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US FACEBOOK
Title:
HD
Summary: +4:3 FACEBOOK MAKES STOCK MARKET DEBUT; ZUCKERBERG RINGS BELL
Story No: 741674
Source: NASDAQ , AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 05/18/2012 05:02 PM
People: Mark Zuckerberg
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Facebook's shares jumped on Friday as the social networking website made the most talked-about debut in years on the Nasdaq Stock Market.

The website was born in a dormitory room eight years ago and now connects almost a (b) billion people around the world.

Wearing his trademark hoodie and standing before a huge crowd of cheering employees in Menlo Park, California, Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg symbolically opened trading.

The banks helping take Facebook public want the market to value the company at as much as 104 (b) billion US dollars, more than Disney or Kraft Foods, though those companies earn three and four times more.

That estimated top valuation is also more than 100 times Facebook's earnings last year.

Those are a couple of reasons why veteran trader Kenneth Polcari, Managing Director of ICAP Corporates, said he thinks people should not get "caught up in the euphoria" of the offering.

"Getting in on the very first trade actually may not be the best decision. Especially if it is so overhyped and the first trade is a little bit out of line," he said.

On Thursday, Facebook and the investment bankers arranging the IPO settled on a price of US 38 US dollars per share.

Trading in Facebook Inc. shares was delayed by about a half-hour from their planned 11 a.m. Eastern (1500 GMT) start. Just after noon, they were trading at 39.60 US dollars, up 4.2 percent from their offering price.

But Facebook's initial public offering failed to push up US stocks.

The Dow Jones industrial average was down 35 points at 12,408 in midday trading on Friday, while the Nasdaq fell 21 to 2,792.

Jason Weisberg of Seaport Securities said he didn't think the Facebook IPO will give too much of a boost to the world markets.

Weisberg said the excitement about the Facebook offering has already been priced into world markets.

Facebook's public debut marks a new milestone in the history of the Internet - and the people who use it.

In 1995, Netscape Communications' IPO gave people their first chance to invest in a company whose graphical Web browser made the Internet more engaging and easier to navigate.

Its hotly anticipated IPO lit the fuse that ignited the dot-com boom and culminated five years later in a devastating bust that obliterated the notion that the Internet had somehow hatched a new economy where making money no longer mattered.

It took Google Inc.'s IPO in 2004 to prove just how profitable a well-run Internet company with a disruptive idea can be.

Facebook's IPO underscores an Internet evolution that has made the understanding of connections among people as important as Google's massive index of Web links.

Now that Facebook will be under greater pressure to sell more advertising to bring in more revenue, this IPO also casts a brighter light on how just how much revealing information people have been sharing over the past few years without fully understanding the implications.

The company and its early investors raised 16 (b) billion US dollars in the offering, which valued Facebook at 104 (b) billion US dollars.

That makes Facebook the most valuable US company to ever go public.

NASDAQ

Menlo Park, California - 18 May 2012

1. Various of Facebook headquarters, Mark Zuckerberg ringing Nasdaq opening bell as crowd cheers

AP TELEVISION

New York City - 18 May 2012

2. Wide of Nasdaq building with screens about Facebook

3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Kenneth Polcari, Managing Director ICAP Corporates:

"I don't think people should get caught up in the euphoria of it and just start to buy just because they think they have to buy it. Listen, it is now a publicly traded company, starting at 11 o'clock, going forward. So you don't have to feel like you have to get in on the very first trade. Getting in on the very first trade actually may not be the best decision. Especially if it is so overhyped and the first trade is a little bit out of line. I think people need to take a deep breath, understand they want to buy it, understand they want to own a piece it. That's great. Just don't go in their making foolish decisions based on emotion."

AP TELEVISION

Menlo Park, California - 18 May 2012

4. Facebook sign at headquarters

5. Pan of Facebook headquarters

AP TELEVISION

New York City - 18 May 2012

6. Pan of traders on New York Stock Exchange floor

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Kenneth Polcari, Managing Director ICAP Corporates:

"Facebook is an individual issue, it is an issue unto itself. You know there is euphoria about it, but it is not certainly going to dictate volume or price action in the overall market. So you have to be careful not to tie one with the other. Certainly, the excitement about it will just get people talking, but it doesn't necessarily solve the economic problems of Europe, or Asia, or slowing economy here in the States or anywhere else."

8. Wide of Nasdaq

9. Close-up of screen on building with Facebook listing

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Jason Weisberg, Seaport Securities:

"I think it had an impact (on markets) in the previous days leading up to this day, only because people are freeing up cash to buy Facebook. Outside of that, I think the European overhang and the debt concerns of Europe are playing, have a much bigger impact on today's market than Facebook."

11. Wide of Nasdaq building

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US Facebook
Title:
SD
Summary: Facebook to simplify privacy controls; VNR, statement, privacy expert
Story No: 646672
Source: AP TELEVISION , VNR
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 05/26/2010 11:24 PM
People: Mark Zuckerberg , Ted Leonsis
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SHOTLIST

AP TELEVISION

Location unknown - 26 May 2010

++MUTE++

1. Screen shot of Facebook website with "Privacy update" part of the site popping up

FACEBOOK VNR

Location unknown - 26 May 2010

2. SOUNDBITE: (English) Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook CEO:

"We recognise that we've changed a lot of things so we've spent a lot of time reviewing your feedback so we can address your concerns. The number one thing we've heard is that there just needs to be simpler ways to control your information. We agree."

AP TELEVISION

Location unknown - 26 May 2010

++MUTE++

3. Pan of Facebook website

AP TELEVISION

Washington, DC - 26 May 2010

4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jules Polonetsky, Director The Future of Piracy Forum:

"Zuckerberg has always maintained that he believes that the more open we are the more connected we are, the more we share the better it'll be for us, the better it'll be for the world. Now, he may have some point. It certainly, you know, lots of us are enjoying connecting to each other. But we want to be in control of that and we want to decide how open we want to be and some of us are exhibitionists and others are introverts and most of us are somewhere in between where if I get that there is something for me, if there's a community I want to join, if it's family I want to be connected. But I want to feel in control."

AP TELEVISION

FILE: San Francisco, California - April 2010

5. Wide of people on computers

FACEBOOK VNR

Location unknown - 26 May 2010

6.SOUND BITE: (English) Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook CEO:

"(When) I started Facebook it was built around a few simple ideas. People want to share and stay connected with their friends and the people around them. When people have control over what they share they're comfortable sharing more. When people share more the world becomes more open and connected."

AP TELEVISION

Washington, DC - 26 May 2010

7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jules Polonetsky, Director of The Future of Privacy Forum:

"The thing that many people, I think, disliked the most was that their interests, the groups, the things that they had joined to express who they were had to be public. And lot's of folks, frankly, were happy with their friends knowing it, or even maybe people in their community but they didn't want to be told that their information had to be public. And so they're rolling that back now and they are giving people that control back and they are also giving people the chance to turn off some of the features that were controversial."

AP TELEVISION

Location unknown - 26 May 2010

8. Pan of Facebook web page

AP TELEVISION

Washington, DC - Recent

9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Ted Leonsis, Chairman of Revolution Money and Lincoln Holdings LLC, and former AOL Executive:

"I don't think you can paint with too broad of a brush. I think the concept of privacy was up to each individual and it's up to the suppliers, to provide them with tools so that you can dial up, dial down what you want, what you feel comfortable with."

AP TELEVISION

FILE: San Francisco, California - April 2010

10. Mid of Mark Zuckerberg on stage at Facebook developers conference

AP TELEVISION

FILE: Los Angeles, California - Recent

11. Pan of street in Los Angeles

AP TELEVISION

New York City - 26 May 2010

12. Man in coffee shop with computer

13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Vox Pop, Facebook user, (name not provided):

"Privacy settings can be a lot more intuitive than they are, if you think of, you know, the advances that online banking and bill paying, you know, companies have made to do that kind of mobile applications and any of those things, you would think that Facebook being as large as it is and as advanced as it is, could make things a bit easier than they are."

14. Mid of coffee shop

STORYLINE

The US social website Facebook announced on Wednesday that it was simplifying its privacy controls and applying them retroactively, so users can protect the status updates and photos they have posted in the past.

The announcement came amid growing concerns about privacy on the website - most recently complaints that the site forced Facebook users to share personal details with the rest of the online world or have them removed from Facebook profiles altogether.

Facebook rolled out a slew of new features in April that spread its reach to the broader Web.

Among them was a programme called "instant personalisation" that draws information from a person's profile to customise sites such as the music service Pandora.

Protesters have been organising campaigns to quit Facebook and privacy groups complained to regulators after the change.

In a video statement, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg acknowledged the complaints and said his company was trying to make things simpler.

One grievance has been over the fact that while Facebook allows users to hide their list of interests on their personal profile pages, the user would still show up elsewhere as "liking" that band, company or hobby.

Zuckerberg said that under the simplified controls, privacy preferences will be extending to those other places as well.

Jules Polonetsky, a former AOL executive who now co-chairs the Washington-based Future of Privacy Forum, said that Zuckerberg had always believed that "the more open we are, the more connected we are, the more we share the better it'll be for us, the better it'll be for the world".

"He may have some point... lots of us are enjoying connecting to each other. But we want to be in control of that and we want to decide how open we want to be", Polonetsky said.

Zuckerberg said the company was also making it easier for users to decline the instant personalisation feature.

To address complaints its settings were getting too complex, Facebook will now give users the option of applying the same preferences to all their content, so that with one click you can decide whether to share things with just "friends" or with everyone.

For those who found it complicated to prevent outside websites and applications from gaining access to Facebook data, there's now a way to do so in a couple of clicks.

Facebook said the changes will be rolled out in the coming weeks.

It's not yet clear whether the latest changes will quell user unease.

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US Facebook
Title:
HD
Summary: Social media giant unveils move to home screens of Android phones
Story No: 886202
Source: AP Television , Facebook VNR
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 04/05/2013 12:17 AM
People: Mark Zuckerberg
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

++QUALITY AS INCOMING++

Facebook VNR

Menlo Park, California

1. Wide of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on stage at launch event

2. SOUNDBITE: (English) Mark Zuckerberg, CEO, Facebook:

"Today, our phones are designed around apps and not people. So we want to flip that around. We want to bring all this content to the front and make it so that you can also just go ahead and use whatever apps you need whenever you need them."

3. Graphic explaining Facebook 'Home'

4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Mark Zuckerberg, CEO, Facebook: ++Partially overlaid with b-roll of product++

"So we are not building a phone and we are not building an operating system. It's a family of apps and you can install it and it becomes the home of your phone. So we are calling this 'Home.' Since 'Home' is the lock screen, in addition to the home screen, you don't need to do any swipes or gestures in order to be able to see this content. And it's all right there as soon as you look at your phone because you've already loaded all this content in the background while your phone was sleeping."

5. Mid of Android phone running 'Home'

6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Mark Zuckerberg, CEO, Facebook:

"One of the most important things that we do, as people, is stay connected with what is going on in the world around us. So 'Home' is designed specifically to help you do this. So let's say you're waiting in line at the grocery store and you look down and you see these beautiful immersive updates of your friend finishing a bike race or your family cooking a meal together or news from your favourite sports team. You might've missed these otherwise if you had to go into in app to see them, but with 'Home' they're brought right in front of you."

7. Mid of Android phone running 'Home'

AP TELEVISION

San Mateo, California

8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Chris Silva, Mobile Analyst, Altimeter Group:

"People were expecting a phone. They were expecting a new version of Android. What they actually announced today was an app that acts like a launcher. So it takes over the main top-level screen on your Android phone. So when you look at that phone and it's locked, when you pull that phone out of your pocket, the first thing you see, all you see, is Facebook."

AP TELEVISION

Menlo Park, California

9. Close-up of somebody holding phone running Facebook 'Home' software

10. Mid of reporter taking photographs of Facebook 'Home' app

AP TELEVISION

San Mateo, California

11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Chris Silva, Mobile Analyst, Altimeter Group:

"I think it's a great way for them to make a smart move to drive engagement. I think building a phone or building an operating system would've been just asking for an uphill battle for Facebook. So having the ability to create an app that people can download and having a new piece of hardware that this is integrated with is a really smart move for them."

AP TELEVISION

Menlo Park, California

12. Mid of somebosy using Facebook 'Home' app

13. Various of room where journalists are trying out Facebook 'Home'

STORYLINE:

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg unveiled a new product for Android phones on Thursday, a service called 'Home' that brings the social media website's content to the phone's home screen, rather than requiring users to check apps on the device.

Zuckerberg said the new product was called 'Home' because it's on the home screen of any Android phone, and described it as a family of apps designed around people's Facebook connections.

If users choose to download Facebook's 'Home' software, starting on April 12, the social network will become the hub of their Android smartphones.

The service is part of Facebook's move to shift its users' focus from "apps and tasks" to people, said Zuckerberg, speaking during the unveiling of Home at the company's Menlo Park, California, headquarters.

Rather than seeing a set of apps for email, maps and other services when they first turn on their phones, users will be greeted with photos and updates from their Facebook feeds. There will be advertisements too, eventually.

A phone from HTC that comes pre-loaded with 'Home' will also be available starting that day, with AT&T as the carrier.

The idea behind the software is to bring Facebook content right to the home screen, rather than requiring users to check apps.

Home comes amid rapid growth in the number of people who access Facebook from phones and tablet computers.

Of its 1.06 billion monthly users, 680 million log on to Facebook using a mobile gadget.

The deeper mobile integration will likely help Facebook to attract more mobile advertisers.

Mobile advertisements were a big concern for Facebook's investors even before the company's initial public offering last May, but some of the worry has subsided as the company muscles its way into the market.

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