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Off Kuwait - USS Abraham Lincoln Steams Into Gulf
Title:
SD
Summary: Off Kuwait - USS Abraham Lincoln Steams Into Gulf
Story No: w028248
Source: WTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 28/08/1995 04:00 AM
People: Saddam Hussein
Subscription:

T/I 10:18:48

STORY: CARRIER

LOCATION: OFF KUWAIT

DATE: 26 AUGUST 1995

DURATION: 1.33

USS Abraham Lincoln steams into Gulf

As speculation continues about "unusual" troop movements inside

Iraq, US forces continue to gather in the Gulf. Among the 31

ships in the US 5th fleet is the aircraft carrier USS Abraham

Lincoln with 6,000 sailors on board. At the end of the month

American troops will be taking part in joint manoeuvres with

Kuwaiti armed forces. On Saturday (26/8) the commander of US Navy

forces in the Gulf, Vice Admiral Scott Redd, said: "We are not

looking for a conflict. War is always a tragedy but if there will

be a war it will be a great tragedy for the Iraqi forces."

Deterring Iraq are some 23,000 US Navy, Army, Marines and Air

Force personnel in the region. In addition, seven supply ships

with enough tanks and equipment for 16,500 Marines and almost

6,000 army soldiers have entered the Gulf over the last few days.

The United States raised concerns over unusual Iraqi troop

movements after Hussein Kamel Hassan, a leading Iraqi official,

defected to Jordan with his brother and their wives, both

daughters of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein. But on Saturday Iraq

poured scorn on the US fears, saying the American intelligence

services got it wrong and had caused confusion in Washington.

SHOWS:

(ABOARD THE USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN, 26/8)

Aerial of aircraft carrier. Flight deck. Crew of helicopter. Missiles. Interior of aircraft backs of pilots' heads. Jet taking off. Jet in the air. Jets and crew on flight deck. Pull out from crew to deck. Flight deck crew running. Radar scanners to aircraft. Rockets. Missiles. Aircraft in background. Jet taking off.

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Keywords: General News Service, GS, gulf, alert, preparations, av, air view, artillery, warplanes, technology,
Subjects: Government and politics
People: Saddam Hussein
Organisations: United States military, United States government
Locations: Iraq , Middle East , Kuwait
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PHILIPPINES: US AND FILIPINO JOINT MILITARY EXERCISES
Title:
SD
Summary: PHILIPPINES: US AND FILIPINO JOINT MILITARY EXERCISES
Story No: 27079
Source: APTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 07/05/1996 04:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

English/Nat

Nearly 1,500 U-S sailors are in the Philippines for joint military exercises with their Philippine counterparts.

The 10-day long joint exercises are a good will gesture by both the countries.

The Philippines was once the site of the largest American military base outside the United States.

American sailors are back in the Philippines.

The last U-S base was closed in November 1992 when the Philippine Senate voted not to extend its lease.

But this time it is for a joint military exercise.

American and Filipino marines storm the beach of Ternate in Cavite province Monday.

The exercises are called "Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training" or "CARAT '96".

U-S frigates George Philip and Mahlon Tisdale, the amphibious ship Germantown and the submarine Bajolla docked on Philippine shores for the training.

The amphibious landing conducted in Cavite on Monday was the highlight of the exercise.

During the ship-to-shore movements, marine corps teams used landing craft air cushioned vehicles(LCAC's), amphibious assault vehicles (AAV's) and helicopters.

Once ashore, the combined elements simulated taking their objectives in a war-like setting.

The U-S officer spoke about the objectives of the exercises.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"The main purpose of this training is enhance inter-operability between U-S Navy marines

and the Philippine Navy marines and also to foster goodwill between the two services - continued goodwill and share training tactics."

SUPER CAPTION: Lieutenant Dane Lajoye, U-S Navy Spokesman

Carat '96 continues this week with live-firing exercises at sea, maneuvering drills and training lectures on a variety of naval topics.

It concludes on Friday.

The U-S may be the only super power left is the world, but it will not ignore the growing strength of the Asian countries.

Cavite, Philippines; 6th May 1996

1. Wide shot helicopter landing troops

2. CU troops disembark from helicopter

3. Helicopter taking-off

4. WS amphibious ship approach shore

5. Sign "US Navy"

6. WS ship on shore

7. Tanks disembark from ship

8. WS of training area

9. CU American troops with rifles in camouflage

10. Various Filipino troops hiding

11. Various of American troops

12. Wide Philippine troops

13. Helicopter landing zoom out to soldier at foreground

14. SOUNDBITE: (English) Lieutenant Dane Lajoye

15. Various of tanks

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Subjects: Government and politics
Organisations: United States military, U.S. Navy, United States government
Locations: Philippines , United States , Southeast Asia , Asia , North America
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ISRAEL: PRIME MINISTER NETANYAHU WELCOMED ABOARD USS ENTERPRISE
Title:
SD
Summary: ISRAEL: PRIME MINISTER NETANYAHU WELCOMED ABOARD USS ENTERPRISE
Story No: 33168
Source: POOL , APTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 26/08/1996 04:00 AM
People: Benjamin Netanyahu , Yasser Arafat , Shimon Peres
Subscription:

English/Nat

The United States navy has welcomed Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu aboard the U-S-S Enterprise docked in Haifa, off the north coast of Israel.

After meeting the ship's crew and admiring U-S jets, Netanyahu returned to his Jerusalem office for a meeting with Japanese Foreign Minister Ikeda.

Meanwhile, in Hebron, minister of the Palestinian cabinet, Abu Ala practically came to blows with Israeli security forces.

The Israeli Prime Minister boarded the U-S-S Enterprise by helicopter, Monday.

After touring the ship Netanyahu, accompanied by his wife Sarah, watched a display of American jets in action.

He later met visiting Japanese foreign minister Yukihiko Ikeda -- and gave another hint that he'll soon meet Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat, something he's refused to do so far:

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"A meeting between myself and Arafat is possible, based on certain developments. It's not put on the calendar as seeking a date, but it is based on the calendar of events, and, as I explained to the foreign minister, I think were are moving forward on constructive track. I think we will have some positive developments in the coming days and weeks and I think this is something that will serve the interests of both Palestinians and Israelis."

SUPER CAPTION: Benjamin Netanyahu, Israeli Prime Minister

Meanwhile there were angry scenes as Palestinian official Abu Ala toured the flashpoint city of Hebron.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"They want to practice the occupying power and they want to remember the Palestinians that they are the occupying power and we will deal with them as an occupying power only."

SUPER CAPTION: Abu Ala, Speaker of Palestinian Legislative Council

Palestinians want Israeli forces to withdraw from the city in accordance with a deal agreed with former Israeli prime minister Shimon Peres.

The new Netanyahu administration still hasn't made clear whether it'll honour that agreement.

USS Enterprise, Jerusalem and Hebron -- 26 August 1996

USS Enterprise (POOL)

1. Various of Netanyahu's helicopter arriving on USS Enterprise

2. Various of Netanyahu and wife Sarah Netanyahu touring ship

3. Various Netanyahu and other watching jets take off and land

4. Various Netanyahu and Sarah talking with ship's officers, Netanyahu given a cap

Jerusalem (APTV)

5. Wide shot Netanyahu with Japanese Foreign Minister Ikeda

6. Handshake Netanyahu and Ikeda

7. Various round table Netanyahu, Ikeda and Japanese visitors

8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Netanyahu

Hebron (APTV)

9. Various shots Abu Ala and Palestinians touring Hebron

10. Various Israeli security officer arguing with Abu Ala

11. SOUNDBITE: Abu Ala

12. Abu Ala's car leaving

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USA: PENTAGON ANNOUNCE SECOND MISSILE ATTACK ON IRAQ
Title:
SD
Summary: USA: PENTAGON ANNOUNCE SECOND MISSILE ATTACK ON IRAQ
Story No: 33607
Source: APTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 04/09/1996 04:00 AM
People: Saddam Hussein
Subscription:

English/Nat

The United States has launched a second missile attack on Iraq.

A spokesman for the Pentagon described the attack on Iraqi air defences as a "mop- up" operation.

He said it was designed to assure the safety of U-S warplanes that begin patrolling an expanded "no-fly" zone over southern Iraq on Wednesday.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"Good evening. At the direction of President Clinton, the department of defence has launched a second cruise missile attack against selected air defence targets in Iraq. Tonight's attack is designed to complete the suppression of air defences that could potentially remain in operation after the first attack. President Clinton announced an extended no-fly zone in response to an Iraqi attack against a Kurdish faction. The larger no-fly zone in southern Iraq will make it easier for the U-S and coalition partners to contain Saddam Hussein's aggression. The attacks are designed to reduce risks to the pilots who will enforce the expanded no-fly zone which will go into affect on noon Wednesday. No details about the second attack are available now. General Joseph Ralston, the vice chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, will hold a press conference here - the D-O-D briefing room - at approximately 7:10 tomorrow morning for more details. Thankyou. Charlie? (Q How many missiles were fired in this attack, and I understand they were fired by four ships and not bombers this time?) This attack is about half the size of the early morning attack going against about half the number of targets, and they were fired entirely from sea. (Q Were these repeat targets or any other targets?) This is what we would call a mop-up operation. There weren't new targets that weren't on an earlier list. It's an effort to go in and assure that we've done everything possible to suppress air defences before we start enforcing the expanded no-fly zone. As I said, that's supposed to take affect at noon tomorrow, and we want to guarantee that our pilots have every opportunity to fly safely over the expanded no-fly zone. (Q Did this require additional approval from President Clinton, or was this part of the original plan?) It required additional approval and he granted that this afternoon. (Q If this strike is successful will this grant you air impunity over Iraq, and why wasn't a larger attack mounted in the first night with more missiles?) Well in the defence business I don't think there's any such thing as impunity. We will always fly with great caution and after taking all proper precautions, and this is one of those precautions we're taking. Thankyou very much. We'll have more tomorrow. The White House has a statement that's being released at about this time. Thankyou."

SUPER CAPTION: Ken Bacon, US Pentagon spokesman

The strike came 12 hours after President Clinton warned that a defiant Saddam Hussein must "pay a price" for his boldest aggression since the Persian Gulf War.

Washington DC, USA, and Persian Gulf 3 September 1996

Persian Gulf - US Navy

1. Various of U-S-S Laboon

Washington - APTV

2. Pentagon spokesman, Ken Bacon, walking up to podium

3. SOUNDBITE: Ken Bacon, US Pentagon spokesperson

4. Bacon walking away from podium and out of room

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Subjects: Government and politics
People: Saddam Hussein
Organisations: U.S. Department of Defense, United States government
Locations: United States , Iraq , North America , Middle East
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Persian Gulf - Aboard the USS Carl Vinson
Title:
SD
Summary: Persian Gulf - Aboard the USS Carl Vinson
Story No: w048759
Source: Pool
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 08/09/1996 04:00 AM
People: Saddam Hussein
Subscription:

T/I 10:49:46

United States aircraft patrolling the expanded no-fly zone over southern Iraq on Saturday (7/9) reported "no challenge of any significance" from Saddam Hussein's forces.

SHOWS:

ABOARD USS VINSON, 6+7/9;

WS of USS Vinson sailing along;

MS of plane flying over carrier;

MS of air man waving plane in on to carrier;

MS man loading a missile;

MS of plane taking off from carrier;

SOT Captain Larry Baucon, "Our mission since the recent tomahawk strikes into iraq really has not changed; we're still here today flying missions over southern iraq to enfocre the no fly zone and will continue to do that at the same time the task group thats out here is enforcing the sanctions of bringing contraband inside of iraq and thru are maritime interception operation the us navy has been in the gulf for a while and intends to stay here as a force not only to enforce sanctions but also deter further aggression."

MS of planes lined up on carrier;

MS of men attending to planes;

MS of pilot preparing to take off;

MS plane takes off;

WS of profile of ship off of carrier;

SOT Lt.Commander John A. Einhorn: "There has been a little resistence, nothing major, nothing like we saw in thre gulf war, to my know no missiles shot at the one light anti-aircraft fire, nothing major."

WS of planes sitting on carrier;

SOT Lt. Commander Trey Clukey: "We're back out of the gulf, out of harms way for the most part, but in the gulf now things are norman, not higher or lower alert the aircraft are briefing different contingencies because the Iraqis may or may not be ...";

MS of man signalling to aircraft ZOOM OUT to WS of plane taxing;

2.30

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USA: MASSACHUSETTS: USS CONSTITUTION SAILS FOR 1ST TIME IN 116 YEARS
Title:
SD
Summary: USA: MASSACHUSETTS: USS CONSTITUTION SAILS FOR 1ST TIME IN 116 YEARS
Story No: 58104
Source: POOL
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 21/07/1997 04:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

Natural Sound

Near Boston on Monday, thousands of people looked into Massachusetts Bay...for a spectacle not witnessed in more than a century.

For the first time in 116 years the USS Constitution, was set free from her usual two lines to sail freely for an hour.

The voyage marked the 200th anniversary of the wooden ship's commissioning.

The Naval past of the United States came back to life on Monday as one of the oldest serving warships in the world took to the water.

Accompanied by a flotilla of boats, the USS Constitution left her anchorage and was towed into Massachusetts Bay on Monday.

Tugboats pulled the wooden warship, affectionately known as "Old Ironsides", while a fireboat sprayed water coloured red, white and blue high into the air.

Once on the open sea the tugs set her free to begin an hour long sail for the first time in over a century.

A flotilla of smaller craft cruised alongside the remarkable ship with thousands of spectators aboard.

There was also a reminder of the modern day marine power of the United States in the form of the frigate, Halyburton and the destroyer, Ramage which accompanied their ageing cousin through the water.

And from the air modern fighter jets also turned out to pay their respects.

"Old Ironsides" was launched in 1797 as one of the Navy's first warships.

She was undefeated in 30 engagements, and her victory over the British HMS Guerriere in 1812 signalled America's arrival as a naval power.

She earned her nickname because soldiers were astonished when British cannonballs bounced off her hull.

The last time the ship sailed on her own was in 1881 but little seemed to have changed over one hundred years later.

Few wooden warships have survived and no other ship of her age can still sail.

The ship has repeatedly survived being on the chopping block, first thanks to a poem which immortalised "Old Ironsides" as a patriotic symbol and next by a public subscription during the Depression.

Recently, a 12 (m) million dollar restoration was completed just in time for her 200th birthday.

The Constitution originally carried 36 sails but only six had been reproduced for the history making sail.

The sails were the same configuration the 204-foot ship used in battle.

It took three and a half years to return the 44-gun Constitution to seagoing condition.

Even the crew of the ship were dressed for the occasion.

Naval officers were decked out in period costume for the day and seamen climbed the rigging as their forefathers would have done.

Massachusetts Bay, Massachusetts, USA, 21 July 1997

1. Aerial of the USS Constitution being towed by tugboat

2. Water alongside ship, pan to tugs behind ship

3. Crew climbing into rigging

4. Aerial of Constitution and flotilla of boats around her

5. Aerial of sail dropping

7. Crew dropping sail

8. Wide shot of sail filling with wind

9. Aerial of Constitution with sails set

10. Rear view of Constitution with sails set

11. Various shots of crew on board pulling ropes, setting sails

12. Aerial of Constitution being escorted by Navy warship

13. Aerial pan of officers on warship

14. Front view of Constitution

15. Wide shot of fighter flypast

16. Crew at helm

17. Officer dressed in period costume

18. Close up bow of Constitution

19. Pan of officers at work on deck

20. Aerial of crew in rigging, furling sails

21. Wide shot of boats sailing alongside Constitution

22. Aerial of Constitution under tow

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PERSIAN GULF: IRAN UNDER SURVEILLANCE BY USS NIMITZ
Title:
SD
Summary: PERSIAN GULF: IRAN UNDER SURVEILLANCE BY USS NIMITZ
Story No: 64340
Source: APTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 19/10/1997 04:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

English/Nat

The U-S aircraft carrier Nimitz is keeping watch on Iran and its neighbours from its position in the Persian Gulf after a recent flare up in the region.

APTV has the latest pictures from on-board the American carrier rushed to the Gulf to mediate the latest Iran-Iraq confrontation.

The U-S-S Nimitz lies in the Persian Gulf 40 miles off the Iranian port of Bushehr.

The Pentagon rushed the carrier Nimitz to the Persian Gulf after Iranian war planes violated the no-fly zone over southern Iraq on September 29.

It was sent in urgent response to air raids staged by Iran against the southern Iraqi bases of Mujahideen Khalq, a rebel group hostile to the Tehran government.

The captain however says things are relatively calm at the moment.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"None whatsoever. It's been very quiet. We've occasionally run into some of the Iranian ships. They've been very professional and courteous. You can see there's a lot of water out here, so we try to stay out of each other's way."

SUPER CAPTION: Captain Isaac E. Richardson III, U-S Navy

The carrier's presence in the Gulf region is intended to keep both Iran and Iraq in check after Iran's violation of the no-fly zone over Iraq.

Helicopters and fighter planes routinely take off from the deck of the Nimitz to investigate the surrounding area.

American warplanes have been flying some 50 sorties a day in support of the mission, dubbed "Operation Southern Watch," or O-S-W.

The carrier has formidable fire power, with 75 aircraft on its deck.

Rear Admiral John B. Natham, one of those on board, reiterated the strength behind the Nimitz's Gulf mission and the reasons it was ordered into the area.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"It's important that you know that the U-S air force, the United Kingdom and France have a significant number of assets in theatre already supporting O-S-W and we are asked to come in and augment those assets to support the no-fly zone in southern Iraq. And that's the reason we rushed in the Gulf, because of violations by the Iraqis below the 33rd parallel right here (points to map.) So we provided sorties and we're still providing sorties, we're doing that today, we've been doing that for the last six days, have been providing a number of sorties up into that operation to prevent the Iraqis from violating the no-fly zone and enforcement of that by the coalition."

SUPER CAPTION: Rear Admiral John B. Nathman, U-S Navy

He also said the Iranians appear to be growing into their role as an aspiring military power, but there's still work to do.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"I think what they're good at right now is they're getting used to the equipment they purchase and that's really what they're interested in - you know they're exercising the kilos, they exercise their U-dongs (type of weapon), the ships that they bought from overseas, and so they're interested in exercising and understanding their equipment. So that's the best way I would characterize it.

Q: What have they yet to learn?

"I think they have a lot to learn, they always have a lot to learn. But I think what they're seeing is that they need an awful, they need to work at obviously being at sea and understanding the tactical implications of being at sea and so I think they're on the leading edge of regaining some of those skills and they're going to have to work at it."

SUPER CAPTION: Rear Admiral John B. Nathman

Iran accuses the United States of positioning the carrier of its shores to spy on Iran, a charge which Washington denies.

In keeping with recent attempts to show off its military might, Iran declared on Saturday that it possessed the strongest missile force in the Gulf region.

Iran's bold claims may be difficult to verify, but the U-S and Israel do believe Iran has recently upgraded its missile capability with Chinese, Russian and North Korean help.

Persian Gulf, off coast of Iran - 19 October, 1997

1. Wide aerial shot of carrier Nimitz

2. Various shots inside control deck

3. Setup of Captain Richardson looking through binoculars from ship

4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Captain Isaac E. Richardson III

5. Helicopter taking off from carrier deck

6. Closeup of fighter pilot in seat

7. Fighter plane taking off from deck

8. Closeup of plane and runway workers guiding wheels

9. Closeup fighter pilot, waves hands

10. Pans of fighter plane taking off from deck

11. Radar on top of ship

12. Closeup of radar

13. American flags flying atop ship

14. Runway technician signals to plane with hands up

15. Fighter plane taking off, flies off at angle

16. Another plane taking off from deck

17. Runway worker in yellow coat waving hands at plane

18. Fighter pilot getting into cockpit

19. Closeup runway worker waving hands to plane

20. SOUNDBITE: (English) Rear Admiral John B. Nathman

21. Camera cutaway

22. SOUNDBITE: (English) Rear Admiral John B. Nathman

23. Fighter plane flying, landing on deck

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BAHRAIN:  US INDEPENDENCE TO REPLACE US NIMITZ IN PERSIAN GULF
Title:
SD
Summary: BAHRAIN: US INDEPENDENCE TO REPLACE US NIMITZ IN PERSIAN GULF
Story No: 70911
Source: APTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 20/01/1998 05:00 AM
People: Saddam Hussein
Subscription:

English/Nat

The U-S aircraft carrier Independence has been ordered to set sail from Japan to the Gulf later this month to replace its sister ship the Nimitz.

The crew of the Nimitz can finally look forward to some home leave in February after months on high alert as part of the military build up against Iraq.

The commander of the huge warship says he believes the presence of U-S forces in the region is crucial in making Iraq obey United Nations resolutions.

The aircraft carrier, the U-S-S Nimitz set sail for the Gulf in October of last year.

Nearly four months later and she and her crew continue to patrol the gulf waters.

Always within striking range of Iraqi targets, her seventy-five planes, laden with bombs and missiles they patrol the no-fly zones of southern Iraq.

Every day nearly a hundred sorties are flown - so far they return fully laden.

The no-fly zone was created by the United States and its allies to protect Iraq's minority Shi'ite population from Saddam Hussein's forces.

One of two aircraft carriers dispatched to the former war zone, the Nimitz is proof of America's determination to force Iraq to comply with U-N resolutions. .

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"In terms of the Security Council making it very clear to Iraqi government that they need to obey the laws - that they need to comply with the mandates and sanctions against them."

SUPER CAPTION: Rear Admiral John D. Nathman, U-S Navy

Diplomacy is Washington's preferred method - but the presence of the Nimitz and its aircraft in the Gulf are proof that the U-S is also ready for action..

At 95 thousand tons, 5000 crew members and seventy five aircraft the Nimitz is a potent strike force.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"I really wonder how successful Ambassador Butler would be in getting into Baghdad if he didn't have this type of leverage behind him to make it clear that the Iraqi government needs to work closely and carefully and understand their mandates. So I think being here has made a big difference - it's important for us to be here."

SUPER CAPTION: Rear Admiral John D. Nathman, U-S Navy

The Nimitz patrols the waters with another aircraft carrier, the U-S-S Washington,

Along with the forces aboard the carriers are the cruisers, destroyers and submarines that escort them.

In total, the seaborne forces represent more than half the U-S forces in the Gulf.

A replacement has been ordered to the Gulf - so the crew of the Nimitz can finally look forward to going home in February.

The Persian Gulf, Off the coast of Bahrain - 20 January, 1998

1. Wide shot of fighters circling the USS Nimitz, pull out to show plane taking off

2. Set up shot lookout tower

3. Pan of flight deck from lookout tower

4. Close up of writing of 'USS Nimitz' on fighter, pull out to wide of fighter

5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Rear Admiral John D. Nathman, U-S Navy

4. Various of missiles being loaded onto fighter

5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Rear Admiral John D. Nathman, U-S Navy

6. Various of plane preparing to take off

7. Plane taking off

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PERSIAN GULF: ON BOARD THE AIRCRAFT CARRIER USS WASHINGTON
Title:
SD
Summary: PERSIAN GULF: ON BOARD THE AIRCRAFT CARRIER USS WASHINGTON
Story No: 72040
Source: APTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 04/02/1998 05:00 AM
People: Bill Clinton , Mike McCurry , Michael Mullen , Saddam Hussein
Subscription:

English/Nat

As military exercises continued in the Persian Gulf on Wednesday, President Bill Clinton's spokesman warned that time is running out to find a diplomatic solution to avert a military crisis with Iraq.

White House Press Secretary Mike McCurry refused to speculate on when Clinton would abandon diplomatic efforts, but America's military build-up in the Gulf has continued unabated since November.

A-P-T-V spent Wednesday aboard the U-S-S Washington which is flying sorties about 100 miles (160 km) off the southern coast of Iraq.

Pilots and ground crew have been training for a possible strike against Iraq since the U-S-S Washington steamed through the Suez Canal to join the U-S-S Nimitz and 16 other navy vessels patrolling the Persian Gulf.

On board, the Washington has a fleet of strike aircraft -- including F-14 Tomcats and F-18 Hornets -- armed with deadly weapons.

In total, the nuclear-powered aircraft-carrier is carrying 5,800 military personnel, 50 combat aircraft and a further 50 support aircraft.

The warship is also travelling with a small battle group that includes a submarine, and a cruiser and destroyer equipped with guided missiles, cluster bombs, air-to-air missiles and anti-radar missiles.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"I hope very much that this turns out peacefully and that not a shot gets fired. The Navy and the other forces in this area certainly are prepared to execute a military option if that's what the governments and the diplomats and my bosses up the chain of command decide. "

SUPER CAPTION: Admiral Michael Mullen

Americans are hoping the high profile presence of ships like the George Washington will serve as a warning to Saddam Hussein and show that the U-S means business as tension between Iraq and the United Nations continues to increase.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"We're in a high state of readiness and kind of like a gun that's cocked. We're just ready for the finger to pull the trigger."

SUPER CAPTION: Lt. David Kennington

The size of the Washington is imposing -- its like a 24-floor building lying on its side.

Although the crew often relax with video games, everyone here knows that if the diplomatic stalemate over U-N weapons inspection can't be resolved, they may be called on to strike against Iraq at a moment's notice.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"Sure its a possibility. We're ready. We're all out here doing our jobs you know. I don't want it to happen."

SUPER CAPTION: Crew member Jeffery Callitare

Unlike the Nimitz, which is due to leave the Gulf soon, sailors on the George Washington have no idea how long they will be in the Gulf.

U-S-S Washington, Persian Gulf, 4 February 1998

1. Various of planes taking off and landing on flight deck

2. Various of crew signalling

3. Control tower

4. Various of missiles on trolley around plane

5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Admiral Michael Mullen

6. Pilots in briefing room

7. Pilots watching aircraft on TV monitor showing F-16 aborted landing

8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Lt. David Kennington

9. Various of crew in mess room

10. Crew members playing video games

11. Cutaway of video screen

12. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jeffery Callitare, Crew member

13. Callitare plays video game showing a plane taking off an aircraft carrier

14. Planes landing

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Subjects: Games , International relations , Video games , Recreation and leisure , Lifestyle , Government and politics
People: Bill Clinton , Mike McCurry , Michael Mullen , Saddam Hussein
Organisations: United States military, United States government
Locations: United States , Iraq , North America , Middle East
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Persian Gulf - USS Washington on alert
Title:
SD
Summary: Persian Gulf - USS Washington on alert
Story No: w111508
Source: WTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 21/02/1998 05:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

T/I: 11:08:23

Despite hopes of a diplomatic settlement between the UN and Iraq, the United States and Britain were on saturday (21/02) continuing military preparations in the Gulf. On board the USS George Washington training activities are in full swing with as many as 200 sorties being flown a day.

SHOWS:

AT SEA, OFF BAHRAIN, 21/02

WS aircraft on carrier;

MS planes lined up;

MS plane being moved;

CU signalman;

CU two other men standing on deck;

CU plane's propellor;

MS plane taking off;

MS man making adjustments to deck;

CU fighter jet landing;

CU cockpit;

MS Lt. Mike Amos checking his fighter jet;

SOT Lt Mike Amos, fighter pilot, "We usually fly everyday. We are confident that we are ready and well trained. Best striker aircraft a navy has.";

CU front of plane;

CU engines;

PAN to other planes;

MS plane landing;

CU folding up wings;

MS planes on deck;

2.28

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HONG KONG: US NAVY SHIPS VISIT
Title:
SD
Summary: HONG KONG: US NAVY SHIPS VISIT
Story No: 174238
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 08/02/2000 05:00 AM
People:
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English/Nat

A U-S battle group of seven ships and two submarines arrived in Hong Kong on Tuesday.

It's the largest display of U-S firepower allowed to dock there by China since the NATO bombing in Belgrade last May.

It's port call is being seen as the most visible sign of a warming of relation between the U-S and China which deteriorated after the NATO bombing along with allegations of spying.

Hong Kong, a former British colony handed back to China in July 1997, has long been a favored port of call for the

U-S Navy.

But such stops were banned temporarily after U-S warplanes bombed the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade in May 1999.

China rejected Washington's explanation that it was an accident and Sino-U-S relations deteriorated sharply.

U-S allegations of Chinese attempts to steal U-S nuclear secrets also contributed in the souring of relations.

Taiwanese born scientist, Wen Ho Lee was fired from his job at the Los Alamos nuclear labs in New Mexico in March 1999 but was not charged with any crime - though the investigation continues.

However, Beijing has gradually been approving visits to Hong Kong by U-S warships and warplanes.

This is by far the biggest since the embassy attack.

The battle group flagship, the U-S-S John C Stennis, is a 97-thousand tonne nuclear-powered aircraft carrier.

The carrier, which is armed with 80 warplanes, includes two guided missile cruisers, two destroyers, a frigate, an ammunition-and-supply ship and two submarines.

Navy officials say its a "routine port visit" - the ship will be in Hong Kong waters for five days as its 7-thousand plus crew goes on a rest and recreation break

The ship's Rear Admiral Gerald Hoewing said the visit was a good indication of improving Sino-U-S relations.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"I believe that this is a symbol of improving relations. You know that we have been working on that, both countries have for some time. So I believe that this is a good indication towards that."

SUPER CAPTION: Rear Admiral Gerald Hoewing, U-S Navy

The admiral also played down suggestions that the U-S was flexing its military muscles in an attempt to send Beijing signals to leave Taiwan alone.

The port call comes roughly one month before Taiwanese voters will choose a new president.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"Our visit here to the Western Pacific is purely routine. We are a very mobile, very capable battlegroup. Capable of going anywhere at any place at anytime. However there is nothing scheduled that will support any type of operations like that."

SUPER CAPTION: Rear Admiral Gerald Hoewing, U-S Navy

Beijing considers Taiwan to be a renegade province that must eventually reunite with the mainland, by force if necessary.

During the last Taiwanese presidential elections in 1996, China fired missiles off Taiwan's coast in a nerve-rattling

show of force that prompted the United States to dispatch warships into the area.

Hoewing said the Stennis battle group steered well clear of the Taiwan Strait en route to Hong Kong to avoid provoking any hostility.

Near Hong Kong, China - 8 February 2000

1. Mid shot Control tower of U-S-S Stennis

2. Mid shot helicopter and F-18s on deck

3. Wide shot of F-18 Hornet jets on deck with Hong Kong in background

4. Tailwings of F-18s in a row: crew doing maintenance on planes

5. Various of crew on deck

6. Crew member banging aircraft wing with his back

7. Two shot crew walking on deck

8. Mid shot tower and radars

9. Set-up presser

10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Rear Admiral Gerald Hoewing, US Navy

11. Cutaway cameras

12. SOUNDBITE: (English) Rear Admiral Gerald Hoewing, US Navy

13. Mid shot crew working on jet

14. Various of sailors looking out to sea

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Subjects: Embassies , Presidential elections , International relations , Government and politics , National elections , Elections
Organisations: U.S. Navy, United States military, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, United States government
Locations: Beijing , Hong Kong , Taiwan , China , Greater China , East Asia , Asia
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PHILIPPINES: JOINT MILITARY EXERCISES WITH THE U-S-A
Title:
SD
Summary: PHILIPPINES: JOINT MILITARY EXERCISES WITH THE U-S-A
Story No: 175575
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 23/02/2000 05:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

English/Nat

More than two thousand-three hundred U-S personnel and a similar number of Filipinos are currently taking part in large-scale joint military exercises in the Philippines.

Although the arrival of the U-S troops has been welcomed by the Philippines military, critics of the exercises say the presence of the U-S troops will cause a rise in prostitution and crime.

It is more than seven years since the Philippines government closed the last U-S base and five years since the last major joint-exercise.

The U-S navy landing ship, U-S-S McHenry, was given a warm welcome by the Philippines' navy as it docked at Pier 13 in Manila Harbour on Tuesday.

Onboard were seven hundred U-S servicemen ready to join up with soldiers already in the Philippines for the war games.

The ship's Commander, Richard Landolt, announced that he was glad to be back in the Philippines and was looking forward to the exercises with the Filipino troops.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"We've got a lot of cross training exercises going on right now, and planning activities and it's going to be a full work day today. When they do get off, they have a few ground rules to follow: They can't consume any alcohol, they can't go in any bars. Everyone will be back onboard by midnight, and the buddy system is mandatory."

SUPER CAPTION: Commander Richard B. Landolt Commanding Officer, USS Fort McHenry

The strict rules are a reaction to criticism of the exercises which says the arrival of so many U-S troops will cause an increase in prostitution and a rise crime.

Anti-U-S groups have staged protest rallies to demonstrate their opposition to the return of the U-S troops.

These are the first large-scale joint exercises in five years.

Military ties with the United States are still a highly sensitive topic, even though it is more than seven years since the last U-S base was closed by the Philippines government.

It ended nearly a century of heavy U-S military presence.

More than two thousand-three hundred U-S personnel and a similar number of Filipinos are taking part in the land, air and sea exercises which will end on March 3.

The United States suspended major military exercises in the Philippines in December 1996 after Manila closed a loophole shielding U-S military personnel from prosecution for crimes committed in the country.

In a turn around last May, the Philippines Senate approved the resumption of large-scale exercises, granting the United States jurisdiction over crimes committed by its personnel while on duty in the Philippines.

XFA Manila/ Fort Magsaysay, Philippines - 22 February 2000 and Recent

Manila - 22 February 2000

1. Wide shot of USS Fort McHenry arriving at Manila port with brass band welcome

2. US flag

3. US servicemen on deck

4. Band conductor

5. Various of brass band playing

6. Banner reading \"Welcome USS Fort McHenry\"

7. Wide shot of USS Fort McHenry with Philippine and US flags in foreground

8. Ship crewmen pulling rope

9. US servicemen on deck

10. Filipino troops pulling rope

11. Commander Richard Landolt welcomed by Philippine navy officials

12. Cutaway cameraman

13. Wide shot of press conference

14. SOUNDBITE: (English) Commander Richard Landolt, Commanding Officer USS Fort McHenry

Manila - Recent: 14 February 2000

15. Wide shot of protest outside US embassy

16. Banner reading \"No to US war games\"

17. Heart-shaped placard reading \"Goodbye Joe. Take your AIDS with you\"

18. Close-up of woman protester

19. Woman holding heart-shaped placard

20. Reverse shot of protest

Fort Magsaysay - 22 February 2000

21. Wide shot of Filipino and US troops doing rifle firing exercises

22. Filipino firing rifle

23. Wide shot of Fort Magsaysay

24. US marines walking

25. wide shot of US and Filipino troops listening to briefing

26. Various mid shot of US and Filipino troops

27. Troops doing compass exercises

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USA: AIRCRAFT CARRIER USS JOHN F KENNEDY
Title:
SD
Summary: USA: AIRCRAFT CARRIER USS JOHN F KENNEDY
Story No: 187465
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 03/07/2000 04:00 AM
People: Bill Clinton
Subscription:

English/Nat

XFA

More than three-thousand sailors aboard the aircraft carrier U-S-S John F. Kennedy sailed into New York City Harbour on Sunday to spend their Independence Day in style.

The J-F-K is one of hundreds of tall ships, sailboats and military vessels making their way to the harbour one by one for the city's nautical Fourth of July extravaganza.

The J-F-K moored near the Statue of Liberty and will serve as President Bill Clinton's viewing platform for the festivities.

Some 150 tall ships from 23 countries and 25 naval ships from 14 nations are expected for an 11-mile (19 kilometre) military review and tall ship parade down the Hudson River on Tuesday.

Clinton plans to review the military ships from the missile cruiser U-S-S Hue City,

then board the J-F-K for the tall ships' "parade of sail."

As the Kennedy sailed into port, the skies over the harbour were abuzz with helicopters, and white-uniformed sailors joined the throng of seafarers taking part in Operation Sail 2000 and

International Naval Review 2000.

The Hue City steamed up the harbour late on Sunday, bound for a Hudson River pier near the Intrepid, a famed World War II carrier turned military museum.

About 150 miles (250 kilometres) to the northeast, in the seaport in Mystic, Connecticut, a replica of the 19th-century slave ship Amistad set sail for the New York Harbour celebration on its maiden voyage.

Navy officials had hoped to grab the spotlight with the largest naval review in history.

Sixty-one nations were invited to take part, but officials now say this year's gathering isn't likely to surpass the record 25 navies represented at the 1986 Statue of Liberty centennial.

Naval ships from Canada, Ireland, Britain, Ukraine, India, Greece, France, Italy, Brazil, South Africa, Singapore, Turkey and the United States are expected.

The week-long event includes tours of some of the ships and a Fourth of July fireworks display billed as the largest ever.

Sixty tons of explosives will be launched from barges, with a grand finale blast planned over the Statue of Liberty.

Organisers say this will be the largest gathering ever of tall ships and naval vessels.

Recent years have seen the Navy struggling to meet its basic manpower needs as a full employment economy draws sailors and aviators to the civilian sector.

Navy officials are also hoping to get a recruiting boost from the celebrations.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"John F. Kennedy of course is show central, centre stage if you will, and we're very proud of the fact that we get to represent our Navy and our nation on our nation's Independence Day. It's a great opportunity to showcase both the ship and the crew."

SUPER CAPTION: Captain Michael Miller, Commanding Officer JFK, US Navy

New York City, USA and at sea aboard aircraft carrier USS John F. Kennedy, 1/2/3 July 2000 and recent

Aboard USS John F. Kennedy entering New York harbour, 2 July

1. Close up buildings of downtown Manhattan, zoom out to show sailors on deck of USS John F. Kennedy, as song "New York, New York" plays over ship's loudspeaker system

2. Wide shot sailors lining the edge of the flight deck

3. Close up speakers on ship playing song

4. Wide shot JFK passing camera with sailors in white lining the rails

5. Wide shot aerial of JFK entering New York harbor, lower Manhattan visible in background

6. Wide shot sailors lining the edge of the flight deck

7. Close up two sailors with Statue of Liberty in the background, zoom out to wide shot of lower Manhattan

8. Close up sailor's face

9. Medium shot sailors with lower Manhattan behind

Aboard USS JFK at sea in Atlantic ocean, 1 July

10. Wide shot sailor on captain's bridge who is steering ship and speaking to officers

11. Wide shot officers and sailors on bridge

12. Medium shot Captain Michael Miller of USS John F. Kennedy speaking on phone

13. Wide shot view of flight deck and water and ship from bridge

14. SOUNDBITE: (English) Captain Michael Miller, Commanding Officer, JFK, US Navy

New York harbour, 3 July

15. Wide shot sailing ship sailing in harbour, zoom out to show people walking beside the water with sailboat docked

16. Medium shot US Coast Guard patrol boat patrolling harbor

17. Medium shot helicopter flying over harbour

18. Wide shot, zoom to tight, New York Police boat patrolling harbour

19. Wide shot mast of sailing ship, pan down to show ship

20. Close up rigging of sailing ship

21. Close up people sitting on sailing boats making various preparations

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Subjects: Fourth of July , Holidays , Occasions , Lifestyle
People: Bill Clinton
Organisations: U.S. Navy, United States military, United States government
Locations: New York City , New York , United States , Manhattan , North America
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YEMEN: USS COLE UPDATE
Title:
SD
Summary: YEMEN: USS COLE UPDATE
Story No: 197621
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 13/10/2000 04:00 AM
People: Ali Abdullah Saleh
Subscription:

English/Nat

XFA

The attack on the US Navy ship in Yemen by a small boat has killed at least six Americans and injured at least 30.

Eleven others are missing.

The explosion just offshore the port of Aden ripped a hole in the 9,100-ton USS Cole, one of the world's most advanced warships.

The USS Cole, a 505-foot guided-missile destroyer, was en route for a six-month deployment in the Persian Gulf, where it was scheduled to help enforce the U-N embargo against Iraq.

The ship was being moored in the middle of the harbour when a small, rubber boat that had helped in the mooring, headed straight toward the Navy vessel.

As the two ships made contact, an explosion ripped through the Cole's half-inch steel hull, opening a 20-by-40-foot hole at the midsection of the ship at the water line.

The explosion destroyed an engine room and nearby mess area where sailors were eating lunch.

At least six sailors were killed and 35 injured, and 11 were missing.

The two men aboard the small boat also were killed.

Navy officials said there was no expectation of a threat from a small boat that supposedly had been dispatched by harbor authorities to help tie the Navy vessel to its moorings.

While the U-S-S Cole has the capacity to locate and destroy a missile 150 kilometres away, it seemed powerless to stop a rubber boat only metres away.

Yemen is now at the centre of what appears to be an act of terrorism against the United States.

The attack came as anti- US fervour in the region sparked by more than two weeks of Israeli-Palestinian clashes.

There was no immediate claim of responsibility.

Police officials in Yemen, on the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula on the Red Sea, said that a number of people had been detained for questioning but would not say whether any were considered suspects.

Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh was shown on national television visiting some of the wounded, who included at least two Yemenis.

Yemen became a more frequent refueling stop for Navy ships following a U-S decision in December to open up contacts and cooperation with the country.

In recent days, angry street protests have erupted in Yemen and many of its neighbors over what many Arabs see as U.S.-backed Israel's harsh response to Palestinian protests.

Sixteen days of Israeli-Palestinian clashes have left more than 90 people dead, most of them Palestinians.

The apparent bombing of the U-S-S Cole during a refueling stop in Yemen leaves many more questions than answers, but U-S officials vow to retaliate if terrorists are found to be

behind the deadly explosion.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"We have five that are considered to be in critical condition, the others have been stabilised. We are ensuring they are provided with the best medical care possible. This includes a medical team sent from Bahrain, the headquarters for the US 5th Fleet. It's a team of 10 people who are trained to deal with crisis response and direct the course of proper medical treatment."

SUPER CAPTION: Terrence Dudley, US Navy 5th Fleet Spokesman

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"We know the explosion was external to the destroyer caused by some explosive device and material on the boat which run up against the USS Cole."

Q: How many servicemen are missing and what are you doing to find them?

"We have 11 currently missing and we are taking all necessary steps to ensure they are accounted for. That is one of the Navy's primary concerns - that we can account for all missing sailors and cake care of our sailors."

SUPER CAPTION: Terrence Dudley, US Navy 5th Fleet Spokesman

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"The condition of the ship is stable. It did take on some water with the explosion. The ship is now being de-watered. We have pumps moving out water and clearing out the damaged spaces. We hope to make the ship seaworthy enough to take it into a port where we can do some minimal repairs there before towing it back to the United States."

SUPER CAPTION: Terrence Dudley, US Navy 5th Fleet Spokesman

Aden, Yemen - October 13 2000

Night shots

1. Ambulances carrying U-S casualties to hospital

Dayside

2. Various US personnel patrolling military site

3. Various of USS Cole with damaged side

4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Terrence Dudley, US Navy 5th Fleet Spokesman

5. Cutaway

7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Terrence Dudley, US Navy 5th Fleet Spokesman

8. Cutaway

9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Terrence Dudley, US Navy 5th Fleet Spokesman

10. Various of soldiers and armed personnel set against sunset

Expand shotlist extract
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Subjects: Accidents and disasters , War and unrest , General news
People: Ali Abdullah Saleh
Organisations: U.S. Navy, United States military, United States government
Locations: Yemen , Palestinian territories , Middle East , United States , Israel , North America
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YEMEN: INVESTIGATION INTO USS COLE APPARENT BOMBING
Title:
SD
Summary: YEMEN: INVESTIGATION INTO USS COLE APPARENT BOMBING
Story No: 197650
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 13/10/2000 04:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

English/Nat

XFA

U-S investigators have launched an investigation into the apparent bombing of the U-S Navy destroyer U-S-S Cole in Yemen.

The United States says 17 sailors died and 33 were injured in the explosion while the ship was refueling in the port of Aden.

Seven bodies have so far been recovered.

The bodies of five of the sailors killed in the attack arrived Friday evening in Germany on their way back to the United States.

The bodies of the two remaning sailors recovered so far might arrive on later flights carrying some of the wounded.

More than 30 sailors have been flown to Germany for medical attention.

They were expected to arrive before midnight Friday and be taken to the Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, a U.S. military facility.

Other injured sailors have been taken to the east African country of Djibouti.

A Navy spokeswoman said families of the 10 missing sailors were being notified that they are presumed to have died in the explosion but efforts to recover their remains were continuing.

The Navy says explosives experts who examined the ship's damaged hull say the blast came from an external source, adding to the evidence that it was a deliberate attack.

The explosion is believed to have come from a small boat that pulled up alongside the warship while it was docked in the port of Aden and set off a high-explosive charge.

The tragedy comes at a time of high alert among U-S forces in the Middle East because of spiralling Israeli-Palestinian turmoil and considerable anti-American sentiment in the region.

Despite a hole in the ship's hull estimated at being 30 feet high and 40 feet wide, the Navy says the ship is seaworthy and it will be towed back to the United States.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"The explosion of course left a very large hole measuring 20 by 30 feet in the ship on the port side. There was some flooding that has since been stabilised. There's no fire been reported and the Navy is currently working on assisting the injured personnel and also beginning the investigation into the exact cause of the accident. (Question off camera: any update on how many dead and injured?) Yes we do have. The latest figures are we now have six confirmed dead, one American sailor died in the hospital last night, we have 11 who are still missing and 33 who are wounded."

SUPER CAPTION: Terrence Dudley, 5th Fleet Spokesman

Aden, Yemen - 13 October, 2000

AUDIO AND VIDEO QUALITY AS INCOMING

1. Wide shot of damaged ship USS Cole

2. Pan across damaged hull

3. Soldiers with sniffer dogs being used to check security

4. US Marines unloading supplies from truck (including investigation supplies)

5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Terrence Dudley, 5th Fleet Spokesman

6. Various soldiers unloading truck (stretchers and medical supplies, etc)

7. Truck driving away past soldiers

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HKong NKorea Tension
Title:
HD
Summary: US Navy committed to defending US allies in Asia
Story No: 4119019
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/10/2017 10:37 AM
People: Donald Trump , Ronald Reagan
Subscription:

The commander of the USS Ronald Reagan aircraft carrier strike group has told reporters in Hong Kong that his ships have an "ironclad" commitment to defending U.S. allies, including Japan and South Korea.

Rear Admiral Marc Dalton reiterated President Donald Trump's "resolve to use every lever available to us to convince North Korea to alter its dangerous and aggressive behavior."

He was responding to a question about Trump's combative rhetoric.

Dalton would not confirm South Korean media reports that the Reagan would head to Korean Peninsula waters.

Yonhap news agency cited an unnamed South Korean defence official as saying the U.S. carrier plans to conduct exercises with South Korea's navy.

++QUALITY AS INCOMING++

Off coast of Hong Kong - 2 October 2017

1. Various of nuclear powered aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan

2. Tilt down to aircraft on carrier

3. Various of aircraft on carrier

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Rear Admiral Marc Dalton, Senior U.S. Navy commander of aircraft carrier “Ronald Reagan”:

“So the US President (Donald Trump) has been very clear about his resolve to use every lever available to us to convince North Korea to alter its dangerous and aggressive behaviour. That behaviour, including two ballistic missiles that have overflown Japan and a nuclear test earlier last month, are of concern to the entire globe. And this strike group is committed to defend ourselves and our allies. And the United States commitment to defend our allies, including Japan and the Republic of Korea, is ironclad.”

5. Cutaway

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Rear Admiral Marc Dalton, Senior U.S. Navy commander of aircraft carrier “Ronald Reagan”:

“Ok, so first question is how long we gonna be here, and the answer is about four or five days. And the second question is what are we gonna do next. As I mentioned, we’ll continue our operations in the region, including operations with allies and partners throughout the region.”

7. Aircraft on carrier

8. Crew on carrier

9. Parked helicopter

10. Various of crew

11. Flags of China (top) and Hong Kong special administrative region (bottom)

12. Wide of USS Ronald Reagan

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Subjects: Military leadership , Military and defense , Government and politics , Navy , Armed forces
People: Donald Trump , Ronald Reagan
Organisations: United States military, United States government, U.S. Navy
Locations: Hong Kong , Central and Western , Hong Kong
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US FL Keys Flyover 2(CR)
Title:
HD
Summary: US Navy Lending Helping Hand in Hard Hit FL Keys
Story No: apus083888
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 12/09/2017 22:25 PM
People:
Subscription:

U.S. Navy crew members prep aid for their support mission to help those badly affected in the Florida Keys by Hurricane Irma.

The Associated Press was able to ride along on a Navy helicopter as it took off from the USS Abraham Lincoln to survey some of the area.

"Right now we are trying to make an assessment of what this situation is on the ground," said Capt. Putnam Browne.

"The greatest ability we can deliver right now is ability to bring helicopter assets to them, so we can move people as needed."

Off the coast of Florida - 12 September 2017

1. Aerial shot of bridge

2. Aerial shot of damage on other side of bridge

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Capt. Putnam Browne, U.S. Navy: (Partially covered)

"Flying search and rescue missions, and we are also flying some supplies over the beach right now. Right now we are trying to make an assessment of what this situation is on the ground. So I think so far we have seen that, so far we have been here for a day and the reports back is that Florida, the damage has been great, but the people have done a very nice job of evacuating, hunkering in place, so we are not seeing a lot of death and destruction. The greatest ability we can deliver right now is ability to bring helicopter assets to them, so we can move people as needed. We do have some water, we can create. We have an extra 100,000 gallons of water to deliver per day. Obviously we can't deliver 100,000 gallons every day, but that's how much actually we can make per day."

4. Helicopter landing on USS Abraham Lincoln

5. Various of crewmen filling up water containers

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Kennith Malone, Hull Technician, First Class U.S. Navy: (Partially covered)

"We make our own water onboard the ship using steam, we collect the evaporation, or condensation off of that and turn it into drinking water. Approximately 20 Hull technicians and repairmen help fabricate all the parts and we put it together, took it about two days to make two systems. They have 12 valves on each system, so 24 total valves that we can fill 5 gallon stations, 5 gallon jugs from continuously."

7. Crewmen walking around

8. Various of crew getting aid ready

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Organisations: United States military, United States government, U.S. Navy
Locations: Cedar Key , Florida , United States
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US Florida Keys Flyover 2
Title:
HD
Summary: US navy lending helping hand in hard-hit Florida Keys
Story No: 4115749
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 12/09/2017 21:51 PM
People:
Subscription:

US Navy crew members are preparing aid for their support mission to help those badly affected in the Florida Keys by Hurricane Irma.

The Associated Press was able to ride along on a Navy helicopter as it took off from the USS Abraham Lincoln to survey some of the area.

"Right now we are trying to make an assessment of what this situation is on the ground," said Captain Putnam Browne.

"The greatest ability we can deliver right now is ability to bring helicopter assets to them, so we can move people as needed.

Off the coast of Florida - 12 September 2017

1. Various of helicopter flying away from aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln

2. Zoom in of Navy airman inside helicopter

3. Various of waters surrounding the Florida Keys

4. Various aerial shots of damage

5. Aerial shot of bridge

6. Aerial shot of damage on other side of bridge

7. Helicopter landing on carrier

8. US Navy Hull Technician Kennith Malone and other members filling container with water

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Kennith Malone, Hull Technician, First Class US Navy:

"Approximately 20 Hull technicians and machine repairmen help fabricate all the parts and we put it together, took it about two days to make two systems. They have 12 valves on each system, so 24 total valves that we can fill 5 gallon stations, or 5 gallon jugs from continuously."

10. Tilt from water to Malone

11. SOUNDBITE (English) Kennith Malone, Hull Technician, First Class US Navy:

"We make our own water onboard the ship using steam, we collect the evaporation, or condensation off of that and turn it into drinking water."

12. Bridge of USS Abraham Lincoln, pan to Capt. Putnam Browne

13. SOUNDBITE (English) Captain Putnam Browne, US Navy:

"Flying search and rescue missions, and we are also flying some supplies over the beach right now. Right now we are trying to make an assessment of what this situation is on the ground."

14. Crewmen walking

15. Crewmen getting aid ready

16. SOUNDBITE (English) Captain Putnam Browne, US Navy:

"So I think so far we have seen that, so far we have been here for a day and the reports back is that Florida, the damage has been great, but the people have done a very nice job of evacuating, hunkering in place, so we are not seeing a lot of death and destruction, thank God."

17. Various of crewmen getting aid ready

18. SOUNDBITE (English) Captain Putnam Browne, US Navy:

"The greatest ability we can deliver right now is ability to bring helicopter assets to them, so we can move people as needed. We do have some water, we can create. We have an extra 100-thousand gallons of water to deliver per day. Obviously, we can't deliver 100-thousand gallons every day, but that's how much actually we can make per day."

19. Landing strip on carrier

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Organisations: United States military, United States government, U.S. Navy
Locations: Cedar Key , Florida , United States
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++US Irma Aid
Title:
HD
Summary: US warship being loaded with aid to assist FEMA response to Irma
Story No: apus083549
Source: DVIDS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/09/2017 12:32 PM
People:
Subscription:

RESTRICTION SUMMARY: AP CLIENTS ONLY/MANDATORY ON-SCREEN CREDIT TO 'US DEFENSE DEPARTMENT'

SHOTLIST:

DVIDS - AP CLIENTS ONLY/MANDATORY ON-SCREEN CREDIT TO 'US DEFENSE DEPARTMENT'

Norfolk, Virginia - 7 September 2017

1. Various of supplies and equipment, including jet skis, being loaded onto the USS Iwo Jima

STORYLINE:

Supplies and equipment were loaded onto a United States Navy ship in Virginia on Thursday, ahead of a Hurricane Irma relief operation.

The USS Iwo Jima, an amphibious assault ship, will be positioned off the southern coast of the United States to provide assistance to federal, state and local authorities' ongoing relief efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma.

Two jet skis were among the cargo being loaded at the port in Norfolk.

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India Exercises
Title:
HD
Summary: India, Japan, US hold joint exercises in Bay of Bengal
Story No: 4106603
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS , DoS TV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 17/07/2017 13:04 PM
People:
Subscription:

The navies of the United States, Japan and India wrapped up their annual maritime exercise, Malabar 2017, in the Bay of Bengal on Monday.

Aircraft carriers and submarines were deployed for the exercise, which was aimed at achieving closer military ties between the three nations, officials said.

Vessels including the US aircraft carrier Nimitz, the Japanese helicopter carrier Izumo and Indian aircraft carrier Vikramaditya were among those participating in the trilateral exercise.

Conducted both ashore and at sea, the 21st edition of the Malabar exercise included maritime reconnaissance operations and anti-submarine warfare.

Denying that the exercise was a show of strength against China's growing presence in the Indian Ocean, Rear Admiral Yoshi Goka from Japan said the exercise was not targeted at any "specific scenario or country or region".

The exercises began in 1992 as bilateral naval drills between India and the United States.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bay of Bengal - 17 July 2017

1. Wide of Indian aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya and Japanese helicopter carrier Izumo (behind Vikramaditya) participating in the Malabar Exercises; F18 aircraft on the US aircraft carrier USS Nimitz in the foreground

2. Various of INS Vikramaditya and Japanese helicopter carrier Izumo

3. Navy officer on USS Nimitz

4. Participating ships at sea

5. Mid of the Japanese helicopter carrier Izumo

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Bill Selk, Operations Officer, USS Nimitz:

"Partnerships are very important and we are demonstrating that partnership. We don't get a chance to operate with the Indian Navy very often just because of the ocean that separates us, but when we are over here I think it is very important that we do demonstrate that we operate together - we practice those skills - so anytime we need to we can support each other."

7. Tilt up from a radar monitor to F18 aircrafts on the USS Nimitz

8. Navy officers on the USS Nimitz

9. Close-up of a monitor screen

10. Helicopter preparing to take off

11. SOUNDBITE (English) Rear Admiral Yoshi Goka, Commander of Task Group, Izumo helicopter carrier:

"Actually, to say this is nothing specific (in terms of) scenario or country or region in our mind… just do training in the viewpoint of naval skills for operational tactics and so forth."

US STATE DEPARTMENT

On the USS Nimitz in the Bay Of Bengal - 14 July 2017

12. F18 aircraft taking off

ASSOCIATED PRESS

On the USS Nimitz, Bay Of Bengal - 17 July 2017

13. Radar on the USS Nimitz

US STATE DEPARTMENT

On the USS Nimitz, Bay Of Bengal - 14 July 2017

14. F18 aircraft landing on the USS Nimitz

ASSOCIATED PRESS

On the USS Nimitz, Bay Of Bengal - 17 July 2017

15. SOUNDBITE (English) Rear Admiral Biswajit Dasgupta, Commander of Eastern Fleet of Indian Navy:

"Well, the focus of the Exercise Malabar has always in the recent past been on all dimensions of maritime warfare, because the reason for conducting the Malabar series of exercises is to ensure a combined common response to all common maritime challenges, and therefore we have exercised in all aspects of maritime operations."

16. Wide of participating ships at sea

17. Helicopter passing overhead

18. Sea waves

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Subjects: Armed forces , Military and defense , Government and politics , Navy
Organisations: U.S. Department of State, United States government
Locations: Bengal , St Ann , Jamaica
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USA - NYC - FLEET WEEK
Title:
HD
Summary: New York City: Ships enter city for start of annual Fleet Week
Story No: nz002890
Source: Newzulu
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 25/05/2017 00:49 AM
People:
Subscription:

UNITED STATES, New York City: Ships enter New York City, New York on May 24, 2017 as Fleet Week begins. Military members of  the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. The event is a week-long celebration of the country's maritime services.The festivities of this year's 29th Fleet Week began in the morning when 3,700 U.S. and Canadian sailors docked at the New York Harbor, as part of the Parade of Ships.

NYC, NY, USA - May 24, 20171. wide shot of ships passing by

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At Sea USS Bush
Title:
HD
Summary: Life on board carrier USS Bush in Arabian Sea
Story No: 4087477
Source: ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 23/03/2017 11:34 AM
People: Donald Trump , George H. Bush , Hassan Rouhani
Subscription:

Preparatory flights began taking off on Sunday from the USS George H.W Bush aircraft carrier, a day before the vessel was due to make it through the narrow mouth of the Persian Gulf - the Strait of Hormuz - which would lead to the encounter of Iranian vessels.

The Nimitz-class, nuclear-powered carrier left her homeport of Norfolk, Virginia, on Jan. 21 - Trump's first full day in office.

Its passage through the strait closes a roughly three-month gap in which America had no aircraft carrier in the Persian Gulf.

Its overall mission is providing a base for airstrikes against the Islamic State (IS) group.

The ship's contingent of F-18 fighter jets began bombing the extremists in February as the vessel transited through the Mediterranean Sea.

Iranian forces view the American presence in the Gulf and especially the Strait of Hormuz as a provocation by itself.

At dawn on Tuesday, the Bush and its strike force entered the strait, which at its narrowest point is 33 kilometrEs (21 miles) wide, in the waters between Iran and Oman.

Iranian authorities demanded the Americans leave the area, though both the US Navy and a nearby Omani warship said the strike group was in Omani waters.

The Iranians had speedboats and other craft, several displaying the Kalashnikov-rifle emblem of the Revolutionary Guard. US helicopters circled overhead as some of the Iranians used telephoto lens and video cameras to film the carrier - while international journalists invited onboard the Bush filmed them.

But the Iranians merely stood alongside their machine guns, keeping their distance while telling the American forces to leave the area.

Hours later, the carrier exited the strait and entered the waters of the Persian Gulf, leaving the Iranians behind.

US President Donald Trump has warned that Iranian forces will be blown out of the water if they challenge American naval vessels.

Iranian hard-liners, still smarting over the nuclear detente with the West, may see a military confrontation as a way to derail moderate Irainian President Hassan Rouhani heading into the country's May presidential election.

Arabian Sea - 20 March 2017

1. Pan of US aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush flight deck

2. Pan of F-18 jets flights flying overhead

3. Mid of mast

4. Mid of flight controller waving

5. Various of F-18 jets

Strait of Hormuz - 21 March 2017

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Captain Will Pennington, Commanding Officer USS George H.W Bush:

"All of those things here in the area allow us to support the free flow of commerce as well as security in the area which ultimately leads to stability so any and all of those operations are things that we would expect to do as we prepare to ultimately support the ground effort against ISIS (Islamic State group), which I am sure will kick off for us in a couple of days."

7. Staff inside bridge

8. Various of Pennington inside bridge

9. Sign on back on seat reading (English) USS George H.W. Bush, Captain Will Pennington, Commanding Officer"

10. Tilt up of Pennington

11. SOUNDBITE (English) Captain Will Pennington, Commanding Officer USS George H.W Bush:

"So certainly as you are well aware as we have pushed that fight into Mosul, it becomes a little more challenging in the fact that it is a large urban area and the potential to affect the local populace is much higher than it would be in a much more rural area so everybody, not just the air assets supporting the ground campaign but the ground campaign has to be cognizant and respectful of that."

Arabian Sea - 20 March 2017

12. Tilt up from F-18 fighter jets on deck to fighter jet landing

13. Various of jet landing on aircraft carrier

14. SOUNDBITE (English) Captain Will Pennington, Commanding Officer USS George H.W Bush:

"We came through on a slightly different fashion as normal. Some of our escort ships arrived in advance of us to provide security in the Bab al Mandab region and then a few lagged a few days behind so that our extended coverage of that or that our coverage of that area was extended. And that same threat you mentioned could exist in the Strait of Hormuz or any other strait."

15. Various of sailor looking through binoculars

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At Sea USS Mahan
Title:
HD
Summary: Captain of US navy destroyer on Iran altercations
Story No: 4079132
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/02/2017 14:02 PM
People:
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The number of unsafe maritime interactions between the US and Iran has continued to increase over the past years, according to the captain of an American destroyer that recently fired warning shots at Iranian vessels.

The Commanding Officer of the USS Mahan, Marc Davis, said on Wednesday that in 2015 there were 23 unsafe and unprofessional interactions out of the 327 that occurred with the Iranian Navy.

In 2016, he said, the number increased to 35 out of 527, and so far in 2017 the USS Mahan has had eight interactions with the Iranians, of which the last was unsafe

In January, the USS Mahan fired warning shots after four high-speed IRGCN (Navy of the Army of the Guardians of the Islamic Revolution) patrol boats approached it at the entrance to the Persian Gulf and ignored multiple warnings.

Three shots were fired using .50-calibre machine guns onboard the destroyer.

Commander Davis said they were within their right to act, as all boats should "abide by the international rules of the sea and also the international norms and laws."

The United States Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT) deemed the Iranians' actions "unsafe and unprofessional", Davis added.

Persian Gulf - 1 February 2017

1. Various of the USS Mahan, a US Navy Destroyer

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Marc Davis, Commanding Officer of USS Mahan:

"In 2015 there were 327 interactions with the Iranian Navy or IRGCN (Navy of the Army of the Guardians of the Islamic Revolution), of those 23 were unsafe and unprofessional. 2016 I believe the number was 527 interactions, 35 I believe were unsafe and unprofessional. I believe the current number right now for 2017 is eight, about eight interactions that we have had."

3. Various of .50-calibre machine gun, like the one used to fire warning shots towards IRGCN patrol boats in January

4. Various of twin machine guns onboard the ship

5. Ammunition for the machine guns

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Marc Davis, Commanding Officer of USS Mahan:

"We tend to abide by the international rules of the sea and also the international norms and laws. And part of that is if you're closing a vessel that you're supposed to you know establish communication, let them know what your intentions are and then you come to an agreement as to how you're going to pass so that it's not unsafe and does not make people nervous. This was deemed by NAVCENT (United States Naval Forces Central Command) to be unsafe and unprofessional."

7. View from inside the ship's bridge

8. Various of sailor

9. Davis inside the ship's bridge

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Marc Davis, Commanding Officer of USS Mahan:

(++responding to question on if the January exercise was a show of power to Iran++)

"But it's not directed at any one country or any one threat or any one, or anybody in particular."

11. Gun in the middle of the ship

12. Various of missile launchers onboard ship

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Subjects: Military leadership , Military and defense , Government and politics , War and unrest , General news
Organisations: Iranian armed forces, Iran government, U.S. Navy, United States military, United States government
Locations: Iran , Middle East , Persian Gulf
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US AL Giffords (CR)
Title:
HD
Summary: Navy Prepares to Welcome USS Gabrielle Giffords
Story No: apus069139
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 27/12/2016 15:00 PM
People: Gabrielle Giffords , John McCain
Subscription:

FOR CLEAN VERSION SEE STORY NUMBER: apus069138

A naval program that has become a target for critics is preparing to commission a new vessel named after a well-known shooting survivor.

Constructed by Austal USA in Mobile, Alabama, the USS Gabrielle Giffords has completed testing in the Gulf of Mexico and is scheduled to be commissioned in mid-2017. The company handed over the $475 million ship to the Navy on Friday.

Giffords, the former Arizona congresswoman who was shot in the head during an assassination attempt in 2011, helped christen the ship in 2015. It's part of a hotly debated program that congressional critics slam as flawed and too expensive but that Navy leaders defend as a critical new step in naval warfighting.

The 421-foot-long Giffords will be the ninth in a series of high-speed vessels designed to navigate in shallow coastal regions known as littoral waters.

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., has cited the $12.4 billion spent for 26 littoral combat ships as the worst example of wasteful Pentagon spending.

The ship's name also has become a target for conservatives who see it as promoting stricter gun laws, a cause Giffords has promoted.

Some critics lampooned the ship as being gun-free, a bit of parody and fake news that was debunked on snopes.com.

The Navy said it chose to name the ship in honor of Giffords because of the perseverance she showed after the shooting

AP TELEVISION

Mobile, Alabama — 30 November 2016

1. Various of USS Gabrielle Giffords

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US Drug Bust
Title:
HD
Summary: Officials Seize 26 Tons of Cocaine in Pacific
Story No: 4071556
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 15/12/2016 20:30 PM
People:
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More than 26 tons of cocaine worth at least $715 million (US) was brought ashore in Florida on Thursday following multiple recent seizures by the U.S. Coast Guard and the Royal Canadian Navy in the eastern Pacific.

Coast Guard officers said at a news conference that the drugs brought to Fort Lauderdale came from 27 separate vessel interdictions and five bale recovery operations off Central and South America over the past three months.

Pallets containing the drugs, many wrapped in brightly-colored plastic and some bearing labels such as "white sugar" or "pork," covered the entire flight deck of the 418-foot Coast Guard Cutter Hamilton.

Vice Admiral Karl Schultz, Coast Guard commander in the Atlantic, said the seizures are part of an effort to target vessels bringing cocaine north by sea from Colombia, Peru and Bolivia before the loads reach land and are divided up into much smaller amounts for smuggling into the U.S. and Canada.

Cocaine seizures at sea result in three times more drugs intercepted than all U.S. land-based law enforcement efforts combined, Shultz added.

Authorities say about 100 suspected smugglers were detained the various interdictions.

Some are being prosecuted in South Florida, one reason the Hamilton brought the cocaine to Port Everglades.

The Hamilton, a national security cutter, also is based in Charleston, South Carolina.

In the federal fiscal year that ended Sept. 30, Schultz said similar operations at sea resulted in seizure of more than 221 tons of cocaine and numerous arrests.

The cocaine brought ashore Thursday represents 75 percent of the drugs seized so far this fiscal year, he said.

The seized cocaine typically is kept in a secure location as evidence for criminal prosecutions and is eventually burnt by the Drug Enforcement Administration, officials said.

Fort Lauderdale, Florida - 15 December 2016

1. Various of cocaine wrapped up on crates on the deck of a USCG Cutter Hamilton

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Vice Admiral Karl Schultz, U.S. Coast Guard:

"The crew of Coast Guard Cutter Hamilton, is the first national security cutter assigned on the east coast, today will be offloading 53 thousand pounds, that's the equivalent of 24 thousand kilograms of cocaine that was interdicted by multiple Coast Guard and Canadian units with an estimated wholesale value of 715 million (USD) dollars. That's probably equivalent to about two plus billion (USD) dollars on the streets of America. These impressive interdiction results are attributable to a whole of government approach to prevent illicit cargoes from reaching our shores. As well, as the hard work and dedication of this crew, our inter-agency partners and our international allies."

3. Various of flight deck of the USCG Cutter Hamilton with cocaine wrapped up sitting on crates

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Vice Admiral Karl Schultz, U.S. Coast Guard:

"Most of the drugs interdicted here today come out of the Indian ridge. That is, basically the essential sole cocaine producing region in the world here; The countries of Bolivia, Peru, and Colombia. The drugs are generally destined from what we call the source region, the source zone, into the Central American corridor. Sometimes, as far north as Mexico. And then, the drugs get ashore and they are broken essentially into smaller packages and moved essentially across the southwest border."

5. Various of United States Coast Guardsmen unloading cocaine using a crane

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Subjects: Drug-related crime , Crime , General news
Organisations: U.S. Coast Guard, United States military, United States government
Locations: Fort Lauderdale , Florida , United States
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At Sea USS Eisenhower
Title:
HD
Summary: Life onboard US aircraft carrier in Persian Gulf
Story No: 4067515
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 22/11/2016 19:41 PM
People: Dwight Eisenhower
Subscription:

Airstrikes against Islamic State group (IS) positions in Iraq and Syria launch every day from the flight deck of the American aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower.

The carrier's captain Paul Spedero said since June they've dropped nearly 1,100 bombs as part of the Operation Inherent Resolve against IS in Iraq and Syria.

The ship's 5,200 sailors arm, repair, launch and recover 7-20 Superhornet F18 fighter jets every day dropping on average 10 bombs but also reconnoitring in support of anti-IS coalition forces, Spedero said.

The crew catapults the jets from the ship at 145mph, and they use a hook and cable to rapidly catch the fighter jets on the 500-foot long carrier deck.

++CLIENTS PLEASE NOTE: THIS WAS SHOT BY AN AP CAMERA OPERATOR EMBEDDED ABOARD THE USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER++

Persian Gulf - 22 November 2016

1. Various of F18 fighter het in heat of flight deck of aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower

2. Close of pilot

3. Close of decal showing aircraft's bomb record

4. Close of decal of Zappers strike fighter squadron

5. Mid of catapult approaching fighter

6. Pan right wide of jet launching

7. Various of jet leaving flight deck with afterburners

8. Wide of jet flying overhead

9. Set-up of Jennifer Sandifer, pilot, Gunslingers of strike fighter squadron 105

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Lt. Jennifer Sandifer, pilot, Gunslingers strike fighter squadron 105:

"It's such an awesome tool that we have at our disposal and it's pretty bad-ass to fly you know going 500-600 knots and just flying as low as possible. I don't fly at 20 feet but you could, really, and just zipping around and having a great time doing it but at the same time providing a huge resource for the United States and the Navy to project their power in this part of the world is really important."

11. Mid of jet taking off

12. Tracking mid of airborne jet using afterburners

13. Mid of ground crew beckoning next jet onto the flight deck

14. Mid of F18 approaching launch site

15. Wide of F18 testing wing control, taking off

16. Mid of two F18s starting launch

17. Mid of two F18s taking off

18. Tracking mid of two F18s flying overhead

19. Wide of two F18s flying above "the island" or the aircraft carrier's control tower

20. Wide of control tower

21. Wide of Commander Jeremy Rifas, air boss of the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, watching a jet prepare to launch

22. View of jet launching from the commander's window

23. Control tower crew

24. Wide of jet launching

25. Mid of launch details drawn on window

26. Mid of crewman

27. Mid of Rifas

28. SOUNDBITE (English) Commander Jeremy Rifas, air boss, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower:

"For a catapult shot, if you think about like a Porsche 911, zero to 16 in about two and a half seconds, these aircrafts will go from 0 to 145 miles an hour in two and a half seconds. Then, to land, they're coming in, based on the aircraft, but the fighters are coming in at 145 knots as well. And then as soon as they touch down, they'll end up stopping in about three and a half to four seconds with the wire."

29. Wide of jet flying over the Persian Gulf

30. Wide of jet flying with aircraft missiles in silhouette

31. Mid of jet approaching landing

32. Close of wire used to catch the landing jets

33. Wide of jet landing using the wire

34. Mid of jet caught in wire

35. Mid of jet

36. Various of hangar with aircrafts and armaments

37. Armaments on deck

38. Wide of crew carting missiles to a jet

39. Mid of wingtip sidewinder missile

40. Mid of armaments on jet fighter wing

41. Mid of armed jet

42. Wide of control tower

43. Wide of control tower with sign reading "IKE" (nickname for USS Dwight D. Eisenhower)

44. Various of sunset on Persian Gulf

45. Wide of sunset on the bridge

46. Mid of radar screen

47. Mid of screen showing ship's bearing

48. SOUNDBITE (English) Captain Paul Spedero, commanding officer, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower:

"They will fly a relatively administrative leg into either Iraq or Syria that involves aerial refuelling, so they'll go to the tanker and get gas, and then they'll check in for their tasking. They may have the target ahead of time or they may receive the target coordinates while they were airborne and then they would employ the weapon at that time."

49. Pan right wide of sunset on carrier deck

50. Mid of sunset

51. Mid of sailor watching sunset with helicopter rotor next to him

52. Various of helicopter taking off and flying into the sunset

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People: Dwight Eisenhower
Organisations: Islamic State group
Locations: Persian Gulf , Syria , Iraq , Middle East
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NORTH VIETNAM US SHELLING
Title:
SD
Summary: SYND 20/5/72 US WARSHIP SHELLS COAST OF N.VIETNAM
Story No: z009165
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 19/05/1972 00:00 AM
People:
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A United States navy warship, the USS Mullinnix, shells communist targets off the coast of North Vietnam.

1. aerial shot of Mullinnix

2. ms helicopter hovering over deck

3. vs guns firing

4. ws coast

5. ms ranges to targets being worked out by crew

6. vs ships guns firing

Film: Pos - Sound: MAG SOF - Colour - NYFilm: c0026257 - LN Number: LN33075 - Available in HD

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MEDITERRANEAN US NAVY LEBANON
Title:
SD
Summary: SYND 9 5 73 US NAVY SIXTH FLEET WITHIN EASY REACH OF LEBANON
Story No: z026137
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/05/1973 00:00 AM
People:
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File film of the United States Navy's sixth fleet currently stationed in the Mediterranean within easy reach of Lebanon.

1. ws aircraft carrier

2. vs aircraft carrier USS Enterprise

3. ws destroyer

4. ms warps between two ships

5. ms aircraft carrier deck

6. ms plane takes off

7. ms another plane

8. ms planes on deck

9. ms planes land

10. ms planes on deck

11. vs missiles coming out of launchers

12. ws destroyer

Film: Pos - Sound: Mute - B&W - NYFilm: a0065096 - LN Number: LN42825 - Available in HD

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Organisations: U.S. Navy
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PHILIPPINES US CARRIER REPAIRS
Title:
SD
Summary: LIB 17/12/73 US AIRCRAFT CARRIER IN DOCKS FOR REPAIRS
Story No: z014731
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 17/12/1973 00:00 AM
People:
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The United States Navy aircraft carrier, USS Kitty Hawk, in Subic Bay for repairs.

1. vs of the carrier in port

2. vs of a navy officer talking to press in his office; also showing plans for repairs

3. vs of the interior of the ship including fire damage photos

4. vs of the flight deck and planes

Film: Rev - Sound: Mute - Colour - NYFilm: No - LN Number: LN48989 - Available in HD

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US NIMITZ AIRCRAFT CARRIER
Title:
SD
Summary: SYND 30 4 75 US NAVY BIGGEST AIRCRAFT CARRIER "NIMITZ"
Story No: z019832
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 30/04/1975 00:00 AM
People:
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Footage of the new United States Navy supercarrier Nimitz.

1. aerial shots of Nimitz at sea

Film: Pos - Sound: Mute - Colour - NYFilm: c0050642 - LN Number: LN62436 - Available in HD

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Organisations: U.S. Navy
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US FORD ANNIVERSARY NAVY
Title:
SD
Summary: SYND 10 10 75 FORD AT CEREMONY ANNIVERSARY OF 200th YEAR OF US NAVY
Story No: z021459
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/10/1975 00:00 AM
People: Gerald Ford
Subscription:

United States President Gerald Ford attends celebrations for the two hundreth anniversary of the formation of the US Navy.

1. ms of Ford walking to the review stand

2. vs of Ford taking the salute and inspecting a guard of honour

3. ms of Ford being presented with a wooden momento and a flag

Film: Pos - Sound: Mag SOF - Colour - NYFilm: No - LN Number: LN66715 - Available in HD

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People: Gerald Ford
Organisations: U.S. Navy
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USA CARRIER EISENHOWER
Title:
SD
Summary: UPITN 22 10 77 NUCLEAR POWERED EISHENHOWER AIRCRAFT CARRIER SEA TRIALS
Story No: z034711
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 22/10/1977 00:00 AM
People: Dwight Eisenhower
Subscription:

The Navy's newest nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, Dwight D. Eisenhower, was commissioned on October 18th, at Pier 12, Naval Station in Norfolk, Virginia, following sea trials. Named after the late President, Eisenhower, the ship is the third US nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and the second in the Nimitz class. Eisenhower and her sister ship Nimitz share the distinction of being the largest naval vessels ever built. The Eisenhower has an overall length of 1,092 feet, and extreme breadth of 252, and a flight deck covering four and a half acres. The ship has been undergoing sea trials since July 1977. After commissioning, Eisenhower's schedule calls for a brief at-sea period for flight deck certification, damage control training during a cruise to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and post-shakedown availability at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard before deployment in late 1978 as part of the Atlantic Fleet.

1. vs Eisenhower underway at sea

2. ls plane taking off from deck of Eisenhower

Film: Rev - Sound: Mute - Colour - NYFilm: F01584 - LN Number: LN87456 - Available in HD

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USA TOMAHAWK MISSILE
Title:
SD
Summary: SYND 23 6 78 US NAVY'S TOMAHAWK CRUISE MISSILE LAUNCHING
Story No: z037764
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 23/06/1978 00:00 AM
People:
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In California, the United States Navy launches its Tomahawk cruise missile from naval aircraft.

1. ls missile travelling over range

2. ws missile travelling over range

3. ws airstrip taken from camera underneath plane

4. ws slow motion firing of dummy warhead

5. ls canisters falling to ground

Film: Rev - Sound: Mute - Colour - NYFilm: c0063212 - LN Number: LN94246 - Available in HD

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Keywords: Military
Organisations: U.S. Navy, United States military, United States government
Locations: United States , North America
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ITALY US NAVY
Title:
SD
Summary: UPITN 5/1/80 USS FORRESTAL AND USS NIMITZ
Story No: z043641
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 05/01/1980 00:00 AM
People:
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The United States Navy aircraft carriers Forrestal and Nimitz in port in Naples.

1. ws Naples seafront with pan to ships out to sea

2. vs from a moving landing craft of the crew and the ship

3. ms of a helicopter over head with tilt down to ship

4. ms of the stern of the Forrestal as the landing craft ties up

5. ms with pull out of McDonnell Douglas Phantom jets on deck

6. vs of check being made on Grumman A-6 Intruders

7. ws of the superstructure of the ship with tilt down to jets on deck

8. vs of crew working on Phantoms

9. ws of a Sikorsky SH-3 Sea King taking off from deck with pull out to show ws Naples

10. ms and pan of aircraft on deck

11. vs of aircraft on deck

12. ms of Nimitz in distance

Film: Rev - Sound: Mag Trk - Colour - NYFilm: No - LN Number: LN17227 - Available in HD

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Organisations: U.S. Navy, United States military, United States government
Locations: Napoli , Italy
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S.Africa - U.S.Navy Ships Goodwill Visit
Title:
SD
Summary: S.Africa - U.S.Navy Ships Goodwill Visit
Story No: w073655
Source: WTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/11/1994 05:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

A 21-gun salute welcomed two U.S. Navy ships to South Africa on

Tuesday (8/11), the first such visit in 27 years. The guided

missile carrier USS Gettysburg and the frigate USS Halyburton,

with a combined crew of more than 600, began a seven-day goodwill

visit at the Simonstown naval base near Cape Town.

SHOWS: CAPETOWN, SOUTH AFRICA 8/11

0.00 pullout from u.s. warship to south african naval officers and

guns on shore

0.10 side shot of u.s. warship

0.14 cu warship

0.18 s. african naval honour guard fire salute

0.24 u.s. warship and pullout to band

0.32 bandsman and ship

0.35 sailor tying up ship

0.38 flags

0.42 pullout from one ship to another

0.50 officers saluting and shaking hands

0.56 captain peter smith, commanding officer of the uss

gettysburg, sot "the united states strongly supports the

goals and efforts of the new government and this visit is one

way to express that support"

1.04 ws of presser on bridge of uss gettysburg

1.08 VISION ENDS...

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GUIDED MISSILES
Title:
SD
Summary: GUIDED MISSILES
Story No: BM58836
Source: British Movietone
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 13/04/1953 00:00 AM
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The American Navy has developed a new guided jet-propelled missile with a powerful war-head. Sent off under its own power by remote control, the "Regulus" (as it's called) is presently controlled in the air by a pilot plane.

Disclaimer: British Movietone is an historical collection. Any views and expressions within either the video or metadata of the collection are reproduced for historical accuracy and do not represent the opinions or editorial policies of the Associated Press.

SHOTLIST:

Cut story - KS. MS missile being uncovered. Shots of the missile taking off & in flight controlled by aircraft. Various shots of take-offs from land & from vessels. Also landing aided by parachute.

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MID ATLANTIC RESCUE
Title:
SD
Summary: MID ATLANTIC RESCUE
Story No: BM59840
Source: British Movietone
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 01/10/1953 00:00 AM
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The 6,000 ton Liberian freighter "Greenville" was in a sinking condition, when the "Ile de France" came to her rescue. In New York the rescued and rescuers were filmed and interviewed.

Disclaimer: British Movietone is an historical collection. Any views and expressions within either the video or metadata of the collection are reproduced for historical accuracy and do not represent the opinions or editorial policies of the Associated Press.

SHOTLIST:

Cut story - KS. Shot of "Greenville" wallowing in heavy seas. Shots of same. Shots of "Ile de France" coming alongside "Greenville" (taken from "Ile de France"). Crew of "Greenville" down rope ladder and jumping in sea. Men swimming in rough sea. Lifeboat with men in and picking up another in heavy seas (all preceding is 16mm blown up). New York - Crew of the "Ile de France" ashore. Officer thanks French captain. French captain says few words.

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US NAVAL DISASTER
Title:
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Summary: US NAVAL DISASTER
Story No: BM61108
Source: British Movietone
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 31/05/1954 00:00 AM
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The worst disaster of American peace-time Naval history, when an explosion rocked the aircraft-carrier Bennington. Ninety-one seamen lost their lives and over 200 were injured in the resulting fire.

Disclaimer: British Movietone is an historical collection. Any views and expressions within either the video or metadata of the collection are reproduced for historical accuracy and do not represent the opinions or editorial policies of the Associated Press.

SHOTLIST:

Cut story - KS. Aerial of Carrier. A/C Bennington steaming into port. A/C on quay (Quonset Point Rhode Island). Various shots of crew covered in soot. Men lowering stretchers from ship. Many injured taken to awaiting ambulances. Injured and soot covered crew landing. Ninety odd men were killed and many injured in this disaster.

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GUIDED MISSILES
Title:
SD
Summary: GUIDED MISSILES
Story No: BM62456
Source: British Movietone
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 13/12/1954 00:00 AM
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The demonstration of America's latest guided missiles, known as the "Terrier" shows it is to be a relentless hunter with destruction in its jaws.

Disclaimer: British Movietone is an historical collection. Any views and expressions within either the video or metadata of the collection are reproduced for historical accuracy and do not represent the opinions or editorial policies of the Associated Press.

SHOTLIST:

CU of a rocket being launched from the ground. Rocket being launched from a ship. The "Terrier" hitting the target. Another shot of the "Terrier" hitting the plane from a different angle. CU of the navy "Sparrow" with Terriers underneath its wing. GV of a Terrier being launched. Terrier on its way to the target. Plane exploding.

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U S S SARATOGA - NO SOUND
Title:
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Summary: U S S SARATOGA - NO SOUND
Story No: BM67220
Source: British Movietone
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 06/06/1955 00:00 AM
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Disclaimer: British Movietone is an historical collection. Any views and expressions within either the video or metadata of the collection are reproduced for historical accuracy and do not represent the opinions or editorial policies of the Associated Press.

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Pushed into midstream by tugboats the U.S.S. Saratoga leaves New York City's Brooklyn Navy Yard just three years and five months after laying of her keel- but her towering masts must be dipped so that she may clear the Brooklyn Bridge, the city's oldest and lowest span over the East River- The mighest warship afloat, displacing 60,000 tons, the Saratoga has grey weather for her initial move- but her crew of 3,000 officers and men are in festive mood- for after a short anchorage in Cravesend Bay, near Coney Island, she will start her breakdown cruise after which shelltake her place in the world's greatest navy.

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CLEAR THE BRIDGE - LATE 1950'S -  COLOUR  - CINEMASCOPE
Title:
SD
Summary: CLEAR THE BRIDGE - LATE 1950'S - COLOUR - CINEMASCOPE
Story No: BM86-71
Source: British Movietone
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 31/12/1955 00:00 AM
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Disclaimer: British Movietone is an historical collection. Any views and expressions within either the video or metadata of the collection are reproduced for historical accuracy and do not represent the opinions or editorial policies of the Associated Press.

SHOTLIST:

Film about US Navy Submarines - shots inside & out, on surface and submerged, scenes featuring crew, torpedoes etc.Made with the cooperation of the Department of Defense and the US Navy.Shots of Submarine at sea on surface. Then diving POV shot. Line of subs in dock. Torpedo loaded and into tube. GV Balao SS 285 submarine moving out of port. AV Submarine at sea. Good shots of Submarine at sea on surface. Submarines on exercise. Command goes out "clear the bridge". Interiors preparing to dive and diving. AV Submarine dives. POV camera on exterior as submarine dives. Shots of submarine underwater. Interiors sailors to action stations. Periscope up. Torpedo fired. Underwater torpedo. AV Torpedo travelling. Submarine surfacing. Interiors and POV shots. AV's Submarine at sea. Submarine returns to port. Atomic Seawolf submarine launched.

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