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Ukraine Tension 3
Title:
HD
Summary: Pro-Russian demonstrators push past police to hold rally near parliament ahead of session
Story No: 933229
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/27/2014 12:45 PM
People: Oleksandr Turchinov
Subscription:

Hundreds of pro-Russian demonstrators pushed past police barricades on Thursday morning ahead of a scheduled session in the Crimean parliament.

Demonstrators in the regional capital of Simferopol demanded that authorities protect the rights of Crimean Russians and called for the region to join Russia.

"We have to thank Russia because Russia is helping us to stabilise the situation," said Oleg Slusarenko, a Cossack leader from Crimea.

The protests in Crimea pose an immediate challenge to Ukraine's new authorities as they seek to set up an interim government for the country, whose population is divided in loyalties between Russia and the West.

"I think that if Kiev wants to see Crimea as a part of Ukraine they will have to do a lot to persuade the Crimean people," said on Pro-Russian demonstrator Andrey Maslov.

"I don't know which politicians we can ask for who could find a comprise between the west and east of Ukraine," he added.

Ukraine's acting president Oleksandr Turchynov said that unidentified people with automatic weapons, explosives and grenades have taken over the parliament had other governmental buildings in Crimea.

He said he had ordered the military to use all methods necessary to protect the citizens, punish the criminals, and to free the buildings.

Turchynov has condemned the takeover of the buildings in Crimea as a "crime against the government of Ukraine."

In a clear warning to Ukraine, Russia on Wednesday ordered massive military exercises involving most of the military units in western Russia.

On Thursday, as part of the exercises, 90 fighter jets were put on combat alert and were patrolling the border with Ukraine, Russian news agencies quoted the Defence Ministry as saying.

The military also announced measures to tighten security at the headquarters of Russia's Black Sea Fleet on the Crimean peninsula.

AP TELEVISION

1. Wide of Crimean Parliament in Simferopol with dozens of pro-Russian demonstrators gathered outside and police blocking access

2. Mid of Crimean Parliament with dozens of pro-Russian protesters

3. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Oleg Slusarenko, Cossack leader from Crimea:

"We are staying here. We are all the same common people as you are, we have absolutely the same rights as you, we just consider that we are Russian compatriots and here we have the Russian flag. We have to thank Russia because Russia is helping us to stabilise the situation."

4. Zoom in to Russian flags

5. Wide of pro-Russian demonstrators after they broke through police line surrounding parliament, UPSOUND, chanting: (Russian) "Russia!"

6. Close of banner

7. Mid of Pro Russian demonstrator holding banner

8. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Andrey Maslov, pro-Russian demonstrator:

"I think that if Kiev wants to see Crimea as a part of Ukraine they will have to do a lot to persuade the Crimean people, but Kiev's new government cannot come here. I don't know which politicians we can ask for who could find a comprise between the west and east of Ukraine."

9. Close of pro-Russian demonstrator

10. Close of pro-Russian demonstrator

11. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Valentina (only first name given), pro-Russian demonstrator:

"These are very tense times but we are all here together, the Crimean people, and we all want peace and we want to be together with Russia."

12. Wide of pro-Russian crowd

13. Close of pro-Russian ribbon being tied on Russian flag

14. Close of police officers outside of Crimean Parliament

15. Wide of police outside of Crimean Parliament

16. Close of entrance to Crimean Parliament obscured by barricades

17. Mid of a deputy entering parliament behind barricades

18. Wide of police officer walking in front of barricades

19. Wide of Crimean Parliament Building

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Ukraine Tension 4
Title:
HD
Summary: Pro-Russian protesters demand deputies support autonomy, officer comments on APCs
Story No: 933253
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/27/2014 03:53 PM
People:
Subscription:

Pro-Russian protesters descended on the Crimean Parliament in the regional capital Simferopol on Thursday.

The protesters are calling for autonomy from Ukraine, deepening the crisis for the new Ukrainian government even as it was being formed.

Protesters broke through a police cordon surrounding the Crimean Parliament, which is currently occupied by unidentified gunmen who entered the building on Thursday.

Seven armoured personnel carriers (APCs) were also seen in Crimea on Thursday, according to a local Ukrainian reporter.

The region has seen tense protests between nationalists and pro-Russian factions this week as lawmakers in the capital Kiev try to form a new government.

The personnel carriers were parked near the village of Ukromnoye, two kilometres (over a mile) from Simferopol airport and about 10 kilometres (6 miles) from the city of Simferopol, the regional capital.

The APCs had no markings to distinguish whether they were Ukrainian or Russian.

But an unidentified Ukrainian military officer, when asked whether the APC's were Ukrainian or Russian answered: "No, they are not Ukrainian ones".

The military vehicles were seen on the same day that Russia sent fighter jets to patrol its border with Ukraine and announced measures to tighten security at the headquarters of its Black Sea Fleet on the Crimean peninsula.

AP TELEVISION

Simferopol

1. Wide pan of pro-Russia protesters marching near Crimean Parliament with giant Russian flag chanting: (Russian) "Russia"

2. Wide of people gathered outside Crimean parliament

3. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Yuri Alexeyev, Pro-Russia Protester:

"Sooner or later it had to happen, the whole population of Crimea demanded this. One way or another we depend on the solution that this Parliament will accept (autonomy). If we follow all the laws then we have to obey this legislative authority."

4. Close of banner reading (Russian) "Crimea"

5. Mid of protesters behind banner

6. Various of protesters outside Crimean Parliament

7. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Roman (surname not given), Pro-Russia Protester:

"At this moment we expect the deputies will accept the constitution of 1992, according to which Crimea has great authority, and we want the Crimean Parliament to reject this current Ukrainian government in Kiev."

7. Close of flag and symbol of Sevastopol sailors

8. Mid of former sailors from Sevastopol standing in front of Crimean Parliament

Ukromnoye (10 kilometers or 6 miles from Simferopol)

9. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Name not given, Lieutenant Colonel of the Ukrainian Armed Forces:

"There is a press centre here, we are not authorised to answer questions�"

Reporter question: "What press centre?"

Lieutenant Colonel: "Of the navy�"

Reporter question: "Of Ukraine?"

Lieutenant Colonel: "Yes. Or of the defence ministry."

Reporter question:"Can you, at least, tell us if the APCs are Russian or Ukrainian?"

Lieutenant Colonel: "No, they are not Ukrainian ones."

Reporter question:: "Where are they from? Where are they based?"

Lieutenant Colonel: "They are not telling us."

Reporter question:: "Are they from somewhere nearby?"

Lieutenant Colonel: "I have no idea. They are not providing any information."

Simferopol

10. Various of pro-Russian protesters standing on tank monument and waving Russian and Crimean flags

11. Mid of pro-Russian protesters on top of monument holding signs saying (Russian) "Crimea for peace" and "Crimea for a referendum"

12. Close of masked protester behind sign

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Ukraine Tension 2
Title:
HD
Summary: Pro-Russian activists clash with Crimean Tatars outside local parliament building
Story No: 933046
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/26/2014 11:33 AM
People: Viktor Yanukovych
Subscription:

Police struggled to keep apart rival groups holding competing rallies on Wednesday in Ukraine's largely pro-Russian Crimea region.

The regional parliament in the Crimean city of Simferopol was to hold a crisis session on the turmoil that has gripped the country.

More than 10-thousand Muslim Crimean Tatars rallied in support of Ukraine's interim leaders, and chanted "Ukraine is not Russia" and "god is great".

Meanwhile pro-Russian demonstrators gathered at a smaller rally nearby and called for stronger ties with Russia.

Police and leaders from both sides were struggling to keep the two groups apart, as protesters shouted and punched each other in ongoing scuffles.

The tensions in Crimea - a peninsula jutting into the Black Sea that is a strategically critical region because it is home to Russia's Black Sea Fleet - highlight the divisions that run through Ukraine after months of protests that ultimately forced the pro-Russian President Viktor Yanukovych to flee the capital, Kiev.

It also underscores fears that the country's mainly Russian-speaking east will not recognise the legitimacy of the interim authorities.

Crimean Tatars took an active part in the protest movement against Yanukovych and harbour deep resentment against the Kremlin, having been deported en masse on the orders of Soviet dictator Josef Stalin during the World War II.

Zaif Sulayev, a supporter of Ukraine's interim government, told the Associated Press that fellow Crimean Tatars would "not let anyone make a decision about Crimea's status without our consent."

The turmoil in Ukraine has raised concern that the country is facing a split between Russian-speaking regions, which include Yanukovych's home area in the east, and the Ukrainian-speaking west.

"Crimea has to be a part of Russia," said Alexander, one pro-Russian activist on Wednesday.

"It must always be a part of Russia. We have to restore justice," he added.

"I am Crimean, I am watching what is happening in western Ukraine and I don't want my children, my sons to live on their knees," said Valentina Glipova, another pro-Moscow demonstrator.

"I don't want people standing over me with weapons and I don't want to be forced to speak Ukrainian."

++AUDIO QUALITY AS INCOMING++

AP TELEVISION

1. Wide of Crimean Tatars, supporters of Ukraine's interim government, pushing against pro-Russian demonstrators outside local parliament building

2. Mid of Sergei Aksenov, Leader of pro-Russian party in Crimea, in crowd shouting (Russian) "Get back, get back!"

3. Close of Crimean Tatar as he chants (Ukrainian) "Bandits out!"

4. Wide of Crimean Tatar outside local parliament holding Crimean Tatar flags (blue with yellow symbol)

5. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Zaif Sulayev, Crimean Tatar and supporter of Ukraine's interim government:

"Crimean Tartars are from here and were literally deported on 18 May 1944, and we will not let anyone make a decision about Crimea's status without our consent."

6. Mid of Crimean Tatars putting Crimean Tatar blue ribbons on arms

7. Wide of Crimean Tatars outside local parliament chanting

8. Various of Crimean Tatar protester shouting at crowd

9. Wide of Aksenov with pro-Russian activists

10. Wide of demonstrators at rally

11. Mid of pro-Russian demonstrators standing in a line outside parliament building

12. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Alexander, no last name given, pro-Russian activist:

"Crimea has to be a part of Russia. It must always be a part of Russia. We have to restore justice."

13. Close of pro-Russian ribbons (orange and black) being held by activist

14. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Valentina Glipova, pro-Russian activist:

"I hope that in the end Russians won't leave us here. I am Crimean, I am watching what is happening in western Ukraine and I don't want my children, my sons to live on their knees. I don't want people standing over me with weapons and I don't want to be forced to speak Ukrainian."

15. Various of activists putting on pro-Russian ribbons

16. Close of police officer standing outside local parliament building

17. Wide low angle of police outside of local parliament building

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Ukraine Protest
Title:
SD
Summary: Hundreds rally outside parliament to protest new business tax
Story No: 665539
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 11/18/2010 10:04 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide of protest near parliament

2. Mid of protesters

3. Mid of woman blowing on plastic horn

4. Wide of police in front of protesters

5. SOUNDBITE: (Ukrainian) Lebedeva Irina, businesswoman from Irpen, Kiev region:

"We're here against the Internal Revenue Code. It isn't fair. We don't agree with the new version. The authorities want to destroy small and middle-sized businesses and to take us out of markets and trading."

6. Mid of protesters shouting: (Ukrainian) "Authorities out"

7. Protesters banging cymbals and shouting: (Ukrainian) "Shame"

8. Wide of protest

9. Cutaway of flags and banners

10. SOUNDBITE: (Ukrainian) Kravchuk Lidia, businesswoman from Irpen, Kiev region:

"We agree to pay taxes but we want taxes for the rich and rich authorities don't want to pay taxes. They want us to do this, this is not fair. It seems that all lawmakers are liars. And the president is a liar, because he promised to drop taxes for five years."

11. Various of protest

12. Wide of parliament building

STORYLINE:

Hundreds demonstrated outside Ukraine's parliament on Thursday to protest a draft tax law that they say favours big business and will choke small and medium-size firms.

The government of President Viktor Yanukovych says the new tax code being discussed in parliament will streamline the complicated Soviet-era tax system, and increase budget revenues to aid the recovery from the severe economic downturn.

But businesspeople say it will deprive small enterprises of desperately needed tax breaks.

"We agree to pay taxes but we want tax for the rich," said Kravchuk Lidia, a businesswoman from Irpen in the Kiev region.

"The president is a liar, because he promised to drop taxes for five years," she added.

Protests against tax reforms began in Ukraine on Tuesday.

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Ukraine Protest 5
Title:
HD
Summary: Opposition leaders urge supporters to keep up anti-goverment protest
Story No: 920280
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 11/30/2013 04:25 PM
People: Viktor Yanukovych
Subscription:

Leaders of the main opposition parties in Ukraine on Saturday night called for President Viktor Yanukovych's resignation.

Vitali Klitschko, leader of the Udar party and world boxing champion, and Arseniy Yatsenyuk, leader of the All-Ukrainian Union "Fatherland" (Batkivshchyna) party, addressed thousands of protesters gathered in a central Kiev square.

About 10-thousand anti-government demonstrators, angry about Ukraine's refusal to sign a pro-European Union agreement, converged on the square outside St. Michael's Golden-Domed Monastery.

Protesters had early been driven into the square to take shelter after a pre-dawn clash with police.

"Today Yanukovych does not have support, nobody believes him, and he has no friends either in Russia or in Europe. He is left alone," Klitschko told protesters.

"On his hands is the blood of our children, our students, our youth," Yatsenyuk said.

"He is guilty and because of that Viktor Yanukovych will be ousted."

The two opposition leaders' call encapsulated the two issues agitating the demonstrators, Yanukovych's refusal to sign an association agreement with the European Union and the violent dispersal of protests denouncing that decision.

Earlier on Saturday, officers in riot gear moved against several hundred protesters at Independence Square in the city centre, beating some with truncheons.

Some protesters then went to the monastery about 500 metres (1,640 feet) away to take shelter in its cathedral.

In the early morning action, police took 35 demonstrators into custody.

AP TELEVISION

++NIGHT SHOTS++

1. Wide of protesters at rally chanting (Ukrainian) "Together we are united"

2. Vitali Klitschko, Leader of Ukrainian Democratic Alliance for Reform (Udar) Party addressing protesters

3. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Vitali Klitschko, Leader of Ukrainian Democratic Alliance for Reform (Udar) Party:

"We understand that today Yanukovych does not have support, nobody believes him, and he has no friends either in Russia or in Europe. He is left alone."

4. Mid of people chanting "Klitschko"

5. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Arseniy Yatsenyuk, leader of All-Ukrainian Union "Fatherland" (Batkivshchyna) party:

"Tonight Yanukovych has crossed the line, on his hands is the blood of our children, our students, our youth. He is guilty for that and has to be punished. He is guilty and because of that Viktor Yanukovych will be ousted."

6. Mid of people chanting

7. Various of protesters holding banners

8. Wide of protest rally

9. Various of police standing behind barricades at Freedom square

10. Mid of protesters holding Ukrainian flags

11. Close of flag

12. Wide of square

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Subjects: Protests and demonstrations , Political and civil unrest , General news , Government and politics
People: Viktor Yanukovych
Organisations: Ukraine government, European Union
Locations: Kyiv , Kyiv City , Ukraine
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Ukraine Protest
Title:
HD
Summary: Morning scenes, protesters speculate on who might make best president
Story No: 933025
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/26/2014 08:28 AM
People: Viktor Yanukovych , Yulia Tymoshenko , Vitali Klitschko , Oleksandr Turchinov
Subscription:

Protesters in Kiev speculated on Wednesday about who might make the best president as Ukraine remained in a state of uncertainty following days of rapid political developments.

Legislators from the parliament in Kiev delayed the formation of a new government until Thursday, reflecting the political tensions and economic challenges the country faces after Viktor Yanukovych fled the capital and went into hiding.

Ukraine's new authorities have been navigating tricky political waters, launching a new presidential campaign, working on a new government and trying to seek immediate financial help from the West.

Yet protests in the country's pro-Russian region of Crimea and the shooting of a top aide to Yanukovych have raised fears of divisions and retaliation.

The campaign for Ukraine's early May 25 presidential election began on Tuesday, with Yanukovych's archrival - former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko - widely seen as a top contender for the post.

Opposition leader Vitali Klitschko, the former heavyweight boxing champion, has announced his candidacy.

But Tymoshenko, who was freed on Saturday after spending 2 � years in prison on charges that many in the West called politically tainted, has not yet declared whether she will run.

Parliament speaker Oleksandr Turchinov, who was named Ukraine's interim leader, is now nominally in charge of this strategic country of 46 million, whose loyalties are sharply torn between Europe and Russia.

While Kiev and western Ukraine have risen up against Yanukovych, he remains popular in the Russian-speaking eastern and southern regions, where economic and cultural ties with Russia are strong.

Law enforcement agencies have issued an arrest warrant for Yanukovych over the killing of 82 people, mainly protesters, last week in the bloodiest violence in Ukraine's post-Soviet history.

The president fled after signing a deal Friday with opposition leaders to end months of violent clashes between protesters and police.

AP TELEVISION

1. Wide of people Independence Square

2. Wide of people standing in front of large crucifix

3. Mid of women crossing themselves as they stand in front of crucifix

4. Mid of woman kissing icon

5. Wide of people looking at noticeboard with photographs of those who died during clashes

6. Mid of photographs of those who died during clashes

7. SOUNDBITE: (Ukrainian) Mykola Nesterchuk, protest supporter from the Western Ukraine:

"Considering that presidential powers are not the same anymore and in order to unite East and West, Klitschko may be the person who will do everything for Ukraine to stay a united, independent state."

8. Wide of people looking at photographs of those who died during clashes

9. Wide of piles of flowers next to brick barricade

10. Various of protesters warming up by fire near Parliament building

11. SOUNDBITE: (Ukrainian) Yuri Horobets, protester from the Eastern Ukraine:

"I think it will be Yulia Volodymyrivna (Tymoshenko) as she has a lot of electoral support. This is how it seems to be, whether I want it or not."

12. Wide of flowers placed along the street on Independence Square

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Ukraine Protest 4
Title:
HD
Summary: Russian opposition leader on Kiev protests, Khodorkovsky release
Story No: 923698
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 12/22/2013 04:08 PM
People: Ilya Yashin , Mikhail Khodorkovsky , Vladimir Putin
Subscription:

A prominent activist from Moscow on Sunday said the mass protests in Ukraine's capital were a source of inspiration for Russia's opposition.

Ilya Yashin was speaking in Kiev, after joining the tens of thousands of anti-government protesters gathered in Independence Square.

"This event, this phenomenon, will help the development of the protest movement in Russia just like in 2004 with the Orange Revolution, and I am really glad to have experienced a bit of this enthusiasm," the Russian opposition leader said.

"I will take it to Moscow, as this is something we lack," he added.

Tens of thousands of demonstrators who favour closer ties between their country and the EU gathered on Kiev's Independence Square on Sunday afternoon as opposition leaders spoke to the crowds.

Ukrainian President, Viktor Yanukovich has faced nearly a month of angry protests since his abrupt decision to shelve a political and trade agreement with the EU in favour of closer ties with Russia.

The rallies have grown larger, swelling to hundreds of thousands, after riot police violently broke up the first small protests, injuring dozens.

Yashin also spoke of the release of jailed businessman Mikhail Khodorkovsky.

Yashin said most were surprised by the release, as they had expected Khodorkovsky to be in jail as long as Russian President Vladimir Putin was in the Kremlin.

Khodorkovsky walked free on Friday after being imprisoned for a decade for tax evasion and money-laundering.

The case was widely criticised in many Western countries as a political revenge, for Khodorkovsky had challenged Putin's dominance by funding opposition parties.

He was also believed to have personal political ambitions.

AP TELEVISION

1. Wide overhead view of protesters in Kiev's Independence Square

2. Medium overhead view of Independence Square

3. Mid of Russian opposition leader Ilya Yashin at news conference

4. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Ilya Yashin, Russian opposition leader

"This event will definitely be a strong source of inspiration for the European development of Ukraine. This event, this phenomenon, will help the development of the protest movement in Russia just like in 2004 with the Orange Revolution, and I am really glad to have experienced a bit of this enthusiasm. I will take it to Moscow, as this is something we lack."

5. Demonstrators on Independence Square

6. Overhead view of Ukrainian and opposition flags flying from structure on Independence Square

7. Wide overhead view of Independence Square

8. Side view of Yashin during news conference

9. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Ilya Yashin, Russian opposition leader ++leaving news conference at end of soundbite++

"The release of (pardoned former oil tycoon Mikhail) Khodorkovsky was a real surprise to almost everyone. Even the possibility of him being freed was known only to a very limited number of people in his family, those closest to him - not even his lawyers. But it is great news first of all, for the Khodorkovsky family, as well the person (Khodorkovsky himself) who has been in jail for more than 10 years. Absolutely everyone had the impression that he would stay in jail for as long as Putin was in the Kremlin."

10. Close up of Ukrainian flag flying in Independence Square

11. Mid overhead view of tents in Independence Square

12. Wide overhead view of protest in Independence Square

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Ukraine Protest
Title:
HD
Summary: Opposition ready to vacate seized building if conditions met
Story No: 931413
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/15/2014 12:42 PM
People: Viktor Yanukovych
Subscription:

A top Ukrainian opposition leader on Saturday said that protesters were ready to vacate the Kiev City Hall they have occupied for nearly three months, if the government dropped all charges against the demonstrators.

Oleh Tyahnybok, head of the nationalist Svoboda party, said a final decision would have to be approved by demonstrators on Kiev's Independence Square, known as the Maidan.

But outside the City Hall, many protesters were determined to keep up the protests in a bid to force President Viktor Yanukovych to resign.

This week, the last of the 234 protesters were released from jail as part of an amnesty.

The amnesty law also calls for the opposition to vacate seized government buildings in Kiev and elsewhere in Ukraine.

The protests erupted in November after President Viktor Yanukovych abandoned a long-anticipated political and economic treaty with the European Union and sought a bailout loan from Russia.

After police violently dispersed several rallies, the protests turned into a broader movement for human rights and against corruption.

Yanukovych still remains popular in the Russian-speaking east and south of the country, where cultural and economic ties with Russia are strong.

1. Riot police arriving to take up positions

2. Various of radical opposition protesters by barricade watching riot police in distance

3. Various of riot police taking up positions

4. Various of opposition supporters with Ukrainian flag standing on barricade

5. Opposition supporters at barricade

6. Metal shields at barricades with riot police in background

7. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Sergei, family name not given, radical opposition protester:

"We will free the street only when our demands will be fully fulfilled, our brothers who have been arrested have to be not only freed but also the law on amnesty has to be applied. Not like the government sees it, but as the opposition demands. We will stand until victory. We are many more than 45 (m) million. Long Live Ukraine!"

8. Close-up of protester's rounders bat

9. Mid of radical opposition protesters talking

10. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Volodymir, family name not given, radical opposition protester:

"If all the demands will be fulfilled and the criminal cases will be lifted against those who they have arrested and they (government) will not try to revoke its decisions, we are ready to free only the part of Grushevsky street (which leads to the government buildings)."

11. Various of barricades

12. Wide interior of Kiev City Hall

13. Various of protester packing up

14. Protesters carrying blankets down the stairs

15. Various of Oleh Tyahnybok, leader of the opposition Svoboda Party, meeting supporters

16. Opposition supporters seated at table, banner reading (Ukrainian) "Committee of self-governance of Kiev"

17. SOUDBITE (Ukrainian) Oleh Tyahnybok, leader of nationalist Svoboda Party:

"We do not have a final decision yet. If we have guarantees that right after this step, the government will close all the criminal cases against participants of the protest movements, with the consent of the Maidan, we are ready to take this step."

18. Man carrying blankets outside City Hall

19. Close-up of pile of blankets

20. Tents of protesters outside City Hall

21. Wide exterior of City Hall

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Ukraine Protest
Title:
HD
Summary: Protesters reject amnesty vote requiring them to vacate square and occupied buildings
Story No: 928873
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/30/2014 07:38 AM
People: Viktor Yanukovych
Subscription:

Protesters in Kiev's Independence Square remained defiant on Thursday after a law passed in the Ukrainian Parliament the day before offered amnesty to those arrested in two months of protests, if occupied public buildings are vacated.

"These laws are a lie and people don't trust them," said Oleh, a protester from Kiev.

"People were defending their constitutional rights and we actually don't understand what we need an amnesty," he added.

The measure was put forward by a lawmaker from the party of President Viktor Yanukovych, who is looking for a way to end the protests, which are calling for his resignation.

The move was quickly greeted with contempt by the opposition.

"They voted for these laws only in their own interests," said Andre, a protester from Western Ukraine.

The measure was a softer version of an earlier proposal to offer an amnesty only if all protesters dispersed.

But the opposition regard the arrests during the protests - 328 by one lawmaker's count - as illegitimate.

The protests erupted after Yanukovych turned to Russia for a bailout loan instead of signing a deal with the European Union, and have since morphed into a general plea for more human rights, less corruption and more democracy in the nation of 45 million people.

AP TELEVISION

1. Wide shot of Kiev's Independence Square

2. Mid shot shot Kiev's Independence Square

3. Close-up cutaway of flags of Ukraine and various opposition political parties

4. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian ) Oleh, Protester from Kiev:

"Of course they are adopted (the laws), and it looks like a step forward to us, but these laws are a lie and people don't trust them because first of all you need to consider that people were defending their constitutional rights and we actually don't understand why we need an amnesty."

5. Mid shot of demonstrators doing exercises in the morning on Kiev's Independence square

6. Close-up demonstrators doing exercises in the morning on Kiev's Independence Square

7. Wide shot of demonstrators doing exercises on Kiev's Independence Square

8. Wide shot of demonstrators walking in Kiev's Independence Square with dozens of tents and flags

9. Mid shot of demonstrators gathered around fire barrel

10. Close-up demonstrators gathered around fire barrel

11. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Andre (no last name given), Protester from Western Ukraine:

"They voted for these laws only in their own interests. They want us to evacuate all the buildings, like Kiev city hall where we still have the chance to warm up as it's minus 20 outside right now, but they won't do anything because we saw how they cancelled the laws that were adopted on the 16th of January, but Yanukovych has yet to sign this decision. They only sign the laws they need."

12. Close-up demonstrators at barricades resting, with fire from burning tyres in foreground

13. Mid shot of demonstrators at barricades resting, with fire from burning tyres in foreground

14. Close-up police officers standing near barricades

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Ukraine Protest
Title:
HD
Summary: Protesters say they want Yanukovych to go after PM resigns and parliament scraps anti-protest laws
Story No: 928711
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/29/2014 07:33 AM
People: Mykola Azarov , Viktor Yanukovych
Subscription:

Protesters continued to maintain their stance in Kiev on Wednesday, calling for the resignation of President Yanukovych, a day after the prime minister resigned and parliament repealed anti-protest laws that had set off violent clashes between protesters and police.

The two developments, aimed at defusing Ukraine's political crisis, were significant concessions to the anti-government protesters who have fought sporadically with police for the last 10 days after two months of peaceful around-the-clock demonstrations.

The departure of Prime Minister Mykola Azarov removed one of the officials most disliked by the opposition forces whose protests have turned parts of Kiev, the Ukrainian capital, into a barricaded maze.

However, Azarov's spokesman told the Interfax news agency that another staunch Yanukovych ally, deputy Prime Minister Serhiy

Arbuzov, will assume temporary leadership of the Cabinet, a move that is unlikely to please the opposition.

Over the weekend, Yanukovych offered the premiership to Arseniy Yatsenyuk, a lawmaker and one of the opposition's top figures,

but the opposition leader refused the post.

Protesters at Kiev's sprawling protest encampment were encouraged by Azarov's departure but insisted that Yanukovych also resign.

"Having Prime Minister Azarov resign means that we have achieved something," said Myrolav, a protester from Kiev, "Yanukovych needs to do the same thing now, as we are not leaving until victory."

Earlier this month, Yanukovych pushed through the new laws to crack down on protests and increase prison sentences for creating disorder.

These laws were repealed earlier this week after pressure from demonstrators.

Parliament will consider an amnesty measure Wednesday for scores of arrested protesters.

But Yanukovych has said the amnesty is only possible if demonstrators clear the streets and vacate the buildings they now occupy, a condition that is probably unacceptable to many.

The protests erupted after President Viktor Yanukovych turned toward Russia for a bailout loan instead of signing a deal with the

European Union and have since morphed into a general plea for more human rights, less corruption and more democracy in this nation of 45 million.

AP TELEVISION

EARLY MORNING

1. Top shot of main barricade area with a cordon of riot police

2. Protesters huddling around fire with snow on the ground

3. Protesters around fire

DAY SHOTS

4. Medium of riot police at main flashpoint area

5. Barricade and flags

6. Mid of riot police with shields

7. Protesters manning barricade

8. Mid of protesters singing

9. Protesters by fire

10. Tight shot on flame and protester with a mask

11. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Oleg (no last name given), Protester:

"To be honest with you, in my opinion, they can adopt a couple of laws like they did yesterday, but they keep postponing (the real solution) until tomorrow, the day after tomorrow but there's no time left as more and more people are coming here and he (President Yanukovych) just needs to step down and to leave his post as president."

12. Pan over barricades

13. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Myrolav (no last name given):

"I'll tell you one thing: having him (Prime Minister Azarov) resign means that we have achieved something. Yanukovych needs to do the same thing now as we are not leaving until victory."

14. Ukrainian priests and protesters heading toward the barricade, tilt up to flags

15. Protesters heading toward the barricade

16. Wide of riot police on guard

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Ukraine Protest
Title:
HD
Summary: +4:3 Opposition leader says president offers to negotiate; fiery protests continue
Story No: 927334
Source: HANDOUT , AP TELEVISION , ARSENIY YATSENYUK HANDOUT
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/20/2014 12:29 AM
People: Viktor Yanukovych
Subscription:

Ukraine's opposition leader, Arseniy Yatsenyuk, said early on Monday that the government had announced a "readiness to start the negotiation process" to help end violent protests in central Kiev.

Protesters clashed with riot police overnight, hurling rocks and firebombs at police and setting fire to a barricade of vehicles set up by authorities.

Police responded with stun grenades, tear gas and water cannons, but were outnumbered by the protesters.

Yatsenyuk said he had received a phone call from President Viktor Yanukovych offering to start negotiations.

"They (the government) proclaim a readiness to start the negotiation process. The Secretary of National Security and Defence Council Andriy Klyuyev is responsible for these negotiations," he said.

Yatsenyuk said he considered the negotiations offer as an achievement by the protesters, but insisted that they be carried out publicly.

The violence overnight was a sharp escalation of Ukraine's two-month political crisis, which has brought round-the-clock protest gatherings, that had been largely peaceful.

Serhiy Burlakov, press officer for the Interior Affairs Ministry, accused the protesters of trying to "provoke" police into violence.

"Concerning the events happening on Hrushevsky Street in Kiev we can't say it's a peaceful protest anymore," he said early on Monday.

"Police are keeping far from using force because we understand they want to provoke us into violence," Burlakov added.

The clashes occurred shortly after a large peaceful rally on Kiev's main square, Independence Square, also known as Maidan.

They also came after Yanukovych last week approved a number of laws that limit Ukrainians' rights to protest, civic activism and free speech.

The laws prohibit demonstrators from wearing masks or hard hats at rallies, prompting many to don theatrical masks and kitchen pots at the latest rally.

The crisis erupted in November after President Viktor Yanukovych's decision to shelve a long-discussed economic and political treaty with the European Union.

Instead, Yanukovych chose to focus on improving ties with Russia and received a pledge of a 15 (b) billion US dollar bailout loan from the Kremlin to aid the troubled

Ukrainian economy.

AP TELEVISION

++NIGHT SHOTS++

++16:9++

1. Wide of protesters with fire burning in background

2. Mid of an explosion near protesters

3. Mid of protesters holding up shields as an explosion goes off nearby

4. Wide of crowd of protesters

5. Mid of men standing near bus on fire

6. Wide of protesters, pan left to emergency services spraying fires with water

ARSENIY YATSENYUK HANDOUT

++4:3++

7. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Arseniy Yatsenyuk, opposition leader:

"I got a call from President Viktor Yanukovych a few minutes ago. They (the government) proclaim a readiness to start the negotiation process. The Secretary of National Security and Defence Council Andriy Klyuyev is responsible for these negotiations. I can tell you my own view on this. First of all, a mandate on negotiations is only a mandate (meaning: an achievement) of Maidan (Independence Square). Secondly, these negotiations must be public. Thirdly, these negotiations are a first step on the way to satisfy our demands."

AP TELEVISION

++NIGHT SHOTS++

++16:9++

8. Tilt down from smoke to protesters

9. Wide of protesters and police throwing projectiles at each other

10. Various of protesters

11. Protesters moving in on police, one holding a flaming projectile and then throwing it

12. Wide of protesters

13. Mid of protesters standing near pile of bricks from the road, tilt up

14. Wide of explosion on the line between activists and buses

15. Wide of protesters

MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS HANDOUT

++4:3++

16. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Serhiy Burlakov, press officer for Interior Affairs Ministry:

"Concerning the events happening on Hrushevsky Street in Kiev we can't say it's a peaceful protest anymore. Trying to get through police borders, protesters have used sticks and tear gas and equipment for explosions and they have thrown stones on the police side. We know about three destroyed buses. One of them is on fire. Police are keeping far from using force because we understand they want to provoke us into violence."

AP TELEVISION

++NIGHT SHOTS++

++16:9++

17. Mid of water being sprayed on smouldering buses

18. Mid of protesters near the buses with some fires still burning

19. Close of burnt out truck with tyre still alight

20. Wide of protesters throwing flaming projectiles over the buses at police

21. Wide of protester throwing projectile and then pulling the finger

22. Various of protesters in masks and helmets

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Ukraine Protest
Title:
HD
Summary: Opposition leader injured in scuffle between police and anti-government activists
Story No: 926016
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/11/2014 03:01 PM
People: Viktor Yanukovych
Subscription:

Ukraine's former Interior Minister turned opposition leader was injured in a scuffle on Friday night between police and anti-government protester, reflecting the high level of tensions after weeks of anti-government protests in the nation's capital.

Yuri Lutsenko, a top organiser of the mass protests that have gripped Kiev, was injured when he tried to intervene in a confrontation between riot police and opposition activists.

The clashes erupted outside a court after it set six-year prison terms for three ultra-nationalist activists convicted of planning to blow up a statue in 2011.

Protesters threw water bottles and stones at the courthouse and a prison truck carrying the convicted activists.

Protesters upset over the verdict tried to block the passage of the truck, according to the Interior Ministry.

"When people in the court disagreed with the verdict, "Berkut" (police forces unit) clashed with activists," said Dmytro Bulatov, an activist with the anti-government group, Automaidan.

11 people were hospitalised after the clashes, according to Ukraine's top human rights official.

About 20 police officers were also injured in the clashes, the Interior Ministry said.

The incident is likely to further fuel anger against President Viktor Yanukovych, who has faced protests over his decision to freeze ties with the West and move closer to Russia.

The protests on Kiev's main square, which were further fuelled by a violent police crackdown on demonstrators, peaked at hundreds of thousands last month.

AP TELEVISION

++NIGHT SHOTS++

1. Various of Ukrainian police trying to get off bus surrounded by anti-government protesters chanting (Ukrainian) "Shame"

2. Various of police holding shields outside bus

3. Former Interior Minister and opposition leader Yuri Lutsenko holding head after being injured in scuffle between protesters and police

4. Mid of protesters wrapping bandage around Lutsenko's head

5. Mid of protesters helping Lutsenko into ambulance on stretcher

6. Mid of ambulance crew treating Lutsenko

7. Wide of ambulance driving away

8. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Dmytro Bulatov, activist with anti-government activist group, Automaidan:

"When people in the court disagreed with the verdict, "Berkut" (police forces unit) clashed with activists. There were 15 ambulance cars. We don't know the exact number of injured people. There is even a man who has two broken hands. Many people got injured."

9. Wide of protesters and police

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Ukraine Protest 2
Title:
HD
Summary: Protesters seize justice ministry building in capital
Story No: 928362
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/27/2014 12:38 AM
People: Viktor Yanukovych
Subscription:

Anti-government protesters seized the Justice Ministry building in Kiev on Sunday night, adding another government building to the several already occupied by the opposition.

After bursting into the Justice Ministry, which is several hundred meters away from the main protest camp at Independence Square, protesters began erecting barricades.

"We entered very peacefully, and treated the security people well. The deputy of the region police arrived too," said Oleg, one of the occupation organisers.

He added that the building will be used as a shelter for protesters.

"People are coming to Maidan (Ukrainian name for Independence Square), they need a place to get warm and everything is going to become better. We are not going to do any hooliganism, or have anyone hurt. We are peaceful people, we are for justice," Oleg said.

Protests against President Viktor Yanukovych continue to engulf the country, now spreading to central and eastern Ukraine, the leader's support base.

The protests began in late November after Yanukovych shelved a long-awaited agreement to deepen ties with the European Union, but they have been increasingly gripped by people seeking more radical action, even as moderate opposition leaders have pleaded for the violence to end.

AP TELEVISION

++NIGHT SHOTS++

1. Wide of people outside Justice Ministry entrance

2. Mid of protesters in uniform and with shields guarding entrance

3. Various of barricade made out of furniture blocking the Ministry windows

4. SOUNDBITE: (Ukrainian) Oleg, no last name given, from city of Zhytomyr, one of people who organised the Ministry of Justice seizure:

"We entered very peacefully, and treated the security people well. The deputy of the regional police arrived too."

5. Mid of broken Ministry of Justice sign

6. SOUNDBITE: (Ukrainian) Oleg, no last name given, from city of Zhytomyr, one of people who organised the Ministry of Justice seizure:

"People are coming to Maidan (Ukrainian name for Independence Square, where the main demonstrations are being held), they need a place to get warm and everything is going to become better. We are not going to do any hooliganism, or have anyone hurt. We are peaceful people, we are for justice."

7. Wide of building entrance

8. Mid of bags used as barricades

9. Various of people filling up bags for barricades

10. Wide of people carrying bags

11. Mid of barricade and protesters guarding it, pan to Justice Ministry entrance

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Ukraine Protest 3
Title:
HD
Summary: Demonstrators still doubtful solution can be reached ahead special parliament session
Story No: 928412
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/27/2014 07:29 AM
People: Viktor Yanukovych
Subscription:

Demonstrators said on Monday that they believe little will come from a planned extraordinary parliament session called by Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych in the hope of ending the country's political crisis.

"Unfortunately our government won't make any concessions and this meeting won't lead anywhere," said Kiril, a demonstrator from Kiev, who did not give his last name.

On Sunday night, protesters seized the Justice Ministry building, adding another government building to the several already occupied by the opposition.

After bursting into the Justice Ministry, which is several hundred metres away from the main protest camp, protesters began erecting barricades.

The protests began in late November after Yanukovych shelved a long-awaited agreement to deepen ties with the European Union, but they have been increasingly gripped by people seeking more radical action, even as moderate opposition leaders have pleaded for the violence to end.

About half of Ukraine's people favoured deeper integration with the EU, according to polls, and many Ukrainians widely resent Russia's long influence over the country.

In the past week, demonstrators have seized government administration buildings in a score of cities in western Ukraine, where Yanukovych's support is weak and desire for European ties is strong.

AP TELEVISION

1. Wide shot of demonstrators at barricades, police on other side

2. Mid shot of police behind barricades

3. Wide shot of demonstrators standing behind barricades with sling seen in foreground

4. Close up shot of sling of massive slingshot built by protestors

5. SOUNDBITE (Russian ) Kiril, no last name give, demonstrator from Kiev:

"So, what are we expecting from tomorrow's meeting (planned extraordinary parliament session)? Unfortunately our government won't make any concessions and this meeting won't lead anywhere."

6. Close up of two demonstrators wearing helmets and masks guarding barricade

7. Mid shot of demonstrators sleeping near fire on barricades

8. Wide shot of demonstrators sleeping near fire on barricades

9. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Gregory, no last name given, demonstrator from Ternopil (Western Ukraine)

"We hope that our government will finally make the right choice, that they will stop this mess and relinquish their power because there is no way forward for them."

10. Close up of fire

11. Mid shot of demonstrators warming hands

12. Wide shot of barricades

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Ukraine Protest 2
Title:
HD
Summary: Klitschko says they must find answer to solve crisis ; pro govt rally
Story No: 929808
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/05/2014 01:30 PM
People: Catherine Ashton , Viktor Yanukovych , Vladimir Putin , Ban Ki-Moon
Subscription:

Ukrainian opposition leader Vitali Klitschko said on Wednesday that the priority was to prevent the political crisis in the country from getting "out of control," as the European Union's foreign policy chief was due to meet with the country's embattled president.

Catherine Ashton's meeting with Yanukovych was announced on Twitter by her spokeswoman, Maja Kocijancic, without any details.

The announcement came as Ukraine's political opposition made little advance in parliament on Wednesday in their bid to curtail presidential power by amending the Ukrainian constitution.

Klitschko told journalists inside parliament that the political impasse must be resolved.

"All of the neighbouring countries of the European Union are interested in not allowing this situation to get out of control, as instability in Ukraine can lead to instability in the whole region," he said.

The opposition leaderships' bid to reform the constitution was slammed by governing party lawmaker Vadim Kolesnichenko who accused them of trying to change the rules when "you cannot win by the rules."

"You demand that we bring back the constitution of 2004 and certain provisions, but you have forgotten that the constitution of 2004 provides for partial slavery," Kolesnichenko said, referring to the fact that party factions were forced to vote along strict party lines.

In 2004, presidential powers were reduced in a compromise during the Orange Revolution, the mass protests against fraud in the presidential election that Viktor Yanukovych reportedly won.

He was defeated in a rerun of that vote, but won the election in 2010. Several months later, the Constitutional Court reversed the 2004 changes, a move whose legality has been widely questioned.

A rally supporting Yanukovych, meanwhile, gathered outside the parliament building in Kiev on Wednesday to coincide with the constitution debate.

Oleg Lyubenko, one of hundreds of participants in the rally, said he was there to "support the president and to prevent the government from being overthrown."

The anti-government protests began in November, 2013 after Yanukovych backed off from an expected agreement to deepen economic relations with the EU, fearing that the bloc was not offering an adequate cushion for the trade that presumably would be lost with Russia, which wants Ukraine to join a Moscow-led customs union.

Yanukovych subsequently obtained a 15 (b) billion US dollar aid package from Russian President Vladimir Putin, including getting lower gas prices from Russia.

AP TELEVISION

1. Wide of leader of the opposition Udar party, Vitali Klitschko, speaking to media on sidelines of parliamentary session

2. Close of Klitschko

3. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Vitali Klitschko, Leader of the opposition Udar party:

"This is the question of resolving the crisis that is happening in our country right now. All of the neighbouring countries of the European Union are interested in not allowing this situation to get out of control, as instability in Ukraine can lead to instability in the whole region. Madame Ashton (EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton) can only give recommendations and in this case she offered to be a mediator in resolving the conflict. They have experience in resolving such conflicts as in Yugoslavia. The question was also brought up by the United Nations Secretary (General, Ban Ki-moon). In Munich (Security Conference last week), everyone was interested in keeping the situation under control and in not allowing the Syrian scenario to play itself out here."

4. Mid of Klitschko in parliament

5. Deputies banging papers on desks

6. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Vadim Kolesnichenko, Party of Regions (party of President Viktor Yanukovych ) parliamentarian:

"Everyone is guilty and you (opposition) first of all because when you cannot win by the rules, you demand that the rules are changed. You demand that we bring back the constitution of 2004 and certain provisions, but you have forgotten that the constitution of 2004 provides for partial slavery (he means the party factions were forced to vote along strict party lines)."

7. Members of parliament speaking

8. Wide of parliamentary session ++MUTE++

9. Wide of pro-government rally

10. Mid of participants in rally

11. Various of poster of Yanukovych

12. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Vox Pop, Oleg Lyubenko, pro-government protester:

"I am here, first of all to support the president and to prevent the government from being overthrown. The situation in the country is simply a counter-revolution."

13. Close of woman singing at rally

14. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Vox Pop, Yelena Danilchenko, pro-government protester:

"We are the majority. We represent all of the Ukraine. We have chosen our president by a legitimate majority of votes. We gave him our votes and we believe in his decisions. That is why we came here to support him."

15. Various of people attending rally

16. Close of Ukrainian flags

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Ukraine Protest
Title:
HD
Summary: Protesters remain sceptical ahead of emergency parliamentary session
Story No: 928570
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/28/2014 07:35 AM
People: Viktor Yanukovych
Subscription:

Anti-government protesters remain doubtful that anything will come of Tuesday's emergency parliamentary session called by embattled Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych.

"In fact I don't have a good feeling about this as I don't believe the people leading our government have the least a drop of humanity," one protester said, as he stood near the barricades in Kiev's Independence Square.

On Monday Yanukovych agreed to scrap harsh anti-protest laws that set off a wave of clashes between protesters and police over the past week, a potentially substantial concession to the opposition but one that still stopped short of meeting all of its demands.

There is possibly one major sticking point however.

A proposed amnesty for arrested protesters would not be offered unless demonstrators stopped occupying buildings and ended their round-the-clock protests and tent camp in the square, according to a statement by Justice Minister Elena Lukash on the presidential website.

But the protesters show no sign of moving from the square any time soon.

Protesters have been afraid that authorities were preparing to end the spreading demonstrations by force, but the foreign ministry said earlier the government has no immediate plans to declare a state of emergency.

With protesters now willing to risk injury, a state of emergency would be likely to set off substantial fighting on the streets of the capital.

Tuesday's session is also expected to include a discussion of government responsibility in the crisis, suggesting a cabinet reshuffle could be imminent.

For those in Independence Square it is now a matter of waiting to hear what the government says, and deciding then what their next plan of action will be.

Yanukovych has come under increasing pressure since he pushed the tough laws through parliament which led to a sharp escalation in tension since his rejection of a deal to deepen ties with the 28-nation European Union and turn towards Russia instead.

AP TELEVISION

1. Mid of anti-government protesters standing around burning tyres

2. Wide of barricades

3. SOUNDBITE: (Ukrainian) Oleksii (no last name given) Protester:

"In fact I don't have a good feeling about this as I don't believe the people leading our government have the least a drop of humanity."

4. Close of protesters guarding barricade

5. Mid of barricades

6. Close of protesters on the barricades

7. Wide of barricades

8. Mid of demonstrators moving smoking tyres with police in background

9. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Ihor (no last name given), Protestor from Lviv in Western Ukraine:

"Then our leaders will come here and we will decide together what to do next and what will be our plan."

10. Close of police

11. Mid of police

12. Various of protesters on barricades

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Ukraine Protest 8
Title:
HD
Summary: Fires, clashes, as Ukraine protests escalate
Story No: 927332
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/19/2014 10:28 PM
People: Viktor Yanukovych
Subscription:

Clashes continued in the centre of the Ukrainian capital Kiev on Sunday night between riot police and protesters, with several buses set on fire.

A group of activists began attacking riot police, trying to push their way towards the Ukrainian parliament building, which was cordoned off by rows of police and buses.

The buses were later set of fire and battered with sticks and rocks.

Many of the riot police held their shields over their heads to protect themselves from the projectiles being thrown by demonstrators.

Numerous explosions were heard and plumes of smoke rose above the crowd.

Several people were injured in the demonstrations.

The violence was a sharp escalation of Ukraine's two-month political crisis, which has brought round-the-clock protest gatherings, but had been largely peaceful.

The crisis erupted in November after President Viktor Yanukovych's decision to shelve a long-discussed economic and political treaty with the European Union.

Instead, Yanukovych chose to focus on improving ties with Russia and received a pledge of a 15 (b) billion US dollar bailout loan from the Kremlin to aid the troubled

Ukrainian economy.

The decision sparked protests, which increased in size and determination after police twice violently dispersed demonstrators.

But anger rose substantially after Yanukovych last week signed an array of laws severely limiting protests and banning the wearing of helmets and gas masks.

Many of Sunday's demonstrators wore hardhats and masks in defiance of the new laws.

They set several police buses on fire and some chased and beat officers.

AP TELEVISION

++NIGHT SHOTS++

1. Wide of buses on fire with silhouette of crowd of protesters nearby

2. Various of protesters and burning buses

3. Mid of protesters

4. Various of person videoing protest through phone

5. Mid of protesters near burnt out bus

6. Mid of protesters striking the burnt out bus with sticks

7. Various of protesters and burning buses

8. Mid of protesters breaking up concrete and passing it along

9. Mid of protesters with burning buses in background

10. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Konstantin Shaporenko, Kharkiv (eastern Ukraine) resident and protester:

"We have only one aim. We want to live. This is our target. They interfere with (our desire) to live. Bandits are ruling in the country. They are destroying the country and we are here to stop this."

11. Various of protesters and burning buses

12. Wide of protesters with man standing on burnt out bus

13. Mid of man standing on bus, holding stick

14. Mid of protesters

15. Mid of protesters with white smoke billowing from bus

16. Various of protesters

17. Mid of front of crowd with protesters, dressed in helmets and masks, forming chain of arms

18. Mid of bus burning including tyres on fire

19. Mid of protester holding red flare and then throwing it at riot police

20. Wide of emergency crew with man holding up shield in front of them

21. Various of protesters

22. Mid of riot police holding up shields

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Ukraine Protest 6
Title:
HD
Summary: +4:3 Clashes continue, Klitschko comments
Story No: 927455
Source: CHANNEL 5 , AP TELEVISION , UDAR PARTY HANDOUT
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/20/2014 04:48 PM
People: Viktor Yanukovych , Vladimir Putin
Subscription:

Clashes between riot police and protesters continued in the Ukrainian capital, Kiev, on Monday.

The unrest followed a night of rioting sparked by the passage of laws aims at curbing street protests.

The violence has seriously escalated the country's political crisis which has been marked by two months of largely peaceful protests.

The pro-Western protests in Kiev began on November 21 after President Viktor Yanukovych shelved a long-planned political and economic treaty with the EU and then accepted a huge bailout package from Russian President Vladimir Putin instead.

The protests swelled to hundreds of thousands - the biggest since Ukraine's 2004 pro-democracy Orange Revolution - after riot police violently broke up a small peaceful student protest.

Vitaly Klitschko, who leads the opposition Udar Party, said in a statement that what Ukraine was seeing is unprecedented in the post-independence era.

It is "something that people can't imagine in their worst dreams - fighting in the centre of the capital", he said, and blamed the government.

"Government which, during the last two months, didn't listen to its citizens and pretended that nothing was happening, and that has led to devastating consequences," Klitschko said.

He also called on "every citizen of Ukraine, its patriots, to defend our country and its future".

Meanwhile, one local television channel ran footage of protesters who had allegedly been stripped naked and beaten by police.

One protester showed the bruises and wounds apparently caused by rubber bullets.

Oleg Burlakov, a spokesman for the Ukrainian Interior Ministry, said the situation was "under control".

"The police are abstaining from activity but we all have to understand that law enforcement has the right to use force in accordance with the law of the police," he said.

Sunday's violence began after Yanukovych pushed through a sweeping anti-protest law that significantly increased fines and imposed jail terms for unauthorised street protests.

The law also restricts the activity of non-governmental organisations funded by the West, as many are in Ukraine.

It mirrors anti-opposition legislation passed in Russia, prompting accusations from critics that Yanukovych is following in Vladimir Putin's footsteps and building a police state.

The United States has called the legislation "undemocratic" and the EU has urged Ukraine to revise it.

AP TELEVISION

++16:9++

1. Various of anti-government protesters throwing rocks at riot police, who shoot back stun grenades

UDAR PARTY HANDOUT

++16:9++

2. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Vitaly Klitschko, leader of the opposition Udar Party:

"In Ukraine we're witnessing a situation that didn't happen throughout the whole history of independence, something that people can't imagine in their worst dreams - fighting in the centre of the capital. The government is to blame for what is happening. Government which, during the last two months, didn't listen to its citizens and pretended that nothing was happening, and that has led to devastating consequences. I call upon every citizen of Ukraine, its patriots, to defend our country and its future. Today, everyone who cares should be here at Maidan (Independence Square). The government is bringing its fighters from other parts of the country but we will be more and we will win."

CHANNEL 5 - NO ACCESS UKRAINE

++4:3++

++NIGHT SHOTS++

4. Various of anti-government protesters allegedly stripped naked and beaten by police being taken into shelter ++CONTAINS SEMI-NUDITY++

5. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Name not given, worker allegedly stripped naked by police:

"We were taken out and shot with the rubber bullets."

6. Zoom into man lifting his top and showing wounds allegedly caused by rubber bullets ++GRAPHIC++

7. Close of man's head wound; zoom out

8. Close of man's hands covered with blood

9. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Oleg Burlakov, Press spokesman, Ukrainian Interior Ministry:

"At the moment the situation is under control. The police are abstaining from activity but we all have to understand that law enforcement has the right to use force in accordance with the law of the police."

AP TELEVISION

++16:9++

10. Wide of riot police

11. Mid of wounded protester being escorted from scene

12. Wide of riot police using sticks to dismantle barricade

13. Wide of protesters throwing rocks, stun grenade landing

14. Mid of protester in medieval knight's costume

15. Mid of protesters banging sticks: AUDIO: banging

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Ukraine Protest 5
Title:
HD
Summary: Hundreds rally outside EU office demanding action from the West against President Yanukovych
Story No: 927437
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/20/2014 02:00 PM
People: Viktor Yanukovych , Vladimir Putin
Subscription:

Hundreds of people rallied outside the European Union's office in Kiev on Monday to demand the EU take action against President Viktor Yanukovych and his government.

Opposition leaders have been urging the EU and the United States to impose sanctions on top Ukrainian officials and Yanukovych's financial backers, but so far Western diplomats have only threatened sanctions and issued harsh statements.

Hundreds of activists rallied outside the EU's office, chanting "We need your help!" in English and holding posters that read "No sanctions, no peace."

Their rally came after a night of vicious street battles between riot police and anti-government protesters, which has seriously escalated Ukraine's political crisis.

The pro-Western protests in Kiev began on November 21 after Yanukovych shelved a long-planned political and economic treaty with the EU and then accepted a huge bailout package from Russian President Vladimir Putin instead.

The protests swelled to hundreds of thousands - the biggest since Ukraine's 2004 pro-democracy Orange Revolution - after riot police violently broke up a small peaceful student protest.

Sunday's violence came after Yanukovych pushed through a sweeping anti-protest law that significantly increased fines and imposed jail terms for unauthorised street protests.

The law also restricts the activity of non-governmental organisations funded by the West, as many are in Ukraine.

It mirrors anti-opposition legislation passed in Russia, prompting accusations from critics that Yanukovych is following in Vladimir Putin's footsteps and building a police state.

The United States has called the legislation "undemocratic" and the EU has urged Ukraine to revise it.

AP TELEVISION

1. Wide of group of protesters standing outside the European Union's office in Kiev

2. Mid of protesters holding banners

3. Close of woman wearing bandana reading (English): "Help"

4. Close of placard reading (English): "Dictatorship. Who is next?" (arrow on banner is pointing at Ukraine)

5. Mid of protesters holding banners and placards calling on EU to impose sanctions on Ukrainian officials

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Darya Kaliniuk, protester and local resident:

"The situation in Ukraine is very critical and now we are demanding sanctions. But not political sanctions, we are demanding the European Union to follow its anti-money laundering laws and block access to the financial system in the European Union for those who are in power."

7. Mid of protesters chanting (English): "We need your help"

8. Close protester with child chanting (English): "We need your help"

9. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Volodimir Vyatrovych, activist:

"We demand from European politicians, from European officials, European citizens to help us in the struggle for democracy which has been taking place in Ukraine for the past two months. In this struggle we are using non-violent methods but, as a result, the government is imposing laws that transform Ukraine into a dictatorship. Europe can help us win against the dictatorship. For this, it has to impose sanctions against those Ukrainian officials who have bank accounts in Europe."

10. Wide of protest outside EU office

11. Mid of protester talking to EU office representative (name not given) inside building

12. Close of protester talking

13. Mid of protester talking to EU representative starting to cry

14. Close of protester crying

15. Mid protester handing petition to EU representative

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Subjects: Protests and demonstrations , Government and politics , Legislation , Laws , Political and civil unrest , General news , Legislature
People: Viktor Yanukovych , Vladimir Putin
Organisations: Ukraine government, European Union
Locations: Kyiv , Kyiv City , Ukraine
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Ukraine Protest
Title:
HD
Summary: Protesters not confident opposition will be able to dilute presidential power
Story No: 929571
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/04/2014 07:53 AM
People: Viktor Yanukovych , Catherine Ashton , Victoria Nuland
Subscription:

Protesters camped out in Kiev said they are holding out little hope that opposition leaders will succeed on Tuesday in their efforts to dilute presidential power through changing the constitution.

The changes are expected to be discussed in a parliament session that comes as Ukraine's political crisis remains locked in stalemate.

Protesters are refusing to leave their encampment in downtown Kiev or vacate buildings they occupy, but radicals who clashed with police last month are holding to an uneasy truce.

Justice Minister Olena Lukash said last week that officials were preparing measures for constitutional change, but did not give details.

"If the result is negative (in parliament today), and we think that it will be, as usual they will postpone and delay so we have little faith," said protester Igor Kurtyn.

He said demonstrators want a peaceful resolution but are prepared to fight for their cause.

Among protesters' demands are calls for President Viktor Yanukovych's resignation and early elections.

Yanukovych, who returned to work Monday after a brief sick leave, has shown no sign of accepting either of those demands.

In addition, the issue that set off the protests remains: Yanukovych's shelving in November of an agreement to deepen Ukraine's ties with the European Union.

Meanwhile, the European Union urged Ukraine to end its political crisis so the bloc could consider increasing aid to the country's struggling economy.

But protesters were sceptical about efforts from the US and Europe to create a financial aid package.

Vassiliy Panchenko said he suspected the US would only act to help Ukraine, because "America has its own interests in this financial aid package."

"They don't care too much about Ukraine as we know. This is what they do in every other country as well. They put their personal interests first. They wouldn't worry about us just for the heck of it."

EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton is expected in Ukraine this week on her third diplomatic mission to Kiev since the crisis began.

US Assistant Secretary of State Victoria Nuland also is to visit Ukraine this week to push for a resolution of the tensions.

AP TELEVISION

1. Mid of barricaded protest encampment

2. Various of riot police on guard some 50 metres (165 feet) from protesters

3. Wide of barricade area

4. Mid of protester wearing helmet with head down, possibly sleeping, amid protest encampment

5. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Igor Kurtyn, protester:

"If the result is negative (in parliament today), and we think that it will be, as usual they will postpone and delay, so we have little faith. Of course we would like to resolve all of this peacefully and without blood but if need be, we will stay here until the end, since we came here for democracy."

6. Mid of Ukrainian and EU flags at encampment

7. Mid of protester keeping warm by camp fire

8. Mid of riot police on guard with shields

9. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) No name given, protester:

"We don't even know what our parliamentarians will agree upon today. In this kind of a situation, no one really knows what will happen day-to-day. Few of us believe the opposition leaders, as their agreements so far have not been very effective. We don't want (to implement) radical actions but some people think that there is no other way out of this situation."

10. Various of Independence Square with people walking around, drinking and eating

11. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Vassiliy Panchenko, protester:

"America has its own interests in this financial aid package. They are interested in our situation. They have their personal interests. They don't care too much about Ukraine as we know. This is what they do in every other country as well. They put their personal interests first. They wouldn't worry about us just for the heck of it."

12. Wide of protest encampment at Independence Square

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Ukraine Protest 7
Title:
HD
Summary: +4:3 As clashes continue, President Yanukovych says situation poses a threat to the whole country
Story No: 927479
Source: Presidential Handout , AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/20/2014 07:01 PM
People: Vladimir Putin
Subscription:

As clashes continued between protesters and police for a second day in central Kiev on Monday, Ukrainian President Victor Yanukovych said the situation posed a threat to the whole country.

"Now, when the peaceful protests are transforming into mass riots accompanied by mayhem and arson using violence, I am confident that such events carry a threat not only to the residents of Kiev, but to Ukraine as a whole," Yanukovych said.

After a night of vicious street battles, anti-government protesters and police clashed again in the Ukraine's capital.

Hundreds of protesters, many wearing balaclavas, hurled rocks and stun grenades. Police responded with tear gas.

The violence in Kiev has seriously escalated Ukraine's political crisis, which has been marked by two months of largely peaceful protests.

The pro-Western protests in Kiev began November 21 after Yanukovych shelved a long-planned political and economic treaty with the European Union, then accepted a huge bailout package from Russian President Vladimir Putin instead.

The demonstrations swelled to hundreds of thousands on some days - the biggest since Ukraine's 2004 pro-democracy Orange Revolution - after riot police violently broke up a small peaceful student protest.

Clashes broke out on December 1 between radical protesters and police, but the demonstrations had since been largely peaceful until Sunday's violence which came after Yanukovych pushed through a sweeping anti-protest law that significantly increased fines and imposed jail terms for unauthorised street protests.

The new law also prohibits activists from wearing helmets or masks to demonstrations, curbs free speech and limits the ability to investigate or monitor the activity of officials, including judges.

Another provision restricts the activity of non-governmental organisations funded by the West, as many are in Ukraine.

The law mirrors anti-opposition legislation passed in Russia, prompting accusations that Yanukovych is following in Putin's footsteps by cracking down on his foes.

The United States has called the legislation "undemocratic," and the European Union has urged Ukraine to revise it.

The law has highlighted Yanukovych's disregard for the protests, which have been calling for his ouster, the restoration of civil rights and a pro-Western course for Ukraine.

But the demonstrators have been frustrated by the fragmented and often indecisive opposition leadership.

AP TELEVISION

++NIGHT SHOTS++

++4:3++

1. Wide of protesters in central Kiev, zoom in to group of protesters on top of building carrying Molotov cocktails and throwing them at riot police, pull out to wide of scene, zoom into mid of flames with protesters in the foreground and riot police in the background

3. Wide of protesters AUDIO stun grenades being fired

4. Mid of injured protester being helped from the scene

5. Mid of Molotov cocktails being thrown at riot police, zoom into police behind shields

PRESIDENTIAL HANDOUT

++16:9++

6. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Victor Yanukovych, President of Ukraine:

"Now, when the peaceful protests are transforming into mass riots accompanied by mayhem and arson using violence, I am confident that such events carry a threat not only to the residents of Kiev, but to Ukraine as a whole."

AP TELEVISION

++4:3++

++NIGHT SHOTS++

7. Mid riot police UPSOUND banging

8. Wide of protesters, Molotov cocktails and stun grenades being fired, zoom in to mid shot, flames and smoke visible UPSOUND banging

9. Mid protesters standing next to fire

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Ukraine Protest
Title:
HD
Summary: Govt holds cabinet meeting as crisis continues; nationalists ask army to join anti govt protests
Story No: 929773
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/05/2014 10:44 AM
People: Catherine Ashton , Viktor Yanukovych
Subscription:

Ukraine's interim prime minister told his cabinet on Wednesday that nationwide unrest is declining and that protests are continuing without government interference.

His comments come as the country's political crisis remains bogged down in a stalemate, with the opposition accusing the leadership of conducting a war of attrition.

Serhiy Arbuzov told cabinet ministers that "there is no confrontation on the streets".

He said peaceful demonstrations were taking place without any government interference and that the "temperature of the conflict is decreasing".

"The executive branch of the government should support the process of the stabilisation of the situation in the country," he told ministers.

The European Union's foreign policy chief, Catherine Ashton, is in Kiev on Wednesday for talks with President Viktor Yanukovych.

She met on Tuesday evening with leaders of the large months-long protests against Yanukovych, over his decision to shun the EU and turn to Moscow.

Many protesters remained camped in Kiev's Independence Square, also known as Maidan, despite wintry weather.

One man who said he supported the protest movement said that if the country's leaders can negotiate their way to an agreement, "then Ukraine will head a little more towards Europe".

Another protest supporter said that any financial help would be a short-term fix for Ukraine because of its current government.

"I watch television and go to Maidan (but) I still don't see anything good coming from this," she said,

Meanwhile, a group of nationalist protesters held a demonstration outside the Ministry of Defence.

The protesters, many of whom were aligned with the Svoboda party, want the army to support the anti-government demonstrations.

"We came to support the army to call them to join the people, as theirs is not a fight between east, the west, the north, and the south, it is a fight between the government gang and the people," said protest organiser Viktor Lomanetskyi.

Mikhola Believ, a member of the Svoboda party, said they disagreed with a Ministry of Defence decision taken on 30 January to call on the government to "take radical action to restore order in Kiev and the rest of Ukraine".

"We're opposed to this decision and we came here to let them know," he said.

An increasing number of pro-government lawmakers have called on the military to end the demonstrations and clear the protest camp in Independence Square.

AP TELEVISION

1. Tilt up of riot police walking past Cabinet Minister's building

2. Wide of riot police

3. Wide exterior of Cabinet Minister's building

4. Wide interior of Interim Prime Minister Serhiy Arbuzov holding cabinet meeting

5. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Serhiy Arbuzov, Interim Ukrainian Prime Minister:

"There is no confrontation on the streets. Peaceful demonstrations are taking place without any government interference. In general, the temperature of the conflict is decreasing and the executive branch of the government should support the process of the stabilisation of the situation in the country. The government is working on reducing the negative impact of the political situation on the economy. Unfortunately, such an impact cannot be completely avoided. There is still a threat that the regional governments don't execute their functions."

6. Various of anti-government protesters at barricades

7. Various of anti-government protesters sitting around fires to keep warm

8. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Vox pop, Vitaly Abram, Protest supporter:

"I think if our fancy (opposition) leaders eventually come to an agreement through negotiations, if they can find common point, then Ukraine will head a little more towards Europe. If you consider the latest events here, Europe is not likely to accept us immediately, but step by step we can at least start moving towards Europe."

9. Cutaway of anti-government protester

10. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Vox pop, Ludmilla Malinovska, Protest supporter:

"I think that even though they (the government) might accept financial aid, it won't lead anywhere because I see that there is a real gang there (in government). And so, as I watch television and go to Maidan (Independence Square, hub of anti-government protests), I still don't see anything good coming from this."

11. Protester drinking hot drink

12. Wide of demonstrators from the nationalist Svoboda party gathered outside the Ukrainian Ministry of Defence and calling for the army to support anti-government demonstrations

13. Mid of demonstrators holding placards reading (Ukrainian) "Military forces should be cleaned of corruption" and "The army is with the people"

14. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Viktor Lomanetskyi, Organiser from nationalist Svoboda party:

"We came to support the army to call them to join the people, as theirs is not a fight between east, the west, the north, and the south, it is a fight between the government gang and the people."

15. Close of sign reading (Ukrainian) "Ministry of Defence"

16. Close of demonstrator singing national anthem

17. Mid of demonstrator singing national anthem

18. Close of Ukrainian government seal on gate of defence ministry compound

19. Mid of Mikhola Believ, member of Svoboda from central Ukraine, addressing crowd on megaphone

20. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Mikhola Believ, Member of nationalist Svoboda Party:

"We came to the Ministry of Defence to express our negative opinion with the decision made on 30 January by the Ministry of Defence. The decision regarding to the Ministry of Defence and the military officer calling the government to take radical action to restore order in Kiev and the rest of Ukraine. We're opposed to this decision and we came here to let them know."

21. Various of anti-government demonstrators outside ministry

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Ukraine Protest 5
Title:
HD
Summary: Protesters angered by Yanukovych's statement blaming opposition for escalating tension
Story No: 928972
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/30/2014 05:20 PM
People: Viktor Yanukovych , Vladimir Putin
Subscription:

Protesters in Kiev were angered by a statement from the Ukrainian president on Thursday which claimed that the government had fulfilled its obligations and the opposition were continuing to protest for their own gains.

Demonstrators in the capital continued to congregate behind barricades and in the protest centre established at Kiev's Independence Square, calling for President Viktor Yanukovych to step down.

"What they are offering is very little," said protester Misha from Western Ukraine.

"They are killing the people. We fear for the future. We don't know what is going to happen tomorrow. We will only leave when he resigns," he added.

In the midst of Ukraine's unending political crisis, its embattled president went on sick leave on Thursday, unleashing a tidal wave of conspiracy theories since protesters have been demanding his removal for months.

In spite of the sick leave, Yanukovych issued a statement saying: "The opposition continues to escalate the situation and urges people to stand in the frost for the sake of the political ambitions of several of its leaders."

Temperatures in Kiev have dropped as low as minus-20 Celsius (minus-4 Fahrenheit) on some nights, bringing severe discomfort to those manning barricades and the sprawling round-the-clock protest tent camp on Kiev's main square.

Yanukovych has faced two months of large protests that have sometimes paralysed the centre of Kiev.

The protests started after he backed out of a long-awaited agreement to deepen ties with the European Union, but quickly came to encompass a wide array of discontent over corruption, heavy-handed police and dubious courts.

After stepping back from the agreement with the EU, Yanukovych got a 15 (b) billion US dollar aid package from Russia that also gives Ukraine lower prices for the Russian gas upon which the country depends.

That aid from Russian President Vladimir Putin is key to propping up Yanukovych and keeping the struggling Ukrainian economy from bankruptcy.

But as the crisis drags on, concerns are rising about whether Russia will keep its financial commitment if the Yanukovych regime collapses.

AP TELEVISION

++NIGHT SHOTS++

1. Various of opposition protesters behind barricades, gathered around burning tyres to keep warm

2. Close of protester standing by fire in a barrel

3. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Danil (no last name given), Protester from outside of Kiev:

"I think that he, we are not going to listen to him (President Viktor Yanukovych) and stay here, because he is a bandit and he doesn't have a right to stay in his position. He can say whatever he wants to say, we are going to stay here until the end."

4. Wide of tents on Independence Square, pro-EU flags flying above them

5. Mid of protesters on Independence Square watching stage

6. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Misha (no last name given), Protester from Western Ukraine:

"What they are offering is very little. Do you understand? They are killing the people. We fear for the future. We don't know what is going to happen tomorrow. We will only leave when he resigns."

7. Wide of stage on Independence Square

8. Mid of speakers on stage singing Ukrainian national anthem

9. Close-up of speaker finishing national anthem, then shouting to crowd, UPSOUND (Ukrainian): "Glory to Ukraine!", crowd shout back (Ukrainian): "Glory to the heros!"

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Ukraine Protest 2
Title:
HD
Summary: Hundreds of protesters clash with riot police after passage of anti-protest law
Story No: 927309
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/19/2014 02:42 PM
People: Viktor Yanukovych
Subscription:

Hundreds of protesters clashed with riot police in the centre of the Ukrainian capital of Kiev on Sunday after the passage of anti-protest legislation.

A group of activists began attacking riot police with sticks, trying to push their way towards the Ukrainian parliament building, which was cordoned off by rows of police and buses.

Stun grenades were used and smoke was seen above the crowd.

Opposition leader Vitali Klitschko tried to stop the protesters from attacking police.

The clashes occurred shortly after tens of thousands rallied on Kiev's main square as part of anti-government protests which have rocked Ukraine for two months.

In November, President Viktor Yanukovych's decided to freeze ties with the European union and embrace Russia instead.

Since then, Moscow has promised a 15 (b) billion US dollars bailout loan to aid Ukraine's struggling economy.

Scores of opposition leaders and journalists have been attacked, harassed and prosecuted, since the protests started on November 21.

Last week, Yanukovych caused uproar at home and abroad when he approved a number of laws that limit Ukrainians' rights to protest, civic activism and free speech.

The laws prohibit demonstrators from wearing masks or hard hats at rallies, prompting many to don theatrical masks and kitchen pots at Sunday's rally.

Several opposition leaders addressed the crowds from a giant stage, wearing bright construction workers' hats.

Other provisions of the controversial legislation restrict the activity of non-governmental groups funded by the West and seek to equate critical reporting with defamation.

Opposition leaders denounced Yanukovych's legislation as unconstitutional and called for formation of parallel governing structures in the country.

AP TELEVISION

1. Wide of activists trying to get through police barrier

2. Close of activists breaking windows of police bus

3. Smoke beside bus

4. Wide of activists and police

5. Wide of police holding riot shields

6. Damaged police bus

7. Mid of protesters

8. Man stood on bus, protesters, tear gas

9. Wide of crowd trying to get through the police line, tear gas canister goes off

10. Udar political party leader Vitali Klitschko surrounded by protesters

11. Mid of activists wearing masks

12. Pan from protesters to police

13. Wide of people

14. Wide of activists

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Ukraine Protest 4
Title:
HD
Summary: +4:3 Opposition leaders comment on president's health; interior min calls for end to violence
Story No: 928945
Source: INT MINISTRY HANDOUT , AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/30/2014 03:50 PM
People: Viktor Yanukovych , Mykola Azarov
Subscription:

Ukraine's opposition leaders reacted on Thursday to the news that the country's embattled president is taking sick leave.

The surprise development - announced by President Viktor Yanukovych's office - left unclear how efforts to resolve the country's political crisis would move forward.

Protesters have been calling for his resignation for two months.

According to a statement on the presidential website on Thursday, the 63-year-old Yanukovych has an acute respiratory illness and a high fever.

There was no indication of how long he might be on leave or whether he would be able to do any work.

Vitali Klitschko, the leader of the opposition Udar party, said that during the era of the Soviet Union, such an announcement would have been a bad sign, because "if some Soviet Union leaders have to make an unpopular decision, they go to hospital".

"Before they announce emergency situation, they go to the hospital - to show as if he is out of the process", he added.

Oleh Tyahnybok, the leader of the opposition Svoboda party, said "one's health and one's political activity are two different things".

Yanukovych wasn't known to have any previous health issues.

A presidential spokesman told the Associated Press that Yanukovych remains in charge of the country and, under Ukraine's constitution, can't transfer his powers to anyone.

Yanukovych has faced two months of large protests that have often paralysed Kiev, the capital.

The protests started after he backed out of a long-awaited agreement to deepen ties with the European Union, but quickly came to encompass a wide array of discontent over corruption, heavy-handed police and dubious courts.

Despite offering several concessions, authorities have so far failed to mollify the protesters.

In a series of moves aiming at resolving the crisis, parliament voted on Tuesday to repeal harsh anti-protest laws.

Yanukovych must formally sign that repeal and it was unclear whether he could do so while on sick leave.

He also has accepted the resignation of his prime minister, Mykola Azarov.

But protesters say the moves are insufficient - they want him out and new elections held.

According to Tyahnybok, the fight will continue as the "demands of Maidan (meaning protesters at Independence Square) have not been met".

Meanwhile, Interior Minister Vitali Zakharchenko appeared on television and said he couldn't be "indifferent" to the causes of ongoing violence in Ukraine.

"There are already hundreds of injured (people). I am referring to those people who want power so much that they are willing to pay for it with people's lives," he said.

On Wednesday, Ukraine's parliament passed a measure offering amnesty to some of those arrested in the two months of protests.

That new law, however, was only valid if demonstrators vacate most of the government buildings they occupy in Kiev and in some western cities.

The law would not apply to several city buildings in the centre of Kiev that the protesters use as dormitories and operation centres to support the extensive protest tent camp on the city's main square.

With temperatures dropping as low as -20 Celsius (-4 Fahrenheit) during the night, continuing the protests without some shelter would be virtually impossible.

AP TELEVISION

++16:9++

1. Wide exterior of Hyatt hotel

2. Wide of Ukrainian opposition leaders gathered in hotel lobby

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Vitali Klitschko, Leader of the opposition Udar ("Punch") party:

"I remember from the Soviet Union, it's a bad sign. A bad sign because always if some Soviet Union leaders have to make an unpopular decision, they go to hospital."

4. Close of Klitschko

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Vitali Klitschko, Leader of the opposition Udar ("Punch") party:

"I think about that, it's my prediction: before they announce emergency situation, they go to the hospital, to show as if he is out of the process."

6. Cutaway of Klitschko

7. SOUNDBITE (German) Vitali Klitschko, Leader of the opposition Udar ("Punch") party: ++ROUGH TRANSLATION++

"Every Ukrainian sees Ukraine as a European country. Our wish is for the laws to change, our wish is to stop what there is in Ukraine, the people are sick and tired. In good German you can also say, (the people) live without a future, because no one gives any security, there is above all no future for anyone, and anyone who comes to protest can be detained."

8. Mid of Oleh Tyahnybok, leader of the opposition Svoboda party

9. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Oleh Tyahnybok, leader of the opposition Svoboda party: (++responding to question about political impact of Yanukovych becoming ill++)

"I don't think it's important, personally. One's health and one's political activity are two different things."

10. Cutaway of hotel

11. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Oleh Tyahnybok, leader of the opposition Svoboda party:

"But the fight will continue as the demands of Maidan (meaning protesters at Independence Square) have not been met. Only one of them was fulfilled which was the resignation of the government of (Mykola) Azarov (former Prime Minister)."

12. Wide of opposition leaders leaving hotel

UKRAINIAN INTERIOR MINISTRY

+4:3++

13. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Vitali Zakharchenko, Ukrainian Interior Minister:

"As a minister I cannot be indifferent to what is happening from one side as well from another side. There are already hundreds of injured (people). I am referring to those people who want power so much that they are willing to pay for it with people's lives. Open your eyes! On both sides of the barricades are citizens of Ukraine."

AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLY

++16:9++

14. Mid of Independence Square

15. Mid of protesters' flags

16. Wide of Independence Square

17. Extreme wide of Independence Square

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Ukraine Protest 2
Title:
HD
Summary: Protesters forcibly removed from Agriculture Building; pro Yanukovych rally
Story No: 928754
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/29/2014 01:32 PM
People: Viktor Yanukovych
Subscription:

Anti-government protesters in Ukraine on Wednesday evicted a group of more militant protesters who had occupied the Agriculture Ministry.

Activists from an opposition party that represents moderate protesters forced out members of the more militant Spilna Sprava group and took them to Ukrainian House, another building that anti-government protesters recently took over.

Ukraine's political opposition parties have asked demonstrators not to occupy government ministries.

But activists from Spilna Sprava have nonetheless been involved in seizing and occupying them, and have threatened to occupy more if President Viktor Yanukovych does not meet the demands of the protesters.

Opposition lawmaker Andrei Senchenko said there had been "a certain confrontation between the groups".

"But we agreed on Spilna Sprava moving to the Ukrainian House, and after that they will continue defending the democratic choice of Ukraine," he said.

Meanwhile, dozens of people gathered outside Parliament in support of embattled President Viktor Yanukovych.

Their rally came as lawmakers in Parliament discussed an amnesty for those arrested during weeks of protests in the crisis-torn country.

The amnesty bill is part of a series of concessions from embattled Yanukovych, after a week of street clashes between police and protesters and protesters' seizure of government buildings in western Ukraine.

The prime minister has resigned and harsh anti-protest laws have been recalled but those moves did not address the protesters' other key demands that Yanukovych resign and early elections be held.

One Yanukovych supporter outside Parliament on Wednesday said the president had been "legitimately and lawfully chosen".

"I'd like them to find some sort of peaceful way out of the conflict," she said. "I don't know, they are smarter than me, they are in charge of the country."

AP TELEVISION

1. Various of militant anti-government activists leaving the Agriculture Ministry after being forcibly evicted by opposition protesters

2. Close of Spilna Sprava (militant group) banner hanging over building entrance

3. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Andrei Senchenko, Opposition lawmaker:

"The decision was made for them to vacate the building. There was a certain confrontation between the groups, but we agreed on Spilna Sprava moving to the Ukrainian House, and after that they will continue defending the democratic choice of Ukraine."

4. Close of Spilna Sprava banner crumpled on ground alongside firehouse

5. Various of opposition protesters inside ministry after militant activists were evicted

6. Close of bags belonging to militant activists being relocating to new sleeping quarters at Ukrainian House

7. Wide of militant activists at Ukrainian House after being evicted from the Agriculture Ministry

8. Close of militant activists at Ukrainian House

9. Mid of militant activist with bags and sticks at Ukrainian House

10. Various of militant activists waiting to enter Ukrainian House

11. Wide of Ukrainian House

12. Wide of supporters of President Viktor Yanukovych at rally

13. Mid of woman singing

14. Mid of Yanukovych supporters

15. Various of Ukrainian national flags

16. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Valentina Yadiatlova, Member of the Party of the Regions in Chernigov, northern Ukraine:

"Is it possible to tell anyone about what's happening in Ukraine? It's shameful! Those three, I cannot even pick out a word for them, have set Ukrainians against each other. And where are they planning to bring Ukraine? Tell me, please. Those Tyahnybohs, the big-faced and the rabbits."

17. Various of protesters receiving hot tea

18. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Olena Obeleck, Yanukovych supporter from Kiev:

"We have a legitimately and lawfully chosen president, and he is now in his workplace chosen by us. I personally voted for him. I'd like them to find some sort of peaceful way out of the conflict. I don't know, they are smarter than me, they are in charge of the country."

19. Wide of rally

20. Various of protesters playing ball with frozen ice bottle

21. Mid of police officer

22. Wide of rally

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Ukraine Protest
Title:
HD
Summary: Scuffles as thousands continue to occupy capital despite new anti-protest laws
Story No: 927195
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/18/2014 11:32 AM
People: Viktor Yanukovych
Subscription:

Pro-government activists scuffled on Saturday with anti-government protesters on a street in the Ukrainian capital, Kiev.

The mild skirmishes occurred after around 200 pro-government activists approached anti-government protesters who were blocking one of Kiev's main streets, and tried to remove them.

Activists said the barricades were restricting access to the street for people and vehicles.

Anti-government demonstrators fortified the barricade with their own security and were seen pushing the pro-government activists out of the area.

One pro-government activist said all the barricades, including the ones on the Independence Square (known as Maidan), should be removed as they were affecting ordinary citizens.

One of the Ukrainian opposition leaders, Oleh Tyahnubok, tried to negotiate with pro-government activists.

"Let's avoid provocation, because that's what the government wants, a conflict between the people. They want to see angry people fighting each other, to create an internal conflict inside the country," he said.

Tyahnubok also added that the government wanted to see protesters fighting each other to draw attention away from the reason behind the ongoing protests.

The scuffles between protesters on Khreshatykon street didn't last very long.

Anti-government demonstrations have been rocking Kiev for nearly two months.

The demonstrations were sparked by a decision by President Viktor Yanukovych to shelve a long-discussed economic and political treaty with the European Union.

Instead, Yanukovych chose to focus on improving ties with Russia and received a pledge of a 15 (b) billion US dollar bailout loan from the Kremlin to aid the troubled Ukrainian economy.

The protests swelled to hundreds of thousands after police violently dispersed several rallies.

AP TELEVISION

1. Wide of barricade of pro-European Union protesters on Kiev's main street, barbed wire in foreground

2. Various of anti and pro-government protesters gathered on street, some wearing red helmets (anti-government)

3. Various of protesters pushing each other

4. Mid of nationalist party "Svoboda" leader Oleh Tyahnubok talking to protesters

5. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Victoria (surname not given), pro-government activist:

"Ukrainians are not just people who live in Western Ukraine. That is absolutely all the people who live in Ukraine. And dear all, when people came to Maidan on December 1st, they were normal, ordinary people, Kiev residents who came. You can say I'm not right. But what is happening there right now is a big problem."

6. Wide of anti and pro-government protesters

7. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Oleh Tyahnubok, leader of Svoboda:

"Let's avoid provocation, because that's what the government wants, a conflict between the people. They want to see angry people fighting each other, to create an internal conflict inside the country, instead of with the government. So, lets not fight each other, because that's what the government wants."

8. Various of chanting pro-government protesters holding up posters reading (Ukrainian): "Out of Khreshatyk street"

9. Mid of anti-government security man separating protesters

10. Mid of protesters pushing each other

11. Wide top shot of anti and pro-government protesters, some wrapped in Ukrainian flags

12. Wide of barricade of anti-government protesters

13. Wide of security escorting one pro-government protester out of area

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Ukraine Protest
Title:
HD
Summary: Demo against new laws seen as restricting the rights of protesters
Story No: 927085
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/17/2014 03:21 PM
People: Viktor Yanukovych , Catherine Ashton
Subscription:

Around 300 protesters gathered outside the Presidential Administration Building in Kiev Friday to demonstrate against

anti-protest legislation adopted by the Ukrainian parliament on Thursday.

The controversial bills would significantly curb the rights to protest, free speech and the activity of non-governmental organisations and provide more power to the police, judges and lawmakers.

Many protesters on Friday had their faces painted with fake blood stains and mouths sealed with the word "dictatorship", as they demonstrated outside the government building.

One of the protest organisers, activist Volodymyr Viatrovuch, explained that it symbolised what would happen if the bills were passed.

"The goal of our action was to show the Ukrainians what would happen when the bills adopted yesterday come into effect. It means that they (authorities) will shut our mouths, it means that anybody who takes part in any action or defends this or that point of view, will face handcuffs and arrest," he said.

Viatrovuch also warned of a "slide back into Communism".

One of the protesters, who had her face painted red, imitating blood, said the legislation, if approved by the president, "would unleash dictatorship and terror."

"These bills are aimed not only against the participants of protest rallies, they would affect all the residents of Ukraine who would like to express their point of view and have free access to information or join a peaceful protest," said Yulia Romanuk.

The bills have yet to be signed by the president, and Viktor Yanukovych's office refused to say Friday if he supports them.

European Union foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton said Friday she was "deeply concerned" by the legislation and called on Yanukovych to revise it.

And in a statement released late Thursday, the US State Department called the laws "undemocratic" and said they contradict Ukraine's aspiration to a European future.

Ukraine's opposition leaders dubbed Thursday's legislation as unconstitutional and called for a big rally on Sunday to protest against the move.

Anti-government protests, sparked by Yanukovych's decision to freeze ties with the EU and tilt toward Russia instead, have rocked Kiev for nearly two months.

Demonstrations in Kiev's main Independence square, which were further fuelled by a violent police crackdown on demonstrators, peaked at hundreds of thousands last month.

AP TELEVISION

1. Wide top pan right of anti-government protesters gathered outside Presidential Administration Building in Kiev

2. Mid of protesters shouting UPSOUND: (Ukrainian) "Criminals, out!"

3. Mid of police barricade

4. Mid of man with face painted to look like his mouth is sewn shut, fake blood on his face

5. Mid of protesters with mouths sealed with signs reading (Ukrainian): "Dictatorship", man raising handcuffed hands in background

6. Mid of female protester with fake bloodstains painted on face, poster of beaten activist being held up behind her

7. Mid of protesters holding up posters, some have mouths sealed with signs reading (Ukrainian): "Dictatorship"

8. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Yulia Romanuk, protester:

"Yesterday, against the regulation and common sense, the majority of the Ukrainian parliament passed the budget and ten bills. The ten bills (if signed by president) would unleash dictatorship and terror. These bills are aimed not only against the participants of protest rallies, they would affect all the residents of Ukraine who would like to express their point of view and have free access to information or join a peaceful protest."

9. Wide of protest, shot from behind, Ukrainian and opposition flags in background

10. Mid of protesters

11. Close of man's hands in handcuffs

12. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Volodymyr Viatrovuch, leader of "The Public Sector of Maidan" community:

"The goal of our action was to show the Ukrainians what would happen when the bills adopted yesterday come into power. It means that they (authorities) will shut our mouths, it means that anybody who takes part in any action or defends this or that point of view, will face handcuffs and arrest. The level of punishment (according to the new law) is very strong and even stronger than those adopted in Russia. It means that if the laws come into effect, we are going to face dictatorship and slide back into communism."

13. Wide of protesters

14. Wide top shot of protesters and protest camp on Independence Square, men on rooftop of building in the foreground looking towards site

15. Various wide top shots of protesters' camp and stage

16. Wide of barricade on road to the protest camp

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Ukraine Protest
Title:
HD
Summary: Protesters on barricades as opposition urges continued truce; government ministry seized
Story No: 928030
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/24/2014 08:22 AM
People: Viktor Yanukovych
Subscription:

Hundreds of protesters continued to guard barricades in Kiev's Independence Square on Friday after top opposition leaders asked demonstrators to maintain a shaky truce with police.

Early on Friday, some protesters broke into the downtown building of the Ministry of Agricultural Policy, meeting no resistance.

Protesters said they planned to use the building as accommodation, and would not do any damage to the property.

The move followed the seizure of local governors' offices in several western regions on Thursday.

At least two people were killed in clashes between police and demonstrators this week.

After meeting with President Viktor Yanukovych on Thursday, opposition leaders said the president promised to ensure the release of dozens of detained protesters, and stop further detentions.

Although most protesters have for now heeded the calls of opposition leaders, some remain doubtful that anything will come of the negotiations with Yanukovych.

"I think our president has shown that he doesn't care about what is going on in Ukraine and his people, so I don't think negotiations will lead anywhere," said Anatoli, a demonstrator who did not give his last name, as he guarded a newly constructed barricade.

Another protester, also called Anatoli, said if it was not possible to resolve the situation peacefully, "we should be ready for war."

Ukraine's two month-long political crisis has shifted into a new phase after Yanukovych pushed through harsh anti-protest laws last week that were widely seen as an attempt to quash the demonstrations calling for his resignation.

The massive protests in Kiev erupted after Yanukovych spurned a pact with the European Union in favour of close ties with Russia, which offered Ukraine a 15 billion (b) USD bailout to help with the county's economic woes.

AP TELEVISION

1. Wide of demonstrators guarding barricade made overnight in Kiev's Independence Square

2. Mid of demonstrators guarding barricade

3. Wide of demonstrators standing on barricade facing police with burned out vehicle and tires in foreground

4. Mid of demonstrator

5. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Anatoli, last name not given, protester:

"Like every other person, I want peace, but if it is not possible to resolve this in a peaceful way, we should be ready for war."

6. Mid of police

7. Pan left and pull out from burning tires to wide of protesters

8. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Anatoli, last name not given, protester:

"I think our president has shown that he doesn't care about what is going on in Ukraine and to his people, so I don't think negotiations will lead anywhere. Especially on terms which guarantee the safety of the people on the Maidan (Maidan Nezalezhnosti, or Independence Square)."

9. Close of candles being lit during outdoor church service

10. Mid of people singing with priests

11. Wide of people singing near barricade

12. Mid of entrance to Ministry of Agricultural Policy, pan to broken window

13. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Alexander Mayesyenko, building occupation protest organiser: ++WALKING SHOT++

"As soon as we are done with cooperating with the Ministry, we will put up security, board off the entrances, put up signs, lock the doors. On each of the doors, we arranged with the Ministry to put up their stamps so we can lock all this down. After that we can start bringing people in."

14. Various of demonstrators occupying ministry

15. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Alexander Mayesyenko, building occupation protest organiser: ++ENDS WITH PAN TO MAN SLEEPING ON BENCH++

"As this is state property, and we are state citizens, we are not planning on doing any damage to the property."

16. Mid pan of building lobby

17. Mid of items from building and some protesters' belongings in pile

18. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Igor, no last name given, demonstrator:

"Well, everything is fine, everything is in its place, we have watered the flowers, cleaned the toilets."

19. Wide pan of Khreshchatyk street

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Ukraine Protest 5
Title:
HD
Summary: Opposition leaders react to clashes between protesters and riot police
Story No: 927317
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/19/2014 05:31 PM
People: Viktor Yanukovych , Nicolae Ceausescu , Muammar Gaddafi
Subscription:

Thousands of anti-government demonstrators clashed for hours with riot police in Ukraine's capital Sunday, attacking officers

with sticks, stones and flares after new laws were passed to stifle protests.

Dozens of people were injured.

The protesters, many wearing hard hats and gas masks in defiance of the new legislation, also used stun grenades and fire extinguishers on officers.

A police bus was set on fire, and some activists were seen breaking the pavement into stones.

Police responded by using tear gas and stun grenades of their own.

The violent scenes further escalated Ukraine's political crisis, which erupted two months ago after President's Viktor Yanukovych's decision to freeze ties with the European Union and seek a huge bailout from Russia.

Yanukovych caused uproar at home and abroad Friday when he approved a number of laws that limit Ukrainians' rights to protest, civic activism and free speech.

The laws prohibit demonstrators from wearing masks or hard hats at rallies.

Several opposition leaders addressed the crowds from a giant stage, wearing bright construction workers' hats.

A group of activists marched toward a police cordon blocking a city district housing government offices and began attacking riot police with sticks to push their way toward Ukraine's parliament building.

The crowd then swelled to thousands.

The blasts of stun grenades could be heard and plumes of smoke rose above the crowd.

Activists chanted "Shame!" and "Revolution."

Dozens of police and protesters were injured in the violence, but it wasn't immediately clear how serious the injuries were.

Opposition leader Vitali Klitschko spent hours attempting to stop the protesters from attacking police, but he himself was sprayed with a fire extinguisher.

Speaking to reporters later, Klitschko called for an end to violence and early presidential and parliamentary elections.

"Don't go the way of Ceausescu and Gadhafi," he urged Yanukovych, referring to the former leaders of Romania and Libya, Nicolae Ceausescu and Moammar Gadhafi.

Klitschko's top allies, who stood by his side at a large peaceful rally earlier in the day, didn't show up at the site of the clashes.

Instead, they called for a peaceful means of protest from nearby Independence Square and condemned the clashes.

Protest leader Arseniy Yatsenyuk condemned the violence, speaking from the stage as the clashes dragged late into the evening.

Other provisions of the controversial legislation restrict the activity of non-governmental groups funded by the West and seek to equate critical reporting with defamation.

Scores of opposition leaders and journalists have been attacked, harassed and prosecuted, since the anti-government protests started November 21.

Yanukovych's government has ignored previous demands made by the opposition.

Opposition leaders denounced Yanukovych's legislation as unconstitutional and called for the formation of parallel governing structures in the country.

++CLIENTS PLEASE NOTE: SHOTLIST UPDATED WITH CHANGE OF SOUNDBITE FOR SHOT 7++

AP TELEVISION

++NIGHT SHOTS++

1. Wide of anti-government protesters on Kiev's European square, police bus on fire in the background

2. Various of bus burning

3. Wide of grenade explosions, protesters scattering

4. Mid of smoke following grenade explosion, AUDIO: firing

5. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Vitali Klitschko, leader of "UDAR" opposition party (addressing President Viktor Yanukovych):

"You're fighting with your nation. Stop the escalation and don't force people using police and police forces. Stop the civil war against the citizens of Ukraine who have been calling for two months for you to listen to them. Take the police forces out of the streets. The only way is to change the authority. Early Presidential and Parliamentary elections. Find a power. Don't go the way of Ceausescu and Gadhafi. Anyway, the Ukrainian nation will win."

6. Low-angle shot of United Opposition leader Arseniy Yatsenyuk (left) and Oleh Tyahnybok, head of the opposition nationalist party, Svoboda, on stage addressing protesters

7. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Arseniy Yatsenyuk, leader of United Opposition:

"The peaceful European protest is our formula for victory. Our plan proclaimed today on Maidan is rule of the people in parliament (meaning that authority has to belong to ordinary Ukrainians), people's government. And I would like to empathise a gradual peaceful protest."

8. Wide of opposition leaders on stage

9. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Oleh Tyahnybok, leader of Svoboda:

"Every protest that happens in our country is a reaction to the Yanukovych regime."

10. Various of protesters in European Square, smoke and small explosions as smoke bombs and stun grenades are used

11. Mid of protesters beating drums

12. Various of protesters advancing towards burning bus and throwing projectiles

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Ukraine Protest 4
Title:
HD
Summary: Clashes between protesters and riot police after passage of anti-protest law, bus on fire
Story No: 927312
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/19/2014 04:04 PM
People: Viktor Yanukovych
Subscription:

Hundreds of protesters clashed with riot police in the centre of the Ukrainian capital, following the passage of harsh anti-protest legislation last week seen as part of attempts to quash anti-government demonstrations.

A group of radical activists began attacking riot police with sticks, trying to push their way towards the Ukrainian parliament building, which was cordoned off by rows of police and buses.

The protesters, many wearing hard hats and gas masks, used stun grenades and fire extinguishers and threw flares as they attacked police in riot gear.

Numerous explosions were heard and plumes of smoke rose above the crowd.

Activists chanted "Shame" and "Revolution."

Some were injured and medics were seen treating them.

Opposition leader Vitali Klitschko tried to stop the protesters from attacking police, but he came under attack.

The clashes occurred shortly after a large peaceful rally on Kiev's main square, part of the anti-government protests rocking Ukraine since President Viktor Yanukovych's decision to freeze ties with the European union and embrace Russia instead.

Since then, Moscow has promised a 15 billion US dollar bailout loan to aid Ukraine's struggling economy.

Scores of opposition leaders and journalists have been attacked, harassed and prosecuted, since the protests started on November 21.

Last week, Yanukovych caused uproar at home and abroad when he approved a number of laws that limit Ukrainians' rights to protest, civic activism and free speech.

The laws prohibit demonstrators from wearing masks or hard hats at rallies, prompting many to don theatrical masks and kitchen pots at Sunday's rally.

AP TELEVISION

1. Pan from man wearing breathing apparatus and burning bus to police and protesters

2. Wide of activists and riot police

3. Mid of police hiding behind riot shields

4. Protesters throwing stones towards police

5. Wide of activists

6. Pan from crowd to protesters throwing stones

7. Various of protesters

8. Burning bus

9. Pan of protesters throwing stones

10. Mid of protesters

11. Broken windscreen in vehicle

12. Wide of riot police

13. Wide of protesters running at police

14. Wide of protesters and police amidst smoke

15. Various of medics treating casualties

16. Wide of protesters

17. Mid of riot police

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Ukraine Protest 2
Title:
HD
Summary: Aftermath of fires and street battles between police and protesters
Story No: 927349
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/20/2014 04:31 AM
People: Viktor Yanukovych
Subscription:

Defiant protesters remained on the streets of Kiev early on Monday after violent clashes with police left dozens of officers and protesters injured.

On Sunday, anti-government protests in Ukraine's capital escalated into fiery street battles with police as thousands of demonstrators hurled rocks and firebombs to set police vehicles ablaze.

In the early hours of Monday, some protesters were still throwing projectiles - some ablaze - at police on the other side of a cordon of buses.

Others reinforced the barricades with pieces of metal or improvised structures while police could be seen behind a line of shields.

The violence was a sharp escalation of Ukraine's two-month political crisis, which has brought round-the-clock protest gatherings, that had been largely peaceful.

But anger rose substantially after President Viktor Yanukovych last week signed an array of laws severely limiting protests and banning the wearing of helmets and gas

masks.

"We are not just staying here. We are defending our rights because the latest changes to the law would make Ukraine a police state," said Valdemar, one of the protesters.

Many of Sunday's demonstrators wore hardhats and masks in defiance of the new laws.

They set several police buses on fire and some chased and beat officers.

Police responded with tear gas and stun grenades.

Water cannons were also fired at the protesters in temperatures of -8 degrees Celsius (18 degrees Fahrenheit), but the clashes continued.

Opposition leader Vitali Klitschko tried to persuade demonstrators to stop their unrest, but failed and was sprayed by a fire extinguisher in the process.

Klitschko later travelled to Yanukovych's suburban residence and said the president had agreed to negotiate.

Yanukovych said later on his Web site that he has tasked a working group, headed by national security council head Andriy Klyuev, to meet with opposition representatives to work out a solution to the crisis.

However, it was unclear if either side was prepared for real compromise; throughout the crisis, the opposition has insisted on the government's resignation and

calling early presidential elections.

The crisis erupted in November after Yanukovych's decision to shelve a long-discussed economic and political treaty with the European Union.

Instead, Yanukovych chose to focus on improving ties with Russia and received a pledge of a 15 (b) billion US dollar bailout loan from the Kremlin to aid the troubled

Ukrainian economy.

The decision sparked protests, which increased in size and determination after police twice violently dispersed demonstrators.

AP TELEVISION

++NIGHT SHOTS++

1. Wide of parts of destroyed buses near a small fire

2. Wide of protesters throwing flaming missiles

3. Mid of new barricade built by protesters

4. Pan from barricade to debris from clashes with police

5. Wide of a burned bus

6. Wide of a line of police shields

7. Various of protesters hitting a bin with sticks

8. Wide of protesters moving a structure to shield them from police

9. Wide of protesters throwing objects

10. Various of gathered protesters with covered faces

11. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Valdemar (full name unavailable), protester from the Donetsk region:

"We are not just staying here. We are defending our rights because the latest changes to the law would make Ukraine a police state."

12. Close of fire

13. Pan from fire to vehicles

14. Various of gathered protesters

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Ukraine Protest 6
Title:
HD
Summary: Clashes between protesters and riot police continue
Story No: 927328
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/19/2014 08:45 PM
People: Viktor Yanukovych
Subscription:

Clashes continued on Sunday night between riot police and protesters in the centre of the Ukrainian capital of Kiev.

A group of radical activists began attacking riot police with sticks, trying to push their way towards the Ukrainian parliament building, which was cordoned off by rows of police and buses.

Many of the riot police held their shields over their heads to protect themselves from the projectiles being thrown by demonstrators.

Numerous explosions were heard and plumes of smoke rose above the crowd.

Several people were injured in the demonstrations and an emergency team was seen carrying away one protester.

One protester, Svyatoslav, who only gave his first name, said the crowd was "ready to defend" their nation.

"We are Ukrainians, an independent nation, we have children and we are ready to defend. We don't have another choice. Ukraine is in our hands," he said.

Another protester, Ihor Zhuchenko, feared further clashes would be used by the government to "persecute" demonstrators.

The violence was a sharp escalation of Ukraine's two-month political crisis, which has brought round-the-clock protest gatherings, but had been largely peaceful.

The crisis erupted in November after President Viktor Yanukovych's decision to freeze ties with the European Union and seek a huge bailout from Russia.

The decision sparked protests, which increased in size and determination after police twice violently dispersed demonstrators.

But anger rose substantially after Yanukovych last week signed an array of laws severely limiting protests and banning the wearing of helmets and gas masks.

Many of Sunday's demonstrators wore hardhats and masks in defiance of the new laws.

They set several police buses on fire and some chased and beat officers.

AP TELEVISION

++NIGHT SHOTS++

1. Wide of small explosions and clouds of smoke in crowd of protestors

2. Wide of fire burning near protesters

3. Wide of riot police behind their shields, several of which are on fire

4. Wide of explosions in crowd

5. Mid of fire burning behind burnt out bus, small explosions and protesters throwing rocks

6. Wide of burnt out bus and protester throwing stones. Riot police can be seen in the background as well as the water stream from a hose

7. Close of protestors with helmets and shields

8. Wide of clashes between protesters and riot police

9. Close of explosions and activists throwing stones at riot police

10. Wide of emergency crew carrying injured person through crowd

11. Wide of ambulances

12. Close of ambulance lights

13. Various of tents near Independence Square

14. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Svyatoslav (no last name given), protester:

"We are clamped in a vice so much that only two choices are possible. First one is to leave this country, second one is to be under the Donetsk (refers to the president and his government) clan. We don't need any of them. We are Ukrainians, an independent nation, we have children and we are ready to defend. We don't have another choice. Ukraine is in our hands."

15. Mid of female activists in Independence Square

16. Wide of crowd gathered in Independence Square

17. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Ihor Zhuchenko, protester:

"It's obvious these actions can't get victory for the opposition. And this conflict is profitable for authorities. And in case the authorities do get a victory, these events will be used against protestors to persecute them and to confirm the propaganda of the authorities."

18. Mid of crowd in Independence Square

19. Close of woman with sticker on jacket reading, "Demand 1 - resignation of (Viktor) Yanukovych"

20. Close of sticker

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Ukraine Protest
Title:
HD
Summary: Protesters mobilise for rally at Independence Square, Bulatov friend gives update
Story No: 929307
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/02/2014 11:21 AM
People: Viktor Yanukovych , Yulia Tymoshenko
Subscription:

Thousands of Ukraine's opposition supporters continued to rally in the capital Kiev on Sunday against President Viktor Yanukovych's government.

Activists from some of the country's militant groups also attended the rally and declared they're ready to resume violence if the stalemate persists.

Their presence in the wider protest movement has been slowly growing over the past few weeks, with many becoming increasingly impatient with the failure of opposition leaders to achieve any of their demands.

The total number of so-called radical activists in the protests is difficult to estimate.

The militant group Pravy Sektor (Right Sector) alone claims to have some 300 "active fighters" in Kiev.

Another radical group, Spilna Sprava (Common Cause), which refuses to cooperate with the main opposition camp, claims to have thousands of supporters.

Their emergence is a worry to more moderate protest leaders, because some of the militant groups don't even support their goal of forging closer ties with the European Union, as they complain that the EU is too liberal about gay rights and immigration.

Meanwhile a close friend of the opposition supporter, Dmytro Bulatov, who claims he was abducted and tortured for more than a week, said on Sunday his condition was stable.

Andriy Tleyszhenko said he hoped Bulatov could be moved to a hospital in Germany later on Sunday.

"I hope that today (Sunday) he will leave the hospital for treatment abroad and the (Ukrainian) Foreign Minister will offer the green light for him to be moved as he promised before," said Tleyszhenko.

Bulatov was in charge of Automaidan, a group of car owners that took part in the protests against President Yanukovych.

The 35-year-old disappeared on 22 January and resurfaced more than a week later.

His claims that he was tortured have fuelled fears among anti-government activists that extra-judicial squads are being deployed to intimidate the protest movement.

The Interior Ministry said it was investigating Bulatov's story, but it also accused him of failing to cooperate.

AP TELEVISION

1. Wide of stage in Independence square and preparations for anti-government protest rally

2. Wide of crowds gathered near stage and flags

3. Close of EU flag with writing reading (Ukrainian) "Ukraine Choose the EU"

4. Various of female protesters holding anti-government signs and banners

5. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Petro, anti-government protester:

"People are expecting them (the Opposition Leaders) to bring good news."

6. Close-up of woman wearing a banner reading (Ukrainian) "Government, don't kill our children"

7. Mid of sign with photo of imprisoned former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko and EU/Ukrainian flags

8. Close of EU flags

9. Various of anti-government demonstrators gathered near stage for rally

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Natalya Kaftonyuk, 24, anti-government protester:

"It is supposed to be an informational meeting today so with opposition leaders they are supposed to tell what's going to happen next week. But people are going to... if there is going to be anything happening, so we came to hear what is our future."

11. Close of demonstrator listening to speeches and wearing a mask and helmet

12. Mid of crowd listening to speeches

13. Mid of people making speeches on stage

14. Wide of crowd and stage

15. Various of members of militant anti-government group "Pravy Sektor" (Right Sector) training as rally starts

16. SOUNDBITE (English) Olena Rozhenska, Anti-government Protestor from Kiev:

"I am loosing my hope, the next day we see changes. The situation is very dynamic and a lot of changes... we can see now. So I don't know what will be next day here still we do our are best to change something."

17. Various of supporters of nationalist opposition party "Svoboda" marching towards Independence Square

18. Wide of stage

19. Mid exterior of Boris Hospital in Kiev where activist Dmytro Bulatov is being treated for injuries allegedly sustained during kidnap and torture ordeal

20. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Andriy Tleyszhenko, Close Friend of Dmytro Bulatov:

"The condition of Mr Bulatov is stable. He sometimes loses consciousness. Because he was hit in the head he needs to have some rest but in case of transportation, he will be provided with a special transport car and plane or ambulance. I hope that today (Sunday) he will leave the hospital for treatment abroad and the (Ukrainian) Foreign Minister will offer the green light for him to be moved as he promised before."

21. Mid of ambulance outside the hospital

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Ukraine Protest 3
Title:
HD
Summary: Protesters welcome PM's resignation as parliament opens special session expected to repeal anti-protest laws
Story No: 928597
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 01/28/2014 10:40 AM
People: Mykola Azarov , Viktor Yanukovych , Vladimir Putin
Subscription:

Anti-government protesters in Ukraine reacted on Tuesday after the prime minister submitted his resignation, saying he hoped the move would help bring peaceful resolution to the crisis that has gripped the country for two months.

Mykola Azarov's resignation would remove one of the figures most despised by the opposition.

It must be accepted by President Viktor Yanukovych, but that appears to be only a formality.

Yanukovych last week offered the premiership to Arseniy Yatsenyuk, one of the opposition's top figures. Yatsenyuk turned down the offer on Monday.

In Kiev's Independence Square, where many demonstrators have dug in, erecting barricades and sleeping in tents, there was cautious optimism following news of Azarov's resignation.

"It is very good, he should have done it long ago," said Roman Pasuchenko, a professor from the western city of Lviv. "We are waiting for Yanukovych to do the same."

Father Pavel, a protester from outside Kiev, said the government had been "decapitated" and that others should follow Azarov and "leave together with the president."

Ukraine's opposition is also demanding Yanukovych's resignation and a call for new elections.

Azarov's resignation came as the parliament opened a special session at which it repealed harsh anti-protest laws that were imposed this month.

Those laws set off the police-protester clashes in which at least three protesters died.

On Tuesday, Volodymyr Rybak, the chairman of the Ukrainian Parliament, expressed "deepest condolences to all of the family and friends of those who have died".

Meanwhile, Yanukovych has said that an amnesty for dozens of protesters arrested in the demonstrations would be implemented only if protesters leave the streets and vacate buildings that they have occupied.

Opposition leader Oleh Tyahnyboh said on Tuesday that 'amnesty' was an inappropriate step "because amnesty is the recognition of one's fault".

He also said they were questions regarding transition procedures which the government wants to offer.

"We have not agreed to them yet," he said. "We will only now discuss that."

The pro-Western protests in Kiev began in November after Yanukovych shelved a long-planned political and economic treaty with the European Union, then accepted a huge bailout package from Russian President Vladimir Putin instead.

The crisis was aggravated in recent days after protesters and police clashed violently.

AP TELEVISION

1. Wide of anti-government barricades in Kiev's Independence Square

2. Mid of protesters at barricades, heavy smoke from nearby bonfire

3. Close of protesters at barricade

4. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Roman Pasuchenko, Professor from Lviv:

"It is very good (that Prime Minister Mykola Azarov has submitted his resignation), he should have done it long ago. We are waiting for (President Viktor) Yanukovych to do the same."

5. Close of pro EU flags in Independence Square

6. Mid of people walking in Independence Square

7. Wide of barricade

8. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Father Pavel, Protester from outside Kiev:

"I don't know what else the government can do without Azarov. The government has been decapitated and the rest should follow his steps and leave together with the president."

9. Various of riot police

10. Mid of chairmen of Ukrainian Parliament taking their seats

11. Extreme wide of Parliament

12. Cutaway of photographers

13. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Volodymyr Rybak, Chairman of the Parliament:

"We express our deepest condolences to all of the family and friends of those who have died. Let's honour the memory of the dead with a minute's silence."

14. Wide of parliamentary session

15. Mid of Parliament members standing up

16. Mid of them sitting down

17. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Oleh Tyahnyboh, Ukrainian opposition leader:

"For us, it's very important not to hear the word 'amnesty' as decriminalisation, because amnesty is the recognition of one's fault. For us, there are questions regarding transition procedures which they want to offer us. We have not agreed to them yet. We will only now discuss that."

18. Wide of Parliament

19. Various of entrance to Parliament

20. Wide of pro-Yanukovych rally outside Parliament

21. Mid of police officer

22. Mid of rally

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Ukraine Protest 2
Title:
HD
Summary: Thousands of anti-government protesters rally in central square
Story No: 929323
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/02/2014 02:37 PM
People: Viktor Yanukovych , Mykola Azarov , Yulia Tymoshenko
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About 20-thousand anti-government protesters gathered in the main square of the Ukrainian capital Kiev on Sunday, in one of the largest rallies in recent weeks.

Urging protesters to push forward with their demands, opposition leaders announced a new initiate led by the Council of Europe to put together an investigative committee to look into the crimes committed by security forces.

Leader of the opposition Svoboda party Oleh Tyahnybok asked that protesters gather evidence.

"And I would like to ask each one of you to join us in collecting these documents because the bigger the number and the more documents we collect, the more realistic a favourable court decision will be," he said.

Opposition leader Arseniy Yatsenyuk, who had just returned from the Munich Security Conference, said that there is a common understanding between the opposition and its "western partners" about what should be done in Ukraine.

"But first of all, the question is who will be executing this plan of change for Ukraine, as no one trusts this regime," he said.

Sunday's massive rally came as Viktor Yanukovych's office announced that the Ukrainian President was returning Monday after a short sick leave.

The sick leave was announced Thursday, with his office saying he had an acute respiratory illness.

Some opposition leaders were sceptical about it, however, and thought Yanukovych was disappearing from the limelight in preparation for imposing a state of emergency amid the deepest turmoil in Ukraine since the Orange Revolution in 2004-2005.

Yanukovych last week accepted the resignation of Prime Minister Mykola Azarov, but has not appointed a new one.

The president offered the premiership to Yatsenyuk, but he refused the post.

The leader of the opposition Udar party, Vitali Klitschko, who also attended the security conference, said that the situation in Ukraine was a major point of discussion in Munich.

"Everyone understands, as it's one of the largest countries in Europe, it has to have stability politically and in economy. Stability in Ukraine can bring stability in the whole region," he said.

Yanukovych has faced two months of large protests that have often paralysed Kiev

The protests started after he backed out of a long-awaited agreement to deepen ties with the European Union, but quickly came to encompass a wide array of discontent over corruption, heavy-handed police and dubious courts.

During Yanukovych's sick leave, a sense of stasis set in and neither side showed signs of movement.

But his return to work could bring new action.

AP TELEVISION

1. Wide of opposition leaders and activists gathered on stage in Kiev's Independence Square

2. Mid of leader of the opposition Fatherland Party, Arseniy Yatsenyuk

3. SOUNDBITE (Ukranian) Arseniy Yatsenyuk, leader of Ukraine's opposition Fatherland Party:

"We have reached an agreement that has been discussed in Ukraine. An international investigative committee will be established to review the crimes of the regime. Such a committee will be initiated by the Council of Europe."

4. Mid of opposition Oleh Tyahnybok, leader of opposition Svoboda party

5. SOUNDBITE (Ukranian) Oleh Tyahnybok, leader of Ukraine's opposition Svoboda party:

"And I would like to ask each one of you to join us in collecting these documents because the bigger the number and the more documents we collect, the more realistic a favourable court decision will be."

6. Wide of leader of the opposition Udar party Vitali Klitschko surrounded by media‬

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Vitali Klitschko, leader of the Ukraine's opposition Udar party:

"Right now, especially in Munich (at the Security Conference), the main point of discussion is the situation in Ukraine. Everyone understands that, as it's one of the largest countries in Europe, it has to have stability politically and economically. Stability in Ukraine can bring stability in the whole region."

8. Mid of security

9. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Arseniy Yatsenyuk, leader of the Ukraine's opposition Fatherland Party:

"We have a common understanding with our Western partners about what should be done in Ukraine and how much money it requires. But first of all, the question is who will be executing this plan of change for Ukraine, as no one trusts this regime."

10. Wide of crowd of anti-government protesters in front of stage with flags

11. Mid of flags

12. Mid of women in front of the stage, one holding picture of jailed former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko

13. Various of crowd

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