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South Africa Mandela Birthday
Title:
SD
Summary: Interview with Nelson Mandela on his 90th birthday; celebrations
Story No: 571780
Source: AP TELEVISION , AGENCY POOL
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 07/19/2008 02:06 AM
People: Nelson Mandela
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

AP Television

Qunu

1. Mid of Mandela chatting to press

2. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nelson Mandela, former president of South Africa:

"Well, there are many people in South Africa who are rich, who can share those riches with people who are not so fortunate, who have not been able to conquer poverty. If you look around, even in towns, not only in the countryside, even in the towns, there's a lot of poverty."

3. Cutaway Mandela's hand

4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nelson Mandela, former president of South Africa:

"I am very happy that I have lived until now and I hope that many South Africans and other people in the world will live like this so that they could be the object of admiration."

Agency Pool

Qunu

5. Mid interior Nelson Mandela's house, Mandela sitting down in the middle, surrounded by his grandchildren singing Happy Birthday To You

6. Cameraman

7. Mid Mandela's grandchildren giving three cheers to their grandfather

AP Television

Qunu

8. Mid exterior Mandela's house, local women singing and dancing

9. Side shot of women singing

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Nidi, local resident, vox pop:

"I wish him (Mandela) for many years to come and then I wish him to see how South Africa will grow in the next 10 years and also after 2010 for the World Cup because everyone I think will also wish to be there in 2010."

11. Wide more local woman coming to the Mandela house, singing

12. Mid woman singing and clapping

13. Wide women walking into the Mandela house

Johannesburg

14. Exterior of Nelson Mandela Foundation House

15. Mid 90th birthday cake with a picture of Nelson Mandela, tilt up to children singing "Happy Birthday"

16. Bertram junior pupils cutting cake

17. SOUNDBITE (English) Pupil, no name given:

"It's a special day because our school is also celebrating 90 years, the same as Nelson Mandela, so I would like to say happy birthday to Nelson Mandela and wish him a very special day."

18. Mid cup cakes reading (English) "Happy Birthday Madiba Love. All At The Patisserie."

STORYLINE

Nelson Mandela sat beaming in a yellow armchair, his legs propped up on a large stool and covered with a pale yellow blanket as ten grandchildren crowded around to serenade him with "Happy Birthday" and then smothered him with hugs and kisses.

The anti-apartheid icon celebrated his 90th birthday on Friday with his family at his home in rural southeastern South Africa and the whole village

turned out.

Yet the man who has become an icon for peace remained keenly troubled by the demoralising poverty still faced by so many of his countrymen.

Speaking to AP Television from his private lounge in the large home he built in Qunu, in his favourite yellow armchair - his message was simple - the wealthy must do more.

"There are many people in South Africa who are rich and who can share those riches with those not so fortunate who have not been able to conquer poverty," Mandela said.

Sounding and looking vigorous, Mandela told a small group of reporters he was fortunate to have reached 90, but in the countryside and in the towns "there is a lot of poverty."

"I am very happy that I have lived until now and I hope that many South Africans and other people in the world will live like this so that they could be the object of admiration," he said.

He still found time to settle down to read a pile of newspapers, to keep up with local and international affairs.

This while surrounded by his grandchildren, who were also present on Friday, creating a warm atmosphere in the house, singing 'Happy Birthday' and cheering for the birthday boy.

Outside Mandela's house, local women danced and sang to celebrate. The elders in traditional dress came to pay their respects, sheep were trucked into the property and a troupe of bare-breasted young women sang and danced in preparation for Mandela's lunch with 500 dignitaries on Saturday.

"I wish him to see how South Africa will grow in the next 10 years and also after 2010 and the World Cup because everyone I think will also wish to be there in 2010," said Nidi, a local resident.

Mandela's birthday is annual cause for celebration across South Africa and draws attention from his many local and international admirers.

While Mandela was celebrating quietly in Qunu, events were taking place across the country in his honour.

Children from a local Johannesburg school were among the those celebrating his 90th birthday.

As they ate pieces of an enormous birthday cake with the words "Happy 90th Birthday Madiba" written in frosting, students from the Bertrams Junior School presented handmade messages to his foundation in Johannesburg.

Just as Mandela turns 90 this year, so does the school, which is located in a suburb outside Johannesburg.

One student said the shared birthday made this a "special day," and added: "I would like to say happy birthday to Nelson Mandela and wish him a very special day."

The presentation was made at the Nelson Mandela Foundation House in Johannesburg.

Mandela was imprisoned for nearly three decades for his fight against apartheid. He was released in 1990 to lead negotiations that ended decades of racist white rule, then was elected president in South Africa's first democratic elections in 1994.

He completed his term in 1999 and did not run again, but has continued to take a leading role in the fight against poverty, illiteracy and AIDS in

Africa.

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Entertainment South Africa Mandela 4
Title:
SD
Summary: Nelson Mandela's 91st birthday; concert; Mandela and cake
Story No: 613437
Source: POOL , AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 07/18/2009 04:34 PM
People: Nelson Mandela , Jacob Zuma , Trevor Manuel
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

NELSON MANDELA FOUNDATION TV POOL

1. Wide of former South African President Nelson Mandela entering with current President Jacob Zuma

2. Politician and former Minister of Finance, Trevor Manuel, singing

3. Wide of Mandela walking with Zuma

4. Mid of man in traditional dress singing praise song

5. Wide of Zuma sitting next to Mandela and wife Graca Machel, all three clapping

6. Close up of birthday cake for Mandela

7. Wide of photo of Mandela being held up to applause

8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jacob Zuma, President of South Africa:

"You have made a contribution to make the ANC to be what it is. Some of us who are there as volunteers now will maintain it as it is. We will never allow to be changed into anything else. With what you made it to be because it achieved things and we will continue to do so. So sit at home as a pensioner have no worry, the ANC is in good hands in this collective. Happy birthday Madiba."

9. Wide of Mandela blowing out candles, people start singing 'Happy Birthday'

10. Mid of Zuma singing Happy Birthday to Mandela

11. Various of birthday song Mandela, cake being cut

12. SOUNDBITE: (Xhosa) Nelson Mandela, former South African president:

"Thank you."

AP Television

13. Wide of man selling newspapers with headline reading (English) "Happy 91st, Madiba" (affectionate name for Nelson Mandela)"

14. Pan of people entering Mandela Museum

15. Woman donating money to woman at the Nkanyezi Stimulation Centre for disabled children in Soweto

AP Television

16. Wide of Mandela Day birthday celebration concert

17. Mid of group of artists performing

18. Cutaway poster of Mandela reading "Nelson Mandela Day"

19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Thandi Vilakazi, vox pop:

"We volunteered our time to (inaudible) clinic we were helping out the nurses and the clinic stuff, we actually mopped floor for them for one hour and seven minutes of which it was a great thing to do volunteering our time."

20. Artists performing at concert singing "Happy birthday to Madiba"

21. People dancing and singing along to song

22. Wide people waving South African flag, man asking people to sing in (Sotho)"Nelson Mandela ha hona ya tswanang le wena" (English): "Nelson Mandela there is no one like you."

STORYLINE

HAPPY BIRTHDAY MANDELA

Nelson Mandela's supporters celebrated the anti-apartheid icon's 91st birthday on Saturday by emulating his good deeds.

Mandela has called on people to spend time doing good on Saturday, the first Mandela Day, which his charity foundations hope will be an annual event.

President Jacob Zuma, the current leader of Mandela's African National Congress party, paid a birthday visit to Mandela at his home in Johannesburg.

Zuma was joined by party leaders and Mandela's family, including wife Graca Machel and former wife Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, as well as former Zambian President Kenneth Kaunda and former Tanzanian President Hassan Mwinyi, according to a statement from the ANC.

Mandela blew out the candles on his cake, which was decorated in the black, green and gold colours of the ANC.

At the birthday Zuma said Mandela had contributed "to make the ANC to be what it is" and vowed to maintain the party "as it is."

"We will never allow to be changed into anything else. With what you made it to be because it achieved things and we will continue to do so. So sit at home as a pensioner have no worry, the ANC is in good hand in this collective," Zuma said.

Zuma then went to a poor neighbourhood in the city to visit with elderly South Africans at a lunch organised for Mandela Day.

In a speech televised live on national television from the lunch, Zuma lauded elderly citizens caring for grandchildren orphaned by AIDS and the charity groups that help them and other vulnerable South Africans.

Meanwhile a concert was held to celebrate Mandela's birthday.

People sang and danced as various artists took the stage to sing Happy Birthday and other songs.

Mandela Day organisers encouraged people to devote at least a minute for each of the 67 years Mandela campaigned against apartheid to community service.

A woman said she had just volunteered at a clinic to help local nurses.

"We actually mopped floor for them for one hour and seven minutes of which it was a great thing to do volunteering our time," said Thandi Vilakazi.

Elsewhere people were collecting clothing for poor children, painting schools, planting trees near Mandela's boyhood home in eastern South Africa, and renovating a building in downtown Johannesburg for people left homeless by a fire.

And it wasn't just South Africans who responded to the call.

One group of American tourists felt inspired to give to charity after visiting Soweto's Mandela Museum - housed in a red brick building where the former South African president once lived.

The holidaymakers donated 300 (US) dollars to the Nkanyezi Stimulation Centre for disabled children in Soweto.

In recent years, Mandela has stressed that if his legacy is to live, others must take up his causes.

His Mandela Foundation, which houses some of his archives and supports community building projects, has switched from a logo featuring his face to one featuring his hands, reflecting his desire to shift the focus from himself to the work ahead.

Mandela stepped down after serving one term as president - the first black South African to hold the post.

Since 1999, he has devoted himself to such causes as fighting AIDS and poverty and championing the rights of children.

Many of the projects celebrating Mandela Day in South Africa underlined how much work remains to be done in a country proud of ending apartheid peacefully, but plagued by poverty, stubborn inequalities, and AIDS - some 5.2 (m) million South Africans were living with HIV last year - more than in any other country in the world.

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AUSTRALIA: NELSON MANDELA SPEECH
Title:
SD
Summary: AUSTRALIA: NELSON MANDELA SPEECH
Story No: 193863
Source: POOL
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/08/2000 04:00 AM
People: Nelson Mandela , John Howard
Subscription:

English/Nat

Former South African President Nelson Mandela on Friday urged the Australian government to take account of Aboriginal concerns, but stopped short of supporting calls for an apology for past practices.

Mandela received a standing ovation when he attended the "It Starts With Me" World Reconciliation Day celebrations in Melbourne.

Describing his tour of Australia, the elderly statesman said he had been overwhelmed by the hospitality of the people.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"As a young boxer it was my dream that one day I would become the heavyweight boxing champion of the world. That day never came but after the engagements I have had in Australia. In Sydney, Canberra, and now in Melbourne, I feel like a super heavy-weight boxing champion."

SUPER CAPTION: Nelson Mandela, Former South African President

During his tour, Mandela compared racial divisions in South Africa to those in Australia, warning that "the scars of the past remain and fester unless they are addressed."

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"At one level reconciliation, bringing together, wiping out of boundaries, represents a major trend in the world. Sadly that logic of global reconciliation, has not reached us sufficiently into all areas of human concern and it must remain the task of all of us, to take reconciliation to its more profound human levels, of people living together harmoniously, rather than merely trading without barriers."

SUPER CAPTION: Nelson Mandela, Former South African President

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"You will therefore understand the significant and privilege for me of being able to share with you this world day of reconciliation. I come from a society with a long history of deep racial and communal division and conflicts, that was in the end able to achieve political reconciliation through a process of inclusive negotiations."

SUPER CAPTION: Nelson Mandela, Former South African President

In three separate reports over the past year, United Nations committees have criticised Prime Minister John Howard's government over its treatment of the country's 386-thousand indigenous people, the Aborigines.

Aborigines form the poorest, sickest, worst educated and most likely to be jailed section of Australian society.

Aboriginal activists have said they will stage protests at the Sydney Olympics later this month to highlight their plight.

The U-N reports accused the government of severely restricting Aboriginal land rights, condoning mandatory sentencing which results in many Aborigines being jailed, and not doing enough to overcome serious health problems among Aborigines.

Howard responded last week by calling for an overhaul of the U-N committee system and restricted co-operation with U-N human rights committees.

Howard has also refused to apologise officially to thousands of Aborigines who were separated from their families as children under past government policies which were based on the mistaken belief that Aborigines were a doomed race.

Mandela avoided commenting directly on the issue of an apology to Aborigines, but said that when majority rule was adopted in South Africa some of the former white minority government apologised but others did not.

Howard met Mandela at two functions before leaving for the U-N summit in New York.

Melbourne, Australia - September 8, 2000

1. Various of choir singing on stage

2. Mandela emerges on stage from behind curtain

3. Cutaway audience

4. Various Mandela waving

5. Cutaway audience applauds

6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nelson Mandela, Former South African President

7. Cutaway audience

8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nelson Mandela, Former South African President

9. Cutaway audience

10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nelson Mandela, Former South African President

11. Wide of hall

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Subjects: Race and ethnicity , Boxing , Government and politics , Social issues , Social affairs , Sports
People: Nelson Mandela , John Howard
Organisations: South Africa government, Australia government
Locations: South Africa , Melbourne , Sydney , Australia , Southern Africa , Africa , Oceania
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SOUTH AFRICA: NELSON MANDELA AUCTIONS SOME PERSONAL BELONGINGS
Title:
SD
Summary: SOUTH AFRICA: NELSON MANDELA AUCTIONS SOME PERSONAL BELONGINGS
Story No: 60274
Source: APTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 08/23/1997 04:00 AM
People: Nelson Mandela , Jacob Zuma
Subscription:

English/Nat

The man with a shirt for every occasion - South African president Nelson Mandela is literally having them taken off his back for the good of his country.

The President, who is famous for his jazzy shirts, this week auctioned some of his much sought after clothing together with other valued personal belongings.

The money raised from the auction will go the soon to be established Liberation Archive an archive to keep the memories of South Africa's turbulent struggle in the minds of the nations youth.

The president of South Africa - never far from the limelight and dressed to boogie.

Nelson Mandela has made his mark on the world stage because of his fight against apartheid.

But he has also become famous for his stunning variety of patterned silk shirts.

Now some of those colourful shirts are up for auction together with other valuables belonging to Mandela.

On Thursday night in Durban, Mandela rolled up for the auction in yet another jazzy shirt from his vast collection.

His shirts were swept up like hot cakes, going for as much as U-S four thousand dollars.

Mandela has also recently become known for donning the outfits of sporting heroes and on offer at the auction was a rugby shirt signed by the President himself.

It brought back memories of South Africa's victory in the rugby World Cup in 1995 following the nations return to international sport in the wake of the defeat of apartheid.

If prospective buyers could not get their hands on one of Mandela's shirts then some of his portraits were on offer.

One picture of the President was auctioned for over U-S six thousand dollars.

A signed copy of his autobiography "Long Walk To Freedom" went for close to U-S two and a half thousand dollars. (2,340).

The buy of the night was a silver sword which went for a steal: over U-S ten thousand dollars. (10,638)

All the money raised at the auction is to be used to found the Liberation Archive which will consist documents charting resistance against apartheid over the decades.

It will be housed at the University of Fort Hare in the Eastern Cape Province which once had Mandela as a student.

The young hotheaded student did not graduate from that institution.

After a run-in with the University authorities, he was given a choice to fall in line or leave he did not return.

The aim of the archive is to keep South Africa's turbulent history alive in the minds of nation's younger generation.

As Mandela points out, they should never forget the price paid for South Africa's democracy.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"What we do to restore our true history makes a contribution to the rebuilding of our nation and therefore to the rebirth of our continent. Central to this revival is the reclamation of the vast resources of the people of Africa."

SUPER CAPTION: Nelson Mandela, South African President

Organisers tried to give Mandela a mobile phone as a gift, but had to smile when he returned it for auctioning, claiming he was not in tune with modern technology.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"I would like to avoid the embarrassment of receiving a gift which I'll not be able to use. Therefore it is my pleasure to donate it to the Archive."

SUPER CAPTION: Nelson Mandela, South African President

Having been touched by Mandela, the phone raised over U-S six thousand dollars (6,382).

Durban, South Africa - 22nd August 1997 and File

1. FILE shot of Mandela dancing

2. Various FILE shots of Mandela in colourful shirts

Durban 22 August 1997

3. Cutaway press

4. Mandela entering auction hall

5. Cutaway audience

6. Sign reading "Items For Auction"

7. Close-up words "Nelson Mandela" shot pans right to words in

Mandela's handwriting on rugby shirt reading: "Thank you for your wonderful support" his signature and the date: 21.8.97

8. Rugby jersey in frame

10. FILE of Mandela greeting South African rugby team at World cup finals

11. Painting of Mandela

12. Drawing of Mandela

13. Picture of Mandela

14. Sword in frame being held up

15. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nelson Mandela, South African President

16. Frene Ginwala, the Speaker of the Parliament clapping

17. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nelson Mandela, South African President

18. Auctioneer selling phone

19. Mobile phone

20. Mandela standing talking to Jacob Zuma, the head of the African National Congress in the province of KwaZulu-Natal.

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USA: NEW YORK: SOUTH AFRICAN PRESIDENT NELSON MANDELA VISIT
Title:
SD
Summary: USA: NEW YORK: SOUTH AFRICAN PRESIDENT NELSON MANDELA VISIT
Story No: 89404
Source: APTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/21/1998 04:00 AM
People: Nelson Mandela , Graca Machel
Subscription:

English/Nat

South African President Nelson Mandela has paid tribute to Archbishop Trevor Huddleston at a memorial service for the anti-apartheid campaigner who died in April.

At the service in New York on Sunday, Mandela also praised the part religious organisations played in overturning apartheid in South Africa.

Mandela is in New York for the opening of the U-N General Assembly on Monday.

Dozens of dancers led a rousing procession to welcome South African President Nelson Mandela to the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine in New York on Sunday.

Mandela and his wife, Graca Machel, were attending a memorial service for Archbishop Trevor Huddleston, the anti-apartheid campaigner who died in April.

Hundreds of people gathered to remember the Archbishop.

Despite the solemnity of the occasion, there was some lightheartedness.

UPSOUND: Choir singing

Huddleston was an active leader of the anti-apartheid movement, both in South Africa and throughout the world.

Mandela, who was imprisoned for 27 years in his fight against apartheid, praised Huddleston and other religious leaders for their unwavering support.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"It was the religious institutions that gave us strength and the hope that we will come back and join our people and be part of the struggle to defeat white supremacy."

SUPER CAPTION: Nelson Mandela, South African President

Mandela also touched on the issue of poverty - a recurring theme of his visit to the United States.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"The healing of society means above all working together to improve the lives of especially the poor. If we take pride in the democracy we are creating, it is because it is not merely the hollow form of political freedom. Steadily, but surely, the lives of literally millions of our people are changing for the better, as they gain access to the simple and basic necessities of a decent life that were previously denied them."

SUPER CAPTION: Nelson Mandela, South African President

The South African president's speech was followed by a moving performance by opera singer Jessye Norman.

Mandela is due to address the United Nations General Assembly on Monday.

New York City, U-S-A - September 20, 1998

1. Dancers entering

2. Close up of dancer spinning

3. Close up of clergy

4. Wide shot of clergy with dancer performing in front of them

5. Mid shot of audience

6. Nelson Mandela and Graca Machel enter with entourage

7. UPSOUND: Boys Choir of Harlem singing

8. Musicians playing

9. Back shot of Mandela and Graca Machel cheering

10. Wide shot of Boys Choir of Harlem and audience

11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nelson Mandela, South African President

12. Cutaway of audience

13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nelson Mandela, South African President

14. Cutaway of audience

15. Close up of tapestry, pull out to wide shot of Jessye Norman singing

16. Jessye Norman singing

17. Boys Choir of Harlem

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USA: NEW YORK: SOUTH AFRICA: PRESIDENT NELSON MANDELA VISIT
Title:
SD
Summary: USA: NEW YORK: SOUTH AFRICA: PRESIDENT NELSON MANDELA VISIT
Story No: 89254
Source: APTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/18/1998 04:00 AM
People: Nelson Mandela , Bill Clinton , Monica Lewinsky
Subscription:

English/Nat

South African President Nelson Mandela has boasted of his nation's economic gains and said African leaders were able to handle troubles in the war-torn Democratic Republic of Congo.

But on a visit to New York, he would make no comment on the Clinton sex scandal.

Nelson Mandela is scheduled to meet President Bill Clinton next week.

His U-S trip is part of a series of farewells to world leaders ahead of his planned retirement from politics next year.

Mandela said the civil war in the D-R Congo that has drawn in troops from neighbouring countries was not unique to Africa.

And African leaders would solve the problem, he said.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"We have intelligent, capable and experienced leaders in Africa who are rising to the challenge and they are handling the question of the Democratic Republic of the Congo very well and that there were reasons which I will not go into why Uganda put its army in the Congo and we are certain of those motives .. as brothers and we are making progress."

SUPER CAPTION: Nelson Mandela, President of South Africa

As for domestic problems in the U-S, especially those involving the Clinton and Monica Lewinsky, Mandela declined to comment.

He was vehement that Mr Clinton's problems are not South Africa's business.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"I regard America as having very capable and competent leaders who are able to solve their affairs without the expression of an opinion by a third party, by a foreigner. I have confidence that they will able to resolve their problems. I will not interfere in the domestic affairs of another country."

SUPER CAPTION: Nelson Mandela, President of South Africa

Mandela will spend the weekend making appearances at private functions.

And on Monday he will address the United Nations General Assembly.

New York City, USA, September 18th 1998

1. Nelson Mandela enters room

2. Cutaway photographer

3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nelson Mandela, President of South Africa

4. Wide shots press conference

5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nelson Mandela, President of South Africa

6. Cutaway notepad zoom out to reporter

7. Mandela leaves Rockefeller centre and waves to crowd

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SOUTH AFRICA: NELSON MANDELA SPEECH
Title:
SD
Summary: SOUTH AFRICA: NELSON MANDELA SPEECH
Story No: 192630
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 08/26/2000 04:00 AM
People: Nelson Mandela , Bill Clinton
Subscription:

Natural Sound

Former South African President Nelson Mandela has said the international community has failed to intervene sufficiently in African conflicts, leaving the continent with reason to envy Kosovo.

Speaking in Johannesburg at the opening of the fifth and final seminar of the International Independent Commission on Kosovo on Friday, Mandela said the world's reluctance to halt African conflicts desperately requires attention.

Though the Rwandan genocide is the most well-known example of the international community's failure to intervene in Africa, it similarly has neglected the conflict in Sierra Leone, Mandela said.

But the world's interest in the Burundi peace process - over which Mandela is presiding - he said was encouraging.

On Monday, in Arusha, Tanzania, U-S President Bill Clinton and other heads of state are due to attend a signing ceremony for a peace agreement to end seven-year civil war in Burundi.

Besides presenting research about conflict and intervention, the Kosovo commission's report could encourage important discussion among leaders, scholars and others, Mandela said.

The Kosovo commission, established August 1999, aims to ascertain what happened in Kosovo before, during and after the war, and to analyze the conflict's effects on people.

Its final report is expected next month.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"Even more encouraging has been the indications from Western leaders of their willingness to actively assist in the rebuilding and development of the Burundi economy once a peace agreement has been reached."

SUPER CAPTION: Nelson Mandela, Former South African President

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"We would wish to see Burundi as a showcase of peace, bringing its dividends through the actions of the international community. And I am happy to say out President is busy helping to mobilize the international community to support this initiative."

SUPER CAPTION: Nelson Mandela, Former South African President

Johannesburg, South Africa - 25 August 2000

1. Mandela's car arriving

2. Mandela getting out of car

3. Wide shot conference hall

4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nelson Mandela, Former South African President

5. Cutaway audience

6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nelson Mandela, Former South African President

7. Audience

8. Various of choir singing

9. Various of Mandela leaving

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SOUTH AFRICA: NELSON MANDELA VISITS JAIL WHERE HE SERVED 27 YEARS
Title:
SD
Summary: SOUTH AFRICA: NELSON MANDELA VISITS JAIL WHERE HE SERVED 27 YEARS
Story No: 62615
Source: POOL
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/24/1997 04:00 AM
People: Nelson Mandela , Quincy Jones
Subscription:

English/Nat

South African President Nelson Mandela returned to the prison where he served a 27-year sentence to turn it into a national heritage site on Wednesday.

Mandela returned to the Siqithini, or Robben Island, off the coast of Cape Town, where he spent over a quarter of a century in prison.

It was officially dubbed a "place of healing" in the ceremony.

President Nelson Mandela returned to his former prison today to officially declare it a national heritage site and to open the building as a museum.

He was joined at the event by friends, including American musician and producer Quincy Jones.

As part of a national holiday celebrating the event dubbed as "Heritage Day," Nelson Mandela arrived by boat on Robben Island.

Mandela said Robben Island was a vital part of South Africa's collective heritage.

And as a heritage site, he said it would have to find a way to give expression to the country's diverse inheritance.

Mandela said such heritage sites should remind people of their right to secure protection under the law, access to justice, clean water, adequate health care and shelter.

He emphasized the prison should serve as a reminder to South Africans to nurture conditions in which they could participate in building a collective, democratic culture.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"Robben Island is a vital part of South Africa's collective heritage. Siqithini, the island - a place of pain and punishment for centuries and now of triumph, presents us with a richer challenge of heritage. Its future has been the subject of intense and wide ranging debate."

SUPER CAPTION: Nelson Mandela, South African President

Organizers say they hope the prison museum will be the first of new, progressive monuments that would not shelter South Africans from their country's dark past, but build on it.

The monument itself is also a departure from those that existed during colonial times in line with South Africa's apartheid history.

Many of the earlier monuments from years past were dark relics often featuring exhibits that denigrated black people as animals or inferior human beings.

Robben Island, Cape Town, South Africa - 24 September, 1997

1. Shot of Mandela getting off boat and greeting people

2. Shot of Quincy Jones and his wife getting off boat

3. Mandela walking

4. Wide shot Robben Island

5. Wide shot prison hall

6. Various of guests inside

7. Mandela being applauded, hugs introducer

8. Various music played by band, musicians

9. Mandela setup shot at podium

10. SOUNDBITE: (English) President Nelson Mandela, South African President

11. Wide shot of room

12. Mandela being presented with plaque

13. Children gathered outside

14. Mandela surrounded by children waving South African flag and singing

15. Mandela shakes hands with young girl

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Subjects: Government and politics
People: Nelson Mandela , Quincy Jones
Organisations: South Africa government
Locations: South Africa , Cape Town , Southern Africa , Africa
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Entertainment S Africa Will Smith
Title:
SD
Summary: Will Smith meets Nelson Mandela
Story No: 428133
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/17/2004 12:53 AM
People: :Will Smith , Nelson Mandela , Jada Pinkett Smith
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

APTN

Johannesburg, South Africa, 16th September 2004

1. Various Will Smith and Nelson Mandela

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Nelson Mandela:

"We are please to announce that Mr Will Smith has agreed to serve as an ambassador for this global HIV/AIDS campaign. The Nelson Mandela Foundation and I are convinced that his message will reach those most at risk of HIV, the young."

3. Audience

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Will Smith:

"It's a huge honour, and it's very important to me. It's an issue that Mr Mandela and I have spoken about approximately four years ago and we sat down, and I don't know if you remember, I was saying to you, 'I am an actor, I make rap music, that is what I do, what can I do?' And I sat with Mr Mandela and was so inspired, immediately you want to quite your job, you want to go out on the streets and you want to fight, he said 'no, you have to understand the power of what it is you do, you have to understand the hope that is created by the work that you create.' He told me not to force it, that the call would speak to me, today the call has spoken to me and I humbly, gratefully, will aggressively respond."

5. Audience

6. Various photo op

7. Various Will Smith and Nelson Mandela

WILL SMITH MEETS MANDELA

'I,Robot' star Will Smith and Nelson Mandela met at the former president's Houghton home in Johannesburg where he was made an ambassador of the Global Aids Awareness Campaign.

Mandela stated that the Nelson Mandela Foundation was convinced that the youth would relate to the message from the superstar.

Smith was accompanied by his actor wife Jada Pinkett Smith, a star in her own right, as well as his mother and children. He is in the country to promote his latest movie 'I,Robot,' as well as to visit Aids projects in the impoverished townships of South Africa.

Smith later stated at a press conference that Mandela made him understand the power he had as an actor to influence the youth of today in understanding the dangers of HIV/AIDS.

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Subjects: Celebrity causes , Celebrity , Entertainment , Arts and entertainment
People: :Will Smith , Nelson Mandela , Jada Pinkett Smith
Organisations: South Africa government
Locations: South Africa , South Africa
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Thailand AIDS
Title:
SD
Summary: Nelson Mandela in final public speech to AIDS conference
Story No: 422645
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 07/15/2004 12:40 PM
People: Nelson Mandela , Melinda Gates , George W. Bush
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Former South African president Nelson Mandela helped onto stage at news conference

2. Mandela reaching seat

3. Camera

4. Mandela seated

5. Panellists looking at Mandela

6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nelson Mandela, Former South African President:

"I underwent treatment and was completely cured after four months. That was exactly the same with caner of the prostrate. "

7. Panellists

8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nelson Mandela, Former South African President:

"The world has made defeating AIDS a top priority, this is a blessing, but TB remains ignored. Today we are calling on the world to recognise that we can't fight AIDS unless we do much more to fight TB as well."

9. Applause

10. Mandela stands up while being applauded and starts to make his way out of news conference

11. Plenary session, Zeda Rosernberg, International Partnership for Microbicides on big screen with slide

12. Panellists on state, Esparza and Siripon Kanchana, Thai Health Ministry

13. Audience

14. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jose Esparza, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation:

"Another significant thing to mention is that in the last ten years the scientific community has come to grips with the fact that developing an HIV vaccine is probably the most difficult challenges that biomedical science is confronting."

15. Audience

16. Indian press conference

17. Dr. I.S. Gilada, People's Health Organisation listening from stage

18. SOUNDBITE: (English) Asok Alexander, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation:

"In fact there is no where near the level of concern that you see outside India, and at this conference for example, inside India about the epidemic. I think it's the biggest barrier to prevention and finally I would say, very little resource availability."

19. Woman wearing sari in audience

20. Protestors march through exhibition hall chanting against US policy

21. Police watching

22. Protestors marching with police in foreground

23. US government sign on booth, pull out to protest

24. Protestors chanting

25. Poster of Bush with sign in front reading: 'Fund the Global Fund'

26. Overhead shot of parade through Bangkok street

27. Tighter shot overhead of protestors

28. Pan across signs

29. Protestors in condom costumes

30. Protestors at fountain and statue in Lumpini Park

31. Tighter shot of protest in park

32. Sign demanding access for all passes camera

33. Young women watching parade

34. Parade passing women, shot from behind them

STORYLINE:

Experts on Thursday called for urgent work on HIV-killing gels that could help protect women who can't rely on condoms, while democracy icon Nelson Mandela told the world not to ignore tuberculosis whilst battling AIDS.

With research over the past two years showing that an AIDS vaccine is still a long way off, HIV-killing gels and creams, female condoms and diaphragms that could bolster prevention in the interim have become more of a priority.

"Developing an HIV vaccine is probably one of the most difficult challenges that biomedical science is confronting," vaccine researcher

Jose Esparza told a plenary session at the International AIDS Conference running through to Friday.

It's the biggest gathering ever of AIDS scientists, activists, policy-makers and HIV-infected people, also drawing international dignitaries like Mandela, the former South African president.

"The world has made defeating AIDS a top priority. This is a blessing, but TB remains ignored," said Mandela, who turns 86 on Sunday.

Tuberculosis is one of the most common diseases that attacks AIDS patients after their immune system has been destroyed, with the lung disease causing from 15 percent to 40 percent of the 3 (m) million AIDS deaths worldwide last year.

Mandela, who survived tuberculosis in prison during South Africa's apartheid era, noted that the world has known the cure for TB for more

than 50 years but that too many people are not being diagnosed and treated.

Curing TB can cost as little as 10 US dollars per patient, said Dr. Jack Chow of World Health Organisation.

There have been daily protests at the conference over HIV policies of US President George W. Bush, such as his emphasis on abstinence, rather than condoms, in the fight against HIV.

Critics say a vow of abstinence is difficult to maintain and, when broken, can lead to unprotected sex, raising the risk of HIV infection

that could effectively be blocked by a condom.

Much of Thursday's focus was on women, who are now nearly half of the world's 38 (m) million people living with HIV, and their infection rates in many regions are climbing much faster than men's.

With many cultures denying women the power and confidence to demand that partners wear condoms, scientists are addressing ways women can protect themselves.

Indian AIDS activists say that the disease is not getting the attention back home that it should, given the country's population and lack of resources.

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Entertainment: Mandela and Oprah
Title:
SD
Summary: Nelson Mandela and Oprah Winfrey charity action.
Story No: 357432
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 12/06/2002 05:00 AM
People: Nelson Mandela , Oprah Winfrey , Desmond Tutu , Richard Branson
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

1.WS Ext

2. Vs people mingling

3. WS vs Singing Group

4. Caw audience

5. CU Mandela and Oprah Winfrey

6. Caw Cameramen

7. WS Oprah

8. Sot Oprah - "When I think about earth turning I think of more than being here for a symbolic gesture, when I think of earth turning I think of moving mountains, when I think of earth turning I think of building bridges, when I think of earth turning I think of changing lives. I welcome all of you here today."

9. WS Hall

10. Sot Oprah - "I have such a deep affection of this country because of all of what the people of this country have been through. In spite of all of the suffering, in spite of Apartheid the spirit of the country and the people in it is still so strong. Mandela is my strongest living mentor, I want to be like him."

11. caw photographer

12. Sot Oprah - "The leadership academy will offer curriculum focussed on developing and sustaining life long learning leadership abilities in young South African women so that they can grow up and use their skills and knowledge to help build a better South Africa."

13. Caw camera

14. Sot Mandela - "She says on the 19th December I will be in your village, well I didn't believe this, that doctor Quinn could come to my village. On the 19th of December they came, the sun came up from the east as usual and this young lady came. Well she turned my little community upside down. Even the chief wanted to take a photograph with her, it was a wonderful day. She then announced that I am going to give you 10,000,000 dollars to build a school for girls."

15. caw paintings

16. Sot Yoliswa Sibeko: "Once again thanks a million, may god bless you."

17 Caw Oprah & Yoliswa Sibeko

18 CU spade

19. Ws digging

CU Mandela and Oprah.

OPRAH'S 10 MILLION DOLLAR PROJECT.

This morning ( FRIDAY 6 DECEMBER) OPRAH WINFREY was joined by NELSON MANDELA , to break ground on the future site of the THE OPRAH WINFREY LEADERSHIP ACADEMY for girls in South Africa.

The Academy, an initiative of the Oprah Winfrey Foundation, will provide a positive learning environment designed for young South African women to receive an exemplary education and leadership training.

The foundation will contribute 10 million US dollars to build and maintain the academy with aditional funding from the Guateng Department of Education.

It will be located on 22 Acres ( 8.9 hectares) of land in Henley -on- Klip, Meyerton in Guateng Province.

Established in 1987, The Oprah Winfrey Foundation supports the inspiration, empowerment and education of women, children and families around the world. Through this private charity, Oprah Winfrey has awarded hunderds of grantato organisations that carry out this vision and has contributed tens of of millions of dollars towards providing a better education for underserved learners.

At another launch event that will be held at the Kirstenbosche National Botanical Gardens in Cape Town, NELSON MANDELA - joined by Archbishop DESMOND TUTU, OPRAH WINFREY, Virgin Group founder RICHARD BRANSON and Diesel CEO RENZO ROSSO - will announce that he is to host his very first concert.

This extraordinary concert, which will feature top artists from the world of pop and rock, will take place on 2nd February, 2003 on Robben Island in South Africa, the notorious maximum security prison in which Nelson Mandela spent 18 years of his prison term.

The concert, which aims to raise funds and awareness for the worldwide AIDS pandemic, is to be staged within the prison walls on what marks the 20th anniversary of his release from the prison island.

Tickets will be free and distributed by competition or lottery, details of which will be announced later, and the event is to be televised globally with 100% of all funds raised going directly to the following charities:-

The Nelson Mandela Foundation UNAIDS Office for the High Commissioner for Human Rights Robben Island Museum

The full bill of participating artists will be announced at a later date.

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South Africa - Gore & Mandela; New Cabinet; Court
Title:
SD
Summary: South Africa - Gore & Mandela; New Cabinet; Court
Story No: w070780
Source: WTN, RTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 05/11/1994 04:00 AM
People: Al Gore , Nelson Mandela
Subscription:

U.S. Vice President Al Gore, stressing U.S. eagerness to get back

into South Africa after the apartheid years, outlined a series of

options on Wednesday (11/5) in a meeting with Deputy President

F.W. de Klerk. Gore met President Nelson Mandela, who succeeded de Klerk when he took over as the country's first black head of state, after attending Mandela's inauguration on Tuesday.

SHOWS:

JOHANNESBURG, 11/5

0.00 exterior u.s. embassy

0.04 interior embassy u.s. vice president al gore in group

0.07 cu gore

0.10 gore with mandela

0.18 gore sot: this new nation has become a beacon of hope to the

people who love freedom throughout the world

PARLIAMENT BUILDING, PRETORIA, 11/5

0.24 wide of new cabinet

0.29 mandela and second deputy president frederik de klerk

0.33 minister of home affairs mangosuthu buthelezi

0.37 cutaway

0.39 buthelezi shaking hands with mandela

0.45 minister of mineral and energy affairs roelof `pik' botha

0.48 cabinet taking oath, pullout to wide

JOHANNESBURG:

0.53 exterior rand supreme court

0.58 families of victims

1.06 upsot one victim's mother: i still feel that won't bring my

son back... i will never see him again

1.12 exterior court

1.19 ENDS

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Keywords: USA, ANC, African National Congress,
People: Al Gore , Nelson Mandela
Organisations: South Africa government, United States Congress, United States government
Locations: South Africa , Johannesburg , Southern Africa , Africa
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SOUTH AFRICA: PRESIDENT MANDELA'S FACE ON GOLD MEDALLIONS
Title:
SD
Summary: SOUTH AFRICA: PRESIDENT MANDELA'S FACE ON GOLD MEDALLIONS
Story No: 14797
Source: APTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/20/1995 04:00 AM
People: Nelson Mandela
Subscription:

English/Nat

President Nelson Mandela has notched up another first in his country's history - becoming the first black South African to appear on a coin.

The coin commemorates Mandela's inauguration as the country's first black president last year.

Another day, another first for South African President Nelson Mandela.

This time the statesman will be the first black South African to have his image sealed in gold.

The South African mint is running a limited edition of 99 five-ounce gold medallions bearing Mandela's face.

He was at the mint Tuesday to launch the coin.

In front of a mixed race audience, the South African president marked the first of the gold coins.

Seventy-four of the coins will go on to the international market. The 25 earmarked for South Africa have already been sold.

Lower down the price scale, 4-thousand, 9-hundred and ninety nine - one ounce gold coins will sell for 930 U-S dollars each, with proceeds going to a charity that provides education for poor children.

The mint has also made 10-thousand five ounce silver coins at 130 U-S dollars each and - for those on a more limited budget - there's an unlimited edition of bronze coins. Yours for 30 U-S dollars each.

Mandela's appearance on the coin is another triumph for the man who did most to destroy apartheid. The only previous faces to appear on South African coins have been those of white presidents.

A new series of Mandela medallions will be made available each year from 1997.

But there'll be no danger of repetition. Each year the reverse side will be changed to depict a different South African theme.

The president says he's pleased poor kids' schooling will benefit from U-S sales of the coin:

SOUND BITE: (English)

"And believe me when I say that this is worth far more to me than it could be any collector. This is because it not only engraves in gold the dawning of a new era for the people of South Africa but also because the proceeds for the sale of the medallion will go towards a cause which is very close to my heart - that of re-establishing a culture of learning in South Africa."

SUPER CAPTION: President Nelson Mandela

But Mandela's face is unlikely to be passing hands in general circulation in the near future. It is a tradition in South Africa that the image of serving heads of state are not used on currency.

Mandela's face will only be used on coins in circulation a year after he retires or dies. And then only if cabinet agrees.

Pretoria, South Africa. 19 September 1995

1. Mid-shot exterior entrance reads: "SA Mint"

2. Mid-shot of Mandela greeting people lined up with small South African flags waving

3. Mid-shot of enlargement of Mandela medallion, pull out to wide of the room

4. Cutaway of audience

5. Mid-shot of Mandela walking up to coin press

6. Close-up of coin press operating

7. Cutaway of audience

8. Mid-shot of Mandela watching the coin being pressed

9. Close-up of coin being pressed

10. Mid-shot of Mandela holding up the coin and smiling

11. Cutaway of audience applauding

12. Close-up of hand holding coin which reads: "Presidential Inauguration 10 May 1994" with picture of Union Buildings "Unity in South Africa."

13 Coin is turned around to show Mandela's face and the words: "Nelson R. Mandela."

14. Mid-shot of Mandela speaking as noted

15. Close-up of glass cabinet with Mandela photograph and various casts of the coin

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Subjects: African-Americans
People: Nelson Mandela
Organisations: South Africa government
Locations: South Africa , Southern Africa , Africa
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SOUTH AFRICA: PRESIDENT MANDELA MEETS FORMER PROSECUTOR
Title:
SD
Summary: SOUTH AFRICA: PRESIDENT MANDELA MEETS FORMER PROSECUTOR
Story No: 18201
Source: Shots 1 to 11 = APTV, Shot 12 to 13 = SABC
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 11/23/1995 05:00 AM
People: Nelson Mandela
Subscription:

English/Nat

South African President Nelson Mandela has hugged and dined with the man who wanted him executed 30 years ago.

In 1964, Percy Yutar prosecuted Mandela and nine others for plotting to bring down apartheid in the famous Rivonia Trial.

In keeping with his programme of reconciliation, President Mandela met the man who wanted him hanged and talked over old times.

When Nelson Mandela last met Percy Yutar 31 years ago, the diminutive prosecutor was trying to lock him up forever - or have him judicially executed.

On Thursday, they had lunch in Mandela's presidential home in Pretoria.

In trying to bring peace to his troubled country, Mandela has charmed most of his former enemies.

Yutar, now 84, failed to convince the judge to hang Mandela and nine others in the Rivonia Trial which ended in 1964.

Instead they were sentenced to life imprisonment on Robben Island Maximum Security jail near Cape Town.

Mandela became the world's most famous political prisoner.

Despite his long incarceration, the President clearly holds no grudges against his former prosecutor:

SOUND BITE: (English)

"His part was a small one and we were determined that what we did was quite correct and we were prepared you see to pay the price because so many of us have paid the price."

SUPER CAPTION: Nelson Mandela, President of South Africa.

Yutar acknowledged the part his former enemy had played in shaping the new South Africa.

SOUND BITE: (English)

"I wonder in what other country in the world would you have the head of government inviting someone to lunch who prosecuted him 30 years ago. It shows great humility of this saintly man who has done so much in a short space of time, and I have no doubt whatsoever that he will achieve very much more. And all I can say with all the

sincerity at my command: "May the Almighty bless you with good health and years."

SUPER CAPTION: Percy Yutar

Mandela's recollection of their last meeting brought a round of laughter from the assembled press.

SOUND BITE: (English)

"The last time was in the courtroom and we are meeting for the first time since then. In fact I thought he was taller than he is."

SUPERCAPTION: Nelson Mandela, South African President

Mandela endured many hardships during his years behind bars on Robben Island.

His eyes were damaged by the bright sunlight after working outdoors.

Since his release, Mandela's rise from political prisoner to international statesman has astounded his critics.

One of his characteristics has been his lack of bitterness.

Today's meeting is another step in his programme to not only demonstrate this in his politics but to personally make contact with former enemies.

Pretoria, 23 Nov 1995 and file

1. Wide exterior Mandela's official residence in Pretoria.

2. Mid-shot of Mandela walking in with former co-accused Ahmed Kathrada and Yutar.

3. SOUNDBITE: Mandela

4. Cut away press.

5. SOUNDBITE: Yutar.

6. Cut away press.

7. SOUNDBITE: Mandela

8. Wide of Atlantic Ocean with Robben Island in the background (file)

9. Mid-shot of courtyard Robben Island Maximum Security Prison (file)

10. Close-up Mandela in former prison cell (file)

11. Mid-shot of Mandela in the quarry, he smiles and walks away (file)

12. Wide of Airforce planes doing flypast at Mandela inauguration (file)

13. Close-up Mandela being sworn in as President (file)

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Subjects: Political imprisonment , Political issues , Government and politics
People: Nelson Mandela
Organisations: South Africa government
Locations: South Africa , Pretoria , Southern Africa , Africa
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SOUTH AFRICA: HILLARY CLINTON AND BILL COSBY VISIT
Title:
SD
Summary: SOUTH AFRICA: HILLARY CLINTON AND BILL COSBY VISIT
Story No: 46578
Source: POOL , APTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 03/20/1997 12:00 AM
People: Hillary Clinton , Bill Cosby , Nelson Mandela , Kofi Annan
Subscription:

English/Nat

South African President, Nelson Mandela played tour guide Thursday at his former prison island to U-S First Lady, Hillary Clinton and American comedian, Bill Cosby.

The day began with separate visits by Clinton and Cosby to Mandela's Cape Town home.

South African President, Nelson Mandela, hosted an impressive array of visitors Thursday.

American comedian Bill Cosby and U-S First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton both paid separate visits to South Africa.

In the afternoon, Mandela flew by helicopter to Robben Island prison where the president spent 18 of his 27 years as a prisoner of the former apartheid government.

Playing tour guide, he showed his guests the notorious prison.

While touring Robben Island, he told his guests stories from his prison years.

He told Cosby how he had spent hours at a time crushing rocks in the courtyard outside his cell, and how his eyes had been damaged by lime at the quarry where prisoners were forced to work.

Cosby later said he was moved by the Mandela's resilience and lack of bitterness.

The visit included a tour of the president's few former belongings in the prison.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"And this is your spoon."

SUPER CAPTION: Bill Cosby

Robben Island had been used as a place of banishment for political prisoners and criminals since the 17th century. Lepers and the mentally ill also were sent there.

Earlier in the day Cosby met with Mandela at the 78-year-old president's Cape Town home.

The famous comedian had a joke for the occasion.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"I said he was 63-years-old, he said that's an insult to me."

SUPER CAPTION: Bill Cosby, actor

A private fund raising banquet Thursday night on Robben Island, was attended by Mandela, Cosby, Hillary Rodham Clinton and U-N General Secretary Kofi Annan, also visiting South Africa.

The dinner raised money for destitute former political prisoners and for a museum on Robben Island.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"First of all I have come to give to the people that is in the performance and the money raised for the charities. And this is the spirit that our families did, the Cosbys, we have had for some time. And to find time when the president was not busy and be able to do this it is quite thrilling."

SUPER CAPTION: Bill Cosby, actor

Mandela also met U-S First Lady Hillary Clinton on the third day of her two week African trip.

Mandela said her visit gave him the opportunity to thank her first hand for U-S support to South Africa.

The U-S, he said, had actively supported the anti-apartheid struggle and had started programmes, including education projects, for members of disadvantaged communities in South Africa.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"Our meeting has given me the opportunity to thank her for what I have outlined. That is absolutely important."

SUPER CAPTION: Nelson Mandela, South African President

Mrs. Clinton, who visited South Africa for the first time during president Mandela's inauguration in 1994, said she was delighted to meet Mandela again.

Mrs. Clinton and her daughter Chelsea, were also given a tour of Robben Island.

It has been a hectic time for Mandela who spent 10 days on an Asian swing earlier this month and heads for Bangladesh and India next week.

Robben Island and Cape Town, South Africa, 20 March 1997

Robben Island:

1. Wide shot harbour area at Robben Island

2. Sign to Robben Island

3. Close-up Bill Cosby walking with Terror Lekota from ANC

4. Exterior of prison

5. Cosby and Lekota walking

6. Cosby walking into prison building

7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Bill Cosby

8. Cosby and Mandela inside prison

9. Wide shot from outside cell of Mandela and Cosby sitting in cell

Cape Town:

10. Exterior Mandela's Cape Town home

11. Mandela and Bill Cosby walk out

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Bill Cosby, actor

13. Cutaway

14. SOUNDBITE (English) Bill Cosby, actor

15. Cutaway press

16. Mandela, Cosby and family on steps

17. Cosby photo opportunity

18. Cosby walks away

19. Hillary Clinton and Mandela walk out of home

20. Cutaway press

21. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nelson Mandela

Robben Island:

22. Prison with prison tower in background

23. Hillary Clinton and Mandela walk out of prison into courtyard

24. Hillary leaves prison courtyard

Robben Island and Cape Town, South Africa, 20 March 1997

Robben Island:

1. Wide shot harbour area at Robben Island

2. Sign to Robben Island

3. Close-up Bill Cosby walking with Terror Lekota from ANC

4. Exterior of prison

5. Cosby and Lekota walking

6. Cosby walking into prison building

7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Bill Cosby

8. Cosby and Mandela inside prison

9. Wide shot from outside cell of Mandela and Cosby sitting in cell

Cape Town:

10. Exterior Mandela's Cape Town home

11. Mandela and Bill Cosby walk out

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Bill Cosby, actor

13. Cutaway

14. SOUNDBITE (English) Bill Cosby, actor

15. Cutaway press

16. Mandela, Cosby and family on steps

17. Cosby photo opportunity

18. Cosby walks away

19. Hillary Clinton and Mandela walk out of home

20. Cutaway press

21. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nelson Mandela

Robben Island:

22. Prison with prison tower in background

23. Hillary Clinton and Mandela walk out of prison into courtyard

24. Hillary leaves prison courtyard

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SOUTH AFRICA: MANDELA & TUTU PAY TRIBUTE TO FATHER HUDDLESTON
Title:
SD
Summary: SOUTH AFRICA: MANDELA & TUTU PAY TRIBUTE TO FATHER HUDDLESTON
Story No: 78472
Source: APTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 05/06/1998 04:00 AM
People: Nelson Mandela , Desmond Tutu
Subscription:

English/Nat

South African President Nelson Mandela and Archbishop Desmond Tutu on Tuesday paid tribute to veteran anti-apartheid campaigner Father Trevor Huddleston who died in April.

Mandela told a congregation of three thousand people at a memorial service in Johannesburg of the contribution made by Huddleston to the struggle against apartheid.

Tutu expressed wonder that the Anglican Archbishop - the founder of Britain's Anti- Apartheid Movement - saw his dream of outliving white rule come true.

Some three-thousand people gathered for the memorial service for Father Trevor Huddleston at St Mary's Cathedral in Johannesburg.

Huddleston, who died on April 20 in England at the age of 84, helped found Britain's Anti-Apartheid Movement in 1959 and led British campaigns for sanctions against South Africa's white-led government.

He was knighted in England for his fight against apartheid shortly before his death.

Huddleston's support for the black cause made him a lifelong friend of African National Congress leaders like President Nelson Mandela and the late Oliver Tambo, whose widow Adelaide attended Tuesday's service.

Two days after his death, politicians from all South African parties backed a parliamentary motion paying tribute to Huddleston as "one of the greatest champions of freedom and equality the world has ever seen".

The memorial service was led by the Anglican Archbishop of Cape Town, Ngongonkulu Ndungane.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"And as we remember with thanksgiving Trevor and all those who have gone before us in the way of Christ, we pray that we may be counted worthy to share with them the life of the Kingdom of Jesus Christ, our Lord."

SUPER CAPTION: Ngongonkulu Ndungane, Anglican Archbishop of Cape Town

Huddleston became a monk in 1939 and went to South Africa to work in the black slums near Johannesburg, two years later.

Mandela praised the way Huddleston used his faith to fight against apartheid.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"In Father Huddleston we see exemplified in the most concrete way the contribution that religion has made to our liberation. Whenever the noble ideals and values of religion have been joined with practical action to realise them, it has strengthened us and at

the same time nurtured those ideals within the political movement."

SUPER CAPTION: Nelson Mandela, South African President

Archbishop Desmond Tutu said he was particularly touched and inspired by Huddleston as a young boy when he saw him raise his hat to Tutu's mother in the street - a sight Tutu had never seen before on the part of a white man.

He added he was particularly proud that Huddleston had outlived the apartheid regime.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"You heard how he used to say 'apartheid is going to die before I do'. How wonderfully prophetic. He did see the death of apartheid. He voted as a South African in 1994, he attended the inauguration of his friend on 10 May 1994 as the first democratically elected President of the new South Africa."

SUPER CAPTION: Archbishop Desmond Tutu

A band led by the musician Jonas Gwanga ended the service with a mournful tune.

But there was one moment of disharmony during the service.

The singing of the national anthem became an issue as the mourners sang in native African languages, but neglected to sing a verse in Afrikaans, the language of descendants of Dutch settlers.

Mandela, who has been trying to build a spirit of unity in South Africa, expressed dismay and in response, the chastened crowd sang the entire national anthem again to include the missing verse.

Johannesburg, South Africa, 5 May 1998

1. Interior St Mary's Cathedral from behind congregation

2. Priest talking to Adelaide Tambo, widow of the late ANC President Oliver Tambo

3. Black and white still of Trevor Huddleston

4. President Nelson Mandela walks in

5. Various of congregation singing

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Archbishop Njongokulu Ndungane, Anglican Archbishop of Cape Town

7. Congregation

8. Mandela climbs to the podium

9. Congregation

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Nelson Mandela, South African President

11. Congregation

12. Archbishop Desmond Tutu on podium

13. SOUNDBITE (English) Archbishop Desmond Tutu

14. Mandela, watching band play Jonas Gwangwa tune

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SOUTH AFRICA: MANDELA ON NEW STAMP
Title:
SD
Summary: SOUTH AFRICA: MANDELA ON NEW STAMP
Story No: 136700
Source: POOL , APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 06/25/1999 04:00 AM
People: Nelson Mandela , Graca Machel , Thabo Mbeki
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English/Nat

Former South African president Nelson Mandela was conspicuously absent from the opening of the South African parliament on Friday.

Almost as quickly as he re-entered public life and took the country and the world by storm after he was released from prison, Mandela has disappeared from the political scene.

He may be out of sight as he holidays with his wife Graca Machel, but he certainly isn't out of mind.

As new South African President Thabo Mbeki attended the opening of parliament amid much pomp and ceremony on Friday, Nelson Mandela's aura remained.

Many regard the political prisoner turned president a saviour, if not a knight in shining armour, which is how he is being depicted these days.

The South African Post Office has released a limited edition first day cover to commemorate the 900th anniversary of the Order of Saint John.

The group, headed by Queen Elizabeth the Second, dates back from the first crusade in 1099.

Mandela, who is a Knight of Grace of the Order, is depicted in the miniature sheet and

commemorative cover wearing the mantle of the Order.

The Order of Saint John is a Royal Order of Chivalry which aims to alleviate the suffering of people everywhere and to encourage spiritual growth.

Saint John is active in Britain, the United States, Australia, South Africa, New Zealand and nearly 50 other countries.

The creator of the first day cover spoke of her commission.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"It was such an honour. I was just kind of hoping that I would get to meet him but unfortunately with him being such a busy man, I did have to use photographs which is not really a problem, but I still would like to meet him one day."

SUPER CAPTION: Sue Dickenson, Artist

Mandela's face has appeared only once before on a South African stamp when he became the country's first democratically elected president in 1994.

But the man who has strings of international awards, including honorary degrees and streets and buildings named after him, remains unaffected by all the attention.

He finally has the gift he often expressed the most desire for - time to himself.

The day after the inauguration of Thabo Mbeki as President of South Africa, Mandela and his wife, Graca Machel, left for her native Mozambique.

They are expected to travel on to Gabon for a holiday.

Unlike many of his African counterparts, Mandela seems to have no trouble leaving the job of governing the country to someone else.

Pretoria, Soweto and Johannesburg, South Africa - 23 June 1999, Recent and File

POOL - Pretoria, 16 June 1999

1. Wide shot crowds

2. Mid shot Mandela on stage saluting and waving with Mbeki behind him

APTN - Pretoria, 23 June 1999

3. Wide shot exterior South African Philatelic Services

4. Wide shot graphic designer Thea Swanepoel working on computer

5. Midshot screen with Mandela design

6. Close-up hand on computer mouse

7. Close-up screen showing Mandela design

8. Mid shot examples of first day cover

APTN - Johannesburg, 23 June 1999

9. Mid shot artist Sue Dickenson painting

10. Close up hand painting

11. Mid shot Dickenson's face

12. Close-up painting

13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Sue Dickenson, Artist

14. Mid shot photograph of Mandela wearing mantel

15. Wide shot designs and photo

16. Mid shot design in artist's hand

APTN - Soweto, 30 May 1999

17. Midshot Mandela and Mbeki dancing at rally

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South Africa Liliesleaf
Title:
SD
Summary: Focus on farm where Nelson Mandela plotted the fall of apartheid
Story No: 571590
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 07/17/2008 01:32 PM
People: Nelson Mandela , Thabo Mbeki
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

1. Wide pan exterior Liliesleaf Museum where Nelson Mandela and other African National Congress guerrillas gathered

2. Wide plaque on the wall reading the name of the museum "Liliesleaf"

3. Wide visitors at the museum

4. Wide set up shot of Nicholas Wolpe, director of the Liliesleaf museum, walking into the room used by Nelson Mandela UPSOUND (English) Wolpe: "Now this was Nelson's room. This is where he lived and where he wrote."

5. Close audio button which once pressed plays out audio recordings of Mandela talking

6. Wide tilt down from a photo on the wall of Mandela to his old writing desk

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Denis Goldberg, Anti-apartheid activist and member of the Liliesleaf farm group with Mandela:

"When you think of Nelson Mandela, who struggled from being a son of a minor sub-chief, to becoming a lawyer together with Oliver Tambo (fellow anti-apartheid leader), there was Robert Resha (fellow anti-apartheid leader who died in 1973), an advocate, and so on, and Duma Nokwe (fellow anti-apartheid leader who died in 1978). How they struggled to get into their professions and then there are people who say they threw it away. They didn't throw it away, they used their knowledge to make freedom for everybody. What a sacrifice they made."

8. Close archive video footage displayed on the wall in the museum

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Denis Goldberg, Anti-apartheid activist and member of the Liliesleaf farm group with Mandela:

"I think that it is important to know who did it. I mean, you know we weren't superman and women we were just ordinary people, we just had a commitment."

10. Archive video from the Liliesleaf farm

11. SOUNDBITE (English) Denis Goldberg, Anti-apartheid activist and member of the Liliesleaf farm group with Mandela:

"I didn't think we would survive. I thought we would be hanged or they would shoot us or something."

12. Close photo of rooms at the museum

13. Wide interior of one of the rooms at the museum

14. Mid picture on museum wall

15. Mid digital display table with moving photographs at the museum

16. Wide interior museum room which shows a picture of Albert John Lutuli, 1960 Nobel Peace Prize winner and ANC leader, on a the wall UPSOUND audio radio playing some of his audio recordings

17. Mid photo of Lutuli

18. Wide pan across exterior Liliesleaf Museum

STORYLINE:

Anti-apartheid activist Denis Goldberg spent his last day of freedom for 22 years on Liliesleaf Farm, a 28-acre (11-hectare) swathe of land in northern Johannesburg where African National Congress (ANC) guerrillas like Nelson Mandela plotted apartheid's downfall.

As Mandela turns 90 on Friday, Liliesleaf has been restored to look, from the outside, just as it was during the 1960s.

The inside of the buildings, though, have received a high-tech makeover. In one room, visitors can touch sensors on a table to access audio-accompanied newspaper clippings, black and white photographs, text, and videos of famous activists.

Centre director Nicholas Wolpe, whose father Harold Wolpe was among the men arrested at Liliesleaf in 1963, leads visitors around, showing them where the young Mandela lived and wrote.

Anti-apartheid activist Denis Goldberg spent his last day of freedom for 22 years on the farm.

"We weren't supermen and women," the 74-year-old Goldberg said as he surveyed the farm. "We were just ordinary people who had a commitment."

"I didn't think we would survive. I thought we would be hanged or they would shoot us or something," he added.

Goldberg remembered how Mandela and fellow anti-apartheid leaders including Robert Resha, Oliver Tambo and Duma Nokwe "struggled to get into their professions".

"And then there are people who say they threw it away. They didn't throw it away, they used their knowledge to make freedom for everybody. What a sacrifice they made," Goldberg said.

Tourists can see the verandah where Mandela held target practice, an outhouse once home to an underground printing press, and the thatched cottage where activists were eventually arrested as they discussed a military operation to be carried out by Umkhonto we Sizwe, the military wing of the ANC.

They can also see Mandela's small, brick-walled bedroom, and listen to an old radio broadcast in the farmhouse kitchen where he first heard that ANC president Albert John Lutuli had won the 1960 Nobel Peace Prize.

The Liliesleaf museum opened officially on June 9, but exhibit construction is still in progress.

Wolpe says the centre will continue to evolve as more of the farm's history is uncovered. Much of the farm's past is murky, and Wolpe and others are still conducting interviews to learn more about what happened there.

Liliesleaf became a centre for anti-apartheid activists in the early 1960s, after the South African government heightened its brutal crackdown and forced the resistance movement underground.

The regime banned the ANC in 1960, the same year its troops shot and killed 69 civilians protesting the government's repressive restrictions on movement in Sharpeville.

In 1962 the government imposed a state of emergency, one of several that would continue intermittently until 1989, when the apartheid regime began to founder.

The South African Communist Party, then in alliance with the ANC, purchased Liliesleaf in 1961 through a front company called Navian.

Communist Party member Arthur Goldreich and his family pretended to be the owners of the farm, which grew market produce and leased land to neighbours.

Mandela lived at Liliesleaf for a short while, taking the name David Motsamayi and wearing blue overalls in an attempt to look like a farm worker. Some neighbours say they often saw 'David' selling produce on the street outside the farm.

The raid on Liliesleaf led to the Rivonia Trial, where Mandela made his famous "I am prepared to die" speech, and testimony recounting apartheid's evils focused international attention on South Africa's racist regime.

Mandela wasn't arrested in the Liliesleaf raid - he was already in prison for inciting workers to strike and leaving the country without a passport.

Other defendants in the trial included Walter Sisulu and Govan Mbeki - father of South African President Thabo Mbeki. Eight of the 10 defendants were sentenced to life, and two were acquitted.

Of the original eight defendants, only Mandela, Goldberg, Ahmed Kathrada and Andrew Mlangeni are still alive. Kathrada is 78, Mlangeni is 81, and Mandela turns 90 on July 18.

Goldberg, now retired and living in Cape Town, went into exile in London after his release in 1985 and eventually became an ANC spokesman.

No one knows how Liliesleaf was exposed. Some suspect CIA involvement, others place the blame on an opportunistic snitch, and some believe an insider confessed during interrogation.

By 1963, suspecting that Liliesleaf was no longer secure, resistance leaders had bought a farm west of Johannesburg for their new headquarters.

A meeting on July 11, 1963, was to have been the last of its kind at Liliesleaf.

The day of the final meeting, Goldberg and other activists went to visit the new farm.

About 45 minutes after they returned to Liliesleaf, activists were discussing a plan to overthrow South Africa's racist regime when a mysterious van drove up the dusty driveway.

Before anyone could ask farm workers about the unannounced vehicle, armed policemen burst out of the doors and arrested everyone in sight.

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(HZ) South Africa Mandela
Title:
HD
Summary: Images of Mandela on his 95th birthday
Story No: 900904
Source: AP IMAGES
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 07/17/2013 05:59 PM
People: Nelson Mandela , Fidel Castro , Pope John Paul II , Yasser Arafat , Bill Clinton , Thabo Mbeki , Michael Jackson , Jesse Jackson , Jesse Jackson, Jr. , Desmond Tutu , Graca Machel
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SHOTLIST:

1. Nelson Mandela and wife Winnie, walking hand in hand, raise clenched fists upon his release from Victor prison, Cape Town, Sunday, February 11, 1990. The African National Congress leader had served over 27 years in detention. (AP Photo)

2. African National Congress (ANC) leadership standing from left: Oliver Tambo, president, Nelson Mandela, vice president and Walter Sisulu, internal leader giving black power salutes Sunday, Dec. 16, 1990 in Johannesburg. (AP Photo/John Parkin)

3. Nelson Mandela gives a speech to the Special Committee Against Apartheid at the United Nations in New York, June 22, 1990, in his first appearance before the world body. Mandela called for continued sanctions against South Africa. (AP Photo/Doug Mills)

4. South African Deputy President F.W. de Klerk, right, and President Nelson Mandela pose with their Nobel Peace Prize Gold Medal and Diploma, in Oslo, December 10, 1993. (AP Photo/NTB)

5. ANC leader Nelson Mandela in a jubilant pose after casting his vote on Wednesday, April 27, 1994 at Ohlange High School hall in Inanda, 10 miles (15 kilometers) north of Durban, for South Africa' s first all-race elections. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

6. African National Congress President, Nelson Mandela, dances as he gets up on stage to deliver his victory address in downtown Johannesburg Monday May 2, 1994. He become the first black president in South Africa's history.(AP Photo/David Brauchli)

7. African National Congress marshalls at a "people's forum," in Flagstaff, Tranksei, shout and wave in the prop-wash of ANC President Nelson Mandela's helicopter as he takes off Friday, March 4, 1994. (AP Photo/David Brauchli)

8. Nelson Mandela takes the oath of office in Pretoria Tuesday, May 10, 1994 to become South Africa's first black President. (AP Photo/David Brauchli)

9. Cuban President Fidel Castro, right, and African leader Nelson Mandela gesture during the celebration of the "Day of the Revolution" in Matanzas Saturday, July 27, 1991.(AP Photo)

10. Pope John Paul II, right, is greeted by President Nelson Mandela, left, on his arrival at Johannesburg's airport Saturday Sept 16 1995. (AP Photo / John Moore)

11. Former South African President Nelson Mandela, left, greets Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat in Johannesburg, South Africa, Thursday, August 3, 2000. (AP Photo)

12. A close up view of the lock on Nelson Mandela's cell in Robben Island, South Africa, is shown on Tuesday, July 1, 2008. The former prison on Robben Island where Nelson Mandela spent 18 years is an international tourist icon. (AP Photo/Schalk van Zuydam)

13. A copy of art by former former South African President Nelson Mandela shows a colourful scene of Table Mountain as seen from his prison cell on Robben Island where he was imprisoned. This artwork is undated but was painted by Mandela around 2003 . (AP Photo/Ross Calder)

14. South African President Nelson Mandela and U.S. President Bill Clinton, right, peer out of the window of Section B, cell no. 5 at the Robben Island, South Africa prison Friday, March 27, 1998 where Mandela spent 18 years of his 27 years in prison. (AP Photo/Pool, Stephen Jaffe)

15. South African President Nelson Mandela, left, and Deputy President Thabo Mbeki, right, wave to the crowds from the steps of Tuynhuis his last major address to Parliament in Cape Town, Friday, February 5, 1999. (AP Photo/Obed Zilwa)

16. Former South African President Nelson Mandela, right, and AIDS activist Zackie Achmat, left wear 'HIV-positive' t-shirts on a visit to the Nolungile Clinic and Community Health Centre in Khayelitsha, Cape Town, South Africa, Thursday Dec 12, 2002. (AP Photo)

17. Former South African President Nelson Mandela waves during the 2nd International Aids Society conference on HIV pathogenesis and treatment, in Paris Monday, July 14, 2003.

18. South African President Nelson Mandela, left, and American pop singer Michael Jackson arrive at a news conference in Cape Town Tuesday, March 23, 1999. (AP Photo /Obed Zilwa)

19. American Rev. Jesse Jackson, right, speaks to journalist as former South African president Nelson Mandela, left, looks on after their meeting in Johannesburg, South Africa, Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2005. (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)

20. Former South African President Nelson Mandela, right, reacts with Archbishop Desmond Tutu, left, during the launch of a Walter and Albertina Sisulu exhibition, called, 'Parenting a Nation', at the Nelson Mandela Foundation in Johannesburg, South Africa, Wednesday, March 12, 2008. (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)

21. A child kisses Nelson Mandela, Friday, July 31, 2009 during the launch of a children's hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa. (AP Photo/Karel Prinsloo)

22. South African President Nelson Mandela, right, poses with his official companion, Graca Machel, left, outside Mandela's Pretoria residence, Saturday July 18, 1998. Mandela later married Machel, the 52-year-old widow of Mozambican President Samora Machel, in a civil ceremony at his Johannesburg home, on his 80th birthday.(AP Photo/Hand Out)

23. Former South African President Nelson Mandela, left, blows out his birthday candles alongside his wife Graca Machel, right, during his 90th birthday celebrations at his house in Qunu, South Africa, Saturday, July 19, 2008. (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe, POOL)

24. A young girl looks at 'Get Well' messages to former South African President Nelson Mandela, at a school adjacent to the Milpark Hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa, Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011. (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)

25. Former South African President, Nelson Mandela, in a jovial mood at the Mandela Foundation in Johannesburg Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2005 where he met with the winner and runner-up of the local " Idols" competition.(AP Photo/Denis Farrell)

LEADIN

Today ( 18 July) is Nelson Mandela's 95th birthday.

As South Africa's beloved 'Madiba' lies critically ill in a Pretoria hospital, the United Nations has recognised the anti-apartheid leader's birthday as an opportunity to honour his legacy.

STORYLINE

Nelson Mandela, born July 18, 1918, is a retired politician and anti-apartheid activist.

He served as President of South Africa from 1994-1999 and was the first black South African to hold office.

Mandela fought apartheid since his early 20's by working to change institutionalised racism and inequality within social classes.

His campaign for peaceful non-violent defiance against the South African government and their policies paved the way for change.

In 1962, Nelson Mandela was arrested on charges of inciting workers to strike and leave the country without valid documents.

In 1964, Mandela was sentenced to life in prison for four counts of sabotage. He was finally released in February 1990. In this iconic photo he appears alongside his second wife Winnie.

Later that year he took to the stage with fellow members of the African National Congress (ANC) leadership Oliver Tambo and Walter Sisulu.

He also addressed the Special Committee Against Apartheid at the United Nations in New York, June 22, 1990, in his first appearance before the world body.

Mandela took charge of the ANC, shared the 1993 Nobel Peace Prize with F.W. de Klerk and was elected president by a landslide in South Africa's first all-race election the following year.

Mandela spent 18 years of his 27 years in prison on Robben Island.

In 2003 he painted a picture from his memory of the view from his cell.

US President Bill Clinton was given a personal tour of the prison by Mandela during a visit in 1998.

Deputy President Thabo Mbeki took over when Mandela's Presidential term ended in June 1999 and he declined to seek another, a rarity among African presidents.

With apartheid vanquished, Mandela turned to peacemaking in other parts of Africa and the world and to fighting AIDS, with mixed results.

Mandela has married three times.

His first wife, nurse Evelyn Mase, bore him four children. A daughter died in infancy, a son was killed in a car crash in 1970 and another son died of AIDS in 2005. The couple divorced in 1957 and Evelyn died in 2004.

His marriage to his second wife Winnie fell apart after his release and he is now married to Graca Machel, the widowed former first lady of neighbouring Mozambique.

Since June 8, 2013, Mandela has been in hospital, being treated for pulmonary conditions that have been afflicting him for many years.

He is now in a critical but stable condition in a hospital in Pretoria, South Africa.

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South Africa Mandela 2
Title:
HD
Summary: Scenes outside hospital that treated Mandela after former leader spends first night at home
Story No: 907303
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 09/02/2013 09:30 AM
People: Nelson Mandela , Jacob Zuma
Subscription:

Well wishers continued to gather outside the hospital in Pretoria that treated Nelson Mandela, a day after he was discharged home after nearly three months of treatment.

"I feel good when Tata Mandela was released because he was so long and we miss him so much and I am very, very happy that he is discharged," said student Mphumuzo Chiula.

There were no official updates Monday on the condition of the 95-year-old leader of the anti-apartheid movement, who was taken to his home in an ambulance on Sunday.

In announcing Mandela's discharge, the office of South African President Jacob Zuma said the former president remains in critical and sometimes unstable condition.

A statement from Zuma's office also says Mandela will receive the same level of intensive care that he did in the hospital, administered by the same doctors.

1. Wide exterior of the Mediclinic Heart hospital, Pretoria

2. Wide of hospital gate with security

3. Mid of hospital security

4. Wide Mandela tribute outside the hospital

5. Mid of Mandela posters and messages of support for Mandela on the hospital wall

6. Close of a picture of Mandela

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Mphumuzo Chiula, student:

"I feel good when Tata Mandela is released because he was so long and we missed him so much and I am very, very happy that he is discharged."

8. Wide of tributes

9. Close of a picture of Mandela on the wall

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Confedence Ridovhona, Local Resident:

"I am so happy because he is discharged because he was at the hospital for so long a time. I wish he can get better soon."

11. Wide of people passing outside the hospital

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SNTV Mandela File
Title:
HD
Summary: File of Nelson Mandela from a sporting angle
Story No: 994160
Source: SNTV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 06/25/2013 08:44 PM
People: Nelson Mandela , Desmond Tutu , Matt Damon , Aaron Mokoena , Steven Pienaar
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SHOTLIST:

Various

Rugby World Cup 1995

Cape Town, South Africa - May 24th 1995

1. 00:00 Wide of airport

2. 00:05 Nelson Mandela shakes hands with South Africa rugby team

3. 00:19 SOUNDBITE (English) Nelson Mandela

"They are well motivated. Very good spirits. And you know that they are very hungry for victory. The Australians have reached the top. But we have not and that might be decisive tomorrow. I have never been so proud of our boys as I am. I hope that that pride we all share will all be there tomorrow cheering them to victory."

4. 00:52 Wide of Mandela

5. 0:55 Springboks captain Francois Pienaar shaking hands with Mandela

UPSOUND (English) Francois Pienaar, South Africa captain:

"It's wonderful. It's exciting. The guys are really thrilled. We were standing inside having photographs taken with the president. It shows you the hype. We respect him as a great leader. His visit here has honoured us. Tomorrow we know there is one guy in the stand that we have to play for and that's the president."

Failed Cape Town Olympic 2004 bid

Cape Town, South Africa - 7th December 1996

6. 01:15 Nelson Mandela arrives at meeting with the IOC

7. 01:33 Mandela next to speaker of South African parliament Frene Ginwala

8. 01:38 Applause as Mandela shakes young boy's hand

9. 01:49 Wide of Mandela with IOC members

10. 01:55 Close up of Mandela

David Beckham meets Mandela

Johannesburg, South Africa - 21st May 2003

11. 01:59 Nelson Mandela shakes hands with David Beckham

12. 02:13 Close up on Mandela

13. 02:16 David Beckham and Mandela

14. 02:29 SOUNDBITE (English) Nelson Mandela:

"If you and the British people support us (in South Africa's 2010 World Cup bid) I'm sure many other countries will do so. So we make this appeal to you to be in the forefront of supporting our bid. I'm sure you will do that."

15. 02:58 Beckham gives Mandela an England shirt

16. 03:11 Wide of England team with Mandela

South Africa to host 2010 World Cup

Zurich, Switzerland - 15th May 2004

17. 03:17 FIFA president Sepp Blatter announces South Africa as World Cup 2010 hosts

18. 03:33 Nelson Mandela celebrates

19. 03:42 Mandela with the World Cup

20. 03:53 Archbishop Desmond Tutu celebrates

21. 03:58 Blatter and Mandela with the World Cup

22. 04:01 Various celebrations

FIFA executive on Robben Island

Robben Island, South Africa - 3rd December 2009

23. 04:08 Wide of Robben Island

24. 05:18 Pan to FIFA president Sepp Blatter

Film premiere of Invictus

London, England - 31st January 2010

25. 04:27 Matt Damon who played Francois Pienaar

26. 04:40 Former Springbok captain Francois Pienaar

27. 04:49 SOUNDBITE (English) Francois Pienaar, Former South Africa captain:

"We went on jogs. We went to the gym together. We had a couple of glasses of wine. We chewed the fat. We enjoyed each other's company."

28. 04:55 SOUNDBITE (English) Matt Damon, Actor:

"When you really admire the person (it is difficult). I really admire Francois and what he did and what that whole group of people did. So that was an added pressure. Definitely."

Mandela meets South Africa football team ahead of 2010 World Cup

Johannesburg, South Africa - 3rd June 2010

29. 05:11 Mid of Aaron Mokoena with Nelson Mandela

30. 05:17 Coach Carlos Pereira shakes hands with Mandela

31. 05:21 Steven Pienaar with Nelson Mandela

32. 05:33 Wide of Mandela with squad

STORYLINE:

File of Nelson Mandela

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South Africa Mandela STILLS
Title:
SD
Summary: STILLS of former SAF president Nelson Mandela driven across field at WC
Story No: 651078
Source: AP Photos
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 07/11/2010 07:42 PM
People: Nelson Mandela , Jacob Zuma , Robert Mugabe , Desmond Tutu , Kofi Annan
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

AP PHOTOS - NO ACCESS CANADA/FOR BROADCAST USE ONLY - STRICTLY NO ACCESS ONLINE OR MOBILE

1. STILL of former South African President Nelson Mandela and his wife Graca Machel waving to the crowd as they're driven across the field at Soccer City stadium before the World Cup final between Spain and the Netherlands

2. STILL of close-up of Mandela and Machel being driven across field

3. STILL of Mandela and Machel waving to crowd as they're driven across field

4. STILL of wide of Mandela and Machel waving to crowd, spectators standing in the background

STORYLINE

Former South African President Nelson Mandela waved to the crowd as South Africa began saying farewell to the 2010 World Cup at an emotional ceremony before Sunday's final between Spain and the Netherlands in Johannesburg.

The anti-apartheid icon had kept a low profile during the month-long tournament, having decided against attending the opening game following the death of his great-grand daughter.

Driven in a small golf cart alongside wife Graca Machel, a smiling Mandela was welcomed by a thunderous mix of vuvuzelas and roars from the crowd at Soccer City stadium.

He shook hands with officials before leaving the field a few minutes later.

The pre-match ceremony was also attended by heads of state from across Africa, including South Africa's Jacob Zuma and Zimbabwe's Robert Mugabe.

Dutch and Spanish royals were also present, as were Archbishop Desmond Tutu and former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan.

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UK: LONDON: SOUTH AFRICAN PRESIDENT NELSON MANDELA VISIT
Title:
SD
Summary: UK: LONDON: SOUTH AFRICAN PRESIDENT NELSON MANDELA VISIT
Story No: 81556
Source: APTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 06/13/1998 04:00 AM
People: Nelson Mandela
Subscription:

English/Nat

South African President Nelson Mandela on Friday admitted his government had made mistakes, with some members having become corrupt.

Mandela was speaking in London, where he hosted a special reception at the South African High Commission to mark next Tuesday's South African Youth Day.

At the ceremony, the president also met the parents of Stephen Lawrence, a young black man killed in an apparent racist attack in London.

Later in the day, Mandela attended a charity gala performance of the South African hit musical "Kat and the Kings" in London's West End.

President Nelson Mandela stopped in London on his way to the Welsh city of Cardiff, where he will be attending next week's European Union summit as a special guest.

First on the agenda was a visit to the South African High Commission in Trafalgar Square.

Here, the president hosted a reception for more than 300 British and South African youths.

The reception was to celebrate next Tuesday's South African Youth Day.

The president would normally celebrate the day at a mass rally in South Africa, but being out of the country, he decided to throw a party in London instead.

Mandela used the opportunity to call for the support of young people in the efforts to achieve real advance in South Africa in the face of corruption.

He said his government had reason to be proud of its achievements, but did admit that mistakes had been made.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"Little did we know that some of our people - some of whom suffered in exile, underground, languished in jail - have themselves become corrupt. It is one of the greatest challenges that is facing us: to fight the freedom fighters who having helped to win liberation have now put their claws deep into public resources, using them for their personal purposes."

SUPER CAPTION: Nelson Mandela, South African President

The president was speaking just as South Africa's football team was getting ready to take on mighty France in their first ever appearance at the World Cup finals.

Never mind that the "Bafana Bafana" (The Boys, The Boys) lost 3-0 - for the South Africans it was a historic moment.

For 28 years, until 1992, South Africa was banned from international football because of apartheid and its players and fans could only wonder what a World Cup was like.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"All our eyes, attention, our feelings, our emotions are now in Marseille praying, praying that our boys will live up to expectations. If they do not, please don't blame them."

SUPER CAPTION: Nelson Mandela, South African president

Also present at the reception at the High Commission were the parents of Stephen Lawrence - the black teenager killed at a London bus stop five years ago.

A major judicial inquiry is currently under way into the police investigation into the death of Lawrence.

Doreen and Neville Lawrence were invited on to the stage - amid enthusiastic cheers and applause - to meet the South African leader.

Mandela embraced them, giving them his full support in their fight to find out the truth about their son's murder.

Later in the day, the president attended a special performance of the South African musical "Kat and the Kings" which is set in 1950s Cape Town.

It tells the story of a mixed race band in the racial melting pot of Cape Town's "District 6", which was broken up under the apartheid regime.

Mandela went on stage during the interval and spoke of his own memories of District 6.

He said it had produced not only musicians and artists but men and women who were now among the leading diplomats for the new South Africa.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"Those who were the underdogs are know coming up on the surface to say we are human beings, we have the virtues and abilities like any other community."

SUPER CAPTION: Nelson Mandela, South African president

"Kat and the Kings" is the first South African musical to open in the West End since the first all-race vote in 1994 and is based on the real life memories of the show's star Sallie Daniels.

The gala performance was set to raise more than 30-thousand pounds for the New Dawn Fund (Umsobomvu) which helps fund youth skills development and employment.

London, Britain - 12 June 1998

1. Nelson Mandela arriving at the South African High Commission

2. Mandela walking through crowd of children inside the High Commission

3. Mandela walking on stage

4. Young boy

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Nelson Mandela South African President

6. Mandela on stage

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Nelson Mandela South African President

8. Lawrence family walking on stage and Mandela hugging them

9. Mandela arriving at the West End theatre

10. Mandela watching show

11. Crowd

12. Mandela greeting cast of show

13. Audience on balconies

14. Mandela hugging actors

15. Cutaway to actors

16. SOUNDBITE (English) Nelson Mandela, South African President

17. Exterior of theatre (night shot)

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South Africa Mandela
Title:
SD
Summary: Beckham and England football team meet Nelson Mandela
Story No: 375106
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 05/21/2003 04:00 AM
People: Nelson Mandela
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide exterior of former South African President Nelson Mandela's office in Johannesburg

2. Wide shot of Mandela shaking hands with England Football Captain David Beckham

3. Close up of Mandela's face during handshakes

4. Wide of Mandela shaking hands with other England football players

5. Close up of Beckham, zooms to him seated with Mandela

6. Pan of England team and officials

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Nelson Mandela, South African President

"If you and the British people support us (in South Africa's 2010 world cup bid) I'm sure many other countries will do so. So we I make this appeal to you to be in the forefront of supporting our bid. I'm sure you will do that."

8. Mandela and Beckham shaking hands

9. SOUNDBITE (English) David Beckham, England Football Captain

"As England captain I'd like to just say it's a great honour, for me the manager and the rest of the players, to be here today. I said yesterday to meet a great man -- such as you -- it's an amazing honour for everyone involved in the FA (football association) and the England team, so we brought a shirt down which as you can see has your name on the back."

10. Beckham gives Mandela shirt

11. Close up "Mandela" written on back of shirt

12. Journalists shouts out about Beckham's hair, Mandela puts hands of Beckham's hair, pans to Beckham, then back to Beckham

13. SOUNDBITE (English) Nelson Mandela, South African President

"I'm too old to express an opinion on the latest developments for young people." (laughs)

14. Close up of Beckham

15. Beckham, Mandela, South African Captain Lucas Radebe

16. Close up of Radebe

17. Wide of Mandela with England team

18. Mid of Mandela greeting South African players

19. Close up of Mandela putting on cap with logo for South African 2010 World Cup bid, AUDIO of cheering

20. Wide of South African team with Mandela

21. Beckham with South African children, including some of Mandela's great-grandchildren

22. England team's bus departs

STORYLINE:

Former South African President Nelson Mandela on Wednesday asked the English national soccer team to support his country's bid to host the 2010 World Cup.

Mandela asked Captain David Beckham and his teammates for their support after meeting England and South Africa players on the eve on an international friendly between the two countries.

Beckham presented Mandela with an England shirt with Mandela's name on the back.

As he accepted the shirt, Mandela advised the South African players to "walk tall" during the match.

Beckham, who will win his 60th international cap in Durban Thursday, said it was a great honour to meet Mandela and he added that he "fully backed" South Africa's bid to host the World Cup.

When asked his opinion on Beckham's new braided "corn-row" hairstyle, Mandela laughed, saying he was too old to keep up with youth fashions.

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South Africa World Cup Ghana 2
Title:
SD
Summary: WRAP Ghana team visits Winnie Mandela and Nelson Mandela
Story No: 650331
Source: AP , MANDELA FOUNDATION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 07/03/2010 06:26 PM
People: Nelson Mandela , Winnie Madikizela-Mandela , Kevin-Prince Boateng , Richard Kingson , Derek Boateng
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

AP TELEVISION

Soweto - 3 July 2010

1. Ghana players walking up to Winnie Madikizela-Mandela's house, zoom into Milan Rajevac, head coach of Ghana football team, giving thumbs up to onlookers

2. Onwatchers standing by, cheering and taking photos, pan across street

3. Ghana players walking through gates of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela's house

MANDELA FOUNDATION HANDOUT - MUST CREDIT MANDELA FOUNDATION

Soweto - 3 July 2010

4. STILL: of Kevin-Prince Boateng, member of Ghana football team, shaking hands with Madikizela-Mandela

5. STILL: of Richard Kingson, goalkeeper in Ghana football team, with Winnie Madikizela-Mandela

AP TELEVISION

Johannesburg - 3 July 2010

6. Wide of Ghana team bus arriving at house of former South African president Nelson Mandela

7. Pan of Ghana footballers getting off bus and walking through security into house

MANDELA FOUNDATION HANDOUT - MUST CREDIT MANDELA FOUNDATION

Johannesburg - 3 July 2010

8. STILL: of Ghana goalkeeper Stephen Ahorlu shaking hands with Nelson Mandela

9. STILL: of Kevin-Prince Boateng, member of Ghana football team, shaking hands with Mandela

10. STILL: of Ghana goalkeeper Richard Kingson shaking hands with Mandela

AP TELEVISION

Johannesburg - 3 July 2010

11. Ghana team players walking out of Nelson Mandela's house

12. SOUNDBITE: (English) Richard Kingson, goalkeeper in Ghana football team:

"I am very happy to meet a great man like president Mandela. I was there with him, shaking his hand. I'm so happy to meet him face to face."

13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Derek Boateng, midfield player in Ghana football team:

"It's a dream come true, you know. It is very, very good for us. We feel more happy and feel good that we have met this man. He is a legend, you know, and everybody is talking about him, and it is our first time meeting him face to face, so it is a dream come true for us."

14. Mid of Ghana football players being surrounded by screaming fans in Sandton shopping centre

15. Wide of scene inside shopping centre, crowds of people flocking towards Ghana players

16. Ghana player on escalator, having his photo taken with a fan

17. Mid of Ghana player, having his photo taken with a fan

18. Ghana player being swamped by female fans, wanting to take his photo

STORYLINE:

The day after they crashed out of the quarter finals of the FIFA World Cup, the Black Stars of Ghana were still riding the euphoria of respect and devotion from fans across the African continent for getting as far as they did in the tournament.

On Saturday morning, Ghana's national football team ventured out of their team base to meet members of South Africa's first family, the Mandelas.

First stop was the Johannesburg township of Soweto where they paid their respects to Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, ex-wife of former South African president Nelson Mandela.

Madikizela-Mandela's great granddaughter, Zenani Mandela, had been killed in a car crash whilst returning home from the World Cup Kick Off Concert last month. She was 13 years-old.

Arriving in Soweto on the team bus, the players from Ghana were greeted by bystanders who cheered and applauded their arrival.

Ghana was the only African team in the tournament to make it to the quarterfinals and football fans across the continent had been hoping to see the side advance to the semis.

South African fans started rallying behind Ghana after their own team, Bafana Bafana, was knocked out in the group stage.

The World Cup dream wasn't to last though, as Ghana lost 4-2 on penalties to Uruguay when their quarter final match finished 1-1 in extra time.

The Ghana team spent almost 30 minutes inside Winnie Madikizela-Mandela's house before boarding the team bus again and driving across town for their next appointment, this time with Nelson Mandela in his house in the Houghton suburb of Johannesburg.

According to the Nelson Mandela Foundation, Nelson Mandela had sent a letter on Friday wishing the squad well for their match against Uruguay.

On exiting the house, the players spoke of what a great privilege it had been to meet South Africa's greatest political figure.

"It's a dream come true, you know. It is very, very good for us. We feel more happy and feel good that we have met this man. He is a legend, you know, and everybody is talking about him, and it is our first time meeting him face to face, so it is a dream come true for us," said Ghana international player Derek Boateng.

Back on the team bus and Ghana's footballers headed for the upmarket shopping centre of Sandton City.

As soon as Saturday afternoon shoppers recognised the football stars, they were swamped by mostly female well-wishers, wanting to have their photos taken with the players.

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FILE South Africa Stadium
Title:
SD
Summary: World Cup final stadium has historic anti-apartheid links
Story No: 650590
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 07/07/2010 01:40 AM
People: Nelson Mandela
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

AP TELEVISION

October 29, 1989

1. Aerial of packed stadium

2. Various of crowd singing

3. Various of stands crowded with people

4. African National Congress (ANC) leaders walking on field in stadium

5. Wide pan of packed stadium

6. Anti-Apartheid activist Walter Sisulu walking in stadium

7. Crowd cheering

9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Walter Sisulu, anti-Apartheid activist and ANC member

"There can be no question of unilaterally abandoning the armed struggle."

POOL

February 13, 1990

10. Wide an across packed football stadium

11. Wide of Nelson and Winnie Mandela getting out of car

12. Wide of Mandela walking across grass

13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nelson Mandela:

"My return to Soweto fills my heart with joy. At the same time, I also return with a deep sense of sadness; sadness to learn that you are still suffering under an inhuman system."

14. Various of stadium with ANC leaders and VIPs singing ANC national anthem

AP TELEVISION

July 13, 2009

15. South African flag in front of stadium

16. Wide of exterior of Soccer City Stadium

17. Various of partially completed stadium

AP TELEVISION

June 11, 2010

18. View from train window showing Soccer City stadium in distance and South Africa flag in foreground

19. Fans walking to stadium

20. Fans gathered outside stadium for opening match

21. Wide of stadium

STORYLINE

Built on the edge of Soweto, Soccer City Stadium will be the grand stage for Sunday's World Cup final, yet for many South Africans the site has been hallowed ground for two decades

because of its links to politics rather than sport.

In October 1989, with apartheid still in force, Soccer City's precursor stadium hosted an electrifying rally at which more than 70,000 blacks greeted newly freed leaders of the still-outlawed African National Congress.

The group included most of the ANC's long-imprisoned hierarchy except Nelson Mandela.

It was the largest anti-government rally in South African history - but the record was short-lived.

Less than four months later, an even bigger, more euphoric crowd overflowed FNB Stadium to welcome home Mandela himself, the paramount ANC leader, at last freed unconditionally by the white-minority government after 27 years in prison.

Some young men scaled the light towers high above the stadium to see their hero.

Together, the rallies - witnessed by scores of foreign journalists and diplomats - were graphic proof of the ANC's massive popular support, sending an unmistakable message that its leaders would play central roles as South Africa moved forward on a bumpy path away from apartheid.

The first rally was remarkable because almost every aspect - including repeated praise for the ANC's guerrilla campaign - violated the stringent security laws of nation in a declared state of emergency.

Police kept their distance, and the closest thing to a security unit in the stadium was an honour guard of young ANC supporters in khaki uniforms.

The government had given permission for the rally, although a magistrate warned that speakers should avoid promoting ANC aims. The warning went unheeded.

The second rally, on February 13, drew an even bigger crowd - well over 100,000 - to greet Mandela, two days after his release from prison in Cape Town and 11 days after the ANC

was unbanned.

Youths perched precariously on walls, others scaled the 120-foot light towers, and a few dozen people were injured as crowds jostled to glimpse the podium.

Mandela returned to FNB Stadium three years later for another momentous political occasion - the April 1993 funeral for Chris Hani, head of the South African Communist Party and a top ANC official who'd been assassinated by a white gunman.

Barely a year later, on April 27, 1994, Mandela was elected president.

Mandela's release from prison seemed near-impossible when ground was broken for the original stadium in 1986.

The project was the brainchild of football officials and got financial backing from First National Bank, which secured the naming rights.

Amid anti-apartheid unrest and the state of emergency, the goal of building South Africa's first world-class football stadium seemed audacious, but it opened in 1989 - only weeks before the Sisulu rally.

It was constructed in a virtual no man's land near mine dumps on Johannesburg's southwestern outskirts.

Now the site is officially part of Johannesburg, and the city owns the stadium, which was overhauled and expanded for the World Cup.

Its future is somewhat murky - there's even a dispute brewing about whether its post-World Cup name will be National Stadium or revert to FNB Stadium.

Its management promises all-out efforts to prevent it from becoming a white elephant.

In addition to major football matches, rugby, concerts and corporate events are expected.

First National Bank is well aware that the stadium named after it is now enshrined in the anti-apartheid legacy.

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South Africa - Campaign Rallies
Title:
SD
Summary: South Africa - Campaign Rallies
Story No: w064565
Source: WTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 04/17/1994 04:00 AM
People: Nelson Mandela
Subscription:

Three people were killed and 21 injured in South Africa on Sunday

(17/4) in a stampede at a campaign rally addressed by ANC leader

Nelson Mandela, medical officials said. The dead included a boy

aged six. The incident, the worst of its kind in the official

campaign for South Africa's April 26-28 all-race elections,

occurred in a tunnel into a stadium in Athlone near Cape Town

where Mandela addressed an estimated 20,000 supporters. In

Johannesburg, the Zulu-based Inkatha Freedom Party pulled back

from a direct confrontation with the government and the

authorities in the commercial capital on Monday by postponing a

march banned by police to prevent bloodshed. But security forces

fear trouble elsewhere as Inkatha tries to enforce a week of mass

protest against the election. In Natal, the army and police said

at least four people had been killed overnight in fresh political

violence there. The killings took the death toll in the Zulu

heartland of Natal and the adjoining KwaZulu black homeland to at

least 222 since the March 31 declaration of a state of emergency

there.

SHOWS 17/4:

ATHLONE NEAR CAPE TOWN

0:00 cu of Nelson Mandela waving from truck in stadium

0:08 cutaway of crowd in stadium

0:10 ws of Mandela at podium

sot Nelson Mandela "We have been inspired throughout by our honour

by our commitment to the human spirit to reconciliation to nation

building."

DURBAN

0:30 Inkatha rally

0:33 lots of chanting by Inkatha supporters

0:40 supporters holding spears

0:44 Inkatha leader Mangosuthu Buthelezi sot " Even at this late

hour we are hoping there may be a miracle then there will be a way

to devise for us to make it possible to participate in the

election."

NEWCASTLE, NATAL

0:55 Zulu supporters chanting (natsot)

1:01 Zulu King Goodwill Zwelithini walks to VIP tent

1:05 Members of Northern Natal Boere Kommando practice drills

1:11 Boere Kommando leader Leonard Veenendal sot

" We want to give the King the assurance that if he calls upon

us we will be there" (lots of cheers afterwards)

THOKOZA-KATLEHONG TOWNSHIP

1:24 ms of body on the ground covered in sheet

1:28 truck full of troops drives through township

1:35 ends

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South Africa - Mandela Meets Arafat & Weizman
Title:
SD
Summary: South Africa - Mandela Meets Arafat & Weizman
Story No: w070733
Source: WTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 05/09/1994 04:00 AM
People: Ezer Weizman , Yasser Arafat , Nelson Mandela
Subscription:

Israeli President Ezer Weizman and PLO leader Yasser Arafat shook

hands on Monday (9/5) at talks with South Africa's president-elect

Nelson Mandela. Mandela, who has made reconciliation a keynote of

his policy for South Africa under black majority rule, held talks

with the two men in the administrative capital Pretoria.

SHOWS PRETORIA 9/5:

cars arrive

israeli president ezer weizman gets out of car and walks into

building

mandela gives box to weizman

they shake hands

weizman speaks

photo-op mandela standing next to arafat

all walk out

1.42

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Keywords: Palestine Liberation Organisation, Israel, ANC, African National Congress
Subjects: Government and politics
People: Ezer Weizman , Yasser Arafat , Nelson Mandela
Organisations: South Africa government, Israel government, Palestine Liberation Organization
Locations: South Africa , Israel , Pretoria , Southern Africa , Africa , Middle East
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South Africa - Mandela Greets The Masses
Title:
SD
Summary: South Africa - Mandela Greets The Masses
Story No: w070745
Source: WTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 05/09/1994 04:00 AM
People: Nelson Mandela
Subscription:

An hour after South Africa's new democratic parliament appointed

Nelson Mandela the country's first black president on Monday (9/5),

the 75-year-old ANC leader appeared on a balcony of the old colonial City Hall before 40,000 wildly-cheering.

SHOWS CAPE TOWN 9/5:

police standing guard and mandela getting out of car as he arrives

at parliament

mandela listening to anthem with his hand on his heart

mandela and de klerk shaking hands and mandela and thabo mbeki

shaking hands

ws parliament exterior

aerial of parliament exterior

dancers performing traditional dance

anc balloon in the sky

crowds

people running to see mandela alongside parliament's wall

people injured because of jostling and being helped

mandela and bishop tutu on balcony waving

mandela eng. sot making speech on balcony calling for unity,

saying people of south africa have spoken in this election, they

want change and change is what they will get

woman clapping

mandela waving

crowd singing national anthem

2.49

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Tunisia - Mandela On Rwanda At His OAU Debut
Title:
SD
Summary: Tunisia - Mandela On Rwanda At His OAU Debut
Story No: w067655
Source: WTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 06/13/1994 04:00 AM
People: Nelson Mandela
Subscription:

South African President Nelson Mandela, making his grand debut at

a pan-African summit, said on Monday (13/6) the carnage in Rwanda

was "a stern and severe rebuke" to all African leaders and must be

stopped.

SHOWS:

TUNIS, TUNISIA, 13/6

S. african president nelson mandela speaking (at the annual summit

of the Organisation of African Unity) about being willing to help

end the carnage in rwanda: he believes the international community

is doing all it can. south africa has already given humanitarian

aid. also considering providing armed personnel carriers and any

other affordable assistance. s africa can only respond in

accordance with its capacity, mandela says (english)

2.41

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US George H.W. Bush Meets with Nelson Mandela 2
Title:
SD
Summary: African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela and President George H.W. Bush make remarks on the South Lawn of White House
Story No: DC00143
Source: WH Pool
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 06/25/1990 06:48 PM
People: Nelson Mandela , George H. Bush
Subscription:

President George H.W. Bush welcomed African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela at a sun-splashed ceremony on the South Lawn amid applause and cheers from a crowd of several hundred. As Mandela waved, his wife Winnie gave a clenched-fist salute. Mandela told a news conference that he and President George H.W. Bush disagree over the use of armed struggle to end apartheid in South Africa, but the president understands his position that blacks may have no alternative to violence. He explained to the president the stand of the African National Congress. Bush urged Mandela to pursue his goals through peaceful means.

SHOTLIST

1. WS Africa National Congress leader Nelson Mandela and President George H.W. Bush at podiums, Bush finishes remarks and shakes hands with Mandela

2. Push CU Mandela begins remarks

3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nelson Mandela, African National Congress leader:

"Mr. President, it is an honor and a pleasure for my wife, my delegation, and I to be welcomed by you. This is a continuation of the rousing welcome which we have received from the people of New York and Boston, of black and white. That welcome has far exceeded our wildest expectations. We look forward to visiting Atlanta and other cities because we are confident that the warm welcome we have received is not confined to New York, Boston, and Washington. That mood expresses the commitment of all the people of the United States of America to the struggle for the removal of apartheid.

One thing that is very clear, and it has been made even more clear in the remarks by the President, is that on the question of the removal of apartheid and the introduction of a nonracial democracy in our country we are absolutely unanimous. That is something that we have always known because the people of America and the President, in particular, have spoken in this regard in very clear and firm terms. And this has been a source of great encouragement to our people. To receive the support of any government is, in our situation, something of enormous importance; but to receive the support of the Government of the United States of America, the leader of the West, is something beyond words. If today we are confident that the dreams which have inspired us all these years is about to be realized, it is, in very large measure, because of the support we have got from the masses of the people of the United States of America and, in particular, from the Government and from the President.

There are very important political developments that have taken place in our country today, and it is my intention to brief the President as fully as possible on these developments. We are doing so because it is necessary for him to understand not only in broad outline what is happening in our country, he must be furnished with the details which may not be so available to the public so that the enormous assistance that he has given us should be related to the actual developments in the country.

I will also ask the President to maintain sanctions because it is because of sanctions that such enormous progress has been made in the attempt to address the problems of our country.

I will also inform him about developments as far as the arms struggle is concerned. The remarks that he has made here are due to the fact that he has not as yet got a proper briefing from us. I might just state in passing that the methods of political action which are used by the black people of South Africa were determined by the South African Government. As long as a government is prepared to talk, to maintain channels of communication between itself and the governed, there can be no question of violence whatsoever. But when a government decides to ban political organizations of the oppressed, intensifies oppression, and does not allow any free political activity, no matter how peaceful and nonviolent, then the people have no alternative but to resort to violence.

There is not a single political organization in our country, inside and outside Parliament, which can ever compare with the African National Congress in its total commitment to peace. If we are forced to resort to violence, it is because we had no other alternative whatsoever. But even in this regard, there have been significant developments which I hope to brief the President on. I am also going to brief the President on the key role which the ANC now occupies in the country as a result of his efforts to mobilize the entire country around the question of peace."

4. CU Mandela at podium

See also DC00141, DC00143

Rushes available on Tape TVD 0018

KMF

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US Nelson Mandela Address to Joint Session of Congress 1
Title:
SD
Summary: Nelson Mandela appeals to Congress to support the struggle for a multiracial democracy in South Africa and said his country continues to bleed under the repression of white-minority rule
Story No: DC00169
Source: Pool
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 06/26/1990 07:58 PM
People: Nelson Mandela , George H. Bush , Richard Cheney , Dick Thornburgh , Clayton Keith Yeutter , Tom Foley , Robert Byrd
Subscription:

Nelson Mandela appealed to Congress to support the struggle for a multiracial democracy in South Africa and said his country continues to bleed under the repression of white-minority rule. The South African black leader spoke to a rapt audience of lawmakers, diplomats and Cabinet officers in the House of Representatives chamber. Mandela was interrupted by standing applause several times, once when he said the U.S. economic sanctions against South Africa should not be lifted now. Despite the public show of support for Mandela, some members did not attend as a show of protest over Mandela's support for Cuba, Libya and the Palestine Liberation Organization and his backing of armed struggle.

SHOTLIST

1. WS Chamber of House of Representatives, members of congress mingle on floor

2. MS President George H.W. Bush's cabinet is announced, members including Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney, Attorney General Dick Thornburgh, and Secretary of Agriculture Clayton Yeutter enter and walk to seats

3. WS House floor

4. African National Congress Deputy President Nelson Mandela is announced, Mandela enters, shakes hands with various members of congress as he makes his way to podium

5. WS Mandela shakes hands with Speaker of the House Tom Foley (D-Wash.) and Senate Majority Leader Robert Byrd (D-W.Va.)

6. CU Mandela smiles and waves

7. WS Foley and Byrd standing behind Mandela, applauding

8. CU Mandela smiling and waving as applause goes on

9. WS members of congress standing and clapping

10. VS applauding members of Congress, smiling Mandela

11. MS Winnie Mandela, Nelson Mandela's wife, and UNID women standing and clapping

12. Side shot Mandela, Foley bangs gavel to bring session to order

13. CU Foley introduces Mandela, VS clapping members of congress

14. CU Mandela prepares to begin remarks

See also DC00170, DC174, DC00176, DC00177

Rushes available on Tape TVD0034, TVD0035

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Subjects: Legislature , Government and politics , Cabinets , Democracy
People: Nelson Mandela , George H. Bush , Richard Cheney , Dick Thornburgh , Clayton Keith Yeutter , Tom Foley , Robert Byrd
Organisations: South Africa government, United States Congress, United States House of Representatives, United States government
Locations: Washington , Washington, D.C. , United States
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US Nelson Mandela Address to Joint Session of Congress 2
Title:
SD
Summary: Nelson Mandela appeals to Congress to support the struggle for a multiracial democracy in South Africa and said his country continues to bleed under the repression of white-minority rule
Story No: DC00170
Source: Pool
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 06/26/1990 08:24 PM
People: Nelson Mandela , Richard Gephardt , Robert Byrd , Newt Gingrich , Bob Michel , Steny Hoyer , Arlen Specter , Richard Lugar
Subscription:

Nelson Mandela appealed to Congress to support the struggle for a multiracial democracy in South Africa and said his country continues to bleed under the repression of white-minority rule. The South African black leader spoke to a rapt audience of lawmakers, diplomats and Cabinet officers in the House of Representatives chamber. Mandela was interrupted by standing applause several times, once when he said the U.S. economic sanctions against South Africa should not be lifted now. Despite the public show of support for Mandela, some members did not attend as a show of protest over Mandela's support for Cuba, Libya and the Palestine Liberation Organization and his backing of armed struggle.

SHOTLIST

1. African National Congress Deputy President Nelson Mandela prepares to address Congress, puts on reading glasses and begins remarks

2. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nelson Mandela, African National Congress Deputy President:

"...It is a fact of the human condition that each shall, like a meteor, a mere brief passing moment in time and space, flit across the human stage and pass out of existence. Even the golden lads and lasses, as much as the chimney sweepers, come, and tomorrow are no more. After them all, they leave the people, enduring, multiplying, permanent, except to the extent that the same humanity might abuse its own genius to immolate life itself."

3. MS UNID African American Congressman and Rep. Richard Gephardt (D-Mo.)

4. WS Speaker of the House Thomas Foley (D-Wash.) and Senate Majority Leader Robert Byrd (D-W.Va.) sit behind Mandela

5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nelson Mandela, African National Congress Deputy President:

"...we have come to Washington in the District of Columbia, and into these hallowed chambers of the United States Congress, not as pretenders to greatness, but as a particle of a people whom we know to be noble and heroic-enduring, multiplying, permanent, rejoicing in the expectation and knowledge that their humanity will be reaffirmed and enlarged by open and unfettered communion with the nations of the world."

6. MS Rep. Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.), seems to have growth on side of cheek, and Rep. Robert Michel (R-Ill.)

7. CU Mandela remarks in progress

8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Nelson Mandela, African National Congress Deputy President:

"Our people demand democracy. Our country, which continues to bleed and suffer pain, needs democracy. It cries out for the situation where the law will decree that the freedom to speak of freedom constitutes the very essence of legality and the very thing that makes for the legitimacy of the constitutional order.

It thirsts for the situation where those who are entitled by law to carry arms, as the forces of national security and law and order, will not turn their weapons against the citizens simply because the citizens assert that equality, liberty and the pursuit of happiness are fundamental human rights which are not only inalienable but must, if necessary, be defended with the weapons of war..."

9. WS Rep. Steny Hoyer(D-Md.) and others listen, WS chamber

10. CU Mandela

11. MS Sen. Arlen Specter (R-Pa.), front row, and Sen. Richard Lugar (R-Ind.), back row

12. WS Foley, Byrd behind Mandela, clapping

13. CU Mandela, continues remarks

See also DC00169, DC00171, DC00174, DC0176, DC00177

Rushes available on Tape TVD0034, TVD0035

KMF

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Subjects: Legislature , Government and politics , Democracy
People: Nelson Mandela , Richard Gephardt , Robert Byrd , Newt Gingrich , Bob Michel , Steny Hoyer , Arlen Specter , Richard Lugar
Organisations: United States Congress, South Africa government, United States Senate, United States government
Locations: Washington , Washington, D.C. , United States
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Instant Library 1990: Part 6
Title:
SD
Summary: South Africa A
Story No: X03308
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 12/31/1990 12:00 AM
People: Nelson Mandela , Winnie Madikizela-Mandela , Desmond Tutu
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SOUTH AFRICA

Nelson Mandela walks along with Winnie Mandela after his release from jail

Nelson Mandela addresses crowd

Black South Africans dancing and marching along waving banners

Archbishop Desmond Tutu jumps up waving his hands

Newspaper referring to Nelson Mandela's release "Here He Is"

Blacks dancing in the street

South African authorities fire on black demonstrators

Prime Minister De Klerk addresses crowd

Burned out bombed car wreck in street, blackened person helped by others

Montage of Albie Sachs

Albie Sachs shakes hands with blacks

Albie Sachs chanting at black meeting

Slow motion of small black boy allegedly killed by Winnie Mandela's body guards

Winnie Mandela into court accompanied by Nelson Mandela

Blacks chanting, holding up axes and picks

Blacks smashing houses and burning buildings

Aftermath of black riots, buildings demolished, litter in the streets

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