in Georgia, a Senate seat in North Carolina. I'm going to go all over this country to build the Democratic Party better than anybody. But you have to have relationships across the aisle ultimately. And I'm good at that. That's what made me an effective senator. To what's going to make me an effective president."

5. Kamala Harris walking away from reporters

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Senator Kamala Harris, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"Donald Trump's behavior on Twitter that is threatening the lives of human beings. And he therefore has lost the privilege. And Twitter needs to take his account down. And I'm challenging all candidates to agree that this is a matter of safety. It is not a matter of free speech and that the rules that apply to Facebook should apply to Twitter."

7. Julian Castro walking away from reporters

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Secretary Julian Castro, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"Well you know you have 12 people on the debate stage and so it's always a battle for time. But tonight I articulated a strong positive vision for our country's future. We talked about some important issues there are some important issues we didn't get to whether it was housing or immigration or other issues. I hope people have seen from the very beginning of this campaign, my campaign has been different. I've been speaking up for the most vulnerable people in our country for the poor for people who often don't have a voice. I was disappointed that we didn't get to talk more about the kind of police reform that we need to do. I brought up the case of Atatiana Jefferson in Fort Worth. I was surprised that the questioners didn't bring that up because that's the kind of issue that we should be addressing."

9. STILL 2020 Democratic presidential candidates on stage in Ohio

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Beto O'Rourke, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"I feel really good about what the vice president said, about what Hunter Biden has said. He's accounted for himself. The problem with the question as posed during a debate like this one is it suggests an equivalency that is absolutely false and not there. Hunter Biden broke no law. Donald Trump has broken several laws some of them he's tried to cover up by lying to investigators by putting the reconstructed transcript on an NSC server. Others he's committed in broad daylight like asking China to dig up dirt on Joe Biden perhaps in exchange for more favorable treatment in a future trade deal."

11. STILL Kamala Harris talking as Bernie Sanders, Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren listen

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Tom Steyer, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"I wanted a chance to try to introduce myself to a bunch of people who don't know me. To try and explain why I'm running a little bit about who I am what I think.

Why I think America has such a bright future and so if I was able to do that then I'm thrilled."

13. Tom Steyer talking to reporters

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US NY Elizabeth Warren (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Warren: 'Donald Trump is corruption in the flesh'
Story No: apus123597
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/17/2019 04:57 AM
People: Elizabeth Warren , Donald Trump
Subscription:

Facing thousands of cheering supporters in the nation's largest city, Democratic presidential contender Elizabeth Warren on Monday decried President Donald Trump as "corruption in the flesh" and outlined her plans to root out corruption in the White House, Congress and courts.

"Corruption has put our planet at risk. Corruption has broken our economy. And corruption is breaking our democracy," said Warren, a Massachusetts senator who has emerged as a leading presidential contender.

While aggressive, the message was a familiar one. Warren has embraced corruption as a central campaign theme from the beginning of her 2020 presidential bid. But rarely has Warren addressed such a crowd with such a symbolic backdrop.

The crowd - which exceeded 20,000 people, according to the Warren campaign - filled almost the entirety of the 10-acre (4-hectare) Washington Square Park, wrapping around a massive fountain and clogging the pathways that connect the street chess games to the classrooms of New York University to the giant marble arch the downtown park is best known for.

New York - 16 September 2019

1. Senator and Democratic Presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren walks up to stage, waves to crowd

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Elizabeth Warren, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"But despite our being the strongest and wealthiest country in the history of the world, our democracy is paralyzed. And why? Because giant corporations have bought off our government. Americans are killed by floods and fires in a rapidly warming planet. Why? Because huge fossil fuel corporations have bought off our government."

3. Wide, Warren at podium

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Elizabeth Warren, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"Americans disagree on many things. But we don't want each other's homes burned down by wildfires. We don't have each others' children murdered at school. We don't want to be each other's families bankrupted by medical bills. What we want is for our government to do something."

5. Wide, Warren at podium, people holding up signs

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Elizabeth Warren, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"Now when you see a government that works great for those with money and connections and doesn't work for much of anyone else, that's corruption plain and simple and we did call it out for what is. Corruption has put our planet at risk. Corruption has broken our economy. And corruption is breaking our democracy. I know what's broken. I've got a plan to fix it. And that's why I'm running for President of the United States."

7. Pan up from signs to Warren at podium

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Elizabeth Warren, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"Donald Trump is corruption in the flesh. He's sworn to serve the people of the United States but he only serves himself and his partners in corruption. He tries to divide us. White against black. Christians against Muslims. Straight against queer and trans. And everyone against Democrats. Because we're all busy fighting each other, no one will notice that he and his buddies are stealing more and more of our countries' wealth and destroying the future for everyone else."

9. Zoom out/Warren at podium as people chant "Warren"

10. Warren waves to crowd at end of speech

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US TX Debate Candidate Reax (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Candidates speak after Houston Democratic debate
Story No: apus123462
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/13/2019 07:59 AM
People: Bernie Sanders , Andrew Yang , Donald Trump , Kamala Harris , Pete Buttigieg , Julian Castro , Beto O'Rourke , Joe Biden
Subscription:

Some of the Democratic presidential candidates involved in Thursday night's debate in Houston, Texas spoke to reporters in the spin room afterwards. Senator Bernie Sanders drew contrasts with former Vice President Joe Biden over voting record and a vision for the future. Julian Castro also drew emphasized the differences between himself and Biden. Senator Cory Booker said he's the best candidate to take on President Donald Trump.  Former Congressman Beto O'Rourke continued to speak about gun policy. Senator Kamala Harris described President Trump as beating people down instead of lifting them up.

Houston – 12 September 2019

1. Wide of Sen. Bernie Sanders walking to camera

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Bernie Sanders, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"Well I think we made the distinction. Joe voted for the war in Iraq, which turned out to be one of the great foreign policy disasters in the history of this country. Joe was voted for terrible trade agreements NAFTA and PNTR with China which cost us millions of good paying jobs. Joe voted for the bailout of Wall Street. Joe voted for a very bad bankruptcy bill. I opposed all of those initiatives and I think it's not only the voting record, I think it's my vision for the future. I am prepared to stand with the working class of this country and take on the greed and corruption of the corporate elite."

3. Elizabeth Warren speaking to reporters

4 . SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Elizabeth Warren, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"People tease me, I know, about all the plans, but I have two things to say about that. First you want to get something done I think you ought to have a plan. But there's a second part. When you can run on something you make it real clear and when we win, it's a whole lot easier for them to turn around in her own party and say guys, that was the deal. That's why we got elected. So now we're going to get out there together and we're going to pass this. We're not going to nibble around the edges. We're gonna make big structural change."

4. Wide of Julián Castro

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Julián Castro, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"Look I respect Vice President Biden. I worked with him. I have known him for years. I think you know obviously he has tremendous experience. He's a fantastic candidate. But he and I do have a disagreement about how to do health care. We do have a disagreement on immigration. This is a debate. So, you know we have to point out those differences in the debate. And what I can say is that I'm ready to debate when we go. And so when I go up against Donald Trump in October of 2020 you better believe that I'm going to be ready for Trump and I'm going to beat him."

6. Cutaway of Castro

7. Wide of Sen. Cory Booker

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Cory Booker, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"I'm running because I think I'm the best person to take on Donald Trump. I think I'm better than Joe Biden or else I wouldn't be in this race."

9. Close of Beto O'Rourke

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Beto O'Rourke, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"It is the sensational killings that we saw in Sutherland Springs and Santa Fe High School, El Paso, Midland and Odessa. But it's the killings one or two at a time, Cory Booker talked about this, that are so numbingly common they don't even make the news and so beyond background checks we need red flag laws beyond red flag laws we need an end to the sale of weapons of war and beyond that we need to buy those back where they exist and have mandatory licensing and gun registration."

11. Wide of Mayor Pete Buttigieg

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Kamala Harris, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"People have asked me, well is he (Trump) responsible for what happened in El Paso. I said no, of course I mean he didn't pull the trigger. But he's certainly been tweeting out the ammunition because when you have the president of the United States and the voice that she has, when used appropriately, it should be a voice it is about lifting people out not beating them down. We've not seen that from this president."

13. Wide of Andrew Yang

14. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Yang, (D) Presidential Candidate:

"Well I think that the American people recognize when you're being yourself and having a good time and when you're faking it. And in my case, I'm genuinely having a good time. So if that comes across to people, I think that's very positive. Because I'm really having a good time. I don't know if you could tell like I'm actually enjoying myself."

15. Wide, reporters follow Yang

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US NY Sanders Rally (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: 'I am back,' Bernie Sanders tells supporters
Story No: apus125376
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 10/19/2019 09:26 PM
People: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez , Donald Trump , Bernie Sanders
Subscription:

Basking in loud chants of "Bernie's back," Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders resumed campaigning weeks after being sidelined by a heart attack and told supporters he was ready to resume "the epic struggle" for the White House.

Energized by thousands of backers gathered for a Queens rally, the 78-year-old Vermont senator said, "When I look at this huge crowd, brothers and sisters, I have no doubt that the political revolution is going to sweep this country, sweep (US President) Donald Trump out of office and bring the change that this country has long needed."

He said he was "more ready than ever to carry on with you the epic struggle that we face today. I am more than ready to assume the office of president of the United States."

To raucous applause, he declared: "I am back."

It was the start of what he is calling a "vigorous" return to campaigning as he tries to give his stagnant bid an instant shot of energy.

Among those who introduced Sanders from the stage was New York Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Sanders' latest high-profile endorsement.

Sanders had emergency heart surgery this month but insists that he's more committed than ever to the 2020 race.

With the first voting contests less than four months away, he has some work to do.

New York - 19 October 2019

1. US Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders comes on to stage greeted by New York Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Bernie Sanders, (D) presidential candidate:

"When I look at this huge crowd. Brothers and sisters, I have no doubt that the political revolution is going to sweep this country. Sweep (US President) Donald Trump out of office. And bring the change that this country has long needed."

3. Wide of Sanders speaking from podium

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Bernie Sanders, (D) presidential candidate:

"And along with the great medical care that I received, I am happy to report to you that I am more than ready. (Cheering) More ready than ever (cheering), to carry on with you the epic struggle that we face today. I am more than ready to assume the office of president of the United States. (Cheering) I am more than ready to take on the greed and corruption of the corporate elite and their apologists. (Cheering) I am more ready than ever to help create a government based on the principles of justice, economic justice, racial justice, social justice, and environmental justice. (Cheering) To put it bluntly, I am back."

UPSOUND, cheering and chanting (English) "Bernie's back"

5. Wide of Sanders, his wife joins him on stage, zoom

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US VT Bernie Sanders (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Sanders says heart attack won't hurt campaign
Story No: apus124793
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 10/08/2019 06:40 PM
People: Jane Sanders , Bernie Sanders
Subscription:

Vermont senator and Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders says he was "dumb" not to have listened to the symptoms he was experiencing before he was stricken with a heart attack last week.

The 78-year-old Sanders made the comments Tuesday outside his Vermont home as he headed to an appointment with a cardiologist along with his wife Jane O'Meara Sanders.

Burlington, Vermont - 8 October 2019

1. SOUNDBITE (English) Sen. Bernie Sanders, Democratic Presidential Candidate:

"I just want to say thanks for being here. I'm feeling good, getting some work done. Doing some walking, getting stronger. That's about it."

Reporter: "What do plan to hear from the doctor today?"

Sanders: "Well, the truth is my main doctor is in Washington DC. So we have not had a docter here in Vermont, let alone a cardiologist so I'm going to meet him and I understand he is very good cardiologist. I'm going to meet on a regular basis to get some checkups and obviously I be on and off in Vermont."

Reporter: "Do you plan to release your medical records sooner than originally planned now?"

Sanders: "We'll release them, we were always planning to release them. And we have more medical records obviously now and we will release them with the appropriate time. "

Reporter: "How do you envision this that it,  could help your campaign?"

Reporter: "I don't think it helps or hurts, but I'll tell you one thing that I look forward to doing. I must confess I was dumb. I was born and thank God, I have a lot of energy. And you know during this campaign I've been doing in some cases three or four rallies a day running all over the state. Iowa, New Hampshire, wherever.  And yet, I in the last month or two just was more fatigued than I usually have been. So, I should have listened to those symptoms. I should have listened to those symptoms. So if there's any message that I hope we can get out there. Is that I want people to pay attention to the symptoms. And you know when you're hurting when you're fatigued when you have a pain in the chest. Listen to it. "

Reporter: "Do you plan to allow the doctors that treated you to talk to reporters at all?"

Sanders: "Sure,  I mean to the degree that it's acceptable.

Reporter: "But you would permit that?"

Sanders: "Yeah, I don see any reason why not. Thank you. Thank you. "

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