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Austria ElBaradei 3
Title:
SD
Summary: Interview with Nobel peace prize winner
Story No: 463706
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 07/10/2005 21:25 PM
People: Mohamed ElBaradei
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SHOTLIST

1. Establisher ElBaradei

2. Cutaway press

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Mohammed ElBaradei, Nobel Peace Prize laureate:

"This is not sustainable - to have two types of countries, the haves who continue to rely on nuclear weapons and the have nots, who are told not to have nuclear weapons, this is not sustainable. This is the message I think we need to understand - and it's not sustainable, meaning if we fail, we are all going to fail together. If there is going to be a nuclear holocaust, all of us are going to be affected."

4. Cutaway photographer

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Mohammed ElBaradei, Nobel Peace Prize laureate:

"I think it (the prize) is very important because it reflects human conscience, the conscience of the world public opinion. That's why I very much value that we have received the prize today. I have said recently that security issues are too important to be left to governments. Civil society has been engaged in trade and environment but has not really been engaged very much on global security issues. Today, I think the Nobel peace prize is one of the most important, powerful tools where civil societies are expressing their views on how we should move with regard to peace in the world."

6. Cutaway press

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Mohammed ElBaradei, Nobel Peace Prize laureate:

"I don't see it at all as a critic of the US. I think, as I said, that we had disagreement before the Iraq war. I think it was an honest disagreement. We could have been wrong, they could have been right. I think we cannot afford to continue to look backward, we have too many problems that we need to look forward to. I was delighted today to have avery good conversation with Secretary (of State Condoleezza) Rice, who congratulated me on the Nobel peace prize, who assured me of their readiness to work with us very closely on so many issues and I don't see that as a slight at all as a slight of a particular country. I see it as a message to say 'hey guys put your act together, you all need to work together though multi-national institutions". And if you see the citation, it talks about the need for the broadest international cooperation."

8. Cutaway press, pan to ElBaradei

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Mohammed ElBaradei, Nobel Peace Prize laureate:

"Well, the first question: I come to Norway on the 9th-12th of December and I will discuss that. On the money, I think it's the last thing I'm thinking of at this stage. I frankly am not in need of much money. In fact my two kids are probably making more money than I am. My daughter is a practicing lawyer in London right now. So, money is not an issue for me. I haven't had time yet to think of what I will do with the money, but I will put it to a good cause....Thank you very much."

10. ElBaradei leaves

STORYLINE

Mohamed ElBaradei and the International Atomic Energy Agency won the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize Friday in recognition of their efforts to curb the spread of atomic weapons by using diplomacy.

ElBaradei, who has been accused by the United States of being too soft on countries such as Iran and North Korea, said the award sent a "very strong message" about the agency's emphasis on the need for negotiations and inspections.

The Nobel laureate, however, denied that the award censured the US and its foreign policy.

"I don't see it at all as a criticism of the US. I think as I said, that we had disagreement before the Iraq war. I think it was an honest disagreement. We could have been wrong, they could have been right," he told APTN in an interview in Vienna.

ElBaradei has led the nuclear agency as it rose in prominence from a nondescript bureaucracy monitoring nuclear sites worldwide to a pivotal institution at the vortex of efforts to disarm the two regimes.

The austere and methodical diplomat took a strident line as he guided the IAEA through the most serious troubles it has faced since the end of the Cold War.

He accused North Korea, for example, of "nuclear brinkmanship" in December 2002 after it expelled two inspectors monitoring a mothballed nuclear complex.

Pyongyang said the plant needed to go back online because of an electricity shortage.

ElBaradei and the agency had been among the favourites to win as speculation mounted that the Nobel committee would seek to honour the victims of nuclear weapons and those who try to contain their use.

The Nobel committee repeatedly has awarded its peace prize to anti-nuclear weapons campaigners on the major anniversaries of the 1945 atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan.

On the 50th anniversary, in 1995, the prize went to anti-nuclear campaigner Joseph Rotblat and his Pugwash group.

In 1985, it went to International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, and in 1975 to Soviet nuclear scientist-turned-anti-nuclear campaigner Andrei Sakharov.

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Denmark Maathai
Title:
SD
Summary: Interview with fmr Nobel Peace Prize winner Wangari Maathai
Story No: 629841
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/12/2009 21:38 PM
People: Barack Obama
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SHOTLIST

++NIGHT SHOTS++

1. Wide of Faculty of Life Sciences building, University of Copenhagen

2. Window of building with lights on inside

++INTERIOR SHOTS++

3. Professor Wangari Maathai, winner of 2004 Nobel Peace Prize, entering room

4. Wide of Maathai sitting at table for interview

5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Professor Wangari Maathai, 2004 Nobel Peace Prize winner:

"President Obama getting the Nobel Peace Prize, I want to warmly congratulate him, and I want to warmly congratulate the Nobel Committee for having chosen him. He represents hope. He represents idealism. He represents what the world would like to see the one superpower we have, do, and that is engage the rest of the world, allow the rest of the world to speak, listen to the rest of the world, provide the leadership that can push us towards a more stable world. Remember, nobody gets the Nobel Peace Prize because peace has been achieved through their activities. People get the Nobel Peace Prize because they are working towards a more peaceful world. And I know for sure that the leadership that he has already demonstrated, the values that he has already demonstrated, the commitment that he has already demonstrated, can do a lot for the world because he is the president of the United States of America."

6. Cutaway of Maathai's hand on table

7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Professor Wangari Maathai, 2004 Nobel Peace Prize winner:

"But I can tell you that you don't quite realise what a gift that prize is, until you begin to talk to the same world you are talking to, and for once, they listen. So it's a great forum for one to promote the ideas which the Norwegian Nobel Committee recognises. And I do hope that President Obama will use that great forum to do good for the world and to take us to another level of human understanding."

8. Cutaway of photographer

9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Professor Wangari Maathai, 2004 Nobel Peace Prize winner:

"When you are here as a head of state, and with President Obama in Copenhagen, it is possible for all of you heads of states to agree on a legally binding agreement that is going to help the planet survive, and help (m) millions of people who are extremely vulnerable, right now as we speak, there are islands in the Pacific that are literally sinking, there are fields in Africa that are parched, there are people who are starving as we speak, and therefore it's extremely important that you heads of states come and make a legally binding instrument that should include a good, doable financial mechanism that will help us move forward."

10. Maathai talking to group of people

11. Close-up of Maathai listening

STORYLINE

Kenyan Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai congratulated US President Barack Obama on receiving the peace prize on Thursday and said he "represents hope."

Speaking in Copenhagen, where she is attending the international climate change conference, Maathai said Obama could "provide the leadership that can push us towards a more stable world."

Obama received the peace prize in Oslo on Thursday.

In awarding the prize to Obama, the Nobel panel cited his call for a world free of nuclear weapons, for a more engaged US role in combating global warming, for his support of the United Nations and multilateral diplomacy and for broadly capturing the attention of the world and giving its people "hope."

Maathai said the prize recognised Obama's potential and his work "towards a more peaceful world."

She said the prize is a "gift" that gives the winner a stronger voice in the world.

"I do hope that President Obama will use that great forum to do good for the world and to take us to another level of human understanding," she said.

Maathai is a Kenyan scientist and environmental activist who won the Peace Prize in 2004.

She set up the Green Belt Movement in the 1970s to encourage women living in rural areas to plant trees in order to conserve the environment and improve their quality of life, according to the Nobel Committee's website.

Maathai addressed delegates on the first day of the Copenhagen summit, calling for leaders to reach an agreement on a legally biding deal.

"It's extremely important that you heads of states come and make a legally binding instrument that should include a good, doable financial mechanism that will help us move forward," she said on Thursday.

Maathi called for the summit to come up with plans for reforestation and to provide support for developing nations to help them deal with the impact of climate change.

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Norway Malala
Title:
HD
Summary: Interview with Nobel Peace Prize laureate Malala Yousafzai; exhibition
Story No: 2036640
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 10/12/2014 12:53 PM
People: Malala Yousafzai , Kailash Satyarthi , Barack Obama
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Nobel peace laureate Malala Yousafzai said on Wednesday she hopes that her prize will inspire young girls all over the world to fight for their rights, and to step forward to lead.

Yousafzai insisted that she felt the bond of a global sisterhood of sorts, with women gathering the strength to fight for equality.

"It's their voice that I will be raising today," she said.

Yousafzai, who is from Pakistan, is sharing the prize with Kailash Satyarthi of India.

Both have campaigned for the rights of children and young people, particularly education.

Meanwhile, the The Nobel Peace Centre in Oslo has honoured both laureates with an exhibition telling the story of their fight for children's rights.

Included in the display are photographs of Yousafzai as a child and the uniform she wore on the day she was shot in the head by a Taliban gunman in October 2012.

A photojournalist was also assigned to follow Satyarthi for a week to document his work.

They went together on raids to liberate child labourers and centres trying to improve the living conditions of children.

The exhibition will be open to the public from December 12 until the end of the year, and is free of charge.

AP TELEVISION

Oslo - 10 December 2014

1. Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai sitting in Nobel suite at Grand Hotel

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Malala Yousafzai, Nobel Peace Prize laureate:

"Change is coming, and now a girl is getting award, so it shows to girls that the work you do, the steps you take, it really matters. When I received this award I feel that it's not just me receiving the award, it's all these girls, this young generation, they have been working so hard, and it's their voice that I will be raising in my speech today."

3. Yousafzai during interview

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Malala Yousafzai, Nobel Peace Prize laureate:

"We (Yousafzai and fellow prize winner Kailash Satyarthi) both have the same dream, we want to see children getting quality education, we do not want children to suffer from child abuse or any child labour, child trafficking, these are the serious issues that children are facing in many countries, like in millions. So, our goals are the same, and that's why we are looking forward to work together, and work in Pakistan and India and many other countries, because we both have this dream, to see that day when no child is out of school and when no child is suffering from child labour or child trafficking."

5. Photographs of previous Nobel laureates on wall of suite

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Malala Yousafzai, Nobel Peace Prize laureate:

"There has been good relationships between the people of India and Pakistan, and now we are looking forward that the governments would also have good relationships, and when we have good relationships it's good for both the countries, and they can work together and solve the issues that they are facing, and look forward to development and success, and I am looking forward to peaceful relationships."

7. Photograph of previous laureate Barack Obama looking at photographs of former laureates in suite hallway

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Malala Yousafzai, Nobel Peace Prize laureate:

"And I am really proud to be a Pakistani, and it's an honour for my country, for our nation, as we are Pashtun we are really proud we are now known for peace, because there was a time that this region of the world was called as a "terrorist" place, and many people get scared of it, no one even tried to say the name of this country. So, I am really proud to tell people that the people of Pakistan are peaceful, they have harmony, they love each other, they believe in brotherhood. But there are some extremist-minded people who misuse the name of Islam and who give a bad name of our country, but that's not true, we people are standing up for children's rights, for woman's rights and for human rights."

AP TELEVISION

Oslo - 9 December 2014

9. Mid of board showing photograph of Nobel laureate Malala Yousafzai in school

10. Close up of writing of Malala quote reading (English) "One child, one teacher, one book, one pen can change the world"

11. Wide of exhibition board for Malala

AP TELEVISION

Oslo - 10 December 2014

12. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Malala Yousafzai, Nobel Peace Prize laureate:

"I am so happy that I have received this award. Not only for me but this is the happiest and proudest moment for the whole nation. This award is not only for me but also for those children that are always looking for their right of education. God willing, this journey will continue. No child or woman will be deprived from education. All of us together need to struggle and work hard for the day when no child will be unable to go to school."

AP TELEVISION

Oslo - 9 December 2014

13. Collection of personal photographs of Yousafzai

14. Close up of photograph of Yousafzai

15. SOUNDBITE (English) Liv Astrid Sverdrup, exhibition director at the Nobel Peace Centre:

"We do hope that a lot of people will get more acquainted with the peace prize laureates, and also to show their important work. The two, they say, they said both when they got the news about the Peace Prize, that this is a prize that they will share with the voiceless children. So our hope is that by visiting the Peace Centre you will also listen to the voiceless children, and that you will be inspired by Malala and Kailash's work for children's rights."

16. Wall showing the uniform Yousafzai was wearing when shot by Taliban,and photographs of her native Swat valley by Lynsey Addario

17. Various of Yousafzai's school uniform on display

18. SOUNDBITE (English) Liv Astrid Sverdrup, exhibition director at the Nobel Peace Centre:

"The uniform that she was wearing the day that she was shot by Taliban, so this the visitors can see. And I think this is a very important object in the exhibition this year, because it tells both the story about Malala and her fight for the right to go to school, it tells the story about her being threatened, but also it tells the story about her surviving and continuing her fight."

19. Exhibition board for Nobel Peace Prize winner Kailash Satyarthi

20. Close of photograph of Kailash

21. Photograph of Kailash working with children

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US Gore
Title:
SD
Summary: Nobel peace prize winner Al Gore comments on award
Story No: 539726
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 12/10/2007 23:15 PM
People: Al Gore , Tipper Gore
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Gore arriving surrounded by photographers

2. Gore walking into news conference

3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Al Gore, Nobel Peace Prize winner:

"Thank you all very much. I'm of course deeply honoured to receive this award. I want to thank the Nobel Committee and it is even more significant because I have the honour of sharing it with the IPCC."

4. Top shot of Gore speaking to reporters

5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Al Gore, Nobel Peace Prize winner:

"It is the most dangerous challenge we have ever faced, but it is also the greatest opportunity that we have ever had to make changes that we should be making for other reasons anyway. This is a chance to elevate global consciousness about the challenges that we face now."

6. Cutaway of photographs

7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Al Gore, Nobel Peace Prize winner:

"Tipper and I will go to Oslo and I will accept this award on behalf of all of those who had been working so long and hard to try to get the message out about this planetary emergency. There have been so many thousands of people who have worked as long as I have, and there have been so many activists who have been trying to sound the alarm, and Tipper and I are here because we had a pre-scheduled work session at the Alliance for Climate Protection. We are going to donate 100 percent of the proceeds of this award to the Alliance for Climate Protection. That amount is very small compared to the enormous challenge that lies ahead, and the Alliance for Climate Protection, headed by Cathy Zoi, is organising a massive grassroots effort and a mass advertising campaign, all focused together on trying to change the way people think in our country and all around the world about the urgency of the climate crisis."

8. Top view as Gore leaves microphone

9. Close-up as Al and Tipper Gore leave room to applause

STORYLINE:

Former United States Vice President Al Gore, newly named co-winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, said on Friday he hopes the honour will "elevate global consciousness" about the challenges of global warming.

Gore was awarded the prize on Friday along with an international network of scientists, the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change, the IPCC, for spreading awareness of man-made climate change and laying the foundations for counteracting it.

During a news conference after being named the winner, Gore said he would donate his half of the 1.5 million (m) US dollars prize money to the Alliance for Climate Protection, a bipartisan non-profit organisation that is devoted to changing public opinion worldwide about the urgency of solving the climate crisis.

"That amount is very small compared to the enormous challenge that lies ahead," Gore added.

Gore had been widely tipped to win Friday's prize, which expanded the Norwegian committee's interpretation of peacemaking and disarmament efforts that have traditionally been the award's foundations.

Gore said the planet was faced with a true emergency and that the climate crisis was a moral and spiritual challenge to all of humanity rather than a political issue.

Two Gore advisers, speaking on condition of anonymity because they are not authorised to share his thinking, said the award will not make it any more likely that he will seek the presidency in 2008.

If anything, the Peace Prize makes the rough-and-tumble of a presidential race less appealing to Gore, they said, because now he has a huge, international platform to fight global warming and may not want to do anything to diminish it.

Gore, who was an advocate of stemming climate change and global warning well before his eight years as vice president, called the award meaningful because of his co-winner, calling the U.N.'s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change the "world's pre-eminent scientific body devoted to improving our understanding of the climate crisis."

In its citation, the Nobel committee lauded Gore's "strong commitment, reflected in political activity, lectures, films and books, has strengthened the struggle against climate change. He is probably the single individual who has done most to create greater worldwide understanding of the measures that need to be adopted."

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US Nobel Winner
Title:
SD
Summary: Liberia activist Gbowee reacts to winning Nobel Peace Prize
Story No: 708984
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 07/10/2011 17:25 PM
People: Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide of Leymah Gbowee, Nobel Peace Prize winner

2. Mid of hands

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Leymah Gbowee, Nobel Peace Prize winner:

"I was anxious to put on my phone because my sister had surgery yesterday and by midnight I had not spoken to her, she was still in intensive care. So worried, wanted to know what had happened, turned on the phone and text messages. When to the first one - 'yippee, yippee, congrats', it was all fuzzy until I read the one from Abbey which said - 'Nobel, Nobel, Nobel. Congratulations my friend. I told you you would get it.' Tears. And sat by a guy for five hours on the flight and we never spoke to each other, but I had to tap him and say, Sir, I just won the Nobel Peace Prize."

4. Mid of Gbowee

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Leymah Gbowee, Nobel Peace Prize winner:

"It is a shock. It is not was, I am still shocked. People had always said, every time I went to place to work or speak, you deserve the Nobel Prize, you'll win the Nobel Prize. I didn't think twice about it, I didn't even think I was worthy of the prize, because I've never really thought I've done anything great, or I'm doing anything great. Everything I do is an act of survival for myself, for the group of people that I work with. So if you are surviving, you don't take your survival strategies or tactics as anything worthy of a Nobel."

6. Wide of Gbowee

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Leymah Gbowee, Nobel Peace Prize winner:

"I hope and believe that this is a resounding call by the committee and really anchored by the world that women's role in peace and security issue is not just at a dismal level, but that woman have an important role as negotiators as generals in the army. Women have important roles in peace and security issues and I think that this is an acknowledgment of that. The second thing is that globally, I've been telling people, the world is functioning on one side of its brain. When 50 percent of the world's brain, meaning the women, are not - their skills and their intelligence is not being used to advance the cause of the world. I think this is also an acknowledgment that it is time for us to make real all of these commitments we put on paper about equality in every field."

8. Pan of Gbowee

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Leymah Gbowee, Nobel Peace Prize winner:

"Don't wait for any Mandela - don't wait for any Gandhi - and don't wait for any King. You have to be your own Mandelas. You have to be your own Gandhis. And you have to be your own King. You know your issues. You know your priorities. You know your concerns and you know how to address them. Stand up, step out, and work for your own peace."

10. Zoom into Gbowee's book

STORYLINE:

Leymah Gbowee said on Friday that she was shocked to have been jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, adding that there was still much to be done for women's equality across the globe.

The 10 (m) million kronor (1.5 (m) million US Dollar) award was split three ways between Gbowee, fellow Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, and democracy activist Tawakkul Karman of Yemen - the first Arab woman to win the prize.

The prize committee in Oslo, Norway, cited their work on women's rights, describing it as fundamental to the spread of peace around the world.

"When 50 percent of the world's brain, meaning the women, are not - their skills and their intelligence is not being used to advance the cause of the world. I think this also an acknowledgment that it is time for us to make real all of these commitments we put on paper about equality in every field," said Gbowee.

Sirleaf and Gbowee used different tactics to confront thugs and killers in war-ravaged Liberia, with Sirleaf challenging a feared warlord for the presidency and the Gbowee taking to the streets to denounce armed rapists who were preying on women.

That fearlessness was evident on a November day in 2003 when Gbowee led hundreds of female protesters through the battle-scarred capital Monrovia, demanding swift disarmament of fighters who were raping women and girls of all ages.

Fourteen years of near constant civil war had ended in a peace deal three months earlier, but the rapes continued. Gbowee led the women, whose white attire symbolised hopes for peace, straight to Monrovia's City Hall.

In 2009, she won a Profile in Courage Award, but said she never expected to win the Nobel Peace Prize.

"I've never really thought I've done anything great, or I'm doing anything great. Everything I do is an act of survival for myself, for the group of people that I work with. So if you are surviving, you don't take your survival strategies or tactics as anything worthy of a Nobel," said Gbowee.

Gbowee said she hopes the Nobel will help get out her message:

"You know your issues. You know your priorities. You know your concerns and you know how to address them. Stand up, step out, and work for your own peace."

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Norway Climate 2
Title:
SD
Summary: Presser with Gore, Pachauri ahead of Monday's Nobel peace prize ceremony
Story No: 546525
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/12/2007 16:03 PM
People: Al Gore
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

1. Wide of Alfred Nobel Institute in Oslo

2. Close up of Alfred Nobel statue

3. Nobel Peace Prize Laureates, Al Gore and Rajendra K. Pachauri, arriving at news conference

4. Cutaway of media

5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Al Gore, Nobel Peace Prize co-laureate:

"The American people and people in other countries, as the truth of this climate crisis becomes more widely known, are going to demand that political leaders take action. They have to find somehow the courage to resist the special interests, the special pleaders, the concerns that often have more influence then they should, and instead respect the demands of the human future."

6. Cutaway of press

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Rajendra K. Pachauri, Head of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Nobel Peace Prize co-laureate:

"I think it will be naive, as indeed some people have been making us believe, or wanting to make us believe, that merely developing technologies is going to be the answer. You also need to bring about lifestyle changes. And I don't think this means that we will have to go back and start living in caves. Those lifestyle changes merely imply that you have to be conscious of the impact of your actions."

8. Wide of news conference

9. Cutaway of media

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Al Gore, Nobel Peace Prize co-laureate:

"I have no plans to be a candidate (presidential candidate in US elections). You may have heard me or read me saying that before, I know that I risk repeating myself, but the answer is the same. As I have also said, I have not completely ruled out the possibility at some point in the future revisiting whether or not I would ever want to re-enter the political process again. I don't expect to do that, I doubt very seriously that will ever happen, but I see no need to remove it entirely."

11. Wide of media

12. Wide of media leaving news conference

STORYLINE

The former US Vice President Al Gore has reiterated his climate change agenda to a Nobel Peace Prize news conference on Sunday, choosing to highlight the global impact of the crisis.

"The American people and people in other countries, as the truth of this climate crisis becomes more widely known, are going to demand that political leaders take action," he said.

He added that courage was needed to stand up and speak out.

"They have to find somehow the courage to resist the special interests, the special pleaders, the concerns that often have more influence then they should, and instead respect the demands of the human future," he said to journalists gathered at the Alfred Nobel Institute in the Norwegian capital Oslo.

Gore and his fellow Nobel Laureate, Dr. Rajendra K. Pachauri of the IPCC Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change), with whom he shares the prize, were speaking at the news conference as part of the official programme leading up to their acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize at a ceremony on Monday.

Gore and the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change shared the coveted award for their efforts to draw the world's attention to the dangers of global warming.

Pachauri said he believed it was na�ve to think that merely developing technologies was the answer to the climate change problem, saying more was needed.

"You also need to bring about lifestyle changes. And I don't think this means that we will have to go back and start living in caves. Those lifestyle changes merely imply that you have to be conscious of the impact of your actions," he said.

Earlier, Gore and chief United Nations (UN) climate scientist Pachauri, who will represent the IPCC at the awards ceremony, met the Norwegian Foreign Minister, Jonas Gahr Stoere, and Environment and Development Aid Minister, Erik Solheim.

The news conference was the second in a series of engagements the two men had at the start of three days of celebrations for the 2007 Nobel peace laureates, which culminates with the awards ceremony on Monday, followed by a parade and banquet in the winners' honour, and the traditional Nobel peace concert on Tuesday.

At the news conference, and with a clear nod to the 2008 US elections, Gore, a former US vice president, was asked whether he would consider taking part in US politics again.

"I have no plans to be a candidate. You may have heard me or read me saying that before, I know that I risk repeating myself, but the answer is the same," he said.

However, he did hint that he had not completely distanced himself from his former political life.

"As I have also said I have not completely ruled out the possibility at some point in the future revisiting whether or not I would ever want to re-enter the political process again. I don't expect to do that, I doubt very seriously that will ever happen, but I see no need to remove it entirely," he added.

The Nobel prizes are always presented on the December 10 anniversary of the death of their creator, Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel.

The peace prize is presented in Oslo and the other prizes are handed out in Stockholm, Sweden.

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Norway Satyarthi
Title:
HD
Summary: Interview with Nobel Peace Prize laureate Kailash Satyarthi
Story No: 2036653
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 10/12/2014 12:51 PM
People: Kailash Satyarthi , Malala Yousafzai
Subscription:

Nobel peace laureate Kailash Satyarthi said on Wednesday he was thinking of the millions of children around the world "still languishing" in slavery, just hours before he accepted the Nobel Peace Prize.

Satyarthi of India, is sharing the prize with Malala Yousafzai, who is from Pakistan.

Both have campaigned for the rights of children and young people, particularly education.

Satyarthi talked about his close and heartfelt relationship with Yousafzai, who he said spontaneously accepted him as her "new father".

AP TELEVISION

Oslo, Norway - 10 December, 2014

1. Nobel peace laureate Kailash Satyarthi sitting on chair

2. SOUNDBITE: (English) Kailash Satyarthi, Nobel peace laureate:

"I'm frankly speaking thinking of millions of those children who must be still languishing somewhere in the world in slavery. Children must be being sold and bought like animals even now when we are receiving this prize. Children must be (being) abused and exploited. All these things must be happening. So, I'm still thinking of them, though it's an exciting moment and it empowers us, it gives us more courage, it gives us recognisation (recognition), but that recognisation is basically the recognisation to the most neglected children and their issues, and that is very important for me."

3. Books on shelf

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Kailash Satyarthi, Nobel Peace Prize laureate:

"When I asked her (fellow Nobel laureate Malala Yousafzai) that I think that you're like my daughter, can you accept me as father, and her response was very immediate, very spontaneous, she said, yes, you are my new father. And then, I asked her father also, yesterday morning 'what are you going to do in this new situation,' and he was so happy, he said that 'yes, yes, you are the new father for her'. And today, when she said, and yesterday also, when she expressed her willingness to become the prime minister of Pakistan, I immediately congratulated her, and I expressed all my heartiest best wishes to her, and as a Nobel laureate, all my moral support to her."

5. Cutaway of Satyarthi

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Kailash Satyarthi, Nobel Peace Prize laureate (on relations between India and Pakistan):

"And I am sure the peoples to peoples connect would be much faster and deeper, this is the symbolism of it. Because for me, I always say that peace is something, which is inevitable for growth, for sustainability, for the humanity, and peace begins with a child. Let us begin peace with a child."

7. Wide of Satyarthi speaking

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DV Nobel Peace Prize
Title:
SD
Summary: The 2011 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded Friday to Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Liberian peace activist Leymah Gbowee and Tawakkul Karman of Yemen for their work on women's rights.
Story No: 819004
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 12/10/2011 10:02 AM
People: Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf
Subscription:

HEADLINE : Women's rights activists win Nobel Peace Prize

CAPTION: The 2011 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded Friday to Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Liberian peace activist Leymah Gbowee and Tawakkul Karman of Yemen for their work on women's rights. (Oct. 7)

THE 2011 NOBEL PEACE PRIZE HAS BEEN AWARDED TO THREE WOMEN.

("for their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women's rights to full participation in peace-building work.")

JOHNSON SIRLEAF IS A HARVARD-TRAINED ECONOMIST WHO BECAME AFRICA'S FIRST DEMOCRATICALLY ELECTED FEMALE PRESIDENT IN 2005.

("since her inauguration in 2006, she has contributed to securing peace in liberia, to promoting economical and social development, and to strengthening the position of women.")

LEYMAH GWOBEE (BOE-WEE) WAS PRESENTED WITH A PROFILE IN COURAGE AWARD IN 2009 FOR HER WORK IN EMBOLDENING WOMEN IN LIBERIA.

("leymah gwobee mobilized and organized women across ethnic and religious lines to bring an end to the long war in liberia and to ensure women's participation in elections. She has worked to enhance the influence of women in west africa during and after war.")

TAWAKUL KARMAN HEADED A HUMAN RIGHTS GROUP FOR JOURNALISTS.

("and in the most trying circumstances, both during and after the arab spring, in the struggle for womens rights and democracy in yemen.")

KARMAN HAS BEEN DUBBED "IRON WOMAN, "THE MOTHER OF REVOLUTION" OR THE "SPIRIT OF THE YEMENI REVOLUTION."

("We cannot achieve democracy and lasting peace in the world unless women obtain the same opportunities as men to influence developments at all levels of society," the prize committee said.")

ALONG WITH A GOLD MEDAL, WINNERS OF THE NOBEL PEACE PRIZE ARE GIVEN NEARLY 1-AND-A-HALF MILLION DOLLARS.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS.

APTN STORY NUMBER: 708941

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Finland Ahtisaari
Title:
SD
Summary: Interview with Nobel Peace Prize winner Martti Ahtisaari, watching announcement
Story No: 581559
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/10/2008 10:49 AM
People: Al Gore , Hashim Thaci
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

1. Finland's ex-president Martti Ahtisaari with wife Eeva watching announcement on television

2. SOUNDBITE: (English) Martti Ahtisaari, 2008 Nobel Peace Prize winner:

"Of course I am extremely pleased because, as you know personally, that we have been sitting in front of the TV on number of occasions earlier and it has not been my turn so I am grateful for the Nobel committee for their decision. And because this hopefully will facilitate my future work also and create conditions for my colleagues in CMI (Crisis Management Initiative), our non-governmental organisation which is crucial in supporting me and acting on their own without me."

3. Mid of Ahtisaari and wife Eeva

4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Martti Ahtisaari, 2008 Nobel Peace Prize winner:

(Q: What are the new challenges? There are some speculations that you are going to tackle this Sri Lanka crisis.)

"We have been approached from different crisis, there are always contacts taken by different sources in the world. We have to be very careful where we go, we still have to follow the Aceh process because there are elections next year and see that peace development continues because it is very challenging, actually making peace is one thing but then how to build a peaceful society from there requires as much efforts as the peace negotiations and local parties, of course government and the parties required."

5. Close of Ahtisaari speaking on phone

6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Martti Ahtisaari, 2008 Nobel Peace Prize winner:

"I hope to work more and more with employment of youth because that's perhaps the greatest challenge in the world if one looks at the development challenges, and fight against terrorism as well, because estimates are there that in the decade to come, there will be 1.3 billion youngsters under 30 entering the labour market, from 15-16 to 29. And with traditional means we can employ only 300 millions. So what do we do with the nearly billion youngsters, who don't have any hope, no hope for work or better life? They are prime targets for criminals and terrorists, for their recruitment. So we have to seriously provide training that creates to the existing jobs and then make as many as these youngsters into entrepreneurs and see that they also get funding that it grows, and funding has to be more than in traditional micro-credits system."

7. Mid of Ahtisaari and wife Eeva

STORYLINE:

Finland's ex-president Martti Ahtisaari received the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday for his efforts to build a lasting peace from Africa and Asia to Europe and the Middle East.

The Norwegian Nobel Committee said it honoured Ahtisaari for important efforts over more than three decades to resolve international conflicts.

By selecting Ahtisaari, 71, for the prize, the Nobel committee returned its focus to traditional peace work after tapping climate campaigner Al Gore and the UN panel on climate change last year.

Speaking to AP Television, Ahtisaari said he "was very pleased and grateful" to receive the prize.

Ahtisaari said he hoped the prize would make it easier to attract financing for his peace work.

The secretive five-member committee said Ahtisaari's work across the world - Africa, Europe, Asia and the Middle East - proved that such efforts can have a profound effect on peace processes.

"For the past 20 years, he has figured prominently in endeavours to resolve several serious and long-lasting conflicts," the citation said, mentioning his work in conflicts from Namibia to Aceh, Indonesia, Kosovo and Iraq.

Ahtisaari had been listed as a possible Nobel Peace Prize candidate since 2005.

In August that year he negotiated an end to a conflict in Indonesia that began more than 140 years ago, bringing together the Indonesian government and the leaders of the separatist guerrilla movement in Aceh.

He initiated and mediated peace talks in Finland, and a peace agreement was signed in Helsinki.

Speaking to AP Television, he underlined that "we still have to follow the Aceh process" because of next year elections, adding that "making peace is one thing but then how to build a peaceful society from there requires as much efforts as the peace negotiations".

Asked about his future projects, Ahtisaari said he hoped to work more with employment of youth "because that's perhaps the greatest challenge in the world if one looks at the development challenges, and fight against terrorism as well".

Ahtisaari was a senior Finnish diplomat when in 1977 he was named the UN envoy for Namibia, where guerrillas were battling South African apartheid rule.

He later rose to undersecretary-general, and in 1988 was dispatched to Namibia to lead 8-thousand UN peacekeepers during its transition to independence.

Ahtisaari has had a broad career in politics and peacemaking.

A primary school teacher who joined Finland's Foreign Ministry in 1965, he spent 20 years abroad, first as ambassador to Tanzania and then to the United Nations in New York.

In 1994, Ahtisaari accepted the presidential candidacy of Finland's Social Democratic Party and won the election.

He did not seek re-election in 2000 and has since worked on international peace efforts.

In 2007, Ahtisaari's office - Crisis Management Initiative (CMI) - started secret meetings in Finland between Iraqi Sunni and Shiite groups to agree on a road map to peace.

Those talks, based on the format of peacemaking efforts in South Africa and Northern Ireland, included 16 delegates from the feuding groups.

They "agreed to consult further" and begin reconciliation talks.

Ahtisaari was chairman of the Bosnia-Herzegovina working group in the international peace conference on former Yugoslavia from 1992 to 1993, and was special adviser to the UN secretary-general on former Yugoslavia in 1993.

Serbia bitterly rejected his attempts to forge a compromise settlement on Kosovo, which declared independence in February, but his blueprint forms the essence of Kosovo's constitution.

Ahtisaari's plan also laid down the guidelines for the deployment of a European Union police force in Kosovo and other key aspects of the way today's Kosovo is run day to day.

Kosovo's Prime Minister Hashim Thaci hailed the Nobel selection as "the right decision for the right man."

The peace prize is presented in Oslo.

Nobel prizes for medicine, chemistry, physics and economics are handed out in Stockholm, Sweden.

The ceremonies are always on December 10, the anniversary of Nobel's death in 1896.

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NORWAY: OSLO: NOBEL PEACE PRIZE: KIM DAE JUNG (2)
Title:
SD
Summary: NORWAY: OSLO: NOBEL PEACE PRIZE: KIM DAE JUNG (2)
Story No: 203297
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/12/2000 05:00 AM
People: Kim Dae , Kim Jong-il
Subscription:

Korean/Nat

XFA

South Korean President Kim Dae-jung accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of his people Sunday and pledged to continue his lifelong campaign for democracy, human rights and reconciliation with North Korea.

Smiling, Kim accepted the prize, which includes a medal, a diploma and 9 million Swedish kronor (about dlrs 940,000), at the ceremony at Oslo City Hall, marked by music, flowers and speeches.

The 76-year-old leader, a former political prisoner, said the prize is one he shares with the Korean people - and one he would have liked to share with North Korean leader Kim Jong Il.

Since a historic summit in June, North and South Korea have embarked on a series of friendly gestures, including two reunions of separated relatives, the reopening of liaison offices and an agreement to reconnect a cross-border railway.

The two Koreas were divided into the communist North and the pro-Western South in 1945.

They fought a war from 1950-53, which ended in an uneasy armistice, not a peace treaty.

Delivering his acceptance speech, Kim pledged to dedicate the rest of his life to human rights and peace in Korea and the world.

Before the ceremony, Kim attended a gathering of 2000 children and lit a flame outside Oslo City Hall to commemorate the event.

The peace prize is the only Nobel awarded in Oslo, with the others presented in Stockholm, Sweden.

They are always presented on Dec. 10, marking the date their benefactor, the Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel, died in 1896.

Last year's peace prize went to the international humanitarian group Doctors Without Borders.

SOUNDBITE: (Korean with English Translation)

"Your majesty, your royal highnesses, ladies and gentlemen. Excepting the Nobel Peace Prize, the honorary is committed to an endless duty. I humbly place before you as our great heroes of history have taught, as Alfred Nobel would expect of us, I shall give the rest of my life to human rights and peace in my country and the world and the reconciliation and cooperation of my people."

SUPER CAPTION: Kim Dae-jung, South Korean President and Nobel laureate

Oslo, Norway - December 10, 2000

1. Shot of wooden boat in harbour

2. Wide of Oslo City Hall building

3. Various of Kim with lighting flame outside City Hall after children's event

4. Wide interior of presentation venue

5. Trumpeters herald arrival of dignitaries

6. Wide top shot of Kim arriving

7. Wide top shot of Norwegian Royal family arriving

8. Various cutaways of interiors

9. Various of Gunnar Berger, Nobel Peace Prize awards committee chairman presents Kim Dae-jung with Nobel Peace prize medal and diploma

10. Set up Kim Speech

11. SOUNDBITE: (Korean with English translation) Kim Dae-jung, South Korean President and Nobel laureate

12. Cutaways of Kim

13. Various of Kim shaking hands with members of Norwegian royal family

14. Kim and entourage exit ceremony

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Instant Library Oct-Dec 2009
Title:
SD
Summary: Norway / USA - President Obama wins Nobel Peace Prize
Story No: G01783
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/10/2009 00:00 AM
People: Barack Obama , Robert Gibbs , Thorbjoern Jagland , George W. Bush , Morgan Tsvangirai , Jimmy Carter , Al Gore
Subscription:

On October 9th 2009 US President Barack Obama won the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize in a stunning decision designed to encourage his initiatives to reduce nuclear arms, ease tensions with the Muslim world and stress diplomacy and cooperation rather than unilateralism.

Nobel observers were shocked by the unexpected choice so early in the Obama presidency, which began less than two weeks before the February 1 nomination deadline.

White House press secretary Robert Gibbs said Obama woke up to the news a little before 6 a.m. local time (10 GMT).

The Norwegian Nobel Committee lauded the change in global mood wrought by Obama's calls for peace and cooperation but recognised initiatives that have yet to bear fruit: reducing the world stock of nuclear arms, easing American conflicts with Muslim nations and strengthening the US role in combating climate change.

"Only very rarely has a person to the same extent as Obama captured the world's attention and given its people hope for a better future," said Thorbjoern Jagland, chairman of the Nobel Committee.

Still, the US remains at war in Iraq and Afghanistan, the US Congress has yet to pass a law reducing carbon emissions and there has been little significant reduction in global nuclear stockpiles since Obama took office.

The award appeared to be a slap at President George W. Bush from a committee that harshly criticised Obama's predecessor for his largely unilateral military action in the wake of the September 11th attacks.

The Nobel committee praised Obama's creation of "a new climate in international politics" and said he had returned multilateral diplomacy and institutions like the UN to the centre of the world stage.

Until seconds before the award, speculation had focused on a wide variety of candidates besides Obama: Zimbabwe's Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai, a Colombian senator, a Chinese dissident and an Afghan woman's rights activist, among others.

The Nobel committee received a record 205 nominations for this year's prize, though it was not immediately apparent who nominated Obama.

Obama is the third sitting US president to win the award: President Theodore Roosevelt won in 1906 and President Woodrow Wilson was awarded the prize in 1919.

The Nobel committee chairman said after awarding the 2002 prize to former Democratic President Jimmy Carter, for his mediation in international conflicts, that it should be seen as a "kick in the leg" to the Bush administration's hard line in the build-up to the Iraq war.

Five years later, the committee honoured Al Gore - Bush's adversary in the 2000 presidential election - for his campaign to raise awareness about global warming.

In his 1895 will, Alfred Nobel stipulated that the peace prize should go "to the person who shall have done the most or the best work for fraternity between the nations and the abolition or reduction of standing armies and the formation and spreading of peace congresses."

Unlike the other Nobel Prizes, which are awarded by Swedish institutions, he said the peace prize should be given out by a five-member committee elected by the Norwegian Parliament.

Sweden and Norway were united under the same crown at the time of Nobel's death.

The committee has taken a wide interpretation of Nobel's guidelines, expanding the prize beyond peace mediation to include efforts to combat poverty, disease and climate change.

US President Barack Obama said he was honoured and humbled to win the Nobel Peace Prize and would accept it as a "call to action" to work with other nations to solve the problems of the 21st Century.

Obama told reporters in the White House Rose Garden on October 10th that he was not sure he had done enough to earn the award, or deserved to be in the company of the celebrated other laureates before him.

"I do not view it as a recognition of my own accomplishments, but rather as an affirmation of American leadership on behalf of aspirations held by people in all nations", he said.

The president said he would "accept this award as a call to action, a call for all nations to confront the common challenges of the 21st century".

He travelled to Oslo, Norway, in December to accept the award.

SHOTLIST:

622740

Barack Obama announced as winner of the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize

AP TELEVISION

Oslo - 9 Oct 2009

1. Zoom out of Norwegian Nobel Institute exterior

2. Chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, Thorbjoern Jagland, walks to podium, SOUNDBITE (Norwegian):

"The Norwegian Nobel Committee has decided that the Nobel Peace prize 2009 will go to the US President Barack Obama (gasps of surprise) for his extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples."

622760

President in first comments on his Nobel peace prize win

AP TELEVISION

Washington DC - 9 Oct 2009

3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Barack Obama, US President:

" To be honest, I do not feel that I deserve to be in the company of so many of the transformative figures who've been honoured by this prize."

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US Nobel
Title:
SD
Summary: +4:3 Reax to Liu Xiaobo winning Nobel Peace Prize
Story No: 668144
Source: AP TELEVISION , DoS TV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/12/2010 20:32 PM
People: Richard Gere , Dennis Kucinich , Barack Obama
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

AP TELEVISION

New York, New York - 10 December 2010

++16:9++

1. Mid of Hollywood actor, Richard Gere embracing friend

2. Cutaway to media

3. Mid of two protesters holding signs, zoom on sign reading: (English) "Freedom for Liu Xiaobo and all Tibetans"

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Richard Gere, Actor and pro-Tibet activist:

"It's clear that in the end, brute force can never really stop that innate, universal drive for happiness, for freedom, for expression, for community. And this Nobel Peace Prize for Liu Xiaobo, I think, demonstrates that."

5. Tilt down from Chrysler Building to protest in support of jailed Nobel laureate, Liu Xiaobo on street, zoom in of banner displaying photo of Liu

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Richard Gere, Actor and pro-Tibet activist:

"He's more courageous than the President of the United States. He's more courageous than the President of Russia. He's more courageous than the Secretary of the UN. This is a man who has spoken truth to power."

7. Cutaway of media

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Richard Gere, Actor and activist:

"This is a man who is probably sacrificing everything to speak from the clearest, deepest, honest, most honest, most forgiving part of his own heart. And I think the fact that he is able to do that is something that the Chinese people can be extraordinarily proud of."

AP TELEVISION

Washington, DC - 10 December 2010

++16:9++

9. Various of Chinese democracy activists

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Dennis Kucinich, US Congressman:

"We have to come to a standpoint of saying that we respect China, that we want to engage China and cooperate with China, but if our friends do something that we don't agree with, we need to come from a place of love and friendship and say 'We don't agree with the way you're handling this and we hope that you will see that there is something essential that's being recognised here by the Nobel Committee.'"

DOS TV

Washington, DC - 10 December 2010

++4:3++

11. Mid of US Assistant Secretary for Democracy, Human Rights and Labour, Michael Posner taking podium at State Department briefing

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Posner, US Assistant Secretary for Democracy, Human Rights and Labour:

"As we've said again today and repeatedly, we welcome the decision of the Nobel Committee to award this year's peace prize to Liu Xiaobo for his work promoting human rights and democracy in China. Charter 08 is a human rights document and we continue to call for his immediate release."

13. Wide of Posner at podium

STORYLINE

Pro-democracy activists gathered in New York City and Washington, DC on Friday to celebrate Nobel Peace Prize winner, imprisoned Chinese dissident, Liu Xiaobo and to call for his release.

The protest in New York - held in support of Liu - was attended by Hollywood actor Richard Gere.

Gere took part in a symbolic ceremony freeing Liu from a Chinese prison at the protest, held across the street from the United Nations headquarters.

"It's clear that in the end, brute force can never really stop that innate, universal drive for happiness, for freedom, for expression, for community. And this Nobel Peace Prize for Liu Xiaobo, I think, demonstrates that," he said.

Gere said the Chinese people should be "extraordinarily proud" of Liu, who he called "more courageous than the President of the United States...more courageous than the President of Russia...(and) more courageous than the Secretary of the UN."

Meanwhile, Chinese democracy advocates in Washington held a rally in the nation's capital, calling on President Barack Obama to pressure China to release Liu.

The jail sentence - Liu's fourth period of incarceration since 1989 - was handed down after he co-authored a bold appeal for human rights and multiparty democracy known as Charter 08.

About 50 people gathered at the Victims of Communism Memorial, which features a statue inspired by the "Goddess of Democracy" that Chinese students built during the 1089 Tiananmen Square uprising.

Ohio Congressman Dennis Kucinich joined the crowd, saying great nations have a responsibility to protect human rights.

"We have to come to a standpoint of saying that we respect China, that we want to engage China and cooperate with China, but if our friends do something that we don't agree with, we need to come from a place of love and friendship and say, 'We don't agree with the way you're handling this and we hope that you will see that there is something essential that's being recognised here by the Nobel Committee," he said.

At the State Department, the Assistant Secretary for Democracy, Human Rights and Labour reaffirmed US support for Liu's Nobel Peace Prize and reiterated the president's call for his release.

"As we've said again today and repeatedly, we welcome the decision of the Nobel Committee to award this year's peace prize to Liu Xiaobo for his work promoting human rights and democracy in China. Charter 08 is a human rights document and we continue to call for his immediate release."

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COLOMBIA: BOGOTA: CHILDREN'S GROUP NOMINATED FOR NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
Title:
SD
Summary: COLOMBIA: BOGOTA: CHILDREN'S GROUP NOMINATED FOR NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
Story No: 71258
Source: APTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 24/01/1998 05:00 AM
People: Jose Ramos Horta , Jose Ramos
Subscription:

Spanish/Nat

A group of Colombian children has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.

The children were nominated by 1996 laureate Jose Ramos-Horta in recognition for their efforts to promote peace in their country.

In an unprecedented move during the October 1996 elections, over two (m) million children from 300 municipalities voted for peace.

It was a day of joy for Colombia.

A children's group which has been promoting peace and human rights has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.

The nomination was sparked by a group of children belonging to the 'Children's Mandate for Peace and Rights' movement.

With the support of UNICEF and local human rights groups, these children promoted the so-called 'children's vote for peace' in 1996.

During that year's October elections, some two-point-seven (m) million children cast their votes for peace, love and the right to education.

Ten (m) million adults followed their move and also participated in the symbolic vote.

Last June, 1996 Nobel Peace Prize laureate, Jose Ramos-Horta visited Colombia where he learned about the children's success.

He then nominated the youngsters for this year's Nobel Peace Prize.

This girl believes the nomination will help people understand Colombia better.

SOUNDBITE: (Spanish)

'It is definitely a recognition that is given to Colombia for the first time. For the first time we're seen as a good nation, as good people, as hardworking, friendly and dear people and not as drug addicts or thieves. For the first time we're looked at from the heart and not with malice as everyone has been. Today is definitely the happiest day of our life.'

SUPER CAPTION: Farly Fannyd Calle, Delegate form Apartado

UNICEF delegates believe Colombian children are becoming an important issue in the peace process between the government and the guerrillas.

SOUNDBITE: (Spanish)

'Part of the people's will - which was demonstrated by 10 (m) million votes - was to ensure that children do not become enlisted, but not only enlisted as soldiers but also exposed to the risks. We're working on this, talking not only with the guerrillas and the paramilitaries, but also with the army. Colombian law is changing so that this becomes a reality.'

SUPER CAPTION: Cecilio Adorno, UNICEF Representative for Colombia and Venezuela

For the nominated children, peace depends on the values taught both at home and in school.

SOUNDBITE: (Spanish)

'I think that the most important thing are values. Our values must be taught at home, on the streets and in school. Respect for others, tolerance and other values.'

SUPER CAPTION: Luis Alejandro Gutierrez, Delegate Sogamozo

In over three decades of guerrilla violence in Colombia, scores of children have died.

UNICEF and human rights activists hope the Colombian example will help launch a similar movement worldwide.

Bogota, Colombia - 23 January 1998

1. Wide shot nominated children

2. Guests

3. Guests and children

4. Cecilio Adorno and Antanas Mockus

5. Wide shot nominated children at table

6. Wide shot guests

7. Set up shot Farly Fannyd Calle

8. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish), Farly Fannyd Calle, Delegate Apartado

9. Children

10. Nominated children

11. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish), Cecilio Adorno, UNICEF Representative for Colombia and Venezuela

12. Ceremony

13. Children at table

14. Children marching outside

15. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish), Luis Alejandro Gutierrez, Delegate Sogamozo

16. Three girls dancing

17. Tight shot girl singing and dancing

18. Children decorating big logo

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Norway Nobel
Title:
SD
Summary: Barack Obama announced as winner of the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize
Story No: 622714
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/10/2009 10:35 AM
People: Barack Obama , Morgan Tsvangirai , George W. Bush , Jimmy Carter , Al Gore , Nelson Mandela
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

1. Chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, Thorbjoern Jagland, walks to podium, SOUNDBITE (Norwegian):

"Good morning, the Norwegian Nobel Committee has decided that the Nobel Peace prize 2009 will go to the US President, Barack Obama (gasps of surprise) for his extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples."

2. Exterior of Norwegian Nobel Institute

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Thorbjoern Jagland, Chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee:

"The Norwegian Nobel Committee has decided that the Nobel Peace Prize for 2009 is to be awarded to President Barack Obama for his extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples. The Committee has attached special importance to Obama's vision of, and work for, a world without nuclear weapons."

4. Zoom into Alfred Nobel statue

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Thorbjoern Jagland, Chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee:

"Only very rarely has a person to the same extent as Obama captured the world's attention and given its people hope for a better future. His diplomacy is founded in the concept that those who are to lead the world must do so on the basis of values and attitudes that are shared by the majority of the world's population."

6. Tilt down from statue to name

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Thorbjoern Jagland, Chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee:

(Q: He has not achieved nothing in concrete as of yet. What is the reason for giving him the prize and is the nobel committee, is your committee not risking accusation of being a little political by giving this precious award to incumbent US president?)

"If you look at the history of the Nobel Peace Prize, we have on many occasions tried to enhance what many personalities is trying to do."

8. Zoom out of Norwegian Nobel Institute

9. Jagland leaves room

STORYLINE

US President Barack Obama won the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday for "his extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples," the Norwegian Nobel Committee said, citing his outreach to the Muslim world and attempts to curb nuclear proliferation.

The stunning choice made Obama the third sitting US president to win the Nobel Peace Prize and shocked Nobel observers because Obama took office less than two weeks before the February 1 nomination deadline.

Obama's name had been mentioned in speculation before the award but many Nobel watchers believed it was too early to award the president.

Speculation had focused on Zimbabwe's Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai, a Colombian senator and a Chinese dissident, along with an Afghan woman's rights activist.

The Nobel committee praised Obama's creation of "a new climate in international politics" and said he had returned multilateral diplomacy and institutions like the UN to the centre of the world stage.

The plaudit appeared to be a slap at President George W. Bush from a committee that harshly criticised Obama's predecessor for resorting

to largely unilateral military action in the wake of the September 11 attacks.

Rather than recognising concrete achievement, the 2009 prize appeared intended to support initiatives that have yet to bear fruit: reducing the world stock of nuclear arms, easing American conflicts with Muslim nations and strengthening the US role in combating climate change.

"Only very rarely has a person to the same extent as Obama captured the world's attention and given its people hope for a better future," Thorbjoern Jagland, chairman of the Nobel Committee said.

Former US President Theodore Roosevelt won the award in 1906 and former President Woodrow Wilson won in 1919.

The committee chairman said after awarding the 2002 prize to former Democratic President Jimmy Carter, for his mediation in international conflicts, that it should be seen as a "kick in the leg" to the Bush administration's hard line in the build-up to the Iraq war.

Five years later, the committee honoured Bush's adversary in the 2000 presidential election, Al Gore, for his campaign to raise awareness about global warming.

The Nobel committee received a record 205 nominations for this year's prize though it was not immediately apparent who nominated Obama.

Nominators include former laureates; current and former members of the committee and their staff; members of national governments and legislatures; university professors of law, theology, social sciences, history and philosophy; leaders of peace research and foreign affairs

institutes; and members of international courts of law.

The Nelson Mandela Foundation welcomed the award on behalf of its founder Nelson Mandela, who shared the 1993 Peace Prize with then-South African President F.W. DeKlerk for their efforts at ending years of apartheid and laying the groundwork for a democratic country.

In his 1895 will, Alfred Nobel stipulated that the peace prize should go "to the person who shall have done the most or the best work for fraternity between the nations and the abolition or reduction of standing armies and the formation and spreading of peace congresses."

Unlike the other Nobel Prizes, which are awarded by Swedish institutions, he said the peace prize should be given out by a five-member committee elected by the Norwegian Parliament.

Sweden and Norway were united under the same crown at the time of Nobel's death.

The committee has taken a wide interpretation of Nobel's guidelines, expanding the prize beyond peace mediation to include efforts to combat poverty, disease and climate change.

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++Norway Nobel 4
Title:
HD
Summary: Nobel Peace Prize winners, and procession
Story No: 4015646
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 10/12/2015 19:50 PM
People: Houcine Abassi
Subscription:

RESTRICTION SUMMARY: AP CLIENTS ONLY

SHOTLIST:

AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY

Oslo - 10 December 2015

++NIGHT SHOTS++

1. Various of members of the Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet, this year's Nobel Peace Prize Winner, waving from balcony of the Grand Hotel UPSOUND Cheers from crowd below

2. Crowd applauding

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Leyla Swafe, 27, visitor from United Kingdom:

"It's been a really moving, really touching, emotional day today. Just coming back from the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony and then attending the torch parade. It's great to see all the people together, just joining together to celebrate peace and certainly being part of the Tunisian community and seeing the happiness that they're experiencing and the hope that they have for the future."

4. Torchlight procession walking through Oslo city centre with banner reading (English) "Congratulations, Tunisian Dialogue Quartet"

5. Various of the procession

6. Mounted police in front of the procession

7. Torchlight procession approaching square

8. People on square in front of Grand Hotel

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Mouhedine Cherbib, delegate of Tunisian civil society actors living abroad:

"We are here because we enjoy this prize. It's very, very important for us for the Tunisian people and all the region of the Maghreb, the Arabic region because you know this region has many, many problems, tension due to war, and the democracy for the small state in Tunisia, we are very, very happy, very joyous for this prize."

10. Various of laureates on the balcony

STORYLINE:

Members of the Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet waved jubilantly from the balcony of Oslo's Grand Hotel on Thursday evening, after earlier picking up this year's Nobel Peace Prize in the Norwegian capital.

Earlier, a procession of thousands, many carrying torches, walked through Oslo city centre with a banner to celebrate the quartet's win before gathering on the square in front of the Grand Hotel.

They cheered as the representatives of the quartet, which helped build democracy in the violence-torn country after the 2011 revolution, appeared above them.

The quartet is made up of four key groups: The Tunisian General Labour Union; the Tunisian Confederation of Industry, Trade and Handicrafts; the Tunisian Human Rights League; and the Tunisian Order of Lawyers, the country's bar association.

The gold medals and diplomas were picked up by Houcine Abassi, the labour union leader; Mohamed Fadhel Mahfoudh, head of the bar association; Abdessatar Ben Moussa, president of the human rights group and Wided Bouchamaoui, the head of the employers' association.

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Subjects: Nobel Prizes , Events
People: Houcine Abassi
Organisations: Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet
Locations: Oslo , Oslo , Norway
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Norway Ahtisaari
Title:
SD
Summary: Interview with Nobel Peace Prize winner ahead of ceremony
Story No: 588404
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/12/2008 12:05 PM
People: Robert Mugabe , Morgan Tsvangirai
Subscription:

The winner of the 2008 Nobel Peace Prize, Marrti Ahtisaari, said on Wednesday that while he was not enthusiastic about military intervention, "sometimes we have no choice", citing NATO's intervention in Kosovo as a case in point.

When asked whether the situation in Zimbabwe was such an instance, he agreed but cautioned that African people would need to give their support.

"I don't think you could otherwise do that," he said.

Zimbabwe has been brought to its knees as President Robert Mugabe has refused to relinquish any power to the opposition candidate Morgan Tsvangirai.

The African country is now suffering from a cholera outbreak where the death toll has risen to 746, caused by the crumbling health care system and water supply infrastructure.

Ahtisaari was speaking to AP Television at his hotel in Norway's capital Oslo, where he will later receive the prize, which he was awarded in October.

Ahtisaari was also asked about the current unrest in Greece, where the police shooting of a teenager has caused days of rioting in several Greek cities.

"I hope that things calm down and that there are serious negotiations, and not anyone uses this sort of situation for opportunistic political purposes," he said.

The Finnish diplomat was awarded the peace prize for decades of peace work around the world, including a 2005 deal that ended fighting between the Indonesian government and rebels in Aceh province.

He also drafted the United Nations-sponsored plan that paved the way for Kosovo to declare its independence from Serbia, and was involved in the protracted negotiations.

The Nobel Peace Prize is presented in Oslo in line with the 1895 will of prize founder Alfred Nobel, whereas the awards for chemistry, physics, medicine, literature and economics are always handed out in Stockholm.

The prizes - including a 10 million kronor (1.2 million US dollars) purse, a diploma and a gold medal - are always handed out on December 10, the anniversary of Nobel's death in 1896.

Nobel's will stipulates that the prizes, first handed out in 1901, should be given to those who "have conferred the greatest benefit on mankind" in their respective fields.

1. Various exteriors of Grand Hotel where Marrti Ahtisaari is staying

2. SOUNDBITE: (English) Marrti Ahtisaari, winner of 2008 Nobel Peace Prize

(on whether military intervention should be used in Zimbabwe)

"It's very contro(versial)... in general I'm not so enthusiastic about it (military intervention) though I understand that sometimes we have no choice, like in Kosovo, that NATO had to intervene because Milosevic behaved so badly against the Kosovar Albanians. But there are situations where you need intervention or you need actually peacekeepers with (the UN's) Chapter 7 mandate."

(Question: Is Zimbabwe one of those cases?)

"I think it is, in a sense, but then we have to get the Africans to support any action. I don't think you could otherwise do that."

3. Cutaway of window of hotel

4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Marrti Ahtisaari, winner of 2008 Nobel Peace Prize

(talking about current unrest in Greece)

"No I was surprised what happened, because it was unfortunate that this young man was killed, but then on the other hand, they had initiated, if I understood, the action against the police and created that. I hope that things calm down and that there are serious negotiations, and not anyone uses this sort of situation for opportunistic political purposes."

5. Wide exterior of Grand Hotel

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Subjects: Nobel Prizes , Events
People: Robert Mugabe , Morgan Tsvangirai
Organisations: North Atlantic Treaty Organization
Locations: Oslo , Oslo County , Norway
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Switzerland - Nobel Peace Prize presser
Title:
SD
Summary: Switzerland - Nobel Peace Prize presser
Story No: w105608
Source: UNTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/10/1997 04:00 AM
People: Jody Williams
Subscription:

T/I: 10:50:40

The International Campaign to Ban Land Mines (ICBL), which shared the Nobel Peace Prize with its coordinator, Jody Williams on Friday (10/10), urged United States, Russia, China and other nations to sign an international treaty against landmines. A draft treaty drawn up in Oslo last month has the support of more than 90 nations, but there are fears that without the support of big nations that the treaty, to be signed in Ottowa, Canada, in December, won't be enforcable.

SHOWS:

GENEVA, SWITZERLAND, 10/10

SOT Mrs Susan Walker, member of the steering committee of Nobel Peace Prize winning organisation: (in English)" it is an honour, it is a recognition that the countries of the world have the massacre daily that no-one talks about the silent massacre, their voice is being heard. It is for young girls like this one (holding an artificial leg at her right hand) one of our 7 year old Cambodian patient a little girl who went back to Cambodia during repatriation, and our workers presented me with this (the artificial leg) at the end of the Cambodian refugee camps at the border saying we made a new one for her when go back to Cambodia, please take this one and tell the world we don't need

mines any more, that kill our children,that was at 1993";

SOT Walker: "Since the announcement was made at 11 o'clock today, at least 7 people somewhere in the world have stepped on a landmine, one every 22 minutes, 70 people a day, 500 a week, 26,00 a year, this carnage must stop, the Nobel Peace Prize will help us to convince recalcitrant nations, like USA , China, Russia, India, Pakistan , Iran, Iraq stand unnoticed you are on the wrong side of humanity if you don't sign the Peace treaty in December. Countries that have not signed it like Japan, Austaralia and many others, including Europe: Greece , Finland, please listen to the cry of humanity look at your allies

countries that have decide to ban landmines and take that step."

Exterior United Nations building in Geneva;

UN;

audience listening

exterior;

a chair with one broken leg symbolically designing the landmines victims;

2.29

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NORWAY: NOBEL PEACE PRIZE: RABIN / ARAFAT / PERES
Title:
SD
Summary: NORWAY: NOBEL PEACE PRIZE: RABIN / ARAFAT / PERES
Story No: 1425
Source: APTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/12/1994 05:00 AM
People: Yitzhak Rabin , Shimon Peres , Yasser Arafat
Subscription:

Eng/Nat

Israel's Prime Minister has welcomed what could be a major breakthrough in relations between his country and Syria.

Yitzhak Rabin's in Oslo to receive the Nobel Peace Prize, which he's sharing with Shimon Peres and Yasser Arafat.

News that Israel and Syria are to resume talks could see a further boost to peace efforts.

Yitzhak Rabin, Israel's Prime Minister, is in Oslo for the Nobel ceremony. It's a return visit to the city which brokered the peace agreement more than a year ago.

He's sharing the Nobel peace prize with his foreign minister Shimon Peres and P-L-O chairman Yasser Arafat for their role in bringing peace to the Middle East.

As he arrived at the City Hall, Rabin was asked about plans for contacts between Syria and Israel.

SOUNDBITE:

Well, the statement of (Syrian) Foreign Minister Sharaa is in essence a readiness to start a change of views, not formal negotiations. I believe it's better than nothing and no doubt if they are ready to negotiate one of the most important issues, it is to say security arrangements between experts, I look at it in a positive way. I don't know the details. I'm sure the Americans will inform us. It's a good move. It's not all that we wanted. Thank you.

SUPER CAPTION: YITZHAK RABIN, Israeli Prime Minister

While Peres and Rabin walked through the streets of Oslo to get to the Nobel ceremony, Yasser Arafat arrived by limousine.

Meanwhile, there have been continued protests at Arafat being awarded the peace prize, with demonstrators flying into Oslo from around the world.

1. Rabin walks to ceremony

2. Peres walks to ceremony

3. SOUNDBITE Rabin

4. Arafat's car arrives

5. Protesters

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NOBEL PRIZE WINNERS
Title:
SD
Summary: NOBEL PRIZE WINNERS
Story No: BM54732
Source: British Movietone
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 14/12/1950 00:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

In Oslo, Dr Ralph Bunche received the Nobel Peace Prize from the Chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, Dr Gunnar Jahn, for his work as United Nations mediator in Palestine. In Stockholm, other awards were made by King Gustav. Two Britons were among the prize-winners, one of these being Bertrand Russell for Literature.

Disclaimer: British Movietone is an historical collection. Any views and expressions within either the video or metadata of the collection are reproduced for historical accuracy and do not represent the opinions or editorial policies of the Associated Press.

SHOTLIST:

KS. Oslo - GV Oslo University. Interior - Dr Gunnar Jahn presents award to Dr Ralph Bunche. MS King Haakon & Crown Prince Olav congratulates Bunche. In Stockholm - GV interior audience, large audience. King Gustav & Queen arrive & take seats. Bertrand Russell comes on stage, accepts award from King Gustav. SV SCU Russell bowing to King. MS group of winners on stage.

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NOBEL AWARDS
Title:
SD
Summary: NOBEL AWARDS
Story No: BM75768
Source: British Movietone
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 15/12/1958 00:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

King Gustav, Queen Louise, and members of their family attended the ceremony in Stockholm. Dr Sanger of Cambridge University won the Chemistry prize and received it from the King. Three Americans shared the prize for Physiology or Medicine: Doctors George Beadle and Edward Tatum, and Professor Joshua Lederberg. The Nobel Peace Prize, awarded in Norway, was presented in the presence of King Olav at a ceremony in Oslo. The recipient was a Belgian priest, Father Pirie. The spirit of the prize is "neighbourly love".

Disclaimer: British Movietone is an historical collection. Any views and expressions within either the video or metadata of the collection are reproduced for historical accuracy and do not represent the opinions or editorial policies of the Associated Press.

SHOTLIST:

GV Swedish Royal Family arrive. CU statue of Nobel. CU Dr Sanger goes down steps. MS prize presented. CU King of Sweden. BS three Americans. MS first American goes to get prize. MS American receives prize. Slip pan to GV Norway Chamber. CU King Olav seated. MS Priest receives prize. Same. CU Priest speaking.

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PEACE PRIZE WINNER
Title:
SD
Summary: PEACE PRIZE WINNER
Story No: BM83595
Source: British Movietone
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 14/12/1961 00:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

Mr Albert Luthuli came to snow-covered Oslo, where the award of the Nobel Peace Prize of £15,000 was to be given to him. The former Zulu chief, whose life has been dedicated to the aim of peace, had received special permission for the journey from the South African Government.

Disclaimer: British Movietone is an historical collection. Any views and expressions within either the video or metadata of the collection are reproduced for historical accuracy and do not represent the opinions or editorial policies of the Associated Press.

SHOTLIST:

Key scene. GV building. MS pan up statue Alfred Nobel. CU sign Nobel Institute. MS Mr Luthuli gets out of car and shakes hands. MCU same. MS same throws snowball. MS same. CU Mr Luthuli.

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NORWAY NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
Title:
SD
Summary: CAN 056 NOBEL PEACE PRIZE IS AWARDED TO THE RED CROSS FOR 1963 AND TO LINUS PAULING FOR 1962
Story No: z048270
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/12/1963 00:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

The Nobel Peace Prizes for 1962 and 1963 are delivered to the winners at a formal ceremony at Oslo University. CJ Hambro of the Nobel Committee presents the awards to Linus Pauling for his campaigning against the testing of nuclear weapons, and the International Committee of the Red Cross jointly with the League of Red Cross Societies. John MacAuley receives the award as representative of the League of Red Cross Societies and Leopold Boissier is representative for the International Committee of the Red Cross.

1. ws exterior building

2. ms interior hall

3. ms Pauling and wife seated

4. ms Pauling mounts rostrum to rapturous applause

5. SOUNDBITE: (English) cu Hambro presents award to Pauling

6. SOUNDBITE: (English) cu Pauling speaks saying that he wishes Alfred Nobel was still alive when his great goal of a world without war is in sight...

7. SOUNDBITE: (English) ms Hambro speaks on dividing the Peace Prize for 1963 to the International Committee of the Red Cross and League of Red Cross Societies as it is the centennial of the Red Cross.

8. SOUNDBITE: (English) ms MacCauley speaks

9. SOUNDBITE: (English) ms Boissier representative speaks

Film: Pos - Sound: Opt SOF - B&W - NYFilm: a0015988 - LN Number: LN32625 - Available in HD

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NOBEL PEACE PRIZES     - NO SOUND
Title:
SD
Summary: NOBEL PEACE PRIZES - NO SOUND
Story No: BM87667
Source: British Movietone
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/12/1963 00:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

Disclaimer: British Movietone is an historical collection. Any views and expressions within either the video or metadata of the collection are reproduced for historical accuracy and do not represent the opinions or editorial policies of the Associated Press.

SHOTLIST:

KING OLAV V & Crown Prince HARALD of Norway presented the Nobel Peace Prizes at the Festival Hall of Oslo University. There were 3 this year, because in 1962 no peace prize was awarded. Nobel Peace Prize for 1963 was given to Prof. LINUS PAULING of Pasadena University, U.S.A. The 1962 Peace Prize was awarded to The Red Cross represented by LEOPOLD BOISSIER and JOHN A. MacAULAY.

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Locations: Oslo , Oslo County , Norway
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NORWAY MARTIN LUTHER KING
Title:
SD
Summary: CAN391 KING ARRIVES IN NORWAY FOR NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
Story No: z055058
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/12/1964 00:00 AM
People: Martin Luther King Jr.
Subscription:

Black Civil Rights activist Dr. Martin Luther King arrives in Oslo with his wife Coretta Scott Kingto receive the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize

1. vs of King through crowds at the airport

2. vs of King meeting crowds and shaking hands

3. vs of the King's moving through crowd and then standing at microphones ready for a statement

4. SOUNDBITE (English): vs of King speaking

Film: Neg - Sound: Opt Trk - B&W - NYFilm: No - LN Number: LN16677 - Available in HD

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People: Martin Luther King Jr.
Locations: Oslo , Norway
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NORWAY MARTIN LUTHER KING
Title:
SD
Summary: CAN391 DR. KING ARRIVES IN NORWAY FOR NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
Story No: z054953
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/12/1964 00:00 AM
People: Martin Luther King Jr.
Subscription:

Black Civil Rights activist Dr. Martin Luther King arrives in Oslo with his wife Coretta Scott Kingto receive the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize

1. ms King and wife Coretta down plane steps

2. mcu cameramen

3. ms King and press along

4. ts King and wife to airport building

5. various ms King and wife in airport building welcomed by crowd, shaking hands

6. ws King at microphone, speaks: SOUNDBITE: "My colleagues and I ought to be in Norway (?). This is for most of us for most of us our first trip to Scandinavia, and we look forward to making many friends while here and in Sweden. We feel we have much to learn from Scandinavia's democratic socialist traditions, and from the manner in which you have overcome many of the social and economic problems that still plague for more powerful and affluent nations. I bring you greetings from many Americans, of good will, Negro and white, who are committed to struggle for brotherhood, and the crusade for world peace. On their behalf I have come to Oslo to collect the Nobel peace Prize. Thank you."

Film: Neg - Sound: Opt SOF - B&W - NYFilm: a0011049 - LN Number: LN16677 - Available in HD

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NORWAY NOBEL KING
Title:
SD
Summary: CAN387 MARTIN LUTHER KING RECEIVES NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
Story No: z054961
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/12/1964 00:00 AM
People: Martin Luther King Jr.
Subscription:

Dr Martin Luther King accepts 1964 Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo.

1. ms audience, title The Nobel Committee

2. vs King receives prize

3. ms audience applauds, Luther King in background

4. ms Luther King gives acceptance speech

5. cu prize on lap of Mrs Luther King

6. cu King continues speaking

Film: Pos - Sound: Mute - B&W - NYFilm: a0011112 - LN Number: LN16715 - Available in HD

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Keywords: Human Rights
People: Martin Luther King Jr.
Locations: Oslo , Norway
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NORWAY SWEDEN NOBEL PRIZE
Title:
SD
Summary: CAN387 MARTIN LUTHER KING AND OTHERS RECEIVE NOBLE PRIZE
Story No: z054354
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/12/1964 00:00 AM
People: Martin Luther King Jr.
Subscription:

Recipients of 1964 Nobel Prize in Peace, Physics, Chemistry, and Medicine or Physiology (named in shotlist).

**Cuts of z054961

**also listed at z054948

1. ms audience with credits 'The Nobel Committee'

2. SOUNDBITE [NORWEGIAN]: mcu man at microphone announced Martin Luther King, Jr. (MLK)

3. mcu MLK listens, seated, prepares own notes

4. cs Nobel Peace Prize

5. mcu MLK

6. ms trumpeters step aside as guard marches

7. mcu two guards followed by Nobel Prize recipients onto stage

8. mcu man carries Nobel medal to master of ceremonies

9. ALL SOUNDBITES NOW IN ENGLISH: vs ceremony proceeds as medal is awarded to Alexander Mikhaylovich Prokhorov, Nobel Prize in Future.

10. has Nikolay Gennadiyevich Basov with medal

11. mcu Basov to podium

12. mcu Basov bows

13. ms and cu Dorothy Mary Hodgkin, laureate in Chemistry, listens as her name she is congratulated

14. ms Hodgkin from stage to receive Nobel Prize

15. vs Hodgkin with prize

16. mcu Konrad Emil Bloch and Feodor Felix Konrad Lynen listen as their names are announced

17. ms Bloch and Lynen walking from stage

18. vs Bloch receiving award with cutaway of Bloch's family watching

17. mcu Lynen and Master of Ceremonies

18. mcu Lynen's wife

19. vs Lynen shaking hands, with award, onto stage, bows

20. ws auditorium, audience seated

Film: Neg - Sound: Opt SOF - B&W - NYFilm: No - LN Number: LN16714 - Available in HD

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People: Martin Luther King Jr.
Locations: Norway
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NORWAY KING
Title:
SD
Summary: CAN389 NOBEL PEACE PRIZE WINNER MARTIN LUTHER KING GIVES PRESS CONFERENCE
Story No: z054960
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 11/12/1964 00:00 AM
People: Martin Luther King Jr.
Subscription:

Nobel Peace Prize winner Martin Luther King gives press conference.

1. vs interior King speaks to press

Film: Pos - Sound: Mute - B&W - NYFilm: No - LN Number: LN16629 - Available in HD

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Keywords: Human Rights
People: Martin Luther King Jr.
Locations: Oslo , Norway
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NORWAY NOBLE PEACE PRIZE
Title:
SD
Summary: CAN673 LABOUISSE RECEIVES PEACE PRIZE ON BEHALF OF UNICEF
Story No: z061952
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 11/12/1965 00:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

Henry Richardson Labouisse, Jr. receives the Nobel Peace Prize at a ceremony in Oslo on behalf of UNICEF.

1. ws exterior auditorium of University of Oslo

2. ws pan audience

3. ms woman giving speech

4. mcu speaker

5. ms zoom in Labouisse in audience

6. ms cameramen

7. ws audience applauding

8. mcu Labouisse giving speech pan to audience

Film:Neg - Sound: Mute-B&W - NYFilm: a0027172 - LN Number: LN23721- Available in HD

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Organisations: United Nations Children's Fund, United Nations
Locations: Oslo , Norway
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NOBEL PRIZE   - NO SOUND
Title:
SD
Summary: NOBEL PRIZE - NO SOUND
Story No: BM94036
Source: British Movietone
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/10/1968 00:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

Disclaimer: British Movietone is an historical collection. Any views and expressions within either the video or metadata of the collection are reproduced for historical accuracy and do not represent the opinions or editorial policies of the Associated Press.

SHOTLIST:

Shots of French jurist, Rene Cassin, who is President of the State Council who won a 1968 Nobel Peace Prize.

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Locations: Paris , Île-de-France , France
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NORWAY NOBEL PRIZE
Title:
SD
Summary: SYND 11-12-69 NOBEL PEACE PRIZE AWARDED TO DAVID MORSE
Story No: z001265
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 11/12/1969 00:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

Director-general of the International Labour Organization, David Morse, receives Nobel peace prize on behalf of his organization in Oslo

1)overhead shot of hall in Oslo, where Nobel prizes are awarded

2) ms nobel peace prize awarded to ILO Director General, David Morse

Film: Pos - Sound: Mute - Colour - NYFilm: a0060225 - c0007440 - LN Number: LN12544 - Available in HD

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Subjects: Nobel Prizes , Events
Locations: Norway
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NORWAY NOBEL WINNER BORLAUG
Title:
SD
Summary: SYND 08/12/1970 NOBEL PEACE PRIZE WINNER DR BORLAUG AIRPORT ARRIVAL AND INTERVIEW
Story No: z005339
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 08/12/1970 00:00 AM
People: Norman Borlaug
Subscription:

Nobel Peace Prize winner Dr Norman Borlaug arriving at Oslo airport and being interviewed.

1. MS of Borlaug coming off the plane with his wife and being greeted by the Nobel Peace committee director, Mr Skaug and his wife

SOUNDBITE:

2. CU of Borlaug

Film: Pos - Sound: MAG SOF - Colour - Paperwork N - NYFilm: c0014920 - LN Number: LN17350 - Available in HD

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NORWAY NOBEL PRIZE
Title:
SD
Summary: SYND 7 12 74 NOBEL PEACE PRIZE WINNER EISAKU SATO ARRIVES AT OSLO
Story No: z013184
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 07/12/1974 00:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

Nobel peace prize winner, former Japanese Premier Eisaku Sato, arrives at Oslo airport

1. ms former Japanese Premier, Eisaku Sato, out of plane and down steps

2. various shots, Sato greeted and walks to terminal building

3. interior airport, cu Sato, pull back to ms, Sato and wife

Film: Rev - Sound: Mute - Colour - NYFilm: c0049147 - LN Number: LN58669 - Available in HD

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Locations: Oslo , Norway , Western Europe , Europe
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NORWAY PEACE PRIZE
Title:
SD
Summary: SYND 11 12 74 FORMER JAPANESE PRIME MINISTER SATO RECEIVES PEACE PRIZE
Story No: z013674
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/12/1974 00:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

Former Japanese Prime Minister Eisaku Sato receiving Nobel Peace Prize anti Sato demostrators outside hall where presentation was made and police arresting demonstrators

1 ms Former Japanese Prime Minister Eisaku Sato walks to stage to receive prize

2 gv audience

3 mcu Sato speech of thanks

4 gv hall

5 ms police

6 ms police move demonstrators from steps

7 ms police arrest demonstrators

8 gv pan exterior of hall and demonstrators

Film: Rev - Sound: Yes - Colour - NYFilm: c0049199 - LN Number:LN58748 - Available in HD

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NORWAY NOBEL
Title:
SD
Summary: SYND 29 11 76 LEADERS OF IRELAND'S WOMENS PEACE MOVEMENT RECEIVE PEACE PRIZE
Story No: z030287
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 28/11/1976 00:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

Mairead Corrigan and Betty Williams, leaders of the Northern Ireland Women's Peace Movement receive the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo. Gunnar Borovik is the Norwegian journalist who started the campaign for the women to receive the prize. With them is journalist and fellow leader, Ciaran McKeown.

+++VOIVEOVER++++++NIGHT SHOTS+++1. ms McKeown, Corrigan and Williams receive bouquets at airport2. cu Williams 3. ms Corrigan 4. cu Corrigan, pull out to crowd of press5. ms press 6. SOUNDBITE: (English) cu Borovik speaks 7. ms interior Corrigan, Williams and McKeown take seats at press conference8. cu and pan of the three leadersFilm: Pos - Sound: Opt SOF- Colour - NYFilm: c0057720/c0057720A - LN Number: LN78025 - Available in HD

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NORWAY SADAT BEGIN NOBEL PRIZE
Title:
SD
Summary: SYND 28 10 78 PRESIDENT SADAT AND PRESIDENT BEGIN WIN THE NOBEL PEACE PRIZE 1978
Story No: z039288
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 27/10/1978 00:00 AM
People: Menachem Begin , Jimmy Carter
Subscription:

The Norwegian Nobel Committee awarded the 1978 Peace Prize to President Anwar Sadat of Egypt and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin. The committee cited Sadat's visit to Jerusalem to meet Begin and Israeli leaders as breaching the "psychological wall" which blocked understanding and human contact between Egypt and Israel. Chairman Of Norwegian Nobel Peace Prize Committee Aase Lionies made the announcement

+++SOUNDBITE+++

1. mcu Aase Lionies making announcement in English: "The Norwegian Nobel Committee has awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for 1978 jointly to the President of Egypt, Anwar Sadat and The Prime Minister of Israel, Menachem Begin. In the course of the last 30 years the people of the Middle East have four times been ravaged by war. During these three decades many sincere efforts have been made to find a road to the solution of the complicated problems of this area. With the historic visit of President Anwar Sadat to Jerusalem in November 1977 a breach was forced in the psychological wall which for a whole generation has blocked understanding and human contact between Egypt and Israel. In the effort to reach a realistic order which could build bridges between former enemies and the present conflicts of interest, also the positive initiative taken by the United States President Jimmy Carter, has played a great role. By the award of the Peace Prize for 1978 to Menachem Begin and Anwar Sadat the Nobel Committee wishes not only to honour the actions already performed in the services of peace but also to encourage further efforts to work out practical solutions which can give reality to those thoughts of a lasting peace as they have been kindled by the framework agreement.

Film: Pos- Sound: Mag Trk - Colour - NYFilm: c0064372 - LN Number: LN97887 - Available in HD

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NORWAY MAREI
Title:
SD
Summary: SYND 8 12 78 EGYPTIAN ASSISTANT PRESIDENT MAREI ARRIVES TO COLLECT NOBEL PEACE PRIZE FOR PRESIDENT SADAT
Story No: z040040
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 07/12/1978 00:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

Egyptian presidential assistant Sayed Marei arrives in Oslo to receive President Sadat's share of the Nobel Peace Prize.

1. ws control tower with troops2. ms troops in field, pull out3. ws plane taxis 4. ms guard watches 5. ms Marei disembarks from plane and is greeted6. ms guard 7. ms Marei gets into car8. ms cars drive off Film: Rev - Sound: Mag Trk - Colour - NYFilm: c0064716A/c0064716 - LN Number: LN99362 - Available in HD

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NORWAY BEGIN NOBEL
Title:
SD
Summary: SYND 8 12 78 ISRAELI PRIME MINISTER BEGIN ARRIVES IN OSLO TO RECEIVE NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
Story No: z040024
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 08/12/1978 00:00 AM
People: Menachem Begin
Subscription:

Israel's Prime Minister Menachem Begin arrives in Norway to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. He gives a short speech to waiting press at the airport.

1. ws Begin and wife disembark from plane and are greeted2. cu photographer, zoom to guards on roof 3. SOUNDBITE: (English) ms Begin speaksFilm: Rev - Sound: Mag Trk - Colour - NYFilm: c0064721/c0064721A - LN Number: LN99374 - Available in HD

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EGYPT SADAT NOBEL
Title:
SD
Summary: SYND 15 12 78 EGYPT'S PRESIDENT SADAT RECEIVES NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
Story No: z039992
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 13/12/1978 00:00 AM
People: Menachem Begin
Subscription:

Amid the stalemate in his current peace initiative with Israel, President Anwar Sadat receives his half of the 1978 Nobel Peace Prize which he shares with Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin. Unlike his Israeli counterpart, however, Sadat refused to attend the official prize giving ceremony in Oslo on December 10th, and instead, sent as his representative, the ex-speaker of the Egyptian Parliament, Sayed Marrey. Marrey presents Sadat with the Peace Prize diploma and medal in the Abdin Palace in Cairo. Shortly after receiving the Nobel Prize, Sadat is awarded the Methodist Peace Prize medal, also in recognition of his bold peace initiative which began a year ago with his trip to Jerusalem.

1. ms interior Sadat receives prize from Marrey, zoom into diploma

2. ms Sadat receives Nobel medal, zoom in to medal, pull back to Sadat shaking hands with Marrey

3. ms Muslim delegation looking on

4. ms Sadat has Methodist Peace Prize placed around his neck

5. ms Sadat shakes hands with Christian clergy

Film: Rev - Sound: Mag SOF - Colour - NY Film: c0064777 - LN Number: LN99553 - Available in HD

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NORWAY NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
Title:
SD
Summary: SYND 10 12 78 MENACHEM BEGIN AND ANWAR SADAT AWARDED NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
Story No: z040022
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/12/1978 00:00 AM
People: Menachem Begin
Subscription:

Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin and Egypt's President Anwar Sadat receive the Nobel prize in Oslo. Sadat's award was accepted by Marei Sayed

1. cu Chairman of the Nobel committe, Aase Lionaes, SOUNDBITE: (English) calls Begin up to the stage

2. ms Menachem Begin, standing, listening, then Marei Sayed stands

3. ms Lionaes, Begin and Sayed step forward and Begin accepts award

4. Sayed recieves award

5. ms Sayed and Begin shake hands

6. exterior, various shots protesters chanting

7. ms police hold back demonstrators

Film: Rev - Sound: Mag/SOF - Colour - NYFilm: c0064737 - LN Number: LN99419 - Available in HD

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People: Menachem Begin
Locations: Oslo , Norway , Western Europe , Europe
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NORWAY MOTHER THERESA
Title:
SD
Summary: SYND 12 12 79 MOTHER THERESA RECEIVES NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
Story No: z042884
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 12/12/1979 00:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

Mother Theresa receives the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo for her work with the poor in Calcutta.

1. ws interior Oslo City Hall

2. SOUNDBITE: (English) ws speaker asks Mother Theresa to receive award

3. ws Mother Theresa makes way to podium

4. ms Mother Theresa receives diploma and medal

5. ws Mother Theresa approaches microphones, crowd applauds

6. SOUNDBITE: (English) ms Mother Theresa speaks

Film: Rev - Sound: Mag Trk - Colour - NYFilm: No - LN Number: LN16643 - Available in HD

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NORWAY NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
Title:
SD
Summary: SYND 12 12 80 ARGENTINIAN ADOLFO PEREZ ESQUIVEL ACCEPTS PEACE PRIZE
Story No: z047332
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 12/12/1980 00:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

Argentinian human rights activist Adolfo Perez Esquivel receiving 1980 Nobel Peace Prize and shaking hands with King Olav of Norway in Oslo.

1. ms Esquivel receives prize from Nobel chariman John Sannes

2. top shot audience applaud

3. ms esquivel speaks: SOUNDBITE (Spanish) speech translated into Norwegian

4. top shot king and officials

5. ts King Olav moves forward to shake Esquivel's hand

Film: Rev - Sound: Mag - Colour - NYFilm: c0067916 - LN Number: LN25488 - Available in HD

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Locations: Oslo , Norway
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COSTA RICA Nobel Peace Prize
Title:
SD
Summary: G16128705
Story No: w085420
Source: WTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 08/12/1987 05:00 AM
People: Jim Jordan , Oscar Arias , George W. Bush
Subscription:

GS CAS NICARAGUA/GUATEMALA/NORWAY/COSTA RICA/DOMINICAN REPUBLIC/USA:

16128705 Costa Rican President Oscar Arias has accepted a Nobel Peace

1"VT+BVU Prize for his plan to end fighting in Central America, yet

talks between representatives of the Nicaraguan government

and rebel leaders already appear to be breaking down. Former

Nicaraguan Defence aide Major Robert Miranda Bengoechea, who

defected to the US in October, has alleged that Nicaragua is

planning a massive increase in its defence systems: a report

in part corroborated by Defence Minister Humberto Ortega.

WTN/ABC 31.03 to 35.11

--------------------------------------------------------------

SHOWS:

8.12.87

NICARAGUA American pilot captured in Nicaragua, James )

Jordan Denby, with Nicaraguan guards; his )

Cessna-172 aircraft; more of Denby with ) ABC

captors; Nicaraguan official showing Denby's )

US passport, speech in Spanish; )

10.12.87

NORWAY Nobel Peace Prize ceremony; audience; Arias ) WTN

Oslo accepting prize; )

GUATEMALA Arias and other leaders signing peace accord; ) GS070887

Guatemala ) WTN

City )

10.12.87

NORWAY Arias speaking at Nobel ceremony in English; ) WTN

Oslo )

7.12.87

DOMINICAN Contra spokesman Roberto Urroz at news )

REPUBLIC conference, saying in English that the )

Santo Nicaraguan government continues to ask for the )

Domingo surrender of the Contras; Contra spokesman ) WTN

Fernando Aguero saying in English that direct )

dialogue with Nicaraguan government is needed; )

12.12.87

NICARAGUA Nicaraguan Defence Minister Humberto Ortega )

Managua? telling Union delegates in Spanish of plans for ) WTN/ABC

military build-up; )

LOCATION Parade of arms; )

UNKNOWN )

13.12.87

USA Defector Major Miranda speech in Spanish on )

Washington Sandinista intentions, with English translation;) WTN/ABC

US Vice-president George Bush saying the news )

is worrying; )

G16128705

ABC

8.12.87, NICARAGUA

American pilot captured in Nicaragua, James Jordan Denby, with Nicaraguan guards;

His Cessna-172 aircraft;

More of Denby with captors;

Nicaraguan official showing Denby's US passport, speech in Spanish;

WTN

10.12.87, Oslo, NORWAY

Nobel Peace Prize ceremony;

Audience;

Arias accepting prize;

WTN

Guatemala City, GUATEMALA

Arias and other leaders signing peace accord;

WTN

10.12.87, Oslo, NORWAY

Arias speaking at Nobel ceremony in English;

WTN

7.12.87, Santo Domingo, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

Contra spokesman Roberto Urroz at news conference, saying in English that the Nicaraguan government continues to ask for the surrender of the Contras;

Contra spokesman Fernando Aguero saying in English that direct dialogue with Nicaraguan government is needed;

WTN

12.12.87, Managua, NICARAGUA

Nicaraguan Defence Minister Humberto Ortega Telling Union delegates in Spanish of plans for military build-up;

UNKNOWN LOCATION

Parade of arms;

WTN

13.12.87, Washington, USA

Defector Major Miranda speech in Spanish on Sandinista intentions, with English translation;

US Vice-president George Bush saying the news is worrying;

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