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DV OK School (VO)
Title:
SD
Summary: Search and rescue teams combed through a damaged school, homes and stores Tuesday morning looking for survivors of a massive tornado that tore a path of destruction through Moore, Oklahoma.
Story No: 836533
Source: AP
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 05/21/2013 12:00 PM
People:
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HEADLINE: Raw: Crews search for survivors of Okla. tornado

CAPTION: Search and rescue teams combed through a damaged school, homes and stores Tuesday morning looking for survivors of a massive tornado that tore a path of destruction through Moore, Oklahoma. (May 21)

DURATION: 1:18

AP TELEVISION

Moore, Oklahoma - May 21, 2013

1. Wide of search and rescue team looking through rubble of the Plaza Towers Elementary School

2. Wide of scene

3. Mid of worker trying to dig through debris

4. Wide of damaged neighborhood near school

5. Crews seen in distance through debris

6. Wide of house destroyed by tornado

7. Wide of urban search and rescue teams preparing to start looking for survivors

8. Mid of team member

9. Tight of patch on member's shirt reading, "National US&R Response System - FEMA"

10. Wide of downer power lines and trees in street

11. Rescuers walking through debris-strewn parking lot

12. Rescuers walking up to damaged CVS store

13. CVS employees telling rescuers all their employees have been accounted for

14. Rescuers walking through dark CVS store

15. Pan of debris outside CVS store

STORYLINE:

Emergency crews searched the broken remnants of an Oklahoma City suburb Tuesday for survivors of a massive tornado that flattened homes and demolished an elementary school.

At least 24 people were killed, including at least nine children, and those numbers were expected to climb.

As the sun rose over the shattered community of Moore, the state medical examiner's office cut the estimated death toll by more than half but warned that the number was likely to climb again.

Firemen combed through a large debris pile that stood where Plaza Towers Elementary School once stood.

The storm ripped off the roof, knocked down walls and turned the playground into a mass of twisted plastic and metal as students and teachers huddled in hallways and bathrooms.

Seven of the nine dead children were killed at the school.

Other search-and-rescue teams moved at dawn, taking over from the 200 or so emergency responders who worked all night.

FEMA has sent a special team to Oklahoma's emergency operations center to help out and dispatch resources.

The National Weather Service issued an initial finding that the tornado was an EF-4 on the enhanced Fujita scale, the second most powerful type of twister.

It estimated that the twister was at least half a mile wide.

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US Tornado 5
Title:
HD
Summary: Aftermath, eyewitness; as search for survivors of the tornado continues
Story No: 892940
Source: NOAA , AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 05/21/2013 10:46 PM
People: David Thewlis
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

AP TELEVISION

Moore, Oklahoma, US - 21 May 2013

1. Michael and Josey Ramirez cleaning up debris of their destroyed home

2. SOUNDBITE: (English) Michael Ramirez, Moore resident:

"I'm just grateful that we weren't here. You know, my wife's with me, so that's all I could ask for."

3. Wide of Michael and Josey Ramirez clearing up debris

4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Josey Ramirez, Moore resident:

"He didn't want me to have it, so I can't have it now ... (pan to destroyed car) It was a beautiful car."

5. Wide of destroyed house with US flag flying in front garden

6. SOUNDBITE: (English) David Wheeler, Moore resident reunited with his 8-year-old son Gabriel:

"You know, I was on the phone with my mum and she said that my son's school got hit and it was just terrifying. You know, my dad passed away a few years ago and I was thinking of my dad and just how terrifying it was to lose him and I just did not want to lose my son."

7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Gabriel Wheeler, Briarwood Elementary school student:

"It was really hard, I thought I was going to die, because I was lifted up in the air, my glasses fell off. It was 'thump, thump' and the ceiling came off and all this stuff came on me."

8. SOUNDBITE: (English) David Wheeler, Moore resident reunited with his 8-year-old son Gabriel:

"(Teacher) Miss (Julie) Simon took the kids from, I believe, a hallway into a closet area and she pushed them down, held them down, told them that they were just going to practise what they did before, and that's what they did, and Gabe was on one side and another student was on another, and all the other kids, and the storm hit, Gabe said it sounded like a train, and like four or five pops. The next thing he knows he's drenched, all wet and debris, everything was all over him. He and the teachers pulled themselves out."

9. Close-up of Gabriel Wheeler, UPSOUND: reporter: (English) "Describe what it was like when you saw your Daddy"

10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Gabriel Wheeler, Briarwood Elementary school student:

"(Sighs) I loved it."

11. SOUNDBITE: (English) David Wheeler, Moore resident reunited with his 8-year-old son Gabriel:

"It is the best feeling, knowing that your kids are OK."

12. Wide pan of destruction

13. Various of people picking through debris of destroyed homes

14. SOUNDBITE: (English) Sharon Camper, Moore resident:

"It's just hard to imagine that one day you walk out of your house and the next few minutes you come back and it looks like this. It's just ... I don't know."

15. Wide of destroyed homes

16. Mid of cars and debris

17. Wide of house without roof

18. Pan of destroyed homes

19. Mid of US flag tied to tree stump

20. Pan of destroyed home

NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION (NOAA)

Oklahoma, US - 20 May 2013

++MUTE++

21. Satellite image of clouds, and tornado forming

STORYLINE:

Picking up the pieces after a devastating tornado ripped through their suburban Oklahoma City neighbourhood, Michael and Josey Ramirez counted their blessings on Tuesday.

Although their house was badly damaged, Michael Ramirez was "just grateful" he hadn't been there at the time.

He said he and his wife consider themselves lucky to have escaped without injury.

Josey Ramirez admitted she hadn't sought her husband's permission to buy the car that now sits destroyed in their driveway.

"He didn't want me to have it, so I can't have it now," she joked.

The tornado that smashed through this suburb of 56-thousand people flattened Plaza Elementary school, where at least seven were killed on Monday afternoon.

The twister also slammed into Briarwood Elementary school, where all of the children appeared to have survived.

Students and parents recounted stories on Tuesday of brave teachers who sheltered their pupils.

At Briarwood Elementary, a third-grade teacher didn't think sheltering in the hallways looked safe, so she ushered some of the children into a closet, said David Wheeler, one of the fathers who tried to rush to the school after the tornado hit.

The teacher shielded Wheeler's 8-year-old son, Gabriel, with her arms and held him down as the tornado caused the school roof to collapse and started lifting students upward with a pull so strong that it knocked glasses from the children's faces, Wheeler said.

"It was 'thump, thump' and the ceiling came off and all this stuff came on me," Gabriel said.

"She pushed them down, held them down, told them that they were just going to practise what they did before, and that is what they did, " Wheeler said.

The boy's back was cut and bruised and gravel was embedded in his head, Wheeler said.

It took almost three hours for father and son to be reunited.

An emergency official said Oklahoma has reinforced tornado shelters in more than 100 schools across the state, but the two that were hit by this week's storms did not have them.

The director of the Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management told reporters it was up to each jurisdiction to set priorities for which schools get limited funding for safe rooms.

He said a shelter would not necessarily have saved more lives at the Plaza Towers Elementary School, but added that authorities are going to review which schools have safe rooms and try to get them in more schools across the state.

The National Weather Service said the tornado that hit Moore was a top-of-the-scale EF-5 twister with winds of at least 200 miles per hour (321 kph).

A spokeswoman said the agency upgraded the tornado based on a damage assessment team's findings.

The tornado's path was 17 miles long (27 km) and 1.3 miles (2 km) wide. It was the year's first EF-5 tornado in the US.

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Subjects: Property damage , Tornadoes , School safety , Natural disasters , Weather , General news , Tornadoes , Accidents and disasters , Education issues , Social issues , Social affairs , Education issues , Education , Government and politics
People: David Thewlis
Organisations: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, United States government
Locations: Oklahoma , United States , North America
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US Tornado
Title:
HD
Summary: Mother recounts dramatic bid to rescue her daughter from deadly storm
Story No: 893305
Source: AP TELEVISION , AP PHOTOS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 05/24/2013 07:43 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

AP PHOTOS - No Access Canada/ For Broadcast use only - Strictly No Access Online or Mobile

Moore, Oklahoma - 20 May 2013

1. STILL: LaTisha Garcia holding daughter Jazmin Rodriguez after tornado

AP TELEVISION

Moore, Oklahoma - 23 May, 2013

SOUNDBITE (English) LaTisha Garcia, Mother of Jazmin Rodriguez:

"I started running towards the school. Asked the teacher where my daughter's school or where her class was. And she said well, they're still trying to pull them out. And right when I ran up to ask if I could help start pulling, you know, people are trying to help. Some guy just handed her to me."

2. Wide of damaged home

3. SOUNDBITE (English) LaTisha Garcia, Mother of Jazmin Rodriguez:

"She said all she really remembers is them telling them to get in the position for tornadoes. She remembers everything hitting her back, the noise, the kids screaming and crying. And she remembers the wind at her feet. And she said when she felt everything hit her back, she just tried her best to push everything off of her, and then she said she started getting light-headed, but she just remembered to keep breathing."

AP PHOTOS - No Access Canada/ For Broadcast use only - Strictly No Access Online or Mobile

Moore, Oklahoma - 20 May 2013

4. STILL: LaTisha Garcia holding daughter Jazmin Rodriguez after tornado

AP TELEVISION

Moore, Oklahoma - 23 May, 2013

5. SOUNDBITE (English) LaTisha Garcia, Mother of Jazmin Rodriguez:

"I only recognised her from her clothes. My mind was so in different places, I couldn't even remember what she wore that day. But right when I seen her, I knew that it was her. But it was amazing how, when I was running right up to the school to start digging for her, someone just came out of the blue and handed her to me. They didn't even really know if I was her mom, they just, you know, I just said 'Oh My God, Jazmin'. I just ran to her, and put her in my arms. They were just so busy trying to help other people so I had to take over from that point."

6. Damaged playground

7. Damaged building

8. Driving shot past widespread destruction

9. Wrecked car

10. SOUNDBITE (English) LaTisha Garcia, Mother of Jazmin Rodriguez:

"Kind of just weaved our way out of the neighbourhood in a sheriff's SUV, when we got to Telephone Road, it was kind of overwhelming seeing the hospital was hit too. So I didn't really know where I was going to take her."

11. Various of damaged hospital

12. SOUNDBITE (English) LaTisha Garcia, Mother of Jazmin Rodriguez:

"Is the time going on going to damage her more if she is damaged? It just bothered me a lot."

13. Car approaching house

14. LaTisha Garcia and daughter Jazmin Rodriguez leave house

15. SOUNDBITE (English) Jazmin Rodriguez, Tornado survivor, Daughter of LaTisha Garcia:

"I know she's always there for me and so I wanted her a lot."

16. Various, Garcia and Rodriguez walk back into home

STORYLINE:

A massive tornado was carving its way through town. There was no time to hesitate. LaTisha Garcia had to get to her children.

And so she raced against the storm. She had 30 miles (48 kilometres) to cover from her job in Edmond to Plaza Towers Elementary School, where her 8-year-old daughter Jazmin Rodriguez is a third grader. She lost.

The tornado got there first, and the destruction kept her from driving the final few hundred yards. And so she got out of her car and ran, arriving to find little left of the school and almost nothing of the neighbourhood. Panic set in.

Survivors of the storm were frantic, pulling children from the twisted metal and piles of concrete rubble that remained of what was once a school. She knew her three youngest children were safe at their daycare, but Jazmin was somewhere inside the rubble. Terror came next.

"Right when I ran up to ask if I could start pulling people out or try to help, some guy just handed her to me," Garcia said. "I only recognised her from her clothes. My mind was in so many different places, I couldn't even remember what she wore that day."

Finally, relief. The emotion seared on her face, she scooped her daughter into her arms and set off across the now barren landscape away from the place where seven of Jazmin's schoolmates had died.

An Associated Press photographer, Sue Ogrocki, captured the moment: Mother and daughter, clutching each other, making their way to safety through a decimated neighbourhood.

All that stood behind them was a tree stripped of its limbs and bark, brutally wrapped in sheet metal by the storm.

The picture was published on hundreds of front pages around the world, becoming one of the enduring images from the storm.

Garcia was exhausted after carrying her daughter to the parking lot, where a paramedic placed her on a backboard and rushed her to a nearby hospital. As they pulled into the parking lot of the medical centre, emotions flooded over her again as she realised that building also had been decimated by the twister.

"It was kind of overwhelming seeing the hospital was hit too," she said, her voice quivering.

She also was gripped by what her daughter shared about the frightening moments inside the school as she and her classmates took shelter in a hallway as the storm approached.

"She said all she really remembers is them telling them to get in the position for tornadoes. She remembers everything hitting her back, the noise, kids screaming and crying," Garcia said.

"She said when she felt everything hit her back, she tried her best to just push everything off of her, and then she said she started getting light-headed but that she just remembered to keep breathing."

Jazmin ended up with bumps and bruises, but no long lasting injuries from the ordeal.

And although Garcia's home a few blocks from the school was reduced to a pile of rubble, she's thankful Jazmin and her three younger children all survived.

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DV Okla AP Aerials (VO)
Title:
SD
Summary: The National Weather Service says the tornado that hit Moore was a top-of-the-scale EF-5 twister with winds of at least 200 mph. It cut a path 17 miles long and 1.3 miles wide. Aerial video shows the path of destruction.
Story No: 836506
Source: AP Television , Google
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 05/21/2013 12:00 PM
People:
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A precise count is difficult to come by, but officials at four hospitals in the Oklahoma City area say they've treated hundreds of patients, including dozens of children, since yesterday's deadly tornado struck.

About 60 patients remain hospitalized, though some are expected to be released today. The storm killed at least 24 people, including at least nine children.

But the fire chief in Moore, perhaps the hardest hit community, says he's "98 percent sure" there are no more victims or survivors under the rubble.

Fire Chief Gary says every damaged home has been searched at least once, and that his goal is to conduct three searches of each location just to be sure.

He's hopeful the work could be completed by nightfall, though heavy rains have slowed efforts and soaked debris piles.

The National Weather Service says the tornado that hit Moore was a top-of-the-scale EF-5 twister with winds of at least 200 mph. It cut a path 17 miles long and 1.3 miles wide.

HEADLINE: Raw: Aerial view of Moore tornado damage

CAPTION: The National Weather Service says the tornado that hit Moore was a top-of-the-scale EF5 twister with winds of at least 200 mph. It cut a path 17 miles long and 1.3 miles wide. Aerial video shows the path of destruction. (May 21)

AP TELEVISION

Moore, Oklahoma - May 21, 2013

1. Various aerials of tornado damage

GOOGLE - MANDATORY COURTESY

Moore, Oklahoma- Date Unknown

2. STILL AERIAL PHOTO of Plaza Towers Elementary School before tornado

AP TELEVISION

Moore, Oklahoma- May 21, 2013

3. STILL AERIAL PHOTO of destroyed Plaza Towers Elementary

GOOGLE - MANDATORY COURTESY

Moore, Oklahoma- Date Unknown

4. STILL AERIAL PHOTO of Briarwood Elementary before tornado

AP TELEVISION

Moore, Oklahoma- May 21, 2013

5. STILL AERIAL PHOTO of destroyed Briarwood Elementary

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US Tornado
Title:
HD
Summary: Tour of school flattened by tornado, killed boy's family react, first funeral
Story No: 893236
Source: FAMILY HANDOUT , AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 05/23/2013 09:22 PM
People:
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SHOTLIST:

AP TELEVISION

23 May 2013

1. Mid of wrecked sign in front of ruins of Plaza Towers Elementary School

2. Wide of rubble where Plaza Towers Elementary School used to stand

3. Twisted metal and debris in tree outside school

4. Zoom out from children's games on bookshelf in what is left of classroom

5. Wide of Moore city councilman Mark Hamm looking at school wreckage

6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Mark Hamm, Moore City Councilman:

"We're standing right in the middle of the epicentre of the storm, the path, you can look there and just see how it came through."

7. Various of destroyed school

8. Teacher's desk in middle of rubble

9. Close of contents of desk drawer, still intact

10. Pan of elementary school classroom

11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Glen Lewis, Mayor of Moore:

"There were several hundred people in this building when this happened, so you got to wonder how only seven people died in this building and how many people survived. How in the world could you possibly survive in a situation like this? This is absolutely ground zero and it's complete devastation all around us."

12. Destroyed classroom

13. Wide of mangled swing-sets in what used to be playground

14. Zoom out from clock in rubble to wide

FAMILY HANDOUT

Recent - date unknown

15. STILL of 8-year-old Kyle Davis (right), who died in storm, along with his sister Kaylee (left) and his mother, Mikki Davis (middle)

AP TELEVISION

22 May 2013

16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Mikki Davis, mother of 8-year-old tornado victim Kyle Davis:

"The closer I got to the school, the harder it got, because I could see the houses were pretty much gone or levelled. By the time I got to the school, my cousin had met up with me and I pretty much kind of collapsed in his arms and he kept telling me: 'It's OK, we're going to find Kyle, it's fine.'"

17. Tilt down from Kyle's sister, Kaylee, to her holding framed photograph of him

DAVIS FAMILY HANDOUT

Recent, exact date unknown

18. STILL of 8-year-old tornado victim Kyle Davis

AP TELEVISION

22 May 2013

19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Kaylee Davis, sister of 8-year-old tornado victim Kyle Davis:

"He was a special brother. He was kind to me. He meant everything to me."

DAVIS FAMILY HANDOUT

Recent, exact date unknown

20. STILL of Kyle and Kaylee Davis posing with Father Christmas

AP TELEVISION

22 May 2013

21. SOUNDBITE: (English) Mikki Davis, Mother of 8-year-old tornado victim Kyle Davis:

"All I can tell parents now is, I've been telling people, 'Hug your children'. I mean, I don't care if you're walking out to the store, 'I'll be right back.' Tell your children you love them. You don't know what's going to happen the next minute. Nobody is promised tomorrow."

DAVIS FAMILY HANDOUT

Recent, exact date unknown

22. STILL of 8-year-old tornado victim Kyle Davis with his grandfather

AP TELEVISION

23 May 2013

23. Exterior shot of funeral home where services for 9-year-old Antonia Candelaria, another victim at Plaza Towers Elementary School, was held

24. Cars driving through high waters in front of funeral home

25. Close of high water

26. People standing under shelter outside funeral home, waiting for rain to subside, one mourner walks away

FAMILY HANDOUT, COURTESY BRANDIE CANDELARIA

Unknown location and date

27. STILL of Antonia Candelaria, who was killed when tornado struck Plaza Towers Elementary School in Moore

STORYLINE:

Officials in the devastated town of Moore, Oklahoma gave the media access on Thursday to the Plaza Towers Elementary School, where seven students were killed in a tornado.

Two elementary schools were hit by the Monday's storm, but Plaza Towers was levelled: the one-storey building had barely a wall left standing.

Moore City Councilman Mark Hamm gave the tour for the first time, walking through the rubble of what used to be classrooms.

"We're standing right in the middle of the epicentre of the storm, the path, you can look there and just see how it came through," Hamm said, surrounded by rubble.

The medical examiner reported that six of the children who died at Plaza Towers suffocated after being buried under a mass of bricks, steel and other materials as the building collapsed.

A seventh child who died there, 8-year-old Kyle Davis, was killed instantly by an object - perhaps a large piece of stone or a beam - that fell on the back of his neck.

Moore Mayor Glen Lewis said the death toll at the school could have been much higher.

"There were several hundred people in this building when this happened," Lewis said, standing at the site.

"You got to wonder how only seven people died in this school and how many people survived. How in the world could you possibly survive in a situation like this?"

Lewis credited the media with alerting the public that a tornado was coming, and citizens, both in the school and across the area, for quickly taking safety precautions.

For the victims' families, meanwhile, the mourning is only beginning.

Kyle Davis began his day on Monday just like any other.

Hours later, when the tornado siren went off, he took shelter in the school's gymnasium with dozens of other students.

His mother, Mikki, soon made her way to the school to look for her son.

"The closer I got to the school, the harder it got, because I could see the houses were pretty much gone or levelled," she said.

"By the time I got to the school, my cousin had met up with me and I pretty much kind of collapsed in his arms and he just kept on telling me, 'It's OK, we're going to find Kyle, it's fine.'"

Search and rescue teams combed the school all night for the missing.

They didn't find Kyle until the next day, when authorities had to tell Mikki that during the storm, a large object fell on Kyle's neck, killing him.

Kyle's 9-year-old sister also attended Plaza Towers Elementary. She escaped unharmed.

"He was a special brother," Kaylee said. "He was kind to me. He meant everything to me."

Meanwhile, the first of the funerals, for a nine-year-old girl who was also killed at Plaza Towers School, took place on Thursday morning.

A photo released by her family showed the girl, Antonia Candelaria, beaming with a big smile and wearing a white sun hat.

The third-grader loved to sing and recently auditioned to sing in a talent show scheduled for the last day of school.

She died along with her best friend and next-door neighbour, Emily Conatzer.

Twenty-four people died in the storm, including a total of 10 children.

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DV Tornado Update
Title:
SD
Summary: Workers raced Tuesday to complete the search for survivors and the dead in the Oklahoma City suburb where a mammoth tornado claimed 24 lives. Scientists concluded the storm was a rare and extraordinarily powerful type of twister known as an EF5.
Story No: 836508
Source: AP , Google
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 05/21/2013 12:00 PM
People:
Subscription:

HEADLINE: Families begin returning to their homes in Moore

CAPTION: Workers raced Tuesday to complete the search for survivors and the dead in the Oklahoma City suburb where a mammoth tornado claimed 24 lives. Scientists concluded the storm was a rare and extraordinarily powerful type of twister known as an EF5. (May 21)

1:07

AP TELEVISION

Moore, Oklahoma - May 21, 2013

1. Tracking shot of damaged homes

2. Close of household items

++SHOT 3 PARTIALLY COVERED BY VIDEO++

3. SOUNDBITE (English) No name given, Moore resident (Transcribed Below)

4. Aerial view of damage

5. Panning shot of debris

6. Tracking shot of debris

7. Wide shot of damaged building

8. Panning shot of debris, close of cellar

++SHOT 9 PARTIALLY COVERED BY VIDEO++

9. SOUNDBITE (English) No name given, Moore resident (Transcribed Below)

GOOGLE - MANDATORY COURTESY GOOGLE

Moore, Oklahoma- Date Unknown

10. STILL AERIAL PHOTO of Briarwood Elementary before tornado

AP

Moore, Oklahoma - May 21, 2013

11. STILL AERIAL PHOTO of destroyed Briarwood Elementary

GOOGLE - MANDATORY COURTESY GOOGLE, AP CLIENTS ONLY

Moore, Oklahoma- Date Unknown

12. STILL AERIAL PHOTO of Plaza Towers Elementary School before tornado

AP

Moore, Oklahoma- May 21, 2013

13. STILL AERIAL PHOTO of destroyed Plaza Towers Elementary

14. STILL AERIAL PHOTO of destroyed Briarwood Elementary

15. STILL AERIAL PHOTO of destroyed Plaza Towers Elementary

AP TELEVISION

Moore, Oklahoma - May 21, 2013

16. Tracking shot of damaged homes

17. Panning shot of damaged homes

VOICE-OVER SCRIPT:

RESIDENTS OF MOORE, OKLAHOMA ARE BEGINNING TO SEARCH THROUGH DEBRIS --

WHERE THEIR HOMES ONCE STOOD - JUST OVER 24 HOURS BEFORE.

SOUNBITE (English) Jessica Ellard, family lives in Moore:

"luckily this chest preserved some stuff, the rest is ruined."

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE CONFIRMED WHAT IMAGE --

AFTER IMAGE --

OF DEVASTATION AND DESTRUCTION ALREADY SHOWED.

THIS WAS NO ORDINARY TWISTER.

INSTEAD IT WAS AN E-F-5 -- A RARE AND EXTRAORDINARLY POWERFUL TORNADO --

WITH WINDS MORE THAN 200 MILES PER HOUR.

SOUNDBITE (English) No Name Given, Moore Resident:

"We were in the cellar and it was loud, loud loud and sounded like stuff falling on it and it was just loud roaring noise."

TWO ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS TOOK A DIRECT HIT -- THE DESTRUCTION CAN BE SEEN IN THESE BEFORE AND AFTER IMAGES.

MIRACULOUSLY -- EVERYONE FROM BRIARWOOD ELEMENTARY SURVIVED.

SEVEN CHILDREN WERE KILLED AT PLAZA TOWERS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL.

24 PEOPLE WERE DIED OVERALL --

THE FIRE CHIEF SAYS HE'S CONFIDENT THERE ARE NO MORE BODIES OR SURVIVORS IN THE RUBBLE.

SIGOUT - Bob McCall/Associated Press

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USA: OKLAHOMA: TORNADO AFTERMATH LATEST (3)
Title:
SD
Summary: USA: OKLAHOMA: TORNADO AFTERMATH LATEST (3)
Story No: 124263
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 05/05/1999 04:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

English/Nat

Oklahomans in the United States have begun counting their losses following the deadliest tornadoes in five decades.

Damage estimates are mounting and the full picture of devastation is growing clear.

Where their houses once stood, many people found nothing but rubble.

At least 43 people were killed by the deadly twisters that hit Oklahoma and Kansas on Monday.

Hundreds were injured and thousands of homes destroyed.

Residents of Oklahoma City began trying to rebuild their lives Wednesday by salvaging what they could of the old ones.

Police had kept the hardest hit areas off limits until thousands of people returned home.

But stunned residents found they had little to come home too.

Piles of debris stood in place of their houses.

Most people searched frantically for the irreplaceable - photos, letters and momentos.

This young woman was relieved to find a picture of her deceased grandparents.

And as she combed through the wreckage of what was her home, Sheila Mann said she was grateful just to be alive.

The twister smashed her home, ripping even the foundation from underneath her.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"I was exactly laying underneath there scrunched. I mean, I told my friends I wouldn't be able to get back in there because of the way it scrunched me in there. I had about this much space to breathe in and I had a little pocket there. And, I hollered and I heard some firemen talking and they came over and said, 'Keep hollering until we get over to you.' And I did, and I had a phone with me that wasn't working, and I kept hitting and they got all of this stuff off of me and got me out of it."

SUPER CAPTION: Sheila Mann, Tornado Survivor

And although residents struggled to clean-up, most of the debris will be cleared by a bulldozer.

Jay Holland's home was destroyed - he said he could only take things one day at a time.

Other residents said that as long as their families were safe - nothing else mattered.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"First day to get back in here and see what is salvageable if anything. We'll go from there. I don't know what else..I mean we're all kind of taking one step at a time I guess."

SUPER CAPTION: Jay Holland, Tornado Victim

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"There's five generations of stuff in this house, and it's not worth anything. This (pointing to family) is what's worth something."

SUPER CAPTION: Bonnie Gates, Tornado Victim

But whilst some residents said they were glad just to be alive, others were still clearly stunned by the devastation.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"It's terrible. Look at that. It's terrible. Look. Look at that. It's unbelievable. I thought this was suppose to be only in the movies, not reality."

SUPER CAPTION: Maria Pagonias, Tornado Victim

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says 76 twisters cut through the Midwest in the United States on Monday.

The largest was a category F-Five tornado, that cut a 28 kilometer (19 mile) gash through parts of Oklahoma City.

It was the strongest to hit Oklahoma in 17 years and losses are estimated to run into hundreds of (m) millions of dollars.

The damage caused in just a few minutes is likely to take months to clean-up.

Oklahoma City and Moore, Oklahoma, U-S - May 5, 1999

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

1. Medium shot of people combing through destroyed houses, pull out to extreme wide shot of devastated street

2. Mangled truck lies against building

3. Woman throws door off pile of rubble

4. Girl holds out photo she found of her deceased grandparents

5. Pan what used to be Sheila Mann's home

6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Sheila Mann, Tornado Survivor

7. Close-up of photos and letters that were salvaged by the Mann family

8. Close-up of American flag, pull out to rubble everywhere

9. Woman stands in front of rubble, "Need Dozer" sign spray painted on board

10. Jay Holland goes through debris

11. Jay Holland, Tornado Victim

12. Bonnie Gates, Tornado Victim

13. Maria Pagonias salvages her belongings

14. SOUNDBITE: (English) Maria Pagonias, Tornado Victim

Moore, Oklahoma

15. Wide shot of destroyed neighborhood

16. Devastated homes

17. Neighbours hug each other

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USA: OKLAHOMA: TORNADO AFTERMATH LATEST (2)
Title:
SD
Summary: USA: OKLAHOMA: TORNADO AFTERMATH LATEST (2)
Story No: 124213
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 05/05/1999 04:00 AM
People: James Lee Witt , Al Gore
Subscription:

English/Nat

In the U-S states of Oklahoma and Kansas, homeowners who were evacuated during Monday's tornadoes have spent Wednesday trying to salvage what they can of their homes and their belongings.

On Wednesday morning in the badly hit Oklahoma town of Moore, residents queued up for permission to return to their neighbourhoods.

Many people were bracing themselves for their first visit to their homes to see what devastation the killer tornadoes had wrought.

At least 43 people were killed and hundreds of others injured when twisters tore through the Midwest on Monday.

Cars lined up early on Wednesday morning in the town of Moore, filled with homeowners anxious to get through police barricades and back to their houses.

Many residents were frustrated that television cameras, reporters, and police have been allowed in, but they have been kept out.

While some have walked around the barricades and seen the devastation, many have not seen the rubble on the ground where their homes once stood.

Lieutenant Chris West of the Oklahoma Highway Patrol says when they are allowed back home, many people will be unprepared for how little is left of their material possessions.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"Today, they're going to go in for the first time and they're going to see that it's in rubble and we're going to see the emotion. We're going to see them crying. Yesterday I went in and saw some of the people that walked up on their house. The emotions range from wailing and crying to laughing, people actually laughing. It's just the way that they were dealing with it. One guy found a "For Sale" sign under some rubble. He went and stuck it up in his yard."

SUPER CAPTION: Lieutenant Chris West, Oklahoma Highway Patrol

Police patrols have been mounted to patrol barricaded neighborhoods and discourage looting - even though in many places, there seems to be little left to steal.

Shelters have been set up for the hundreds who were left homeless.

Damage estimates are running in the hundreds of (m) millions of dollars.

But the director of the federal organisation leading the clean-up says it's the emotional toll, not the monetary loss which will be the most difficult.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"We can rebuild a community. But the challenge I think is getting people through the stages they go through - the shock, the frustration, the anger. And making sure that we help them through the process. Our community relations teams are here working with the state emergency management. As long as we can kind of help hold a hand, and get through that process, then it'll move much faster."

SUPER CAPTION: James Lee Witt, Director, Federal Emergency Management Agency

A string of extreme thunderstorms unleashed 76 twisters in five states on Monday.

At least 43 people were killed and hundreds injured in Kansas and Oklahoma.

The same weather system produced another tornado in northeast Texas on Tuesday, which claimed one more life.

The worst twister tore through Oklahoma over a four-hour period, destroying more than 15-hundred houses in Oklahoma City alone.

While the tornadoes came and went within hours, the clean-up will take much longer.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"To me day three is really day one of getting their lives back together."

SUPER CAPTION: Lieutenant Chris West, Oklahoma Highway Patrol

Vice President Al Gore will visit the area on Thursday, to get a first-hand look at the widespread carnage.

Some areas of Kansas and Oklahoma have been declared federal disaster areas.

Moore, Oklahoma, USA, 5 May, 1999

1. Wide shot of people lined up in their cars, waiting to get permission to return to their homes

2. Close-up of police checking identification

3. Wide shot of devastated neighbourhood

4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Lieutenant Chris West, Oklahoma Highway Patrol

5. Various shots of National Guard patrolling neighbourhood to keep out looters

6. Set-up shot of James Lee Witt

7. Wide shot shelter for evacuated home owners

8. SOUNDBITE: (English) James Lee Witt, Director, Federal Emergency Management Agency

9. Wide shot of destroyed homes, national guard patrols

10. Close-up crumpled car

11. Close-up torn roof

12. SOUNDBITE: (English) Lieutenant Chris West, Oklahoma Highway Patrol

13. Wide shot of police patrolling devastated street

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Subjects: Tornadoes , Natural disasters , Property damage , Emergency management , Weather , General news , Tornadoes , Accidents and disasters , Government and politics
People: James Lee Witt , Al Gore
Organisations: Oklahoma Highway Patrol, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Oklahoma state government, United States government
Locations: Oklahoma , United States , North America
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US TORNADO 3
Title:
SD
Summary: Emergency crews searched the broken remnants of an Oklahoma City suburb Tuesday for survivors of a massive tornado that flattened homes and demolished an elementary school. At least 24 people were killed, including at least nine children, and those numbers were expected to climb.
Story No: 836490
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 05/21/2013 01:59 PM
People:
Subscription:

Headline: Search for Oklahoma tornado survivors continues

------------------------------------------------

Caption: Emergency crews searched the broken remnants of an Oklahoma City suburb Tuesday for survivors of a massive tornado that flattened homes and demolished an elementary school. At least 24 people were killed, including at least nine children, and those numbers were expected to climb. (May 21)

------------------------------------------------

SHOTLIST:

AP Television - AP Clients Only

Moore, Oklahoma - May 21, 2013

1. Wide, debris where the Plaza Tower Elementary (primary) school stood

2. Various, workers combing through ruined school

3. Various, ruined houses in neighborhood

4. Close-up earth moving equipment, through debris

5. Wide, house without roof

6. Wide, close-up National and Texas recovery teams being deployed

7. Mid, search teams checking CVS Pharmacy, where staff and customers took cover during storm

8. Close-up search teams in dark store

9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Katy Likens, pharmacy employee:

"And we were huddled down here. We had some of the dog beds from the front store, kind of protecting people's heads. Had the infant under the sink with as much protection as possible and at point our power went out."

10. Wide, exterior of store

11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Katy Likens, pharmacy employee:

"We could hear the storm go over and our ears were popping and everything from the pressure change and you could hear debris hitting everywhere. I know there were a lot of people back here praying, myself included."

12. Wide, debris

13. Close-up, wide car with damaged windscreen

14. Wide, close-up damaged building

15. Wide, search light in background

16. Wide, ruined hospital

17. Close-up Christmas decorations in roof

18. Wide, close-up Mark Ellerd in front of his destroyed home

19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Mark Ellerd, Moore resident:

"I heard news reports on the radio that there was a tornado coming this way, so I made preparations, what little things I could do and right as I heard the roar of it coming I went ahead and grabbed my dog and we went and laid down in the closet and everything just kind of collapsed around us. Just had a little bit of debris that was holding the door, I had to push it open and I actually saw the backside of the tornado as it was leaving. (Reporter: How big was it?) It was huge, as big as that whole building there, it seemed to me."

20. Wide, medical clinic

21. Close-up cars smashed against clinic building

DVIDS - AP Clients Only

Moore, Oklahoma - May 20, 2013

++NIGHT SHOTS++

22. Various, Oklahoma National Guard Airmen from the 146th Air Support Operations Squadron helping removed debris from the Plaza Tower Elementary school

23. Wide, Oklahoma National Guard Airmen searching, helicopter overhead

STORYLINE:

Emergency crews searched the broken remnants of an Oklahoma City suburb Tuesday for survivors of a massive tornado that flattened homes and demolished an elementary school.

At least 24 people were killed, including at least nine children, and those numbers were expected to climb.

As the sun rose over the shattered community of Moore, the state medical examiner's office cut the estimated death toll by more than half but warned that the number was likely to climb again.

Some search-and-rescue teams focused their efforts at Plaza Towers Elementary, where the storm ripped off the roof, knocked down walls and turned the playground into a mass of twisted plastic and metal as students and teachers huddled in hallways and bathrooms.

Seven of the nine dead children were killed at the school, but several students were pulled alive from under a collapsed wall and other heaps of mangled debris.

Rescue workers passed the survivors down a human chain of parents and neighborhood volunteers.

Officials were still trying to account for a handful of children not found at the school who may have gone home early with their parents.

New search-and-rescue teams moved at dawn Tuesday, taking over from the 200 or so emergency responders who worked all night.

A helicopter shined a spotlight from above to aid in the search.

Fire Chief Gary Bird said fresh teams would search the whole community at least two more times to ensure that no survivors _ or any of the dead _ were overlooked.

Crews painted an `X' on each structure to note it had been checked.

CVS Pharmacy employees, along with a handful of customers, sought refuge in a back room of the store when the tornado hit.

With power still out in the store, Katy Likens showed where the people, including a baby, huddled together.

"We had some of the dog beds from the front store, kind of protecting people's heads. Had the infant under the sink with as much protection as possible and at point our power went out," she said.

Likens described the moment the tornado hit, "we could hear the storm go over and our ears were popping and everything from the pressure change and you could hear debris hitting everywhere."

"I know there were a lot of people back here praying, myself included," she said.

The Moore community of 56,000 people, 10 miles (16 km) south of Oklahoma City, braced for another long, harrowing day.

More than 200 people had been treated at area hospitals.

Mark Ellerd had been working on cars in the yard of his Moore home, when he heard reports of the tornado.

"I went ahead and grabbed my dog and we went and laid down in the closet and everything just kind of collapsed around us. "

The tornado also grazed a theatre, and levelled countless homes.

Authorities were still trying to determine the full scope of the damage.

Roofs were torn off houses, exposing metal rods left twisted like pretzels.

Cars sat in heaps, crumpled and sprayed with caked-on mud. Insulation and siding was smashed up against the sides of any walls that remained standing.

Yards were littered with pieces of wood, nails and pieces of electric poles.

The National Weather Service issued an initial finding that the tornado was an EF-4 on the enhanced Fujita scale, the second most powerful type of twister.

It estimated that the twister was at least half a mile (0.8 km) wide.

Monday's tornado loosely followed the path of a killer twister that slammed the region with 300 mph (482 kph) winds in May 1999. It was the fourth tornado to hit Moore since 1998.

The Oklahoma National Guard Airmen from the 146th Air Support Operations Squadron released video Tuesday showing their overnight operations, assisting in removing debris from the Plaza Tower Elementary school and searching the area for survivors.

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Instant Library Apr-Jun 2013
Title:
SD
Summary: USA - At least six killed, many hurt and homes destroyed in spring tornado outbreak / Aftermath of tornado that damaged homes and buildings near Oklahoma City / School flattened by tornado
Story No: G06322
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 05/23/2013 12:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

At least six killed, many hurt and homes destroyed in spring tornado outbreak

892129

AP TELEVISION

Granbury - 16 May 2013

++NIGHT SHOTS++

1. Wide of debris in yard, flashes of light on horizon

2. Tracking shot of debris and wreckage of trailer

Tour of school flattened by tornado, killed boy's family react, first funeral

893236

AP TELEVISION

Moore - 23 May 2013

3. Mid of wrecked sign in front of ruins of Plaza Towers Elementary School

4. Wide of rubble where Plaza Towers Elementary School used to stand

5. Twisted metal and debris in tree outside school

6. Wide of Moore city councilman Mark Hamm looking at school wreckage

7. Wide of mangled swing-sets in what used to be playground

8. Zoom out from clock in rubble to wide

STORYLINE:

On May 16th a tornado swept through the Texan town of Granbury killing six people, injuring about 50, and leaving at least 250 homeless.

Officials were awaiting daybreak to fully assess the scope of the destruction.

The twister was part of several tornadoes that hit northern Texas, devastating two neighbourhoods in southern Granbury and a neighbourhood in nearby Cleburne.

About 50 people were taken to a local hospital, where 14 were admitted for treatment of injuries and two were transferred to a hospital in Fort Worth, police said.

Police set up roadblocks near the stricken areas, while those who had been affected gathered in communal areas.

One group evacuated from Granbury's Rancho Brazos neighbourhood took shelter on a petrol station forecourt, clinging to loved ones and bags of possessions.

"We were all, like, hugging in the bathtub and that's when it started happening. I heard glass shattering and I knew my house was going," said Elizabeth Tovar.

"We looked up and then, like, on top of the bathtub the whole ceiling was gone. And that was when we knew we were, we were probably gone, we were in trouble."

"Hail started coming down about the size of softballs," said local resident Daniel Layne. "Windows in the cars are gone, both of our cars are messed up. I had a big shop, there isn't a piece of it left now."

"The houses are gone, the house next to us, it's got some damage but I knew the people that lived in the other two houses that are gone. It's horrible," said Daniel's wife, Amanda.

Officials were trying to account for 14 people, but it was not clear if they were missing or just away from the area for other reasons.

Even in the dark the damage caused by the tornado was plain to see.

Outbuildings had their doors smashed in and aluminium panels and other debris littered the area.

Ambulances from Fort Worth - 35 miles away - were being called to Granbury, said a police spokesman.

The same storm spawned another tornado that storm-spotters told the National Weather Service was a mile wide.

That twister tore through the south western quadrant of Cleburne, a courthouse city of about 30-thousand about 25 miles southeast of Granbury.

There were no reports of deaths in that storm, said local officials.

Another tornado hit the small town of Millsap, about 40 miles west of Fort Worth.

Hailstones as large as grapefruits also pelted the area around Mineral Wells on Wednesday evening, although police reported only minor damage.

***

Officials in the devastated town of Moore, Oklahoma gave the media access on May 23rd to the Plaza Towers Elementary School, where seven students were killed in a tornado.

Two elementary schools were hit by the May 22nd's storm, but Plaza Towers was levelled: the one-storey building had barely a wall left standing.

Moore City Councilman Mark Hamm gave the tour for the first time, walking through the rubble of what used to be classrooms.

"We're standing right in the middle of the epicentre of the storm, the path, you can look there and just see how it came through," Hamm said, surrounded by rubble.

The medical examiner reported that six of the children who died at Plaza Towers suffocated after being buried under a mass of bricks, steel and other materials as the building collapsed.

A seventh child who died there, 8-year-old Kyle Davis, was killed instantly by an object - perhaps a large piece of stone or a beam - that fell on the back of his neck.

Moore Mayor Glen Lewis said the death toll at the school could have been much higher.

"There were several hundred people in this building when this happened," Lewis said, standing at the site.

"You got to wonder how only seven people died in this school and how many people survived. How in the world could you possibly survive in a situation like this?"

Lewis credited the media with alerting the public that a tornado was coming, and citizens, both in the school and across the area, for quickly taking safety precautions.

For the victims' families, meanwhile, the mourning is only beginning.

Kyle Davis began his day on May 22nd just like any other.

Hours later, when the tornado siren went off, he took shelter in the school's gymnasium with dozens of other students.

His mother, Mikki, soon made her way to the school to look for her son.

"The closer I got to the school, the harder it got, because I could see the houses were pretty much gone or levelled," she said.

"By the time I got to the school, my cousin had met up with me and I pretty much kind of collapsed in his arms and he just kept on telling me, 'It's OK, we're going to find Kyle, it's fine.'"

Search and rescue teams combed the school all night for the missing.

They didn't find Kyle until the next day, when authorities had to tell Mikki that during the storm, a large object fell on Kyle's neck, killing him.

Kyle's 9-year-old sister also attended Plaza Towers Elementary. She escaped unharmed.

"He was a special brother," Kaylee said. "He was kind to me. He meant everything to me."

Meanwhile, the first of the funerals, for a nine-year-old girl who was also killed at Plaza Towers School, took place on Thursday morning.

A photo released by her family showed the girl, Antonia Candelaria, beaming with a big smile and wearing a white sun hat.

The third-grader loved to sing and recently auditioned to sing in a talent show scheduled for the last day of school.

She died along with her best friend and next-door neighbour, Emily Conatzer.

Twenty-four people died in the storm, including a total of 10 children.

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