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Cuba Guantanamo Detainees 2
Title:
SD
Summary: US general addresses Camp X-Ray detainees
Story No: 331692
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 08/03/2002 05:00 AM
People:
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SHOTLIST:

1. US soldiers raising the New York flag over Camp X-Ray

2. Wide shot of soldiers raising flag

3. Various of detainees over audio of Brigadier General Mike Lehnert speaking

4. UPSOUND (English) Brigadier General Mike Lehnert, speaking to detainees (over pictures of detainees behind wire fences):

"You were sent here because you were suspected of being high-ranking Taliban, or members of Al-Qaida. Some of you have said you were innocent, and are not members of the Taliban or Al-Qaida. To you, I would say that America is a place of laws, your case will be heard and you will be judged fairly. None of us can tell you for sure how long you will be here. Within five weeks, all of you will be moved to another place nearby, where you will each have a bed, running water, a sink and a toilet. There will be an exercise area and conditions will be better for you. At all times, you must obey the guards. They are responsible for maintaining discipline in the camp. I will see to it that they treat you fairly.You must tell the truth during questioning. Then and only then, will we be able to determine who will be able to return home. We know a great deal about many of you, and lying to us will only make your stay here longer. You must take care of yourselves and exercise patience, giving yourself up to the will of Allah. If you do these things, and you are not guilty of serious crimes, your lives will continue to get better and one day, you may find yourselves joined again with your families."

5. Wide shot of Brigadier General Mike Lehnert, US Marines, speaking to reporters

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Brigadier General Mike Lehnert

"My thrust was to make sure the detainees knew what was happening, as much as we can tell them. The whole reason that we're doing this is a force protection issue. I don't need a detainee that does something that's unexpected because of fear, or because they are suffering from so much anxiety that they try to take it out on a guard. My sole purpose, or primary purpose here was force protection reasons."

7. Cutaway of Lehnert speaking to reporters

STORYLINE:

A U-S general addressed Al-Qaida and Taliban prisoners being held in Guantanamo Bay on Friday, urging them to cooperate with interrogators and camp guards.

Brigadier General Michael Lehnert spoke to detainees from inside the detention compound known as Camp X-Ray, shortly after 21 men refused breakfast in a waning hunger strike that has lasted more than a week.

Lehnert, a Marine commanding the detention mission, told the men he couldn't say how long they would remain at the base in southeastern Cuba.

U-S officials are determining whether and how to prosecute the captives.

Those not tried by a military tribunal could be prosecuted in U-S courts, returned to their home countries for prosecution, held indefinitely, or released outright.

Of the 300 prisoners at Guantanamo Bay, about 15 are being treated at a field hospital, many recovering from war wounds.

The rest appeared to listen to Lehnert's speech inside their chain-link cells.

An Arabic translation followed over the loudspeakers, and interpreters were on hand to translate into other languages.

Work recently began on a more permanent detention centre to replace Camp X-Ray, hastily built during the war on Afghanistan, and the first 408 cells are to be finished about April 12.

Also on Friday, U-S sailors raised a New York City flag at the entrance to Camp X-ray as a reminder of those killed in the September 11 attack on the World Trade Center.

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US Guantanamo Detainees
Title:
SD
Summary: First detainees moved to permanent facility named Camp Delta
Story No: 336615
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 30/04/2002 04:00 AM
People:
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SHOTLIST:

1. Mid shot two guard towers that look over Camp Delta

2. Wide shot detainee quarters at Delta

3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Brigadier General Rick Baccus, Commander Camp Delta:

"Camp Delta facility includes not only the areas where the detainees will be kept, but will also include the fleet hospital. What this does for us is two different things, first it obviously allows us to increase the security posture that we have in this area, not only for the safety of the detainees, but more importantly the safety of all the service men and women that work in the facility. And secondly, it allows us to establish a more efficient facility, in that we are able to care for the detainees in a much more efficient manner, the manpower usage is greatly reduced, so the wear and tear on the service men and women that are dealing with the detainees on a daily basis is significantly reduced. As of right now, in the area behind us, we have 300 detainees, as we speak."

4. Wide shot press conference

5. Wide shot Camp Delta

6. Wide shot Delta, guard towers on left

7. Close up guard tower

8. Close up guard tower

9. Long shot looking down fence with row of lights next to it

10. Mid shot detainee quarters in Delta

11. Close up barbed wire fence, rack focus back to Delta

12. Mid shot guard tower looking over Delta

13. Wide shot open gate to empty Camp X-Ray

14. Close up gate swinging open in breeze

15. Wide shot vacant Camp X-Ray

24 April 2002 - Camp X-Ray

16. Detainee being transported on golf cart to interrogation buildings

17. Mid shot interrogation buildings

18. Various of detainees being transported on golf carts back to Camp X-Ray after interrogation

STORYLINE:

US military guards have transferred 300 suspects of the war on terrorism under stringent security from makeshift cells at Camp X-ray to a permanent new facility at Camp Delta on the US military base at Guantanamo Bay.

The transfer, which the media was banned from covering, began on Sunday and was completed on Monday.

U-S Army Brigadier General Rick Baccus, in charge of the Guantanamo detention mission, refused to say how the 300 accused Taliban or al-Qaida fighters were transferred to their new prison. But he did say it was similar to the way the men were taken from the airstrip, when they arrived at the US base in eastern Cuba, to Camp X-ray.

When the first detainees arrived in January, the media were given access to their arrival and were allowed to watch as the men were searched, manacled and put aboard buses to Camp X-ray. The new 16.4 (m) million (US) dollar seaside facility contains 408 cells and could eventually be expanded to more than 2,000 cells.

Camp Delta will give detainees metal beds with foam mattresses, flush toilets, wash basins in each cell, and exercise areas. In Camp X-ray, detainees had foam pads on a concrete floor and either used buckets or had to be led from their cells to use portable toilets.

The opening of the new camp, originally set for April 12, was delayed because of last-minute changes, on which officials refused to elaborate. Baccus said journalists were not allowed to watch the transfer because of "operational security" issues.

Journalists were taken to Camp Delta after the transfer was completed on Monday. But they were forced to stand more than 200 yards away and, because of camouflage netting shrouding the fence, could see only the roof tops of the cells.

At X-ray, journalists could see the detainees in their cells. Earlier this month, the military withdrew media access to a field hospital where detainees receive medical care. Previously, reporters were allowed to routinely tour the compound.

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Guantanamo US
Title:
SD
Summary: US lawmakers visit, say conditions improving
Story No: 454152
Source: POOL
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 26/06/2005 11:17 AM
People: Ellen Tauscher , Duncan Hunter , Sheila Jackson Lee
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Congressional delegation walking through cell block yard

2. Members of delegation entering cell

3. Bed inside cell

4. Slippers on bed

5. Koran hanging on wall

6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Captain Eric Kaniut, US Soldier:

"The question was if a guard has to touch the Koran what are the procedures. That is the absolute last case. The procedures will be that the guards will wear gloves."

7. Door of cell

8. Various of detainees in yard

9. Guard on watchtower

10. Delegation talking to press

11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Representative Ellen Tauscher, Democrat, California:

"What I learned today is that the Guantanamo we saw today is not the Guantanamo we heard about a few years ago. This is a facility that I believe is on par, it's run by the Pentagon, but I believe it's on par with American prisons back at home. It is very clear that the people, most of the people here are deadly dangerous. They're intent to kill Americans, American blood is on their hands, we have to contain them, but at the same time I think it's vitally important that we continue to process to have an end state, to have a finality to this."

12. House Armed Services Committee, Representative Duncan Hunter, Republican, California, eating the same lunch given to detainees, UPSOUND: "This is lemon chicken, its quite good."

13. Member of delegation eating lunch

14. Representative Sheila Jackson Lee, Democrat, Texas eating lunch and talking to guard

15. Guards handing out lunch to detainees through their cell doors

16. Cell doors

17. UPSOUND detainees yelling through doors

18. Interior of interrogation room

19. Handcuffs

20. Chairs

21. Interior of prison cell showing cot and toilet at Camp Five, newest facility at Guantanamo

22. Various personal objects of detainee displayed on bed

23. Toilet and sink

24. Exterior showing yard

25. Arrow on floor of yard pointing to Mecca

26. Detainee with guard

STORYLINE:

During a tour of the U-S prison for suspected terrorists at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba on Saturday, House Republicans and Democrats, including one who has advocated closing the facility, said the United States has made progress in improving conditions and protecting detainees' rights.

The U-S lawmakers witnessed interrogations, toured cellblocks and ate the same lunch given to detainees on the first congressional visit to the prison since criticism of it intensified in the spring. A Senate delegation was also visiting this weekend.

"The Guantanamo we saw today is not the Guantanamo we heard about a few years ago," said Democrat Representative Ellen Tauscher of California.

Still, lawmakers from both parties agree more must be done to ensure an adequate legal process is in place to handle detainee cases.

Republicans and Democrats alike fear the prison at the U-S Navy base in eastern Cuba is hurting the United States' image because of claims that interrogators have abused and tortured inmates. The White House and Pentagon have said conditions are humane and detainees are well-treated.

Lawmakers wanted to see for themselves.

After getting a classified briefing from base commanders, the House delegation ate lunch with troops - the same meal of chicken, rice and okra that detainees were served. They then toured several of the barbed-wire camps where detainees are housed, viewing small cells, dusty recreation yards and common areas.

From behind one-way mirrors, lawmakers watched interrogators grilling three individual terror suspects. None of the interrogators touched detainees.

In one session, they questioned a man who defence officials said was a Saudi national and admitted al-Qaida member who was picked up in Afghanistan and knew nine of the September 11th hijackers.

In another, a female interrogator took an unusual approach to wear down a detainee, reading a Harry Potter book aloud for hours. He turned his back and put his hands over his ears.

At a communal camp for those given privileges because of good behaviour, bearded detainees in white frocks, flip-flops and skull caps quietly lingered near lawmakers, although from behind fences.

Representative Sheila Jackson Lee of Texas, is one of many Democrats who have called for an independent commission to investigate abuse allegations and have said the facility should close.

The chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, Republican Representative Duncan Hunter of California, questioned the criteria for determining when a detainee can be released.

The White House and Pentagon have defended their policies at the prison almost daily in recent weeks.

At a news conference last week, the president went so far as to invite journalists to visit the prison and see that the allegations were false. The Pentagon says about 400 news organisations have toured the prison since it opened.

A small press contingent joined House lawmakers on this weekend's trip. However, military escorts controlled how much journalists were able to see and hear.

On a tour of one camp occupied by detainees considered "high value" for providing intelligence, detainees in cells were clearly upset at the sound of visitors, shouting foreign words and pounding on closed doors while journalists entered an interrogation room - empty except for a set of handcuffs, a folding chair, a small table and two padded office chairs.

Last week, human rights investigators for the United Nations urged the U-S to allow them inside to inspect the facility. They cited "persistent and credible" reports of "serious allegations of torture, cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment of detainees" as well as arbitrary detentions and violations of rights.

The prison on the base in eastern Cuba opened in January 2002 to house foreigners believed to be linked to al-Qaida or the ousted Taliban in Afghanistan. U-S officials hoped to gather intelligence from the detainees after the U-S invasion of Afghanistan in October 2001.

US President Bush declared the detainees "enemy combatants," affording them fewer rights than prisoners of war under the Geneva Conventions.

Some detainees have been held for three years without being charged with any crimes.

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US Guantanamo
Title:
SD
Summary: Senate hearing into Guantanamo abuse
Story No: 455946
Source: POOL , APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 13/07/2005 04:00 AM
People: Jack Reed , John McCain , John Warner
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

APTN

Washington, DC, 13 July 2005

1. Pan of military officers in hearing

2. Close-up of Senators listening

Pool

Washington, DC, 13 July 2005

3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Air Force Lieutenant General Randall Schmidt, military investigator:

"ISN-063 was told his mother and sisters were whores, he was forced to wear a bra and a thong (underwear) placed on his head during interrogation. Twice interrogators told him he was a homosexual, had homosexual tendencies and other detainees knew. He was forced to dance with a male interrogator. He was subjected to several strip searches as a control measure, not for security, and an interrogator tied a leash to his hand chains, led him around the room and conducted a series of dog tricks."

4. Shot of Senators

5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Air Force Lieutenant General Randall Schmidt, military investigator

"In my judgement, and we looked at this very, very carefully. No torture occurred. Detention and interrogation operations across the board for the general population and again looking through all the evidence that we could, was safe, secure and humane. We did find that regarding one detainee, ISN-063, I felt that the cumulative effect of simultaneous applications of numerous authorised techniques had abusive and degrading impact on the detainee.

6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Senator Jack Reed, Democrat - Rhode Island:

"And it seems to me ludicrous. This prisoner was not someone lost in the shuffle. He was probably the most significant prisoner in Guantanamo. He was the subject, even though it was with General Dunlevy (previous Guantanamo Camp commander), of debate with the Secretary of Defence about precisely what should be done and for you to exonerate General Miller by simply saying 'he knew how long it was but didn't have to pay attention to the details is unsubstantiated by any evidence."

7. SOUNDBITE: (English) General Bantz J. Craddock, commander of U.S. Southern Command:

"There was no crossing of the line, if you will, violating the law or the policies as they were provided."

APTN

Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, Cuba, 6 July 2005

8. Camp Delta entrance

9. Various views of detainees behind fences

Pool

Washington, DC, 13 July 2005

10. SOUNDBITE: (English) General Bantz J. Craddock, commander of U.S. Southern Command:

"We know, based on this manual, the al Qaida training manual, we know how they prepare resistance techniques and if we use interrogation techniques that they are prepared for they won't work. So the intent there is to get into their space, cause them discomfort, to create a situation where they start to talk and we gain information

11. Wide view of hearing

12. SOUNDBITE: (English) Senator John McCain, Republican - Arizona:

"It is clear to me that one of the reasons why we are sitting here today that at least at the working level the interrogators did not understand, at least some of them, did not understand that quote 'humane treatment might be in the eye of the beholder'."

APTN

Washington, DC, 13 July 2005

13. Mid shot of briefing

14. Cutaway photographer

STORYLINE:

U-S military investigators have found that Guantanamo-based interrogators subjected a suspected terrorist to abusive and degrading treatment, forcing him to wear a bra, dance with another man and behave like a dog.

The two investigators testifying before the Senate Armed Services committee Wednesday said they recommended that Army Major General Geoffrey Miller be reprimanded for failing to oversee his interrogation of the 9-11 suspect at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

The chief investigator, Air Force Lieutenant General Randall M. Schmidt, described the interrogation techniques used on Mohamed al-Qahtani, referred to as prisoner ISN-063, a Saudi who was captured in December 2001 along the Afghanistan-Pakistan border.

It was learned later that he had tried to enter a Florida airport in August 2001, where officials have said 9-11 attack ring-leader Mohamed Atta was at the same time, but was turned away by an immigration agent.

Investigators said they were looking into allegations by FBI agents who say they witnessed abusive interrogation techniques at the Guantanamo prison for terrorist suspects.

Armed Services Chairman John Warner said investigators found only three instances, out of thousands of interrogations, where military personnel violated Army policy.

Senator Jack Reed, of Rhode Island, described the handling of the report as "ludicrous."

General Bantz J. Craddock, commander of U.S. Southern Command, said he overruled the investigator's recommendation on a reprimand for General Miller and will instead refer the matter to the Army's inspector general.

Craddock said he had concluded that Miller did not violate any U.S. laws or policies.

No officer of Miller's rank or higher has been officially admonished in connection with any of the abuse scandals.

The military investigation was conducted by Schmidt and Army Brigadier General John T. Furlow after the FBI agents' reports of abuse at Guantanamo surfaced last year.

Previous investigations of prisoner abuse in Afghanistan, Iraq and Guantanamo have hurt US standing worldwide.

Former Brigadier General Janice Karpinski, who was in charge of Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, is the highest-ranking officer to face punishment, despite calls from human rights groups to hold more senior leaders accountable.

Miller, a subject of criticism by human rights groups, took command of the prison camp at Guantanamo in late 2002 with a mandate to get more and better information from prisoners.

He later went to Iraq to oversee detainee operations there and is now stationed at the Pentagon in a position unrelated to prisoners.

The report said the military should review how it determines the legal status of prisoners at Guantanamo, and decide what forms of treatment and interrogation techniques will be allowed.

Guantanamo holds 520 prisoners, while more than 230 others have been released or transferred to the custody of their home governments.

Most were captured during the US war in Afghanistan after the September 11, 2001, attacks; only a few have been charged with any crime.

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Guantanamo Latest (NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Questions Loom at Guantanamo as Trump Era Begins
Story No: apus068601
Source: AP TELEVISION , POOL
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 15/12/2016 06:16 AM
People: Barack Obama , Donald Trump
Subscription:

FROM BEHIND THE THICK GLASS A GUANTANAMO DETAINEE HOLDS A SIGN WITH A QUESTION MARK- MANY WONDERING WHAT HAPPENS NOW?

SOUNDBITE (English) Navy Rear Adm. Peter Clarke/ Guantanamo Bay Detention Center:

"I don't know, whether it's his hope, whether it's his concern, or his frustration.// He does have a question of what is going to happen."

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA HAD PLEDGED IN 2008 TO CLOSE THE DETENTION FACILITY FOR SUSPECTED AL-QUAEDA AND TALIBAN MILITANTS.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS VISITED THE PRISON THIS WEEK TO SEE WHAT IS HAPPENING HERE DURING OBAMA'S FINAL DAYS IN OFFICE.

SOUNDBITE (English) Navy Cpt. John Filostrat/ Guantanamo Bay Detention Center:

"We're continuing to do our job in supporting the president in his efforts to close the detention facility."

WITH CONGRESS PROHIBITING MOVING PRISONERS TO THE US, THE CLOSURE ALMOST CERTAINLY WILL NOT HAPPEN UNDER OBAMA'S WATCH.

BUT PROGRESS WAS MADE

SINCE THE PEAK IN 2003, THE NUMBER OF DETAINEES HAVE DROPPED FROM AROUND 680 TO 59.

PRESIDENT-ELECT DONALD TRUMP MAKING IT CLEAR ON THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL... HE SEES A DIFFERENT COURSE FOR THE PRISON.

SOUNDBITE (English) President-Elect Donald Trump:

"We're going to keep as you know, you know Gitmo, we're keeping that open. We're gonna load it up with bad dudes. We're gonna load it up with a lot of bad dudes out there. "

DUE TO THE SHRINKING PRISONER POPULATION, MOST OF THE FACILITY SITS UNUSED.

SOUNDBITE (English) Navy Cpt. John Filostrat/ Guantanamo Bay Detention Center:

"All of the rest of the camps are empty are currently we are consolidating."

15 DETAINEES INCLUDING THE 5 ON TRIAL FOR THEIR ALLEGED ROLES IN THE 9/11 ATTACKS ARE IN CAMP 7.

THE REMAINING 44 DETAINEES ARE BEING HELD IN CAMP 6 BUT NEARLY HALF HAVE BEEN CLEARED TO LEAVE.

SOME TRANSFERS MAY TAKE PLACE IN THE COMING WEEKS, BUT THE OTHERS ARE NOW UNCERTAIN.

SOUNDBITE (English) Navy Rear Adm. Peter Clarke/ Guantanamo Bay Detention Center

"You know the detainees have questions of whether the transfers are going to stop, when the new president takes charge January 20th. We don't know, they don't know, their lawyers may speculate, but no one knows."

QUESTIONS THESE DETAINES KEEP ASKING BUT WITH NO IMMEDIATE ANSWERS.

JOSH REPLOGLE, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS.

AP TELEVISION

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - 7 December 2016

1. Prisoner holding up question mark sign

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Navy Rear Adm. Peter Clarke/ Guantanamo Bay Detention Center (transcribed below)

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Navy Rear Adm. Peter Clarke/ Guantanamo Bay Detention Center (transcribed below)

AP TELEVISION

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - 2 February 2016

4. Guard tower

5. Detainees

AP TELEVISION

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - 7 December 2016

6. Flag at half staff, trumpet playing

7. Guantanamo sign

AP TELEVISION

FILE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - 2 February 2016

8. Soldiers walking

AP TELEVISION

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - 7 December 2016

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Navy Cpt. John Filostrat/ Guantanamo Bay Detention Center: (Transcribed below) ++PARTIALLY COVERED++

AP TELEVISION

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - 2 February 2016

10. Soldiers walking

11. Guard tower

12. AP Graphic

POOL

Las Vegas, Nevada - 24 February 2016

13. Trump receiving applause

AP TELEVISION

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - 2 February 2016

14. Guantanamo barricade

POOL

Las Vegas, Nevada 24 February 2016

15. SOUNDBITE (English) Donald Trump, (R) presidential candidate

(transcribed below) ++PARTIALLY COVERED++

AP TELEVISION

FILE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - 2 February 2016

16. Prisoners

17. Outer barricade

AP TELEVISION

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - 7 December 2016

18. SOUNDBITE (english) Navy Cpt. John Filostrat/ Guantanamo Bay Detention Center: (Transcribed below) ++PARTIALLY COVERED++

19. AP graphic

AP TELEVISION

FILE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - 2 February 2016

20. Various of camps and prisoners

AP TELEVISION

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - 7 December 2016

21. SOUNDBITE (english) Navy Rear Adm. Peter Clarke/ Guantanamo Bay Detention Center: (Transcribed below) ++PARTIALLY COVERED++

22. Prisoner holding a sign with question mark

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US Guantanamo
Title:
SD
Summary: Lawyers, Red Cross talks on Guantanamo bay prison camp
Story No: 388087
Source: POOL , APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 08/10/2003 04:00 AM
People: Donald Rumsfeld , Richard Myers
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

APTN

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - September 2, 2003

1. Mid view Camp Delta entrance

2. Mid view American flag at camp

Pool - Must Courtesy 60 Minutes 2

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - July 2003

3. Close up of cell doors

4. Close up lock on door

5. Pan of empty cells

APTN

Washington, DC, USA - October 7, 2003

6. Mid views of Amanda Williamson working at computer

7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Amanda Williamson, International Red Cross spokesperson:

"Our main concern today, after 18 months of captivity in a seemingly open-ended indefinite situation, that is having, and indeed ICRC is the only independent organization to see the detainees in Guantanamo, is uniquely placed to see that this impasse, this vacuum, this lack of certainty about the fate is definitely having a significant impact on the internees. We have witnessed a rather worrying deterioration in the psychological well being for many of the detainees and this concerns us very much. It is, if you like, the humanitarian consequences of this legal vacuum that currently prevails there."

Pool - Must Courtesy 60 Minutes 2

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - July 2003

8. Interior view of empty cell

9. Mid and close up of sign inside cell showing direction of Mecca

APTN

Washington, DC, USA - October 7, 2003

10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Kristine Huskey, attorney for Kuwaiti detainees:

"It raises a lot of flags, it is frightening to think that they are going to go through the whole process again of interrogating the prisoners there... and it really underscores the lack of planning and emphasizes what a mess they have got. I mean they didn't screen the chaplain, they didn't screen the translator. Everybody knows they didn't screen the prisoners to determine you know whether they are there by mistake or whether they are suspected terrorists."

AP - No Access Canada

11. Still photograph of Ahmad al-Halbi

12. Court sketches of Ahmed Mehalba appearing in court

APTN

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - July 30, 2003

13. Close up Chaplain Yee at desk

APTN

Washington, DC, USA - October 2, 2003

14. Mid view of US Secretary of Defence Donald Rumsfeld and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Richard Myers listening to reporter's question about Guantanamo Bay

15. Cutaway reporters

16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Donald Rumsfeld, US Secretary of Defence:

"Historically we know that when you are in a war, and you have enemies that they are going to seek have ways to advantage themselves and disadvantage you. It has been so throughout history. So it ought not to be any great surprise that from time to time there will be instances where this occurs."

17. Close up as Rumsfeld walks out of briefing room

STORYLINE:

The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) says the hundreds of detainees held at Guantanamo Bay are suffering growing psychological problems with their continuing incarceration.

ICRC spokeswoman Amanda Williamson said her organisation has witnessed a "worrying" deterioration of the psychological well being of the 660 people being held there by the US military.

With a delegation from the International Red Cross currently completing their seventh inspection of the facilities at the heavily guarded military camp, the only independent group that has access to the detainees said it has appealed to their American captors to institute a legal framework to determine the fate of those being held.

Williamson's comments come as US newspapers report military investigators are re-checking translations made by two American interpreters on whether they inaccurately translated questions and answers, potential cases of sabotage.

Pentagon officials said three workers at the prison, including two members of the military, had been arrested on suspicion of espionage at the high-security base. It is unclear whether the men were connected to or part of any terrorist plot.

What is clear is that a military investigation is currently underway to determine the extent and nature of any damage to ongoing investigations.

There are fears that if investigations have been compromised, the detainees may have to be re-interviewed.

Some critics say the current problems could delay the start of any legal process against the suspected Taliban or al-Qaida prisoners.

Lawyers retained by families of Kuwaiti detainees say the current situation is a good example of why the US Supreme Court should look into the matter. They have lodged an appeal with the US Supreme Court to look into the cases of 13 Kuwaiti detainees and their lack of legal process.

Attorney Kristine Huskey says without judicial review, the Bush administration can re-question detainees endlessly.

The latest arrest came when federal agents apprehended translator Ahmed F. Mehalba upon his arrival in Boston from his native Egypt. Mehalba, who worked for a government contractor, is charged with lying to federal agents when he denied a compact disc he was carrying contained secret information from Guantanamo Bay.

A second Arabic translator, Air Force Senior Airman Ahmad al-Halabi, is charged with espionage and aiding the enemy, accused of trying to pass Guantanamo Bay secrets to Syria and an unidentified enemy. A Muslim chaplain, Army Captain Yousef Yee, has been arrested but not charged.

Last week Pentagon officials said they were worried that terrorists are trying to infiltrate the US military and may have done so at the prison camp in Guantanamo Bay.

US Defence Secretary Donald Rumsfeld said investigations into possible security problems at Guantanamo Bay continue. He scoffed at suggestions that he should discipline commanders at the base.

Without commenting directly on the cases currently under investigation, Rumsfeld said it should not be a surprise that enemies, "seek (to) have ways to advantage themselves and disadvantage you."

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Instant Library
Title:
SD
Summary: Cuba - Guantanamo Bay / Hicks conviction
Story No: G00955
Source: Pool , AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 30/03/2007 00:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

10:11:55

510149

Cuba - Guantanamo Bay file

AP TELEVISION

Guantanamo Bay - FILE

FILE: Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - date unknown

1. Close-up of sign at Camp Delta

2. Mid view of corridor between cells

10:12:03

517467

Cuba - Camps X-Ray and Delta

AGENCY POOL

Guantanamo Bay, 27 March 2007

1. Guard in watchtower

10:12:12

517795

Australian pleads guilty to supporting terrorists, court sketches

POOL

Guantanamo Bay - 30 March 3007

++VIDEO QUALITY AS INCOMING++

1. Wide of US naval base

2. Sketch of lawyer and Hicks, zoom-in to close-up of Hicks ++MUTE++

3. Sketch showing Hicks and his lawyer ++MUTE++

STORYLINE:

An Australian detainee held for five years at Guantanamo Bay was found guilty in March of providing material support for terrorism, the first conviction at a U.S. war crimes trial since World War II.

David Hicks, a 31-year-old Muslim convert, faces a prison sentence of up to seven years under a plea agreement revealed on Friday that also requires Hicks to drop any claims of mistreatment by the US government since he was captured in Afghanistan and taken to Guantanamo Bay, said the judge, Marine Corps Colonel Ralph Kohlmann.

If sentenced to seven years, the plea agreement calls for an unknown portion of that to be suspended.

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USA: GUANTANAMO BAY REFUGEE CHILDREN
Title:
SD
Summary: USA: GUANTANAMO BAY REFUGEE CHILDREN
Story No: 8563
Source: APTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 05/06/1995 04:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

English/Nat

They came looking for a better life but instead spent months in a squalid refugee camp.

And for the children of hundreds of Cuban and Haitian refugees, the time spent at Guantanamo Bay may have affected them for a lifetime.

A disturbing new study of these children concludes that the stresses of refugee camp life are manifesting themselves in a disorder that was once only associated with combat veterans.

Some of them have been here for months: refugee children living in a makeshift camp at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

They arrived here with their parents, part of the wave of refugees that are trying to get into the United States.

Because of political and bureaucratic difficulties, many of these children may not be leaving any time soon.

Part of the problem is the U-S Immigration and Naturalisation Service, which is reportedly holding up the asylum applications of many Guantanamo Bay refugees.

Not satisfied to sit silently by as hundreds of children live in camps, this Haitian group in Miami is demanding that refugee children be settled as quickly as possible.

U-S officials claim many of these children do not have sponsors in the states, but refugee advocates say that isn't true.

SOUNDBITE:

"Most of the Haitian kids have family members here. So they would be coming to live with someone who is part of their family.

I think it tells you about what happens when a group of people don't have power."

SUPER CAPTION:Father Gustavo Mesilla, Refugee Children's Advocate

Father Gustavo runs a refugee children's center at the Immaculate Conception School in Miami, where cards made by the children express their feelings.

They speak of upheaval, fear and the dream of reuniting with their families still in the camps.

Experts have been studying these children to see how the stress of camp living has affected them.

The results are not encouraging.

The experts say they see symptoms of post traumatic stress disorders in the refugee children, a sickness usually found in combat veterans.

SOUNDBITE:

"Well we studied about 285 children and we found that over 90 per cent of them had severe symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder including bed wetting, even in adolescents, suicide attempts and ideation, aggressive behaviour, crying, and so on and so forth. Nightmares, difficulty with sleep."

SUPER CAPTION: Dr. Eugenio Rothe, Child Expert

Rothe says many factors in the Guantanamo Bay experience may have combined to cause the disorder's symptoms.

SOUNDBITE:

"In the refugee camps there was a lack of privacy. People had to live in very close proximity to strangers. There was tropical storm Gordon that destroyed the camp on November 13 which was another factor. And so all this aggregation of traumatic events really potentiated the post traumatic symptoms.

SUPER CAPTION: Dr. Eugenio Rothe

But until the political snarls of the refugee debate are solved, it may be a long time before many of these children and their families ever find a permanent home.

1. Various of kids in Guantanamo camp

2. Various of Haitian protest in Miami

3. SOUNDBITE: Father Gustavo Mesilla

4. Various of cards made by refugee kids

5. Refugee kids in school

6. Refugee kids dancing in school

7. SOUNDBITE: Dr. Eugenio Rothe

8. Kids in refugee school

9. SOUNDBITE: Dr. Eugenio Rothe

10. Shot of kids in Guantanamo camp

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US Obama Guantanamo 2 (CR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Obama Lays Out Plans for Closing Guantanamo Bay
Story No: apus049155
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 23/02/2016 16:43 PM
People: Barack Obama
Subscription:

FOR CLEAN VERSION SEE STORY NUMBER: apus049158

President Barack Obama on Tuesday proposed to "once and for all" close the detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and transfer remaining detainees to a facility in the United States, saying that despite significant political hurdles and congressional opposition he is making one last effort to shutter the controversial facility.

Obama's proposal ducks the thorny question of where the new facility would be located and whether Obama could complete the closure before he leaves office.

The plan, which requested by Congress, makes a financial argument for closing the controversial detention center. U.S. officials say it calls for up to $475 million in construction costs that would ultimately be offset by as much as $180 million per year in operating cost savings.

The proposal is part of Obama's last effort to make good on his unfulfilled 2008 campaign vow to close Guantanamo and persuade lawmakers to allow the Defense Department to move nearly 60 detainees to the U.S. But with few specifics, the proposal may only further antagonize lawmakers who have repeatedly passed legislation banning any effort to move detainees to the U.S.

FOR CLEAN VERSION SEE STORY NUMBER: apus049158

President Barack Obama on Tuesday proposed to "once and for all" close the detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and transfer remaining detainees to a facility in the United States, saying that despite significant political hurdles and congressional opposition he is making one last effort to shutter the controversial facility.

Obama's proposal ducks the thorny question of where the new facility would be located and whether Obama could complete the closure before he leaves office.

The plan, which requested by Congress, makes a financial argument for closing the controversial detention center. U.S. officials say it calls for up to $475 million in construction costs that would ultimately be offset by as much as $180 million per year in operating cost savings.

The proposal is part of Obama's last effort to make good on his unfulfilled 2008 campaign vow to close Guantanamo and persuade lawmakers to allow the Defense Department to move nearly 60 detainees to the U.S. But with few specifics, the proposal may only further antagonize lawmakers who have repeatedly passed legislation banning any effort to move detainees to the U.S.

AP TELEVISION

Washington - 23 February 2016

++SOUNDBITES SEPARATED BY WHITE FLASH++

1. SOUNDBITE (English) President Barack Obama:

"We'll continue to securely and responsibly transfer to other countries the 35 detainees out of the 91 that have already been approved for transfer. Keep in mind this process involves extensive and careful coordination across our federal government to ensure that our national security interests are met when an individual is transferred to another country. So for example, we insist that foreign countries institute strong security measures and as we move forward that means that we will have around 60 and potentially fewer detainees remaining. Second, we'll accelerate the periodic reviews of remaining detainees to determine whether their continued detention is necessary. Our review board which includes representatives from across government will continue to look at all relevant information including intelligence and if certain detainees no longer pose a continuing significant threat, they may be eligible for transfer to another country as well. Number three, we'll continue to use all legal tools to deal with the remaining detainees still held under law of war of detention. Currently, 10 detainees are in some stage of the military commissions process, a process that we worked hard to reform in my first year of office with bipartisan support from Congress.

2. SOUNDBITE (English) President Barack Obama:

"We're going to work with Congress to find a secure location in the United States to hold remaining detainees. These are detainees who are subject to military commissions but also includes those who cannot yet be transferred to other countries or who we've determined must continue to be detained because they pose a continuing significant threat to the United States. We are not identifying a specific facility today in this plan, we are outlining what options look like, as Congress has imposed restrictions that currently prevent the transfer of detainees to the United States, we recognize this is going to be a challenge and we're going to keep making the case to Congress that we can do this in a responsible and secure way, taking into account the lessons and great record of our maximum security prisons."

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Subjects: Legislature , Production facilities , Government and politics , Campaign laws , Corporate news , Business , Campaigns , Elections , Military and defense , Government and politics
People: Barack Obama
Organisations: United States Congress, U.S. Department of Defense, United States government
Locations: Washington , Washington , United States
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US Guantanamo
Title:
SD
Summary: Bush administration may be nearing decision to close Guantanamo Bay
Story No: 527110
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 22/06/2007 04:45 AM
People: George W. Bush , Condoleezza Rice , Robert Gates , Alberto Gonzales , Michael Chertoff , Mike McConnell , Peter Pace , Richard Cheney , Donald Rumsfeld
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

Washington DC, 21 June 2007

1. Mid of US President George W. Bush departing from the White House

2. Mid of Bush walking to Marine One

FILE: Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Recent

3. Wide of Camp Delta gate

FILE: Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, 27 March 2007

4. Mid of guard tower, focus to fence wire

5. Mid of detainee exercising

6. Pan left to barbed wire

7. Mid of detainee walking and opening door (face not showed)

Washington DC, 21 June 2007

8. Mid of American Civil Liberties Union Legislative Counsel Christopher Anders walking

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Christopher Anders, Legislative Counsel, American Civil Liberties Union:

"Well, it's time to shut it down. It's long past time to shut it down. We have 375 people being held at Guantanamo. The government has no intention of charging most of them, hundreds of them, the United States has already said are never going to be charged. So these people have been held for sometimes over five years without being charged and they're wasting away down there. It's time to make decisions about where they go."

10. Mid of Guantanamo detainees' lawyer Tom Wilmer walking

11. SOUNDBITE (English) Tom Wilmer, Lawyer for Guantanamo Detainees:

"Well, my reaction is, I hope it's true and it's great if they do it. It's great if they do it. It's great not only for the detainees there who will get some measure of due process, but it's great for the United States because it shows we are not afraid of the rule of law."

FILE: Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, 27 March 2007

12. Mid of door at cell closing

STORYLINE

The Bush administration is nearing a decision to close the Guantanamo Bay detainee facility and move terror suspects from there to military prisons elsewhere, The Associated Press has learned.

Senior administration officials said on Thursday a consensus is building for a proposal to shut the centre and transfer detainees to one or more Defence Department facilities, including the maximum security military prison at Fort Leavenworth in the midwestern state of Kansas, where they could face trial.

President George W. Bush's national security and legal advisers had been scheduled to discuss the move at a meeting on Friday, the officials said.

After news of it broke, however, the White House said the meeting would not take place that day and no decision on Guantanamo Bay's status was imminent.

Three senior officials said the advisers were considering the proposal that included using Fort Leavenworth or other military prisons, rather than Guantanamo.

The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were discussing internal deliberations.

Officials familiar with the agenda of Friday's meeting said Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, Defence Secretary Robert Gates, Attorney General Alberto Gonzales, Homeland Security chief Michael Chertoff, National Intelligence Director Mike McConnell, Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman General Peter Pace and Vice President Dick Cheney were likely to attend.

It was not immediately clear whether the meeting would result in a final recommendation on Guantanamo to Bush.

"It's time to shut it down", said American Civil Liberties Union Legislative Counsel Christopher Anders.

"These people have been held for sometimes over five years without being charged and they're wasting away down there."

Tom Wilmer, a lawyer for Guantanamo detainees, welcomed the news of a possible closure of the prison.

"I hope it's true and it's great if they do it," he said.

"It's great not only for the detainees there who will get some measure of due process, but it's great for the United States because it shows we are not afraid of the rule of law."

Previous plans to close the Guantanamo prison have run into fierce resistance from Cheney, Gonzales and former Defence Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld.

But officials said the new suggestion is gaining momentum with at least tacit support from the State and Homeland Security departments, the Pentagon, and the US Intelligence Directorate.

Cheney's office and the Justice Department have been firmly opposed to the step, arguing that moving "unlawful" enemy combatant suspects to the United States would give them undeserved legal rights.

They could still block the proposal, but pressure to close Guantanamo has been building since a Supreme Court decision last year that found a previous system for prosecuting enemy combatants illegal and recent rulings by military judges that threw out charges against two terror suspects under a new tribunal scheme.

Those decisions have dealt a blow to the administration's efforts to begin prosecuting dozens of Guantanamo detainees regarded as the nation's most dangerous terrorist suspects.

Congressional Democrats, now in the majority, and some Republicans also have taken up the cause.

Several recently introduced pieces of proposed legislation would require Guantanamo's closure and one that would designate Fort Leavenworth as the new detention facility.

Another bill would grant new rights to those held at Guantanamo Bay, including access to lawyers regardless of whether the prisoners were put on trial.

Another would allow detainees to protest their detentions in federal court, a right they now are denied.

The Guantanamo Bay prison, where some 380 alleged terrorists are now detained, has been a flash point for criticism of the Bush

administration at home and abroad.

It was set up in 2002 to house terror suspects captured in military operations, mostly in Afghanistan.

Human rights advocates and foreign leaders have urged repeatedly that the United States close the jail, and it is regarded by many

as proof of US double standards on fundamental freedoms in Bush's campaign against terror.

Some of the detainees come from countries that are US allies, including Britain, Saudi Arabia and Australia.

Each of those governments raised complaints about the conditions or duration of detentions, or about the possibility that detainees might face death sentences.

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US Guantanamo
Title:
SD
Summary: New allegations of mistreatment at Guantanamo Bay
Story No: 508531
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 04/01/2007 02:47 AM
People: Donald Rumsfeld
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

FILE: Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

1. Mid view, gate of Camp Delta

2. Various shots of detainees behind fences

New York - 3 January 2007

3. Tilt down over cover page of FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation) report

4. Close-up, pan detail of FBI report

5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Amrit Singh, Attorney, American Civil Liberties Union:

"Well I think that these incidents are very serious. They constitute a violation of not only United States, but international law and they only underscore the need for an independent investigation as to the methods that were authorised for use on detainees at Guantanamo Bay."

6. Various shots of FBI web page showing report

7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Amrit Singh, Attorney, American Civil Liberties Union:

"The claim that there was no policy of abuse is belied by the government's own documents."

8. Close-up of text in report which reads that dogs were used to intimidate a detainee

9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Amrit Singh, Attorney, American Civil Liberties Union:

"Many of the incidents described in these documents relate back to 2002 and 2003 and the public really had a right to know this a long time before January 2 2007 which is the date that the FBI released these documents."

FILE: Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

10. Mid shot of corridor in Camp Delta

Washington, DC - 3 January 2007

11. Pull out from map showing Cuba, to Human Rights Watch US Programme Advocacy Director Jennifer Daskal

12. Close up of Daskal looking at FBI reports

13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jennifer Daskal, Human Rights Watch US Programme Advocacy Director:

"In September, the Pentagon, the Department of Defence, issued a new army field manual that governs interrogations by anybody in the military and it explicitly outlawed many of the types of abusive practices that we have seen in the past. But what hasn't happened is the accountability of the abuses that did happen and that we know were approved implicitly and in some cases explicitly by policies that were promulgated from above."

FILE: Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

14. Various shots of detainees behind camp fence

STORYLINE:

US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) agents have documented more than two dozen alleged incidents of mistreatment at the Guantanamo Bay military base.

The documented incidents include a detainee whose head was allegedly wrapped in duct tape for chanting verses from the Quran and another who allegedly pulled out his hair after hours in a sweltering room.

Documents released late on Tuesday by the FBI offered new details about interrogation practices reportedly used by military officials and contractors when questioning suspected enemy combatants.

The reports describe a female guard who detainees claimed handled their genitals and wiped menstrual blood on their face.

Another interrogator reportedly bragged to an FBI agent about dressing as a Roman Catholic priest and "baptising" a prisoner.

Some military officials and contractors told FBI agents the interrogation techniques had been approved at the Defence Department by officials including former Defence Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld.

The documents were released in response to a public records request by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), which is suing Rumsfeld and others on behalf of former military detainees who claim they were abused.

ACLU Attorney Amrit Singh told Associated Press Television that she the alleged incidents were "very serious."

"They constitute a violation of not only United States, but international law and they only underscore the need for an independent investigation as to the methods that were authorised for use on detainees at Guantanamo Bay," she said.

Singh refutes a Pentagon statement which said that a dozen reviews of detention operations found no policies that condoned abuse.

"The claim that there was no policy of abuse is belied by the government's own documents."

Jennifer Daskal, a Human Rights Watch US Programme Advocacy Director claims that no one has been held accountable for the alleged abuses.

''What hasn't happened is the accountability of the abuses that did happen and that we know were approved implicitly and in some cases explicitly by policies that were promulgated from above."

The US Defence Department said it plans no action as a result of the FBI report, asserting there is nothing new in the document.

The records were gathered as part of an internal FBI survey in 2004 and do not indicate a criminal investigation has been conducted.

A federal judge is considering whether to allow the ACLU's lawsuit against Rumsfeld to go forward.

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Subjects: Criminal investigations , Aerospace and defense research services , Human rights and civil liberties , Intelligence agencies , Government policy , Military and defense , Law and order , General news , Criminal investigations , Crime , Aerospace and defense industry , Industrial products and services , Industries , Business , Social issues , Social affairs , Government and politics
People: Donald Rumsfeld
Organisations: U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation, American Civil Liberties Union, Human Rights Watch, United States military, U.S. Department of Defense, United States government
Locations: Cuba , Caribbean , Latin America and Caribbean
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Cuba Guantanamo
Title:
HD
Summary: US military says over half of prisoners at Guantanamo Bay on hunger strike
Story No: 888372
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 22/04/2013 06:30 AM
People: Barack Obama , George W. Bush
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

1. Wide of sunrise at Guantanamo Base

2. Close of barbed wire outside prison camp

3. Wide of military guards walking by cells (seen from waist down) during morning prayer, UPSOUND: Muslim prayer

4. Mid of military guards, faces not visible, monitoring detainees in cells

5. Wide reverse view of military guards monitoring detainees in cells

6. Mid of sign outside prison camp 5, reading: (English) "Detainees in Vicinity. Maintain Silence.", pan to sign for Camp V, reading: (English) "Camp V, Joint Detention Group, JTF Guantanamo. Honor Bound to Defend Freedom"

7. Trackng shot of cell interior, showing sink, bed and private possessions on bed, up to narrow window

8. Live streaming video of detainees in cells (some are empty)

9. Close of soldier holding helmet used for protection during unrest, UPSOUND: (English) "It's basically a motorcycle helmet. It protects soldier's head and face."

10. Close pan across cell doors

11. Close of camera on ceiling

12. Close of US Army uniform, last name Bogdan on pocket flap

13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Col. John Bogdan, US Army, Guantanamo Bay:

"We were trying to be patient and work with them and give them the opportunity to comply. We hit the point where, you know, I felt we were excepting too much risk and it was time to take action."

14. Close of makeshift weapons created by detainees, shift focus

15. Mid tilt up of restraint chair

16. Mid of food stored on shelves

17. SOUNDBITE: (English) Lieutenant Commander Kevin Bogucki, US Navy Military Lawyer:

"How can the military, even the military, hope to maintain discipline over a prison camp where there is absolutely no hope for those men confined here."

18. Close cutaway of Bogucki's eyes

19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Lt. Cmdr. Kevin Bogucki, US Navy Military Lawyer:

"Until such time as our government starts to do the right thing in connection with Guantanamo Bay, the frustration is only going to continue to build and I can't imagine that the outcome will be good."

20. Close of medals on Bogucki's uniform, tilt up to close of his face

21. Wide of watchtower behind barbed wire, pan to hills in the distance

22. Wide of American flag seen behind barbed wire

STORYLINE

The US military said on Sunday that just over half of the prisoners at Guantanamo Bay were on hunger strike.

A military spokesman said 84 prisoners have been classified as hunger strikers at the US military base in Cuba.

The US holds 166 men at the prison, most without charge.

Army Lieutenant Colonel Samuel House said 16 of the 84 prisoners were being force-fed and five have been hospitalised.

He says none of the hospitalised men have life-threatening conditions.

About a week after a clash between guards and prisoners, the hunger strike was steadily growing.

On Tuesday, the number of hunger strikers was 45.

By Friday, 63 prisoners had joined.

Prisoners have been on a hunger strike since early February to protest conditions and their indefinite confinement.

The latest development shows just how tense Guantanamo has become of late, with more than a third of prisoners refusing to eat and nearly everyone locked down for most of the day since a violent clash with guards on April 13.

At least two detainees have tried to kill themselves since that confrontation between guards in riot gear and prisoners with broomsticks and metal bars.

Prison officials opened the prison to journalists from The Associated Press and three other news organisations this week, portraying the atmosphere as tense but under control at this detention centre that has been open for 11 years.

The visit came with certain restrictions.

Among them was a prohibition on identifying by name certain officials, such as the Muslim cultural affairs adviser who blamed the recent troubles, including the expanding hunger strike, on a small group of jihadist "troublemakers" who he says are trying to make sure at least one fellow prisoner commits suicide.

Seven prisoners have killed themselves over the years at Guantanamo.

The most recent, last September, was Adnan Latif, who took an overdose of prescription psychiatric medicine.

Though the government had accused him of training with the Taliban in Afghanistan, he was not being prosecuted nor could he be sent back to his native Yemen, which is considered too unstable to control former Guantanamo prisoners.

It is the uncertainty over when, if ever, the men held at Guantanamo will be released that has caused widespread despair and frustration among prisoners, lawyers for the men say.

"How can the military, even the military, hope to maintain discipline over a prison camp where there is absolutely no hope for those men confined here," said Lieutenant Commander Kevin Bogucki, an US Navy Military Lawyer who was visiting his clients at the base this week.

President Barack Obama ordered the detention centre closed upon taking office, but Congress thwarted him and made it harder to move prisoners elsewhere.

Releases and transfers have since become rare.

"Until such time as our government starts to do the right thing in connection with Guantanamo Bay, the frustration is only going to continue to build and I can't imagine that the outcome will be good," added Bogucki.

Journalists are not permitted to interview prisoners and can see them only from afar, passing time in cramped recreation pens under a glaring Caribbean sun or, watched on a security monitor via a camera in each cell, pacing back and forth in beige-walled cells.

Prisoners to Guantanamo were first held in open cages, but conditions improved under President George W. Bush and Obama.

In March 2012, officials were proudly saying that 80 percent of the men were living in a communal setting at the prison's Camp 6, free to spend 22 hours a day roaming about their pods and recreation yards with fellow prisoners, watching more than two dozen satellite television channels and taking language lessons and other classes.

The military had begun allowing some to make Skype calls to their families and was about to provide a DVD player to every detainee so they wouldn't have to fight over what to watch.

Things went bad on February 6.

That's when troops went into Camp 6 and began a shakedown for contraband and seized a number of personal

items.

Prisoners soon began complaining that their Qurans had been mishandled and their treatment had suddenly worsened.

Then they launched what has become the most sustained hunger strike in years at the prison.

The men have charged through their lawyers that guards have kept them from praying and sleeping by being noisy, denied them water, painfully strapped them down to be force-fed.

The military denies those allegations specifically and any mistreatment in general.

Officials at the base this week did paint a picture of a Camp 6 that had, in the eyes of some members of the military, grown too lax: Prisoners had hoarded hundreds of bottles of water and food, made weapons out of pieces of exercise equipment and whatever else was at hand.

Some threw urine or faeces at guards or poked at them with broomsticks through the fence.

One managed to secure a contraband iPod, which officials said could have come via a corrupt guard.

The biggest concern was that dozens of men had covered the security cameras in their cells with plastic cereal bowls, making it impossible for guards to monitor them and make sure they weren't attempting suicide, officials said.

The troops, meanwhile, did not risk entering and perhaps setting off a melee with prisoners - at least not until April 13, when commanders decided to move nearly every prisoner back to individual cells.

"We were trying to be patient and work with them and give them the opportunity to comply. We hit the point where, you know, I felt we were excepting too much risk and it was time to take action," said Colonel John Bogdan, the man in charge of the guard force

The raid touched off a clash between guards and several dozen prisoners, but authorities say it lasted only a few minutes, with two guards and five prisoners suffering minor injuries.

All but a handful of the prison's 166 prisoners are now in individual cells, allowed out for only about two hours a day, returning to conditions that human rights groups previously called inhumane, especially for men who have not been convicted of a crime.

Bogdan and other officials said they will gradually allow some detainees - even those participating in the hunger strike - to return to communal living if they follow prison rules.

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Cuba Guantanamo
Title:
SD
Summary: Protests outside Guantanamo Bay detention centre to mark 5th anniversary
Story No: 509334
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 11/01/2007 22:46 PM
People: Cindy Sheehan , Medea Benjamin , George W. Bush
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide shot of protest against detention camp at Guantanamo Bay

2. Tilt up from banner to demonstrators

3. Medium of demonstrators chanting, including peace activist Cindy Sheehan

4. Mid shot of T-shirt bearing slogan "Shut Down Guantanamo," tilt up to protester

5. Pan protesters

6. Pull out Asif Iqbal, a British Muslim detainee released two years ago

7. Mid shot of protesters

8. SOUNDBITE:(English), Ann Wright, Protester:

"It is a very important day. Today is the fifth year that prisoners have been in Guantanamo, including one of the sons and brothers of one of our delegation members. And to go to the checkpoint to be able to say 'stop the torture, release due process for these people' is very important. So, I am very glad I am here."

9. Close-up Cindy Sheehan

10. Protesters including Sheehan and Code Pink's Medea Benjamin marching, pans to the brother of detainee Omar Deghayes (with sign)

11. Protesters marching and chanting

12. Protesters, including Asif Iqbal, marching

13. Close-up of Cuban security officer

14. Medium of check point

15. Medium of protesters

STORYLINE:

International peace activists marched to the Cuban military zone which wraps around the US naval base at Guantanamo Bay on Thursday to demand the closure of the US military prison there, five years after the first detainees arrived.

The dozen protesters, including relatives of one of the prisoners and American peace activist Cindy Sheehan, walked along the road connecting the Cuban city of Guantanamo to the military zone. Sheehan wore a peace sign medallion around her neck.

Sheehan, of Vacaville, California, became an anti-war activist after her 24-year-old son Casey was killed in Iraq in 2004. She drew international attention and was dubbed the "peace mom" after she camped outside US President George W. Bush's Texas ranch.

They chanted "Gitmo prison is a source of shame, no more torture in our name" and held signs reading "due process is overdue" and "there are no justice-free zones."

The brother of British citizen Omar Deghayes carried a large colour photograph of the detainee that read "justice for my brother."

"Today is the fifth year that prisoners have been in Guantanamo, including one of the sons and brothers of one of our delegation members. And to go to the checkpoint to be able to say 'stop the torture, release due process for these people' is very important," said Ann Wright

The US military is currently holding about 395 men on suspicion of links to al-Qaida or the Taliban, including about 85 who have been cleared to be released or transferred to other countries. The military says it wants to charge 60 to 80 detainees and bring them to trial.

Residents of Guantanamo city largely resent the presence of the US base, which their government considers a violation of the communist-run nation's sovereignty.

Zohra Zewawi, the mother of detainee British citizen Omar Deghayes, travelled from the United Arab Emirates with another son, Taher Deghayes, to join the protest.

She says her son had been tortured and blinded in one eye since he was imprisoned in September 2002 and still has not been charged or tried.

The protesters arrived in Guantanamo from Havana on Tuesday night and on Wednesday held a daylong international conference that featured members of their group and Cubans from Guantanamo, many of them high school and university teachers.

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4024805
Title:
HD
Summary: Trump: 'we will load up Guantanamo Bay'
Story No: 4024805
Source: POOL
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 23/02/2016 22:02 PM
People: Donald Trump , Barack Obama
Subscription:

Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump says that the US should keep Guantanamo Bay detention facility open in Cuba and "load it up" with some "bad dudes."

Trump's comments come after President Barack Obama proposed to "once and for all" close the detention center and transfer remaining detainees to a facility in the United States.

Obama said that despite significant political hurdles and congressional opposition he is making one last effort to shut the controversial facility.

Trump suggested that the Cuban government take over the facility and reimburse the US for "paying rent."

Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump says that the US should keep Guantanamo Bay detention facility open in Cuba and "load it up" with some "bad dudes."

Trump's comments come after President Barack Obama proposed to "once and for all" close the detention center and transfer remaining detainees to a facility in the United States.

Obama said that despite significant political hurdles and congressional opposition he is making one last effort to shut the controversial facility.

Trump suggested that the Cuban government take over the facility and reimburse the US for "paying rent."

POOL

Spark, Nevada - 23 February 2016

1. Various of Donald Trump walking on stage

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Donald Trump, Republican presidential hopeful:

"This morning I was watching President Obama talking about Gitmo, Guantanamo Bay which by the way we are keeping open and we're going to load it up with some bad dudes, believe me, we're going to load it up. But here's the thing I didn't understand, I heard this but I didn't understand it. We spent 40 million dollars a month on maintaining this place. Now think of it 40 million dollars a month, I think we have, what do we have left in there what like 100 people or something? So we're spending 40 million dollars, I would guarantee you that I would do it for a tiny fraction, I don't mean like 39, I mean like maybe 5, 3, maybe peanuts, maybe in our deal with Cuba, we get them to take it over and reimburse us because we're probably paying rent."

3. Cutaway

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CUBA: US NAVAL BASE AT GUANTANAMO BAY
Title:
SD
Summary: CUBA: US NAVAL BASE AT GUANTANAMO BAY
Story No: 70564
Source: APTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 16/01/1998 05:00 AM
People: Fidel Castro
Subscription:

English/Nat

In less than a week's time the Pope arrives in Cuba, but one place he

won't be visiting is the U-S naval base at Guantanamo Bay on the south-east of the island.

The base is one of the last outposts of the Cold War and America's front line with the Communist regime of President Fidel Castro.

But now the backbone of the camp's defence is being dismantled, as

thousands of landmines are being unearthed.

This is where Cuba and America face-off -- Guantanamo Bay on the

south-eastern edge of the Carribbean island.

It was back in 1898 when the Stars and Stripes were first raised on the island as U-S forces seized the site during the Spanish-American War.

Now it's the only American military base in a communist country.

Since the revolution of President Fidel Castro, the base on 43

square miles of land, has been cut off from the rest of the island.

Yet every day before dawn these Cubans cross over the no-man's

land between the old enemies, and enter a different world.

All have been working on the U-S base for decades, since before

the Revolution in 1959.

At that time around three thousand Cubans earned their living this way, now only 20 commute daily across the barricades, walking miles from their homes to draw a salary in dollars.

SOUNDBITE: English

"Well I came to work here from '51, which was before the Revolution

The Revolution really started and ended in '59 right, somewhere around this time. So this is a way of life for me, there's nothing new just come in, do my job, move back out."

SUPER CAPTION: Silven Butler, Cuban commuter

For more than 17 miles, the so-called defence line snakes around the

naval base marking the border with Cuba.

From 45 towers along the perimeter, marines from the base's two

rifle companies observe their counterparts from the Cuban Frontier

Brigade on the other side of the razor wire.

Surveillance is non-stop, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Around four thousand Cuban soldiers surround the U-S base,by comparison there are only 4-thousand Marines at Guantanamo.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"There's no way of assessing the Cuban intentions, but I have to look at it from a military Commanders standpoint, I have to look at what they might do with what they have,and what they have is a very formidable Cuban army force on the other side of the Defence Line so I have to be prepared at all times to deal with that."

SUPER CAPTION: Captain Larry Larson, Base Commander

And one person who is prepared to deal with landmines is Sergeant John Kelsch.

Following orders from President Clinton, all fifty thousand mines planted around the base are to be removed by the end of 1999.

Marines assigned to this task undergo extensive training for the

potentially lethal job.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"You don't really dwell on it, risking my life every day. I deal

with it as a job. That is what I came down here to do and I look at it like that. I have great respect for the ordinance.

SUPER CAPTION: Sergeant John Kelsch

The mine removal programme is ahead of schedule and should be

completed before the deadline.

And even though one of the things that has protected the bases for over thirty years is being removed, other measures will compensate.

New monitoring systems will be installed along the fence-line and an

airborne unit from Fort Bragg, North Carolina has been assigned for quick response duty in case of attack.

So while the Marines at Guantanamo maybe outnumbered by the Cuban forces, they say they won't be outgunned.

However there is little tension on the base.

It seems that President Castro is also ambivalent to the base's operations which the U-S leases in perpetuity.

Castro gets a rent cheque every year for four thousand dollars, but he's never cashed one of them.

Guantanamo,Cuba - 14th & 15th January 1998

1. Wide shot Guantanamo Naval Base

2. Medium shot marines raising U.S. flag

3. Medium shot marine in Armoured Personnel Carrier

4. Close up U-S flag

5. Medium shot various Cuban commuters walking across into US base

6. Medium shot U-S soldiers watching commuters

7. Various Cubans picking up security tags

8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Silven Butler, Cuban

9. Wide shot defence Line with Cuba

10. Medium shot Marine observing Cuban territory through binoculars

11. Wide shot Cuban observation posts

12. Pull-out from razor wire along defence Line

13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Captain Larry Larson, Base Commander

14. Various Marines practising landmine removal

15. Close up empty landmine cases

16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Sergeant John Kelsch

17. Wide shot landmines removal in "live" minefield

18. Close up landmine sign

19. Medium shot Marine checking for mines

20. Cuban observation post

21. Wide shot Defence Line

22. Various marines cleaning guns

23. Medium shot Marine with US flag behind

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DV Gitmo Evidence
Title:
SD
Summary: The Bush administration wants to rewrite the official evidence against Guantanamo Bay detainees, allowing it to shore up its cases before they come under scrutiny by civilian judges for the first time.
Story No: 777676
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 20/06/2008 12:00 PM
People:
Subscription:

HEADLINE: US asks to rewrite Gitmo detainee evidence

---------------------------------------

CAPTION: The Bush administration wants to rewrite the official evidence against Guantanamo Bay detainees, allowing it to shore up its cases before they come under scrutiny by civilian judges for the first time. (June 20) >

----------------------------------------

[Notes:ANCHOR VOICE]

NB. THIS IS A VOICEOVER TRANSCRIPT, NOT A FULL SHOT LIST.

[Notes:guantanamo file]

For years, the U-S government has stood behind the evidence it used to hold detainees at Guantanamo Bay.

But now that those prisoners have the right to challenge their detention, the Bush administration wants to rewrite the evidence.

Government lawyers say they want more time to add new details and make other changes to their cases before those hearings begin.

SOT

Matt Apuzzo/The Associated Press

"there's an argument to be made that really you're just moving from one court to another and so you need to make a few changes. But certainly the attorneys for the detainees think this is absolutely indicative that they don't believe their own evidence."

Earlier this month, the Supreme Court cleared the way for detainees to challenge their detention in civilian court.

Attorneys for the detainees say the government's request is proof that the evidence is flimsy.

SOT

David Remes/Detainee Attorney

32:06 at this stage of the game, it's sort of an admission that the original returns were defective, and also an admission that the government thinks it needs to beef up evidence it originally presented in order to justify holding these men

[Notes:video of documents]

The government's case is laid out in documents called factual returns.

Federal judges will decide whether the Justice Department can rewrite the documents.

The Justice Department had no comment.

The Supreme Court's ruling was a blow to the Bush administration, which has long been criticized for detaining prisoners at Guantanamo.

SOT

Matt Apuzzo/The Associated Press

"No doubt the government did not want to go to court on this. They have been fighting this every step of the way"

The ruling means federal judges could end up ordering some detainees to be released.

However, those orders will depend on security concerns.

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DV Guantanamo Prisoners
Title:
SD
Summary: A federal judge overseeing Guantanamo Bay lawsuits ordered the Justice Department to put other cases aside and make it clear throughout the Bush administration that the detainees must have their day in court.
Story No: 778438
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 08/07/2008 12:00 PM
People:
Subscription:

HEADLINE: Judge to Bush admin.: Guantanamo is top priority

---------------------------------------

CAPTION: A federal judge overseeing Guantanamo Bay lawsuits ordered the Justice Department to put other cases aside and make it clear throughout the Bush administration that the detainees must have their day in court. (July 8)

---------------------------------------->

[Notes:ANCHOR VOICE]

NB. THIS IS A VOICEOVER TRANSCRIPT, NOT A FULL SHOT LIST.

(gitmo file)

It was a long in coming

SOT: Susan Baker Manning, Center for Constitutional Rights 18:47:010

"The vast majority of men being held at Guantanamo have had cases pending for years upon years and until today have never had a day in court"

(Scotus exterior)

after last month's Supreme Court ruling that opened courthouse doors to Guantanamo detainees

(more detainee file)

a Washington judge hosted the first ever hearing over whether they're being held lawfully

(group of lawyers 18:48:11)

something the detainees lawyers say the Bush administration hoped would never happen

SOT: Shayana Kadidal, Center for Constitutional Rights 18:41:22

"Their litigation strategy throughout has been to avoid the day when they actually have to show up in court at a hearing and justify their detention of these men."

(White House exterior, followed by Gitmo sign or some exterior)

The government says it's already cleared about 20 percent of the roughly 270 Guantanamo detainees for release..and just needs somewhere to send them

(Justice Department exterior)

while also arguing for more time to bolster the evidence orginally used to justify holding them

(Judge Hogan photo in graphic with lettering matching the quote)

but Judge Thomas Hogan said he didn't understand why the evidence suddenly needs to be changed, saying "If it wasn't sufficient, then they shouldn't have been picked up" -- and that the Justice Department needs to pick up the pace.

SOT: Matt Apuzzo, AP legal affairs writer 18:51:30

"There's nothing going on in the government today that's more important than these cases. The judge told the DOJ, if you need more resources, find em, if you have other cases, put em on the backburner, get these cases done.

SOT: Shayana Kadidal, Center for Constitutional Rights 18:38:33

"Today I'm encouraged that the court isn't going to let the government run out the clock."

STANDUP: Sagar Meghani 18:54:34

The judge told the DOJ he knows it's complicated and unprecedented, but stressed it must find a way to get things done. And while not setting a date for evidence reviews, the judge indicated he's ready to move much sooner rather than later.

Sagar Meghani, The Associated Press, at the federal courthouse, Washington

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DV Pol Obama Intl (FF)
Title:
SD
Summary: In an interview with The Associated Press President Barack Obama talks about the situation in Libya, pulling troops out of the war in Afghanistan and whether or not the prison camp at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba should be closed.
Story No: 813213
Source: AP
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 15/04/2011 13:00 PM
People: Barack Obama
Subscription:

HEADLINE (48 characters): AP Exclusive: Obama on Libya, Afghanistan, Gitmo

CAPTION: (255 characters): In an interview with The Associated Press President Barack Obama talks about the situation in Libya, pulling troops out of the war in Afghanistan and whether or not the prison camp at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba should be closed. (April 15)

I didn't expect that in 3 weeks suddenly as a consequence of an air camp that Gadhafi would necessarily be gone. What I said was under the UN mandate we had an obligation to protect civilians from potential atrocities and we have succeeded in that. It's true that some civilians may be still getting killed but we don't have wholesale slaughter in places like Benghazi ...

What we've been able to do set up no fly zone, set up an arms embargo, keep Gadhafi's regime on its heels, make it difficult for them to resupply and you now have a stalemate on the ground militarily but Gadhafi's still squeezed in all kinds of oterh ways. He's running out of money. He's running out of supplies. The noose is tightening and he's becoming more and more isolated and my expectation is that if we continue to apply that pressure and continue to protect civilians, which NATO is doing very capably, then I think over the long term Gadhafi will go and we will be successful.

We are confident though that we've been able to lift up a Afghan security force that is getting better, more professional, larger. A transition has begun so that they start taking over protection against the Taliban in certain areas. I'm confident that the wdrawal will be significant. People will say ... they will say this is a real process of transition, this is not just a token gesture. But exactly what those numbers are, how it gets spread out over the course of several months, that's something that I want Gen. Petraeus to give me a clear recommendation on. .

I still believe it should be closed. I still believe that it is a symbol of our past efforts that, sincere as they were, ended up cutting some corners in terms of our commitment to due process and our commitment to rule of law. I know that it is a very emotional issue for folks.

(talks about speaking to a group from NY - they said glad not having trial in NY)

I said it was important for us to make a decision to go ahead and prosecute this guy. It's been 10 years now, the families deserve justice. But I remain convinced we could have handled this in NY. We could have handled it in a normal court. I think it's very important for us not to elevate folks who are murderers and thugs into something special. Our criminal justice system is, and our trial system, is capable of prosecuting terrorists. We've done it before. We can do it again. And I think that we do a disservice to the cause of America's security when we elevate these guys into some special category. They're just a bunch of people who had no regard for human life and are willing to kill people and we've got to go after them with everything that we can and we have, which is why Al-qaida in the region between Afghanistan and Pakistan is probably is hunkered down and as embattled and as weak as it has been over the last 10 years. We have been going after them hard. We don't have power down ourselves or somehow feel that they have some special powers that prevent us from trying them and going after them in a serious way.

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Cuba Guantanamo Prison (NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Inside a Shrinking Guantanamo Bay Prison
Story No: apus047980
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/02/2016 00:18 AM
People: Barack Obama
Subscription:

VOICE-OVER:

BEHIND THE RAZOR WIRE-ON THE US NAVAL BASE IN GUANTANAMO BAY..

91 MEN REMAIN LOCKED UP.

THEY'RE KNOWN AS 'THE LEFTOVERS.'

A HANDFUL STILL USE HUNGER STRIKES TO PROTEST THEIR CONDITIONS AND INDEFINITE INCARCERATION.

SOUNDBITE Cultural Advisor

" I usually say, I can make this table talk before I can convince any of those leftovers to quit"

FOR SECURITY REASONS, THE NAVY WOULDN'T ALLOW US TO IDENTIFY THE CULTURAL ADVISOR WHO SERVES AS A LIASON.

SOUNDBITE Cultural Advisor:

"We do have very stubborn detainees ."

SOUNDBITE Rear Admiral Peter Clarke/ Guantanamo Prison Commander:

"We can't forget that the detainees that are here at one point, had for their objective to kill Americans and given the opportunity, they would continue to do so."

<NATS SALUTE-->

THE NAVY INVITED THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FOR A VISIT TO THE CAMP_

THE FIRST TIME SINCE THE POPULATION DIPPED BELOW 100, FROM A HIGH OF NEARLY 680 IN 2003.

EMPTY CELLS OUTNUMBER OCCUPIED ONES WHILE 2000 SERVICEMEN AND WOMEN KEEP THE CAMP RUNNING AT A COST OF 100 MILLION A YEAR.

SOUNDBITE (English) Rear Admiral Peter Clarke/ Guantanamo Prison Commander

" I have no order to issue a closure of Joint Task Force Guantanamo Bay."

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA IS EXPECTED TO SUBMIT HIS GUANTANAMO CLOSURE PLAN TO CONGRESS LATER THIS MONTH, WHERE IT WILL LIKELY MEET THE SAME RESISTANCE THAT HAS PREVENTED OBAMA FROM MAKING GOOD ON HIS VOW TO CLOSE THE FACILITY WHEN HE FIRST TOOK OFFICE.

SOUNDBITE (English) Gen. John Kelly/ U.S. Marine Corps (Ret.)

"We just react to what we're told to do."

MARINE GENERAL JOHN KELLY WAS COMMANDER OF US SOUTHERN COMMAND, WHICH INCLUDED GUANTANAMO, UNTIL HE RETIRED IN JANUARY.

HE SAYS CLOSING THE DETENTION FACILITY WOULD BE COMPLEX, BECAUSE THE SUSPECTED ENEMY COMBATANTS CANNOT BE TRANSFERRED TO A NORMAL PRISON.

SOUNDBITE (English) Gen. John Kelly/ U.S. Marine Corps (Ret.)

"Because of the nature of the detention, DOD has to continue guarding them."

AUTHORITIES, HOWEVER, HAVE DETERMINED 34 OF THE DETAINEES CAN BE RELEASED WITHOUT A SECURITY RISK.

THE US IS WORKING ON FINDING COUNTRIES TO TAKE THEM, WHICH IS EXPECTED TO BE DONE BY THIS SUMMER.

THE REMAINING 57 INCLUDE FIVE MEN ACCUSED OF PLANNING AND AIDING THE SEPTEMBER 11 TERRORIST ATTACKS.

SOUNDBITE (English) Gen. John Kelly/ U.S. Marine Corps (Ret.)

"I do think there is a place we would need to indefinitely hold the detainees at least until whatever the conflict is …is over. So, whether it is Guantanamo or a place in the states, but I do think we need a place."

FOR NOW... THAT PLACE CONTINUES TO BE IN SOUTHEASTERN CUBA.

JOSH REPLOGLE, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS, GUANTANAMO BAY CUBA.

VOICE-OVER:

BEHIND THE RAZOR WIRE-ON THE US NAVAL BASE IN GUANTANAMO BAY..

91 MEN REMAIN LOCKED UP.

THEY'RE KNOWN AS 'THE LEFTOVERS.'

A HANDFUL STILL USE HUNGER STRIKES TO PROTEST THEIR CONDITIONS AND INDEFINITE INCARCERATION.

SOUNDBITE Cultural Advisor

" I usually say, I can make this table talk before I can convince any of those leftovers to quit"

FOR SECURITY REASONS, THE NAVY WOULDN'T ALLOW US TO IDENTIFY THE CULTURAL ADVISOR WHO SERVES AS A LIASON.

SOUNDBITE Cultural Advisor:

"We do have very stubborn detainees ."

SOUNDBITE Rear Admiral Peter Clarke/ Guantanamo Prison Commander:

"We can't forget that the detainees that are here at one point, had for their objective to kill Americans and given the opportunity, they would continue to do so."

<NATS SALUTE-->

THE NAVY INVITED THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FOR A VISIT TO THE CAMP_

THE FIRST TIME SINCE THE POPULATION DIPPED BELOW 100, FROM A HIGH OF NEARLY 680 IN 2003.

EMPTY CELLS OUTNUMBER OCCUPIED ONES WHILE 2000 SERVICEMEN AND WOMEN KEEP THE CAMP RUNNING AT A COST OF 100 MILLION A YEAR.

SOUNDBITE (English) Rear Admiral Peter Clarke/ Guantanamo Prison Commander

" I have no order to issue a closure of Joint Task Force Guantanamo Bay."

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA IS EXPECTED TO SUBMIT HIS GUANTANAMO CLOSURE PLAN TO CONGRESS LATER THIS MONTH, WHERE IT WILL LIKELY MEET THE SAME RESISTANCE THAT HAS PREVENTED OBAMA FROM MAKING GOOD ON HIS VOW TO CLOSE THE FACILITY WHEN HE FIRST TOOK OFFICE.

SOUNDBITE (English) Gen. John Kelly/ U.S. Marine Corps (Ret.)

"We just react to what we're told to do."

MARINE GENERAL JOHN KELLY WAS COMMANDER OF US SOUTHERN COMMAND, WHICH INCLUDED GUANTANAMO, UNTIL HE RETIRED IN JANUARY.

HE SAYS CLOSING THE DETENTION FACILITY WOULD BE COMPLEX, BECAUSE THE SUSPECTED ENEMY COMBATANTS CANNOT BE TRANSFERRED TO A NORMAL PRISON.

SOUNDBITE (English) Gen. John Kelly/ U.S. Marine Corps (Ret.)

"Because of the nature of the detention, DOD has to continue guarding them."

AUTHORITIES, HOWEVER, HAVE DETERMINED 34 OF THE DETAINEES CAN BE RELEASED WITHOUT A SECURITY RISK.

THE US IS WORKING ON FINDING COUNTRIES TO TAKE THEM, WHICH IS EXPECTED TO BE DONE BY THIS SUMMER.

THE REMAINING 57 INCLUDE FIVE MEN ACCUSED OF PLANNING AND AIDING THE SEPTEMBER 11 TERRORIST ATTACKS.

SOUNDBITE (English) Gen. John Kelly/ U.S. Marine Corps (Ret.)

"I do think there is a place we would need to indefinitely hold the detainees at least until whatever the conflict is …is over. So, whether it is Guantanamo or a place in the states, but I do think we need a place."

FOR NOW... THAT PLACE CONTINUES TO BE IN SOUTHEASTERN CUBA.

JOSH REPLOGLE, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS, GUANTANAMO BAY CUBA.

AP TELEVISION

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - 2 February 2016

1.Various of Guantanamo prison camp

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Cultural Advisor, name withheld (transcribed below)

3. Various of detainees

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Rear Admiral Peter Clarke, U.S. NAVY ++SOUNDBITE PARTIALLY COVERED++ (transcribed below)

5. Various of Prison camp, fences

6. Various of soldiers

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Rear Admiral Peter Clarke, U.S. NAVY ++SOUNDBITE PARTIALLY COVERED++ (transcribed below)

8.Various of soldiers, camp

AP TELEVISION

Miami - 12 January 2016

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Gen. John Kelly, U.S. Marine Corps (Ret.) (transcribed below)

10. Various cutaways of the retired general.

AP TELEVISION

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - 2 February 2016

11. Various of detainees.

AP TELEVISION

Miami - 12 January 2016

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Gen. John Kelly, U.S. Marine Corps (Ret.) ++SOUNDBITE PARTIALLY COVERED++ (transcribed below)

AP GRAPHICS

13. '34: Don't Pose a Security Risk"

AP TELEVISION

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - 2 February 2016

14. Various of detainees.

AP GRAPHICS

15. STILLS of 9/11 suspects at Guantanamo

AP TELEVISION

Miami, Florida - 12 January 2016

16. SOUNDBITE (English) Gen. John Kelly, U.S. Marine Corps (Ret.) ++SOUNDBITE PARTIALLY COVERED++ (transcribed below)

AP TELEVISION

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - 2 February 2016

17. Various closing shots, exterior fences and towers

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US Obama Guantanamo 2 (Lon NR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Obama Lays Out Plans for Closing Guantanamo Bay
Story No: apus049158
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 23/02/2016 17:11 PM
People: Barack Obama
Subscription:

President Barack Obama on Tuesday proposed to "once and for all" close the detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and transfer remaining detainees to a facility in the United States, saying that despite significant political hurdles and congressional opposition he is making one last effort to shutter the controversial facility.

"I don't want to pass this problem on the next president, whoever it is. Are we going to let this linger on for another 15 years?" he said, in an appearance at the White House. "Keeping this facility open is contrary to our values. It undermines our standing in the world. It is viewed as a stain on our broader record of upholding the highest standards of rule of law."

Obama's proposal ducks the thorny question of where the new facility would be located and whether Obama could complete the closure before he leaves office.

The plan, which requested by Congress, makes a financial argument for closing the controversial detention center. U.S. officials say it calls for up to $475 million in construction costs that would ultimately be offset by as much as $180 million per year in operating cost savings.

The proposal is part of Obama's last effort to make good on his unfulfilled 2008 campaign vow to close Guantanamo and persuade lawmakers to allow the Defense Department to move nearly 60 detainees to the U.S. But with few specifics, the proposal may only further antagonize lawmakers who have repeatedly passed legislation banning any effort to move detainees to the U.S.

President Barack Obama on Tuesday proposed to "once and for all" close the detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and transfer remaining detainees to a facility in the United States, saying that despite significant political hurdles and congressional opposition he is making one last effort to shutter the controversial facility.

"I don't want to pass this problem on the next president, whoever it is. Are we going to let this linger on for another 15 years?" he said, in an appearance at the White House. "Keeping this facility open is contrary to our values. It undermines our standing in the world. It is viewed as a stain on our broader record of upholding the highest standards of rule of law."

Obama's proposal ducks the thorny question of where the new facility would be located and whether Obama could complete the closure before he leaves office.

The plan, which requested by Congress, makes a financial argument for closing the controversial detention center. U.S. officials say it calls for up to $475 million in construction costs that would ultimately be offset by as much as $180 million per year in operating cost savings.

The proposal is part of Obama's last effort to make good on his unfulfilled 2008 campaign vow to close Guantanamo and persuade lawmakers to allow the Defense Department to move nearly 60 detainees to the U.S. But with few specifics, the proposal may only further antagonize lawmakers who have repeatedly passed legislation banning any effort to move detainees to the U.S.

AP TELEVISION

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - 2 February 2016

1. Various of Guantanamo prison camp

AP TELEVISION

Washington - 23 February 2016

2. SOUNDBITE (English) President Barack Obama:

"We'll continue to securely and responsibly transfer to other countries the 35 detainees out of the 91 that have already been approved for transfer. Keep in mind this process involves extensive and careful coordination across our federal government to ensure that our national security interests are met when an individual is transferred to another country. So for example, we insist that foreign countries institute strong security measures and as we move forward that means that we will have around 60 and potentially fewer detainees remaining. Second, we'll accelerate the periodic reviews of remaining detainees to determine whether their continued detention is necessary. Our review board which includes representatives from across government will continue to look at all relevant information including intelligence and if certain detainees no longer pose a continuing significant threat, they may be eligible for transfer to another country as well. Number three, we'll continue to use all legal tools to deal with the remaining detainees still held under law of war of detention. Currently, 10 detainees are in some stage of the military commissions process, a process that we worked hard to reform in my first year of office with bipartisan support from Congress."

AP TELEVISION

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - 2 February 2016

3. Various of detainees inside prison camp ++AUDIO MUTE++

AP TELEVISION

Washington - 23 February 2016

4. SOUNDBITE (English) President Barack Obama:

"We're going to work with Congress to find a secure location in the United States to hold remaining detainees. These are detainees who are subject to military commissions but also includes those who cannot yet be transferred to other countries or who we've determined must continue to be detained because they pose a continuing significant threat to the United States. We are not identifying a specific facility today in this plan, we are outlining what options look like, as Congress has imposed restrictions that currently prevent the transfer of detainees to the United States, we recognize this is going to be a challenge and we're going to keep making the case to Congress that we can do this in a responsible and secure way, taking into account the lessons and great record of our maximum security prisons."

AP TELEVISION

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - 2 February 2016

5. Various of prison camp, soldiers at camp

AP TELEVISION

Washington - 23 February 2016

6. SOUNDBITE (English) President Barack Obama:

"I don't want to pass this problem onto the next president whoever it is, and if as a nation we don't deal with it now, when will we deal with it? Are we going to let this linger on for another fifteen years, another twenty years, another thirty years? If we don't do what's required now, I think future generations are going to look back and ask why we failed to act when the right course the right side of history and our best American traditions was clear."

AP TELEVISION

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba - 2 February 2016

7. Various of prison camp

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Subjects: Legislature , Production facilities , Government and politics , Campaign laws , Corporate news , Business , Campaigns , Elections , Military and defense , Government and politics
People: Barack Obama
Organisations: United States Congress, U.S. Department of Defense, United States government
Locations: Washington , Washington , United States
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US Guantanamo
Title:
SD
Summary: Algerians ordered released from Guantanamo Bay, legal analyst, file
Story No: 586161
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 21/11/2008 01:32 AM
People: Jonathan Turley , Richard J. Leon , Barack Obama
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

FILE: Guantanamo Bay Naval Base - date unknown

1. Wide of gated entrance to naval base

2. Barbed wire on fences surrounding base

3. US serviceman opening gate with key

Washington DC - 20 November, 2008

4. George Washington University law professor Jonathan Turley seated in his office

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Jonathan Turley, law professor, George Washington University:

"This is a judge that the administration expected a favourable ruling from. He has tended to support the government's claims. So, it's a double loss for the Bush administration. But for many of us who have been critics of the tribunal, there is nothing surprising here. None of us doubted that when a real court looked at these cases, the cases would fail because the tribunal system was designed to avoid real courts. So, we're now in the final stages of the tribunal system when real judges and real courts are rendering real decisions and it's not too surprising what those decisions are."

FILE: Guantanamo Bay Naval Base - date unknown

6. Close up of shackled prisoner's feet in a military vehicle

Washington DC - 20 November 2008

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Jonathan Turley, law professor, George Washington University:

"He was quite adamant that there was an almost complete lack of evidence supporting the government's position that these individuals were enemy combatants. And, indeed, they were originally held for a different reason than they're being held now. They were originally held on suspicion of a terrorist attack that later the administration dropped. Then they accused them of wanting to go to Afghanistan or Iraq, to fight. What the court said is that there's virtually no evidence supporting any of these allegations, that they had been holding these individuals with nothing to show for it."

FILE: Guantanamo Bay Naval Base - date unknown

8. Fence and gate

9. Sign on fence reading (English): "Camp Delta - 4 Medium Security - Honour Bound to Defend Freedom")

Washington DC - 20 November, 2008

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Jonathan Turley, law professor, George Washington University:

"This is a case where the administration has been basically treading water and waiting for (president-elect Barrack) Obama to enter office, and they're going to leave it to him. And he's going to have a colossal mess. He's going to have people who clearly are being held without evidence, people who may have been innocent, and they may not have hated America, but they probably do now."

FILE: Guantanamo Bay Naval Base - date unknown

11. Wide shot of flag on base, seen through barbed wire and fencing

STORYLINE:

A US federal judge in Washington DC ruled on Thursday that five Algerians cannot be held indefinitely as enemy combatants and should be released immediately from the US military base in Cuba.

The men had long pleaded their innocence, saying they were 'swept up' in Bosnia and handed over to the US as political pawns.

A sixth, however, should still be held because of evidence against him, the judge said.

According to Guantanamo documents reviewed by The Associated Press, the men, who have been held at Guantanamo for almost seven years, challenged US military panels to present proof of their alleged ties to al-Qaida.

In his ruling on Thursday, US District Judge Richard J. Leon said the US government's evidence linking the men to al-Qaida was not credible because it came from a single, unidentified source.

He said a sixth Algerian should not be freed because he apparently was close to an al-Qaida operative and had sought to help others travel to Afghanistan to fight the US and its allies.

Some law experts described say the ruling as a serious blow to the Bush Administration.

"None of us doubted that when a real court looked at these cases, the cases would fail because the tribunal system was designed to avoid real courts," said Jonathan Turley, a law professor at George Washington University in Washington DC.

When the Algerians appeared separately before the panels over the years at Guantanamo, some of the men said they were victims of a political game that started after the attacks on America on 11 September, 2001.

Every nation wanted to help the US afterward, said detainee Boudella Al Hajj.

According to transcripts of the panel's proceedings one of the men said they had been 'sacrificed' by Bosnian authorities because they were Algerians and Muslims

They denied accusations that they planned to bomb the US Embassy in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, in October 2001.

The US Department of Justice said on Thursday it would review the judge's decision and praised the judge for ordering that the sixth Algerian remain detained.

A Pentagon spokesman said the ruling would be "reviewed".

The Bosnian government has said it would welcome back the detainees, who had immigrated to Bosnia before they were arrested.

The cases of more than 200 other Guantanamo detainees are still pending, many in front of other judges in Washington's federal courthouse.

Professor Turley says the Bush Administration may just be treading water, waiting for the administration of president elect Barack Obama to take over the White House and figure out how to handle the trials of the remaining detainees.

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Subjects: Military facilities , Court decisions , National courts , Government and politics , Military and defense , Legal proceedings , Law and order , General news , National governments , National courts , Courts , Judiciary
People: Jonathan Turley , Richard J. Leon , Barack Obama
Organisations: United States military, George Washington University, Al-Qaida, United States government
Locations: Washington , Washington, D.C. , United States
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DV Pol Obama Gitmo
Title:
SD
Summary: President Barack Obama moved quickly Thursday to reshape U.S. national-security policy, ordering the Guantanamo Bay prison camp closed within a year and forbidding the harshest treatment of terror suspects.
Story No: DV02376
Source: APTN , Pool
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 22/01/2009 13:00 PM
People: Barack Obama , Dennis Blair , Hillary Clinton
Subscription:

HEADLINE: Obama upends Bush, will close Guantanamo

---------------------------------------

CAPTION: President Barack Obama moved quickly Thursday to reshape U.S. national-security policy, ordering the Guantanamo Bay prison camp closed within a year and forbidding the harshest treatment of terror suspects. (Jan. 22)

----------------------------------------

[Notes:ANCHOR VOICE]

((Obama signing))

With a stroke of the pen, Barack Obama made good on a campaign pledge to erase what he's called a stain on America's honor...

((Guantanamo file footage))

... ordering the Guantanamo Bay detention center closed inside a year.

((Back to Obama))

He says America can't sacrifice its core values just to fight terrorists.

OBAMA SOT: We thank thit is precisely our ideals that give us the strength and the moral high ground.

OBAMA SOT: We intend to win this fight. We are gonna win it on our terms.

((More Guantanamo file))

The Bush administration called Guantanamo inmates hardened killers. To U.S. allies, the camp in Cuba was a place of shame, where suspects were locked up and the key thrown way.

((Tribunals file footage))

But the new president has ALSO ordered a halt to war crimes tribunals ...

((More terror prisoners footage))

... the shuttering of secret CIA prisons abroad ...

((Protesters simulating waterboarding))

... and an end to harsh interrogation methods including waterboarding, which critics call torture.

BLAIR SOT: (10:45 a.m.) ''Torture is not moral, its not legal, its not effective." FONT: Retired Adm. Dennis Blair, Obama pick for intel chief

((Back to Guantanamo file))

Human rights groups were overjoyed.

DASKAL SOT: (From APTN edit) "It is the beginning of the end to a failed system at attempted justice.." (FONT: Jennifer Daskal, spokeswoman, Human Rights Watch

((More Guantanamo file))

But closing Guantanamo won't be easy. Officials must decide which inmates to prosecute, transfer or release.

CSIS ANALYST SOT: "There are ways to work through it. But it is not as simple as just releasing everybody on one single day."

What about transfers to domestic prisons?

GATES SOT: 2:15:30 "I've heard from members of Congress where all those prisons are located. Their enthusiasm is limited" (laughter)

((State Department walkin/wave))

The detainee orders came as Obama paid his first visit to Secretary Hillary Rodham Clinton's State Department -- and vowed to turn over a new leaf in U.S. diplomacy.

OBAMA SOT: (25:40 from start of event) The inheritance of our young century demands a new era of American leadership.

((Standup close))

These moves by the president aim at a clean break with his predecessor's foreign policy and waging of the war on terror. He's hoping to improve America's image abroad, and win new allies in that war, without endangering national security.

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DV Pol Obama Gitmo
Title:
SD
Summary: President Barack Obama says new policies when it comes to suspected terrorism detainees at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba gives him 'huge pause' because of civil liberties implications
Story No: 790013
Source: AP
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 02/07/2009 04:24 AM
People: Barack Obama
Subscription:

HEADLINE: AP Interview: Obama on terrorism detentions

---------------------------------------

CAPTION: President Barack Obama says new policies when it comes to suspected terrorism detainees at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba gives him 'huge pause' because of civil liberties implications. (July 2)

----------------------------------------

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Guantanamo US
Title:
SD
Summary: US Troops prepare to receive al-Qaida suspects
Story No: 326150
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/01/2002 05:00 AM
People: Ari Fleischer , Fidel Castro , Richard Myers
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide shot of camp perimeter with guard tower and US flag

2. US army jeep drives past with soldier manning machine gun on roof

3. Two-shot of US soldier with mounted machine gun

4. Wide shot of US troops patrolling camp

5. Squad of US troops marching and chanting

STORYLINE:

A group of reporters toured cells that will shortly hold suspected Taliban and al-Qaida members at Guantanamo Bay Naval Base in eastern Cuba on Wednesday.

Officials said the first detainees will arrive by the end of the week and each will be held in an individual cell.

The military is building the high-security detention facility at the base's Camp X-ray, used in the past decade to hold migrants from Haiti and Cuba.

The camp is surrounded by guard towers and several rings of fences, topped with coils of barbed wire.

US troops are hurriedly building "cells" with walls of chain-link fence.

Officials hope to build 220 such cells, and eventually 2,000 permanent ones to hold war detainees.

In Washington, White House spokesman Ari Fleischer said the government would decide the detainees' legal status case by case.

US President Theodore Roosevelt leased the land at Guantanamo from Cuba in 1903.

Ever since Fidel Castro's communist revolution succeeded, in 1959, the US military presence on Cuban soil has remained a source of irritation.

Cuban soldiers patrol the area around the base, where they have planted thousands of land mines.

The Cuban government has said it has no opinion of US plans to hold Afghan war detainees at the base.

Speaking in Washington General Richard Myers, chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff, said US forces were holding 364 suspected Taliban or al-Qaida members.

It was unclear how many would initially be brought to Guantanamo.

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People: Ari Fleischer , Fidel Castro , Richard Myers
Organisations: Al-Qaida, Taliban
Locations: Cuba , Caribbean , Latin America and Caribbean
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Cuba Guantanamo
Title:
SD
Summary: Cuban reax to US detention centre
Story No: 326237
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/01/2002 05:00 AM
People: Fidel Castro
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Pan of Guantanamo bay

2. US flag being raised at base

3. Various exteriors of base with barbed wire shot from the Cuban base

4. Set up shot of Jose Solar, Cuban Army General

5. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Jose Solar Hernandez, Second in Command, eastern Cuba:

"We haven't taken any additional measures. Firstly because we hope the North Americans are going to take high security measures for these prisoners."

6. US helicopter flying overhead

7. US soldier driving vehicle inside base

8. Wide shot of base

9. Second camp for the prisoners

9. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Jose Solar Hernandez, Second in Command, eastern Cuba:

"We have measures in place that guarantee and resolve any contingency which could arise. We don't have to do anything else as it is not necessary."

10. Wide of bay

STORYLINE:

Cuba's military said on Thursday it trusted the imminent arrival of Taliban and al-Qaida prisoners at a US naval base on the island would not upset the calm on one of the last Cold War frontiers.

Cuban senior army general Jose Solar said that Havana continued to demand sovereignty over the area, but did not consider the prisoner transfer a provocation.

The rare press conference for foreign journalists was held on the Cuban side of the US installation at Guantanamo Bay.

Cuba's military insisted it had taken no new precautions after the recent arrival of extra US troops and the expected transfer of the prisoners.

He also said that the country already has measures to guarantee security.

Those include thousands of Cuban mines on the arid, cactus-strewn zone around the US base, which has existed since Marines landed there in 1898 during the Spanish-American War.

The US side removed their mines a few years ago.

Camp X-Ray, as the detention facility has been called, has room for 100 prisoners and soon could house 220.

A more permanent site under construction is expected to house up to 2,000.

Although some representatives of President Fidel Castro's government initially expressed opposition when Washington announced its plan to bring detainees from Afghanistan, the official line now is one of discretion.

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US Guantanamo
Title:
SD
Summary: Activity as US base prepares for Afghan prisoners arrival.
Story No: 326248
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 11/01/2002 05:00 AM
People: John Walker Lindh
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Aerial shot of Guantanamo base

2. Exterior wide shot of base

3. Close up of sign reading "GTMO Bay is currently in threat condition"

4. Tilt from US flag to exterior of base

5. Wide shot of airfield as plane lands

6. US soldier patrolling base

7. Wide shot of US soldiers patrolling base

8. Close up of barbed wire fence

9. Wide shot of humvee patrolling base

10. Mid shot of US troops standing in front of tent

11. Close up of soldier looking through binoculars

12. Set up shot of Brigadier General Michael Lehnert, Commander Task Force 160

13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Brigadier General Michael Lehnert, Commander Task Force 160:

"I'm going to talk a little bit about the tactical things that Guantanamo Bay offers first. First, it has the infrastructure and the security and the remoteness that we desire to secure individuals of this type. The second issue is the strategic issue. We need a place to give Afghanistan a chance to regain its stability, we need a place to prevent terrorists from destablising other nations and finally, we need to able to give our forces the opportunity that are over in Afghanistan to relieve them of the logistics burden of watching these individuals so that they can continue to press the global war on terrorism."

14. Long shot of base viewed from sea

15. Various shots of base as seen from sea

STORYLINE:

Preparations continued Thursday at the Guantanamo Bay U-S Naval Base, Cuba, as U-S Marines flew the first of hundreds of suspected al-Qaida and Taliban prisoners to the island for questioning and possible trial.

The U-S Central Command said on Thursday that 20 detainees were aboard the C-17 cargo plane on its way to the Navy base at Guantanamo Bay, in eastern Cuba.

That left 331 prisoners at the base in Kandahar and 19 at the air base in Bagram, north of Kabul.

One prisoner - American Taliban John Walker Lindh - remained on the U-S-S Bataan in the Arabian Sea.

The prisoners will be held in temporary cells made out of chain-link fences with metal roofs, with one prisoner per cell.

The military is building the high-security detention facility at the base's Camp X-ray, used in the past decade to hold migrants from Haiti and Cuba intending to enter the United States illegally.

The camp is surrounded by guard towers and several rings of fences topped with coils of barbed wire.

Meanwhile, Cuba's military said on Thursday it trusted the imminent arrival of prisoners at the US naval base on the island would not upset the calm on one of the last Cold War frontiers.

In a rare press conference for foreign journalists, Cuban senior army general Jose Solar said that Havana continued to demand sovereignty over the area, but did not consider the prisoner transfer a provocation.

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US Pentagon Briefing
Title:
SD
Summary: US Department of Defence briefing
Story No: 326338
Source: Pool
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 11/01/2002 05:00 AM
People: Donald Rumsfeld
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide shot of Pentagon briefing.

2. SOUNDBITE:(English) Donald Rumsfeld, U-S Secretary of Defence

"There's no question...but I mean...there's going to be obviously these people are going to be tried. Or correction, they're going to be interrogated and then to the extent charges are appropriate charges will be filed and to the extent charges are filed they'll be tried according to Singapore law one would think. I don't know that I should get into it. But we have vessels in the area, and we do have people in the area, and so do other countries...coalition countries...and the government of Singapore. There are all kinds of targets that exist in that area and I think the government of Singapore has acted with dispatch and were very pleased that they've been able to do what they've done.

3. Briefing

4. SOUNDBITE:(English) General Richard C. Myers, Chairman, U-S Joint Chiefs

"I don't want to get into details of how we do that. In fact some of this is for the Singapore government to tell you, so you'll have to ask them. But the video tape that the Singapore government says they got from Afghanistan was not the first indication that we had threats against our forces."

5. SOUNDBITE:(English) Donald Rumsfeld, U-S Secretary of Defence

"I think it's noteworthy that some four months to the day that terrorists attacked the United States the first group of al-Qaida and Taliban detainees are arriving or have arrived at a detention centre in Guantanamo Bay Cuba. Our operations are working. We've captured or killed a number of senior Taliban and al-Qaida leaders and as we interrogate more detainees we are being told of terrorists who they believe were killed in earlier bombing raids over the past several months."

6. Briefing.

STORYLINE:

U-S Defence Secretary Donald Rumsfeld says the Bush Administration is very pleased that Singapore officials arrested 13 al-Qaida-linked suspects last month.

The Singapore government says the suspects were planning to attack Western embassies, U-S Navy ships and American companies.

At the Pentagon on Friday, Rumsfeld confirmed that the U-S and other American allies have vessels operating in the area around Singapore.

Rumsfeld also confirmed that a U-S Air Force plane carrying 20 prisoners from Afghanistan touched down at a U-S military base in Guantanamo Bay Cuba on Friday.

The so-called "battlefield detainees" are the first of what could be hundreds who are to be detained here for questioning.

The U-S is not referring to the captives a "Prisoners of War".

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Subjects: Armed forces , War and unrest , Government and politics , Military and defense , General news
People: Donald Rumsfeld
Organisations: U.S. Department of Defense, Singapore government, Al-Qaida, Taliban, United States government
Locations: Washington , Washington, D.C. , United States
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Cuba Prisoners
Title:
SD
Summary: Plane carrying al Qaida and Taliban prisoners arrive at US base.
Story No: 326346
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 11/01/2002 05:00 AM
People: Donald Rumsfeld , Richard Myers , Fidel Castro
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Long shot of C-17 Globemaster aircraft approaching to land at Guantanamo Bay US Navy base, plane goes behind hill, becomes visible again taxiing on base runway.

2. Extreme wide shot of base airstrip radar domes on hill behind, showing aircraft on taxiway

3. Long shot of aircraft on taxiway, approaching buildings

4. Various shots of photographers on Cuban territory outside the base

5. Wide shot of base

6. Long shot of aircraft on runway as several buses and military vehicles approach plane

7. Cutaway wide shot of base

8. Long shot of aircraft with activity visible

9. Cutaway of watchtower

10. Various Cuban soldiers in watchtower observing landing through telescopes and binoculars.

11. Wide shot of aircraft surrounded by buses and military vehicles

STORYLINE:

Twenty Taliban and al-Qaida prisoners captured by US troops in Afghanistan were flown into the US Navy Base at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba on Friday.

The prisoners were taken on Thursday from a makeshift detention center run by US Marines in southern Afghanistan and will be housed at a recently constructed detention center in Guantanamo.

The US is not referring to the captives as "prisoners of war", but as "battlefield detainees."

The twenty men are the first of perhaps hundred who will be detained at Guantanamo for questioning and possible military trials

Extreme security measures were taken to ensure the prisoners were kept under control during the flight from Kandahar in Afghanistan.

Human rights advocates have questioned the use of hoods to keep them from seeing, and that fact that they were chained and reportedly shaved of their long beards.

But the US Secretary of Defence Donald H. Rumsfeld defended the measures.

He said one prisoner was sedated from among the 20 flown out of Afghanistan on a C-17 for detention in Cuba.

"These are people who would gnaw through hydraulic lines in the back of a C-17 to bring it down," General Richard Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said at a Pentagon press conference with Rumsfeld.

He added that in at least two incidents inside Afghanistan, Taliban and al-Qaida prisoners had staged deadly uprisings against their guards.

At Guantanamo Bay, the prisoners will be isolated in individual, open-air fenced cells with metal roofs.

They will sleep on mats under halogen floodlights.

They could get wet from rain, but officials say they will be treated humanely.

The Red Cross and other organizations will monitor conditions.

Cuban soldiers observed the landing from watchtowers placed around the US base.

The US Navy base at Guantanamo Bay predates the Cuban Revolution, and the US nominally rents the land from the Cuban government.

However, the marxist revolutionary government of Fidel Castro, which wants the US to leave the base, has always refused to accept the payment.

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Subjects: Military facilities , Military and defense , Government and politics
People: Donald Rumsfeld , Richard Myers , Fidel Castro
Organisations: U.S. Navy, United States military, Al-Qaida, Taliban, United States government
Locations: Cuba , Afghanistan , Caribbean , Latin America and Caribbean , Central Asia , Asia
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Cuba Guantanamo
Title:
SD
Summary: Cargo planes land ahead of prisoners plus soundbite
Story No: 326324
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 11/01/2002 05:00 AM
People: Osama bin Laden
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

NOTE Telestream material - poor quality

1. Shot of US military plane arriving at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (Not carrying prisoners)

2. SOUNDBITE: (English), Lieutenant. Bill Salvin, Spokesman for US Joint Tasks Force

(Q: Do you have any information yet on who is who among this crew the numbers that you are expecting?)

Al "Well we really don't, we are not going to be told. What we are told is that this is a tough group of people and they are Taliban, they are Al Qaida. They have been involved in the war on terrorism. And our job is to secure them and to lock them up at Camp X-Ray. That is part of...uh...of our operation."

(Q: Tell me about the security in place? This morning we noticed that the navy have a special group to handle here counterintelligence if you will. Which I believe is an important part of your security.)

A: "What I can tell you about that is that there are.. there are a number of layers of secuirty here at the base and involving this operation. And that is about the level of detail I can get into with... Basically what I can say is that we are taken every precaution we can to make sure we can house the detainees in a safe and secure facility and that we can do it in a way that does not endanger US forces."

3. Shot of US army plane arriving and landing at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

STORYLINE:

US army planes landed in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba on Friday as the US military base there prepared to receive prisoners captured by US forces in Afghanistan.

The planes shown here were not carrying the Al Qaida prisoners believed to be on route from the makeshift US military prison in Kandahar, Afghanistan.

US troops expect to receive around 20 prisoners later on Friday.

When they arrive the inmates will be interrogated about the whereabouts of alleged terrorist Osama bin Laden.

Upon their arrival at the remote U-S naval base in eastern Cuba, the alleged al-Qaida and Taliban fighters were to be whisked away for a 20 minute ferry ride to their detention camp on the windward side of the base, where they were to be photographed, fingerprinted and transferred to individual cells, Navy spokesman Lt. Bill Salvin said.

The prisoners will be isolated in temporary cells with walls of chain-link fence and metal roofs, where they will sleep on mats under halogen floodlights.

The camp is surrounded by barbed wire and watchtowers.

The detainees are being held under extraordinary security since other captives from the al-Qaida terrorist network and fighters of the ousted Taliban government that harbored them have staged bloody uprisings.

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Subjects: Military facilities , Terrorism , Military and defense , Government and politics , War and unrest , General news
People: Osama bin Laden
Organisations: United States military, Al-Qaida, Taliban, United States government
Locations: Guantánamo , Guantánamo , Cuba
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Cuba Briefing
Title:
SD
Summary: Military police briefing on Afghan prisoners
Story No: 326394
Source: Pool
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 12/01/2002 05:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

VIDEOPHONE FOOTAGE

12 Jan

1. SOUNDBITE: (English) US Army Col. Terry Carrico:

"Good morning. Yesterday as you observed we took receipt of 28 detainees on Guantanamo. I am pleased to report that everything went ahead according to rehearsals and plans. They arrived at Camp X Ray with no incidents, they went through processing, we got them in their individual units about 2330 last night total. As I left the camp this morning they were doing chow (meal) call. Everything was calm and according to our plans and at this time I will take any questions you might have."

11 Jan

2. C-17 Globemaster aircraft nearing Guantanamo Bay US Navy base

12 Jan

3. SOUNDBITE: (English) US Army Col. Terry Carrico: "I have not been notified that the IRC (International Red Cross) when they are coming in but as soon as they arrive on the island they will have access."

11 Jan

4. C-17 Globemaster aircraft nearing Guantanamo Bay US Navy base

12 Jan

5. SOUNDBITE: (English) US Army Col. Terry Carrico:

"I don't know of any sedation of any of the camp detainees and we are not doing that at Camp X Ray."

11 Jan

6. C-17 Globemaster aircraft nearing Guantanamo Bay US Navy base

12 Jan

7. SOUNDBITE: (English) US Army Col. Terry Carrico: "My understanding right now is that they are detainees, other than that I wouldn't want to venture, I don't classify them so that's sort of out of my league."

11 Jan

8. C-17 Globemaster aircraft nearing Guantanamo Bay US Navy base

12 Jan

9. SOUNDBITE: (English) US Army Col. Terry Carrico: "Right now I prefer not to go into any procedural or, for security reasons on arrival."

11 Jan

10. C-17 Globemaster aircraft nearing Guantanamo Bay US Navy base

STORYLINE:

A US military briefing has been held on the Al Qaida and Taliban prisoners who arrived at the Guantanamo Bay from Afghanistan on Friday.

Speaking from the US base on Cuba Colonel Terry Carrico said the transfer of the prisoners of war, whom the US are describing as "detainees", had gone smoothly.

Carrico said he did not want to give any details about the arrivals of other planes; did not know if any of the prisoners had been sedated and did not how long they were going to stay on the base.

But the colonel said he was confident that the prisoners were well under the control of the US soldiers.

Describing the regime as "firm and fair," he said that the prisoners would be escorted by two US personnel when outside their cells and would be handcuffed.

He said they would be allowed to walk around under these conditions.

The prisoners can speak to each other, are not in isolation and they will receive a copy of the Koran as one of their "comfort items."

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Subjects: Military facilities , Military and defense , Government and politics
Organisations: United States military, U.S. Navy, U.S. Army, Afghan armed forces, United States government, Afghanistan government
Locations: Cuba , Caribbean , Latin America and Caribbean
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Cuba Statement 2
Title:
SD
Summary: Military police briefing on treatment of Afghan prisoners.
Story No: 326423
Source: Pool
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 13/01/2002 05:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

12 Jan 2002

1. Mid shot US Army Col. Terry Carrico at press briefing

2. SOUNDBITE: (English) US Army Col. Terry Carrico:

"Over the last night it was very peaceful, I would say it was calm and peaceful, they were in their individual units. There was some conversation but, primarily last night, once we issued comfort items and got them in their individual units, they were in the prone position sleeping. They were very fatigued."

Question: "Was any of them speaking English?"

Answer: "At my knowledge some would respond to English, I have not heard at this time anybody speaking English."

11 Jan 2002

3. C-17 Globemaster aircraft nearing Guantanamo Bay US Navy base

12 Jan 2002

4. SOUNDBITE: (English) US Army Col. Terry Carrico:

"I have not been notified that the IRC (International Red Cross) when they are coming in but as soon as they arrive on the island they will have access."

11 Jan 2002

5. C-17 Globemaster aircraft nearing Guantanamo Bay US Navy base

12 Jan 2002

6. SOUNDBITE: (English) US Army Col. Terry Carrico:

"The individual will be in control of two other individuals when he is out, and he will be properly cuffed when he is out of his individual unit that he is staying in."

11 Jan 2002

7. C-17 Globemaster aircraft nearing Guantanamo Bay US Navy base

12 Jan 2002

8. SOUNDBITE: (English) US Army Col. Terry Carrico:

"I don't know of any sedation of any of the camp detainees and we are not doing that at Camp X Ray."

11 Jan 2002

9. C-17 Globemaster aircraft nearing Guantanamo Bay US Navy base

12 Jan 2002

10. SOUNDBITE: (English) US Army Col. Terry Carrico:

"My understanding right now is that they are detainees, other than that I wouldn't want to venture, I don't classify them so that's sort of out of my league."

11 Jan 2002

11. C-17 Globemaster aircraft nearing Guantanamo Bay US Navy base

12 Jan 2002

12. SOUNDBITE: (English) US Army Col. Terry Carrico:

"Right now I prefer not to go into any procedural or, for security reasons on arrival."

13. Pan from press to US Army Col. Terry Carrico

STORYLINE:

A US military briefing has been held on the Al Qaida and Taliban prisoners who arrived at the Guantanamo Bay from Afghanistan on Friday.

Speaking from the US base on Cuba Colonel Terry Carrico said the transfer of the prisoners of war, whom the US are describing as "detainees", had gone smoothly.

Carrico said he did not want to give any details about the arrivals of other planes; did not know if any of the prisoners had been sedated and did not how long they were going to stay on the base.

But the colonel said he was confident that the prisoners were well under the control of the US soldiers.

Describing the regime as "firm and fair," he said that the prisoners would be escorted by two US personnel when outside their cells and would be handcuffed.

He said they would be allowed to walk around under these conditions.

The prisoners can speak to each other, are not in isolation and they will receive a copy of the Koran as one of their "comfort items."

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Subjects: Military facilities , Military and defense , Government and politics
Organisations: U.S. Army, United States military, U.S. Navy, United States government
Locations: Cuba , Caribbean , Latin America and Caribbean
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US Pentagon
Title:
SD
Summary: Rumsfeld on Guantanamo prisoners, Philippines mission.
Story No: 326731
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 16/01/2002 05:00 AM
People: Richard Myers , Donald Rumsfeld , Dennis Blair
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Walk in view of Myers and Rumsfeld

2. SOUNDBITE (English) General Richard Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff:

"The number of al-Qaida and Taliban detainees held by U-S forces in Afghanistan today stands at 403. We are also currently holding 50 detainees in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and we expect a third plane of 30 detainees to arrive there later this afternoon. We are preparing to transfer to the government of Pakistan approximately 90 detainees of Pakistani origin that are now held in Afghanistan. We have screened these individuals and determined that they should be returned to their own government for disposition. This transfer will occur soon."

3. Wide view of briefing

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Donald Rumsfeld, U-S Secretary of Defence:

"Is it the first or the second or third, it is one of the early ones. And will it continue, I would think so."

Q: Are any of those ninety people al-Qaida members?

"I would doubt it."

5. Wide view of reporters

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Donald Rumsfeld, U-S Secretary of Defence:

"The Philippines has a problem with terrorists and terrorism. They have a terrorist network in the country that has been active, that has taken hostages still has some American hostages. The government of the Philippines has been addressing it and the United States, through the Combatant Commander and the Pacific Command, Admiral Dennis Blair, has been working with government of the Philippines. At the present time we have, I believe the last time looked, something like 240 or 250 American military personnel in the country. They are located in several locations in the country and more are going in. They are there for training purposes, they are there for logistics purposes, they are there for an exercise with the Philippine government. As you know, we have a very long military to military relationship between the United States and the Philippines and I expect there will be several hundred more people going in for these exercises and for the training that's taking place."

7. Cutaway reporters

STORYLINE:

The U-S military says it is handing back 90 Pakistani detainees captured in Afghanistan to the government of Pakistan.

Secretary of Defence Donald Rumsfield said at a military briefing on Wednesday that he doubted any of the prisoners were members of the terrorist organisation al-Qaida.

At the briefing, Joint Chiefs of Staff General Richard Myers outlined the current location of more than 400 prisoners from the U-S campaign in Afghanistan.

Meanwhile, the Pentagon says more than 200 U-S troops have been sent to the Philippines to help local forces fighting an extremist group linked to al-Qaida.

And they say more troops are on the way.

U-S Defence Secretary Donald Rumsfeld said 240 or 250 American military personnel are now divided among several locations in the Philippines.

He told reporters the troops were there for training purposes as well as logistics.

Rumsfield said some of those already on the ground are on Basilan Island, where Filipino soldiers have been fighting Abu Sayyaf guerrillas holding an American couple and a Filipino nurse hostage.

Rumsfeld said the U-S is addressing terrorism globally, not just in Afghanistan.

Philippine officials have said the American contingent would total about 600, including 160 U-S Army Special Forces.

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Subjects: Hostage situations , Terrorism , Military affairs , Government and politics , Military and defense , General news , War and unrest
People: Richard Myers , Donald Rumsfeld , Dennis Blair
Organisations: Philippines government, United States military, U.S. Department of Defense, Joint Chiefs of Staff, Al-Qaida, Pakistan government, United States government
Locations: Washington , Washington, D.C. , United States
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Cuba Guantanamo
Title:
SD
Summary: More detainees arrive from Afghanistan at US naval base
Story No: 326741
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 16/01/2002 05:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Various wide shots of Guantanamo U.S. naval base

2. Various of buildings where detainees are supposed to be held

3. Various of Guantanamo

4. U.S. Airforce C-141 cargo plane flying into Guantanamo base (bringing latest batch of detainees from Afghanistan)

5. Plane landing at base

6. Close up watch tower and soldiers on duty

7. Various of cargo plane carrying detainees

8. Watch tower

9. Guantanamo base

10. Buses and jeeps driving towards plane transporting detainees

11. Various of watch tower

12. Wide shot of plane surrounded by buses waiting to transport detainees

STORYLINE:

A third group of Taliban and al-Qaida prisoners from Afghanistan arrived at the U-S naval base at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba on Wednesday.

About 60 armed Marines met the thirty detainees who arrived aboard a U-S Airforce C-141 cargo plane shortly after two p-m EST (1900 GMT) amid tight security.

The inmates' ankles were chained together and they wore bright orange jump suits, knitted caps, surgical masks and goggles that had been blacked out for security reasons.

A military spokesman said the detainees were then processed at "Camp X-Ray" as the prison has become known.

Members of the press, who aren't allowed near the prison, waited in the surrounding hills to glimpse the plane.

This latest group brings the total number of prisoners at the base to 80.

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Guantanamo Detainees
Title:
SD
Summary: More detainees arrive from Afghanistan at US naval base
Story No: 326748
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 17/01/2002 05:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

VIDEO AS INCOMING

1. Plane carrying latest batch of detainees from Afghanistan

2. Aerial Guantanamo

3. Plane flying past

4. Shot from plane window, plane landing

5. Wide base

6. Press

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Brigadier General Michael R Lehnert, Commander Joint Task Force 160:

"Because they (the cells) are modular, they can be moved once the mission is complete. Each unit will have a prison bed, an Asian toilet, tap water and a sink. Consistent with the guidance we have received today, they will be humane but they won't be comfortable."

8. Reporters

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Brigadier General Michael R Lehnert, Commander Joint Task Force 160:

"Each detainee receives a breakfast meal consisting of bread, a bagel with cream cheese, fruit and water. For lunch they receive a halal meal."

10. Various shots of food packages for detainees

11. SOUNDBITE (English) Brigadier General Michael R Lehnert, Commander Joint Task Force 160:

"For supper they receive beans, rice, more bread and fruit. Each detainee has an isomat (foam mat) to lay on. It isn't particularly comfortable. It's also the same thing issued every day to our soldiers and marines in the field."

12. Lehnert showing mat detainees will sleep on

13. Reporters

14. SOUNDBITE (English) Brigadier General Michael R Lehnert, Commander Joint Task Force 160:

"They get a canteen with water in it. Shampoo. Toothpaste. A tooth brush."

15. Reporters

16. Lehnert showing prison overalls

17. SOUNDBITE (English) Brigadier General Michael R Lehnert, Commander Joint Task Force 160:

"These are not nice people. Several have publicly stated here they intend to kill an American before they leave Guantanamo Bay. We will not give them that satisfaction."

18. Guantanamo Bay

19. SOUNDBITE (English) Brigadier General Michael R Lehnert, Commander Joint Task Force 160:

"We are being guided by the Geneva conventions." (Question: "What does that mean?") "What that means is the guidance we are receiving from Washington DC we are following, and I think that you'll find that we are treating them in a humane fashion. Once the ICRC (International Committee of the Red Cross) gets here, we are going to confirm that."

20. Guantanamo Bay

STORYLINE:

Al-Qaida and Taliban prisoners being held at Guantanamo Naval Base have threatened to kill Americans there, according to a spokesman at the base.

30 more inmates arrived from Afghanistan on Wednesday.

About 60 armed Marines met the group, who arrived aboard a US Air Force C-141 cargo plane.

The Marines grasped the handcuffed prisoners by the shoulders and arms, leading them one-by-one to waiting school buses.

The latest group brings the total number of prisoners at the base to 80.

Marine Brigadier General Michael Lehnert, commander of US Joint Task Force 160 which is overseeing the operation in Guantanamo Bay, described the way the prisoners were being treated.

He stressed they were being treated humanely, although the cells, he said, were not comfortable.

He said of the detainees, "These are not nice people."

Speaking during a news conference at an aircraft hangar, Lehnert showed the press examples of the types of food the detainees were being given and the clothes they were wearing.

The temporary detention center known as Camp X-ray can currently hold 200 inmates but will be expanded to hold more than 600 while builders complete a permanent facility that can hold 2,000 detainees.

A team from the International Committee of the Red Cross will inspect conditions at Guantanamo on Thursday.

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Cuba Prisoners
Title:
SD
Summary: Activity at Guantanamo in adavance of new prisoner arrivals.
Story No: 326737
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 16/01/2002 05:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Various wides of detention centre at Guantanamo Bay naval base

2. Wide of guard tower

3. Wide of prison

4. Helicopter flying over prison

5. Various wides of prison

6. Wide of ships in Guantanamo Bay

STORYLINE:

A third group of Taliban and al Qaeda prisoners from Afghanistan arrived at the U-S Naval base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba on Wednesday.

About 60 armed Marines met the thirty detainees who arrived aboard the U-S Airforce C-141 cargo plane shortly after 2 p.m. EST (1900 GMT) amid tight security.

The inmates ankles were chained together and they wore bright orange jumpsuits, knit caps, surgical masks and goggles that had been blacked out for security reasons.

A military spokesman said the detainees were then processed at "Camp X-Ray" as the prison has become known.

Earlier, dozens of media, who aren't allowed near the prison, waited in the surrounding hills hoping to catch a glimpse of the plane carrying the detainees.

The latest group brings the total number of prisoners at the base to 80.

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Guantanamo Detainees
Title:
SD
Summary: WRAP More detainees arrive, base activity, comments
Story No: 326831
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 17/01/2002 05:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Bay and base in background

2. View from ferry as it pulls into base

3. Soldier at quayside

4. Top view of US troops on ferry

5. Troops get off ferry

6. Wide view of camp

7. Mid view of detainee through wire

8. Wide view of US flag on tower

9. Mid view of detainee, assisted by US troops, through wire

10. Establishing shot Carrico

11. Press cutaway

12. SOUNDBITE: (English) Colonel Terry Carrico, Security Forces Commander, Camp X-Ray

"We got a facility here that they are housed in. We are feeding them, we allow them to partake in their religious beliefs. I think it's very humane."

13. Mid view of detainee through wire

14. SOUNDBITE (English) Colonel Terry Carrico, Security Forces Commander, Camp X-Ray

"There is only two ways we can punish them right now. It's to take back some of their privileges or we can isolate them from the general population."

15. Military medical vehicles

16. Mid view of detainee, assisted by U-S troops, through wire

17. Wide view of guard on watch tower

18. Medium view of soldier patrolling with guard dog

19. Wide view of barracks

20. Cargo plane flying in to Guantanamo Base

21. Cargo plane on tarmac after landing

22. Cuban soldiers in watch tower overlooking base

23. Cargo plane arriving at unloading zone

24. Cuban soldiers in watch tower

25. Helicopter flying over Guantanamo

26. Buses and trucks for the detainees arriving at plane

27. Cuban soldiers in watch tower

28. Buses and trucks by plane

29. Cuban soldiers in watch tower overlooking base

30. Wide shot plane on runway

STORYLINE:

U-S military officials reported no problems during Thursday's transportation of another group of detainees from Afghanistan to the U-S Navy base at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba.

Officials said no prisoners were sedated, and the 30 detainees arrived safely.

That brings the total so far at the base to 110.

They're being housed in temporary facilities at what is being called "Camp X-Ray."

This includes temporary six by eight foot (1.8 by 2.4 metres) cells which have drawn criticism from human rights group Amnesty International.

Later on Thursday, a team of inspectors from the International Red Cross is scheduled to arrive to check conditions at the base.

Pentagon officials continue to insist the detainees were being treated humanely.

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US Detainees
Title:
SD
Summary: More detainees arrive at Guanatanamo plus base activity.
Story No: 326829
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 17/01/2002 05:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST: NB: wrong slate on tape, story correct

1. Mid view, bay in front of base

2. Ferry pulling into base

3. Top view of US troops on ferry

4. Wide view of US camp

5. Mid view of detainee through wire

6. Wide view of US flag on tower

7. Mid view of detainee, assisted by US troops, through wire

8. Military medical vehicle

9. Wide view watch tower

10. Mid view of detainee, assisted by US troops, through wire

STORYLINE:

U-S military officials reported no problems during Thursday's transportation of another group of detainees from Afghanistan to the U-S Navy base at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba.

Officials said no prisoners were sedated, and the 30 detainees arrived safely.

That brings the total so far at the base to 110.

They're being housed in temporary facilities at what is being called "Camp X-Ray."

This includes temporary six by eight foot (1.8 by 2.4 metres) cells which have drawn criticism from human rights group Amnesty International.

Later on Thursday, a team of inspectors from the International Red Cross is scheduled to arrive to check conditions at the base.

Pentagon officials continue to insist the detainees were being treated humanely.

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Locations: Cuba
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Guantanamo Red Cross
Title:
SD
Summary: Red Cross team arrives to monitor conditions
Story No: 326845
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 18/01/2002 05:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

VIDEOPHONE MATERIAL

1. Mid shot people standing by plane on tarmac, pan to plane (bringing International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) delegation to Guantanamo base)

2. Wide shot people standing by plane on tarmac

3. Mid shot group walking away from plane on tarmac (delegation from ICRC)

4. Mid shot ICRC leader coming through door and meeting press

5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Urs Boegli, Team Leader, International Committee of the Red Cross:

"Today, I'm heading our team of four, including one medical doctor, to start prison visits here. We will look at treatment, conditions, and we will share, that's the important part for the press, we will share our findings confidentially with the authorities."

6. Mid shot Boegli and others walk away

STORYLINE:

Four members of the International Committee of the Red Cross arrived on Thursday in Cuba to meet U-S officials and hold private interviews with dozens of al-Qaida and Taliban prisoners being held at the U-S naval base at Guantanamo Bay.

Their visit was the first by independent experts to Camp X-ray, which has been criticised by human rights advocates for allegedly providing substandard conditions for the prisoners.

U-S officials say the tight security is necessary and that the prisoners' rights are not being violated.

I-C-R-C Team leader Urs Boegli, accompanied by three other Committee members, arrived on Thursday aboard a small plane from Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Boegli said findings about the prisoners' conditions would be shared with the authorities but he wasn't sure whether the findings would be made public.

During the day on Thursday, fevered activity continued at the base to expand the temporary detention facility.

Behind three fences and coils of razor wire, prisoners with shaved heads and orange jump suits sat in open-air cells of chain-link fence.

Occasionally, Army guards led a prisoner out of a cell, taking him for a walk in the heavily fortified yard.

Some journalists were allowed to see the detention camp, but only from about 150 yards (metres) away.

Military officials say the camp will soon be able to hold 320 inmates, or more if they are share a cell between two.

And workers are also building a permanent prison to hold up to two thousand.

The United States is holding more than 300 prisoners at the U-S Marine base at Kandahar airport, in Afghanistan, and a few others elsewhere.

Thirty more prisoners arrived at Guantanamo from Kandahar on Thursday, bringing the inmate population there to 110.

When they arrive, prisoners are given a small sheet of paper on which to write to family members or friends.

There are five interpreters on hand using Arabic and other languages to help the guards communicate with prisoners, officials said.

The unarmed U-S guards also carry booklets with some basic commands and questions in Arabic.

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Cuba Guantanamo Red Cross 2
Title:
SD
Summary: Red Cross team arrives to monitor conditions
Story No: 326912
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 18/01/2002 05:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Mid shot people standing by plane on tarmac, pan to plane (bringing International Committee of the Red Cross delegation to Guantanamo base)

2. People standing by plane on tarmac

3. Group walking away from plane on tarmac (delegation from ICRC)

4. ICRC leader coming through door and meeting press

5. SOUNDBITE:(English) Urs Boegli, Team Leader, International Committee of the Red Cross

"Today, I'm heading our team of four, including one medical doctor, to start prison visits here. We will look at treatment, conditions, and we will share, that's the important part for the press, we will share our findings confidentially with the authorities."

6. Mid shot Boegli and others walk away

STORYLINE:

Four members of the International Committee of the Red Cross arrived on Thursday in Cuba to meet U-S officials and hold private interviews with dozens of al-Qaida and Taliban prisoners being held at the U-S naval base at Guantanamo Bay.

Their visit was the first by independent experts to Camp X-ray, which has been criticised by human rights advocates for allegedly providing substandard conditions for the prisoners.

U-S officials say the tight security is necessary and that the prisoners' rights are not being violated.

I-C-R-C Team leader Urs Boegli, accompanied by three other Committee members, arrived on Thursday aboard a small plane from Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Boegli said findings about the prisoners' conditions would be shared with the authorities but he wasn't sure whether the findings would be made public.

The United States is holding more than 300 prisoners at the U-S Marine base at Kandahar airport, in Afghanistan, and a few others elsewhere.

Thirty more prisoners arrived at Guantanamo from Kandahar on Thursday, bringing the inmate population there to 110.

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Subjects: Treatment of prisoners , Human welfare , Social issues , Social affairs
Organisations: Red Cross and Red Crescent
Locations: Kandahar , Cuba , Afghanistan , Central Asia , Asia , Caribbean , Latin America and Caribbean
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Afghanistan Prison