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(HZ) Iran hero pilot
Title:
HD
Summary: Hero pilot says economic sanctions endanger lives
Story No: 870845
Source: AP Television News, Amateur video
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 12/12/2012 17:21 PM
People: Barack Obama
Subscription:

IRAN HERO PILOT

SOURCE: AP TELEVISION NEWS / AMATEUR VIDEO

RESTRICTIONS: HORIZONS CLIENTS AND AP LIFESTYLE, HEALTH AND TECHNOLOGY CLIENTS ONLY

++AP Television is adhering to Iranian law that stipulates all media are banned from providing BBC Persian or VOA Persian any coverage from Iran, and under this law if any media violate this ban the Iranian authorities can immediately shut down that organisation in Tehran.++

LENGTH 5:15

SHOTLIST

AP Television News

Urmia, North-western Iran - Jan 9, 2011

1. Various of passenger plane wreckage in snow after crash in 2011

AP Television News

Tehran- August 2, 2012

2. Rear shot of Captain Hooshang Shahbazi, Iranian pilot walking towards plane

3. Mid of Shahbazi getting on board and removing hat

4. Low angle of Shahbazi in cockpit turning switches on and off

5. Close-up of switchboard

6. Close of Shahbazi

7. Pan from panel with numerous switches and buttons to Shahbazi

8. Close of map showing internals of plane in Shahbazi's hands

9. Pan from panel to Shahbazi

Amateur video - 18 October 2012

10. Various of Iranian passenger planes on runway

11. Various of airplane landing with landing gear retracted at Tehran's Mehrabad airport - piloted by Captain Hooshang Shahbazi

AP Television News

Tehran- August 2, 2012

12. SOUNDBITE (Farsi) Hooshang Shahbazi, Iranian pilot: "I believe that to achieve human goals one shouldn't threaten lives of human beings. There are things that should never be threatened such as human lives, access to medicine and access to food. Even during the World War I and II there were no sanctions on food and medicine."

Amateur video - 18 October 2012

13. Various of Shahbazi rushing out of cockpit, firefighter cooling down the plane nose with water

AP Television News

Tehran- August 3, 2012

14. SOUNDBITE (Farsi) Hooshang Shahbazi, Iranian pilot: "(Addressing Western countries) When I watch TV I always hear your slogans about freedom, democracy and human rights. President Obama appears on TV at new Iranian year's eve and gives a message of equality, brotherhood and friendship to my countrymen, and (Ironically) then the next day he sits at his desk and signs a decree to extend the sanctions on Iran's civilian aviation industry and puts lives of Iranians in danger. My question is: isn't that paradoxical? That's my question."

AP Television News

Tehran - 7 December 2012

15. Close-up of newspaper headline reading (Farsi) "11 airplanes added to Iranian airliners"

16. Mid of Mohajer at his desk

17. SOUNDBITE (Farsi) Masould Mohajer, Aviation Expert: "Since these sanctions are just politically motivated and affect no military or governmental section and just directly put people in harms way, therefore, any independent attempt by private sector or aviation activists would be definitely helpful and productive. I think aviation organisation and companies which produce airplanes would listen to Iranian rationale. Launching specialised committees and negotiating with the United Nations and Aviation organisation can help us return to pre-revolution condition (buy lots of civilian aircrafts). I mean such organisations can put pressure on the US and Europe to lift sanctions at least from civilian aircrafts. "

AP Television News

Tehran- August 3, 2012

18.Various of souvenirs and awards at Shabazi's house

19. Pull focus from airplane model to Shahbazi speaking

20.Wide of Shahbazi sitting on sofa and talking

21. SOUNDBITE (Farsi) Hooshang Shahbazi, Iranian pilot: "I want to help all the Iranian passengers to be heard by the world. That's way I made the website and wrote that statement. (I want to highlight) that imposing sanctions on the aviation industry is against all international laws and conventions, as well as human right. We hope we can help lift these unfair and inhuman sanctions."

22. Mid of computer screen showing Shabazi's website and Facebook page

23. Mid of Shahbazi working on computer

LEADIN :

An Iranian pilot, who was hailed a national hero after he safely landed a plane with broken landing gear, says air passengers' lives are at risk because of international sanctions.

The sanctions have been imposed over the country's controversial nuclear program, but it's claimed they're also impacting on the country's fleet of aging aircraft.

STORYLINE :

Plane crashes are all too frequent in Iran.

Early January 2011, 77 people died when a passenger jet broke up on impact while trying to make an emergency landing in a snowstorm in northwestern Iran.

Footage on state TV showed the plane's crumpled fuselage lying in a field, torn apart in several places, under whirling snow in the darkness as rescue workers and local farmers searched for survivors in the hours after the crash.

State TV said the aircraft disappeared from radar and went down in farmland after making a second attempt to land at the airport in the northwestern city of Orumiyeh. The nature of the technical failure was not clear.

Iran has a history of frequent air accidents blamed on its aging aircraft and poor maintenance.

Many of the Boeing aircraft in IranAir's fleet were bought before the country's 1979 Islamic Revolution, which disrupted ties with the U.S. and Europe.

Iranian airlines, including those run by the state, are chronically strapped for cash, and maintenance has suffered, experts say. U.S. sanctions prevent Iran from updating its 30-year-old American aircraft and make it difficult to get European spare parts or planes as well.

However on 18 October 2011 another aviation disaster was averted when the pilot guided an Iran Air Boeing passenger plane to a safe emergency landing last year despite broken front landing gear.

Captain Hooshang Shahbazi was hailed a hero by Iran's media and has since used his fame to campaign against sanctions saying that they are "inhuman" and violate international conventions to which the United States is a signatory.

A year after his heroic feat his employers, Iran Air, told him not to wear his uniform while campaigning to lift sanctions. That decision has now been reversed.

Captain Hooshang Shahbazi says U.S. sanctions prevent Tehran from updating its 35-year-old American aircraft, and European parts or planes are extremely difficult to obtain. Iran now relies on Russian aircraft, mostly older planes built before the fall of the Soviet Union for which parts are harder to replace.

Although some technical openings exist for Iranian carriers to obtain U.S. spare parts, such as conducting the repairs outside Iran, the difficult licensing and oversight procedures make them extremely difficult to act upon.

Iran's state carrier Iran Air was placed under specific U.S. sanctions last year over alleged links to the military.

Iran has a history of frequent air accidents blamed on its aging aircraft and poor maintenance. Iran Air's fleet mainly includes Boeing and Airbus aircraft, many of them bought before the country's 1979 Islamic Revolution that led to a breakdown in ties between Tehran and Washington.

"To achieve human goals, one should not threaten lives of human beings," Shahbazi says. "There are things that should never be threatened such as human lives, access to medicine and access to food. Even during World Wars I and II, there were no sanctions on these," he adds.

The pilot's fame comes from a courageous manoeuvre he executed in Tehran last October, landing safely using only the rear wheels of a Boeing 727 flying from Moscow.

Setting the aircraft's nose down gently on the tarmac at the last second, the emergency move allowed 94 passengers and 19 crew members to escape unhurt.

"Lift aviation sanctions. Save passengers' lives. The Iranian people are innocent" reads a slogan on his website (capt-shahbazi.com). So far, 125,900 people have joined a petition he has launched.

"President Obama appeared on TV during Iran's new year holiday with a message of equality, brotherhood and friendship to my countrymen," Shahbazi says. "Then, the next day, he sat at his desk and signed a decree to extend the sanctions on Iran's civilian aviation industry, putting the lives of Iranians in danger. My question is: Is that not paradoxical?"

In a video message for Iranian new year (Nowruz) last March (2012) , President Barack Obama denounced what he called the "electronic curtain" that keeps ordinary Iranians from reaching out to Americans and the West.

Fears of a preemptive Israeli strike on Iranian nuclear facilities added fresh urgency to those concerns in the first months of this year.

The Obama administration opposes using military force against Iran at this point, preferring to rely on a steam of economic sanctions aimed at pressuring Iran to abandon its nuclear ambitions.

Iran has acknowledged in the past that its air industry was suffering from U.S. sanctions, and that it has sought to buy newer second-hand planes such as Airbus models from third countries to compensate for the shortage of passenger aircraft.

Masoud Mohajer is an aviation expert in Tehran.

He supports campaigns like that of captain Shabazi's and believes such independent campaigns can increase pressure on US and Europe to lift sanctions from civilians aircrafts

He says: "Since these sanctions are just politically motivated and affect no military or governmental section and just directly put people in harms way, therefore, any independent attempt by private sector or aviation activists would be definitely helpful and productive."

In recent years, Iran has started producing small passenger aircraft with assistance from Ukraine, with the first 52-seat Iranian-assembled passenger plane entering service in 2002.

The twin-propeller Iran-140 plane is assembled domestically with parts and technology from Ukraine, but it is still not widely used because only a few have been produced.

While civilian aircraft sanctions have been in place for more than three decades, Western powers have offered to ease sanctions on spare parts in return for a halt to Iran's uranium enrichment activities.

Iran has rejected the offer, likening it to swapping diamonds in return for peanuts.

The West accuses Iran of using its civilian nuclear program as a cover to develop nuclear weapons. Iran has denied the charges, saying its program is peaceful and geared toward producing electricity and radioisotopes used to treat cancer patients.

In July 2009, a Russian-made jetliner crashed in northwest Iran shortly after taking off from the capital, killing all 168 on board.

In February 2003 a Russian-made Ilyushin 76 carrying members of the Revolutionary Guard crashed in the mountains of southeastern Iran, killing 302 people aboard.

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Subjects: Aircraft parts manufacturing, Transportation safety, Plane crashes, Airport operation, Aircraft manufacturing, Aviation accidents and incidents, Sanctions and embargoes, Accidents, Transportation accidents, Search and rescue efforts, Political activism, Aerospace and defense, Industrial products and services, Industries, Business, Transportation, General news, Accidents and disasters, Transportation accidents, Transportation infrastructure, Transportation and shipping, Foreign policy, Government policy, Government and politics, Foreign policy, International relations, Political issues
People: Barack Obama
Organisations: United States military, United States government
Locations: Tehran, Iran, United States, Europe, Middle East, North America
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ISR NIGERIA CRASH 2
Title:
HD
Summary: AT LEAST 150 KILLED IN NIGERIA PLANE CRASH
Story No: 744236
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 04/06/2012 01:22 AM
People:
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A commercial airliner crashed into a densely populated neighbourhood in Nigeria's largest city Lagos on Sunday, killing all 153 people on board and others on the ground in the worst air disaster in nearly two decades for the troubled nation.

The cause of the Dana Air crash remained unknown on Sunday night, as firefighters and police struggled to put out the flames around the wreckage of the Boeing MD83 aircraft.

Authorities could not control the crowd of thousands gathered around to see the crash site, with some crawling over the

plane's broken wings and standing on a still-smouldering landing gear.

The plane crashed through a furniture shop and then into residential buildings next to a workshop in a densely packed neighbourhood of the city.

The plane did not to appear to have nose-dived into a building, but seemed to have landed on its belly.

The nose of the plane was embedded into the three-story apartment building, damaging only one part of the structure. Fire still smouldered everywhere as several thousand people looked on.

Two fire trucks and about 50 rescue personnel were at the site after the plane went down. Some of those gathered around the site helped firefighters bring in the water hoses from their trucks.

The Nigerian Red Cross also arrived, as well as Nigeria's air crash safety investigators.

While local residents helped carry fire hoses to the crash site, the major challenges of life in oil-rich Nigeria quickly became apparent as there wasn't any water to put out the flames more than three hours later.

Some young men carried plastic buckets of water to the fire, trying to douse small portions. Fire trucks, from the very few that are stationed in Lagos state with a population of 17.5 (m) million, couldn't carry enough water.

Officials commandeered water trucks from nearby construction sites, but they became stuck on the narrow, crowded roads, unable to reach the crash site.

The dead included at least four Chinese citizens, the official Chinese news agency Xinhua reported late Sunday, citing Chinese diplomats in Nigeria. Officials at the Chinese embassy in Nigeria could not be reached for comment by the AP.

Nigeria, home to more than 160 (m) million people, suffers from endemic government corruption and mismanagement.

The nation also has a history of major aviation disasters, though in recent years there hasn't been a crash.

HEADLINE: Nigeria Plane Crash kills all on board

--------------------------------------------------------

CAPTION: A commercial airliner crashed into a densely populated neighbourhood in Nigeria's largest city Lagos on Sunday, killing all 153 people on board and others on the ground in the worst air disaster in nearly two decades for the troubled nation.( 3 June 2012)

-----------------------------------------------------------

VOICE-OVER: This video contains only natural sound. There is no voice-over narration.

1. Wide of emergency workers at scene of wreckage

2. Wide of wreckage with man standing in smoke in background

3. Close-up of fire burning in wreckage

4. Wide of smouldering wreckage

5. Mid of man standing in front of damaged building which is on fire

6. Wide as plane flies overhead, barely visible through thick smoke from crash

7. Mid of smoking wreckage with group of men standing just behind

8. Wide of building which has been virtually destroyed, smoke can be seen billowing out of building

9. Wide of wreckage

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Subjects: Plane crashes, Accidents, Aviation accidents and incidents, Transportation accidents, Property damage, Fires, Accidents and disasters, General news, Transportation accidents, Transportation
Locations: Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria
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Pakistan Crash
Title:
SD
Summary: Rescue officials at site of plane crash, more bodies being recovered
Story No: 737719
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 21/04/2012 04:20 AM
People: Benazir Bhutto
Subscription:

1. Wide pan across wreckage of plane crash, emergency officials at work in the field

2. Close-up of engine

3. Wide top shot of wreckage

4. Pan of debris-strewn field

5. Close of wheel

6. Mid of women looking down at scene from nearby building

7. Tilt up from pile of passenger belongings to army officials at work

8. Close-up of passenger clothing and shoes

9. Low angle of rescue workers carrying away body of crash victim on a stretcher under a blanket

10. SOUNDBITE: (Urdu) Zameer Ahmed, Rescue worker:

"We are searching and looking for more bodies. We did search extensively last night, but it was dark, so it''s possible that now we may be able to recover five to seven more bodies from here."

11. Part of wreckage, army officials in the background

12. Mid of wreckage

STORYLINE:

Emergency officials were on Saturday searching through the wreckage of a passenger jet that crashed into a muddy wheat field in Islamabad while trying to land in a violent thunderstorm.

"We are searching and looking for more bodies. We did search extensively last night, but it was dark, so it''s possible that now we may be able to recover five to seven more bodies from here," said rescue worker Zameer Ahmed.

The government said there appeared to be no survivors in the crash of the Boeing 737-200 near Benazir Bhutto International Airport - the second major air disaster in the Pakistani capital in less than two years.

The Bhoja Air plane was on a flight from Karachi to Islamabad.

The plane had been given clearance to land, said an air traffic controller who did not give his name because he was not authorised to speak to the media.

A violent thunderstorm was lashing Islamabad at the time of the crash, about 6:40 p.m. (1340 GMT) local time.

Islamabad police chief Bani Yameen said nobody on the ground was reported killed, but all on board had perished.

In a statement, the Boeing Company extended its condolences to the families of the victims and offered technical assistance to Pakistan''s Civil Aviation Authority in investigating the crash.

The last major plane crash in the country - and Pakistan''s worst - occurred in July 2010 when an Airbus A321 aircraft operated by domestic carrier Airblue crashed into the hills overlooking Islamabad, killing all 152 people aboard.

A government investigation blamed the pilot for veering off course amid stormy weather.

Bhoja Air started domestic operations in Pakistan in 1993 and eventually expanded to international flights to the United Arab Emirates in 1998.

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Subjects: Search and rescue efforts, Plane crashes, Accidents, Aviation accidents and incidents, Transportation accidents, General news, Accidents and disasters, Transportation accidents, Transportation
People: Benazir Bhutto
Locations: Islamabad, Islāmābād, Pakistan
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Russia Crash 2
Title:
SD
Summary: 4:3 Plane crash in Siberia kills 31 of 43 on board
Story No: 734915
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 02/04/2012 11:15 AM
People:
Subscription:

1. Pull out from rescue workers at plane crash site

2. Pan to wrecked plane fuselage

3. Mid of fuselage

4. Wide of helicopter landing at crash scene

5. Various of officials and security at crash scene

6. Various of plane wreckage and rescue workers

7. Mid of van at crash scene

8. Various of crash scene and wreckage

9. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Vladimir Yakushev, Tyumen region governor:

"At this point, the first group taken to the regional clinical hospital was 12 people. Unfortunately one person died during the transportation, so there are eleven people for whose life we are fighting today. And about an hour later one person was receiving treatment here at the site, because transporting him was dangerous. Treatment was given and he was transported by helicopter. So at this moment we are fighting for the lives of 12 people."

10. Wide of investigators and vehicle

11. Wide of crash scene and rescue workers

12. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Vladimir Yakushev, Tyumen region governor:

"A state commission will be created that will give its, let's say, assessment, the conclusion on the reasons that caused this accident. So far we have no right to talk about it and generally there is no information. Specialists will determine all this."

13. Various of helicopter landing at scene

14. People disembarking from helicopter

15. Man on snowmobile driving away

STORYLINE:

At least 31 people died on Monday morning when a plane crashed in Siberia shortly after taking off Monday morning, killing 31 of the 43 people on board.

The other 12 were injured and were said by Russian emergency officials to be in hospital, in serious condition.

The ATR-72, a French-Italian-made twin-engine turboprop, operated by UTair was flying from Tyumen to the oil town of Surgut with 39 passengers and four crew.

The aircraft went down on a snowy field outside Tyumen, a regional centre in Siberia about 1,700 kilometres (1-thousand miles) east of Moscow.

The cause of the crash was not immediately clear.

UTair published a list of the passengers and crew, and none of them appeared to be foreigners.

The Emergency Situations Ministry gave the figures for the dead and for survivors.

Tyumen's governor Vladimir Yakushev was present at the crash scene later on Monday.

He said that 12 survivors of the crash were initially transported to hospital, but that one died en route.

Another survivor was treated at the scene then subsequently carried to hospital by helicopter.

Yakushev said a state commission would be created and specialists would uncover the cause of the accident.

"So far we have no right to talk about it and generally there is no information" he said. "Specialists will determine all this."

Russia has seen a string of deadly crashes in recent years.

Some have been blamed on the use of aging Soviet-era aircraft, but industry experts point to a number of other problems, including poor crew training, crumbling airports, lax government controls and widespread neglect of safety in the pursuit of profits.

Pilot error was blamed for a September crash in Yaroslavl, a Russian city 250 kilometres (150 miles) northeast of Moscow, that killed 44 people, including a professional hockey team.

Pilot error and fog also were ruled the main causes of a crash in April 2010 that killed Poland's president and 95 other people as their plane was trying to land near Smolensk, in western Russia.

The ATR-72 has been involved in several accidents in past years.

Most recently, one went down in bad weather in Cuba in November 2010, killing all 68 people on board. Cuban aviation officials said the investigation showed there was nothing wrong with the aircraft.

In August 2009, an ATR-72 flown by Bangkok Airways skidded off the runway and crashed into a building after landing in stormy weather on the Thai resort island of Samui, killing the pilot and injuring seven people.

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Subjects: Plane crashes, Accidents, Aviation accidents and incidents, Transportation accidents, Search and rescue efforts, Aircraft manufacturing, State governments, Accidents and disasters, General news, Transportation accidents, Transportation, Aerospace and defense, Industrial products and services, Industries, Business, Government and politics
Locations: Moscow, Russia, Eastern Europe, Europe
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US Crash Amvid
Title:
SD
Summary: Amateur video of crash at US air show
Story No: 705911
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 17/09/2011 05:33 AM
People:
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SHOTLIST

++++ALL AMATEUR VIDEO, QUALITY AS INCOMING++++

1. Various of planes flying overhead

2. Plane crashes, dust cloud UPSOUND: "Did you see that? Did you see that? He crashed."

3. Wide of crash scene, pan of debris field UPSOUND: Announcer urges people to leave

4. Emergency vehicles drive out on tarmac

5. Pan of debris

6. Plane takes off

7. Emergency crews helping victim, pan of scene

8. Emergency vehicle overtakes car - shot from inside car

STORYLINE:

A World War II-era fighter plane flown by a veteran Hollywood stunt pilot plunged Friday into the edge of the grandstands during a popular air race in Reno, Nevada, killing three people and injuring more than 50 spectators.

The plane, piloted by 74-year-old Jimmy Leeward, spiralled out of control without warning and appeared to disintegrate upon impact.

Spectators shot amateur video of the scene and started posting in on YouTube.

Bloodied bodies were spread across the area as people tended to the victims and ambulances rushed to the scene.

Authorities were investigating the cause, but an official with the event said there were indications that mechanical problems were to blame.

Among the dead was Leeward, of Ocala, Florida, a veteran airman and movie stunt pilot who named his P-51 Mustang fighter plane the "Galloping Ghost," according to Mike Houghton, president and CEO of Reno Air Races.

The P-51 Mustang, a class of fighter plane that can fly at speeds in excess of 500 mph (800kph), crashed into a box-seat area in front of the grandstand at about 4:30pm (2230GMT), race spokesman Mike Draper said.

Houghton said Leeward appeared to have "lost control of the aircraft," though details on why that happened weren''t immediately known.

Houghton said at a news conference hours after the crash that there appeared to be a "problem with the aircraft that caused it to go out of control."

He said the rest of the races have been cancelled as the National Transport Safety Board investigates.

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Subjects: Plane crashes, Transportation accidents, Veterans, Executive changes, Aviation accidents and incidents, Accidents, Accidents and disasters, General news, Transportation accidents, Transportation, Corporate management, Personnel, Corporate news, Business
Locations: Reno, United States
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DR Congo UN Crash
Title:
SD
Summary: 4:3 Only one survivor among 33 UN staff and crew in plane crash
Story No: 682798
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 04/04/2011 23:48 PM
People:
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SHOTLIST

++QUALITY AS INCOMING++

1. Various of plane wreckage

2. Various of Red cross workers carrying medical boxes of equipment

3. Ambulances pull out from UN building

4. Family members of victims standing in street

STORYLINE:

Only one survivor has been confirmed among the 33 United Nations personnel and crew members aboard a plane that crashed in Congo on Monday, a U.N. spokesman said.

U.N. spokesman Farhan Haq said the plane crashed on Monday as it was landing in the city of Kinshasa.

Haq did not say exactly how many people were believed killed so it was unclear whether anyone else may have survived.

The cause of the crash was not immediately known.

A top Congolese aviation official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not permitted to speak to the media, said the plane was travelling from Kisangani to Kinshasa.

Earlier Monday, the Congolese aviation official had said at least 26 people had been killed and six others injured.

The U.N. peacekeeping mission in New York described the craft as a small passenger plane and said it was ferrying a mix of U.N. personnel, including peacekeepers.

The U.N. mission in Congo, known as MONUSCO, includes more than 19,000 uniformed peacekeeping troops.

The mission is charged with protecting civilians in the enormous Central African nation wracked by violence from a myriad of rebel groups and militias.

Few passable roads traverse Congo after decades of war and corrupt rule, forcing the country's deeply impoverished people to rely on ill-maintained planes and boats to move around.

Congo has one of the worst air safety records in the world. The Central African country's safety regulations are notoriously lax.

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Subjects: Plane crashes, Accidents, Aviation accidents and incidents, Peacekeeping forces, Transportation accidents, Accidents and disasters, General news, Transportation accidents, Transportation, Armed forces, Military and defense, Government and politics
Organisations: United Nations
Locations: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kinshasa, Central Africa, Africa
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Libya Benghazi 3
Title:
SD
Summary: 4:3 AP pix of warplane going down in flames, exploding on ground; still
Story No: 680348
Source: AP TELEVISION, AP PHOTOS
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 19/03/2011 12:08 PM
People: Muammar Gaddafi, Barack Obama
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

AP TELEVISION

1. Wide of government fighter jet flying in the air over Benghazi

2. Government fighter jet bursts into flames, crashes to ground, fireball and black smoke rises from ground

AP PHOTOS - No Access Canada/ For Broadcast use only - Strictly No Access Online or Mobile

3. STILL Burning government warplane falls towards the ground

AP TELEVISION

4. Various of smoke rising from government shelling of city

STORYLINE:

Libyan forces struck on Saturday at the heart of the rebellion against Moammar Gadhafi, shelling the outskirts of the rebel-held city Benghazi and launching airstrikes in defiance of international demands for a halt to the fighting.

A warplane was shot down over the outskirts of Benghazi, sending up a massive black cloud of smoke.

An Associated Press reporter saw the plane go down in flames and heard the sound of artillery and crackling gunfire in the distance.

Before the plane went down, journalists could hear what appeared to be airstrikes from it.

Rebels cheered and celebrated at the crash, though the government denied a plane had gone down - or that any towns were shelled on Saturday.

Leaders from the Arab world, Africa, the United States and other Western powers were holding urgent talks in Paris on Saturday over possible military action against Gadhafi's forces, which are trying to crush the nearly 5-week-old rebellion against him.

Trying to outmanoeuvre Western military intervention, Gadhafi's government declared a cease-fire on Friday as the rebel uprising faltered against his artillery, tanks and warplanes.

But the opposition has said shells rained down well after the announcement and accused the Libyan leader of lying.

The fighting galvanised the people of Benghazi, with young men collecting bottles to make Molotov cocktails. Some residents dragged bed frames and metal scraps into the streets to make roadblocks.

Wary of the cease-fire, Britain and France took the lead in plans to enforce a no-fly zone, sending British warplanes to the Mediterranean and announcing the crisis summit in Paris with the U.N. and Arab allies.

In Washington, President Barack Obama ruled out the use of American ground troops but warned that the U.S., which has an array of naval and air forces in the region, would join in military action.

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Subjects: Rebellions and uprisings, Municipal governments, War and unrest, Plane crashes, Government and politics, General news, Local governments, Aviation accidents, Transportation accidents, Accidents, Accidents and disasters, Transportation accidents, Transportation
People: Muammar Gaddafi, Barack Obama
Locations: Benghazi, Libya
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Iran Crash 5
Title:
SD
Summary: AP cover from site where plane crashed, killing at least 77
Story No: 671318
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/01/2011 12:06 PM
People: Mahmoud Ahmadinejad
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

++AP Television is adhering to Iranian law that stipulates all media are banned from providing BBC Persian or VOA Persian any coverage from Iran, and under this law if any media violate this ban the Iranian authorities can immediately shut down that organisation in Tehran.++

1. Wide of crashed plane broken into three pieces on a snow covered area

2. Close of Iranian flag on crashed plane body

3. Close of bloodstained pillow

4. Pan from member of Iranian Red Crescent Society to army soldiers collecting personnel items of passengers

5. Close of a medical prescription belonging to one of the passengers

6. Mid of plane tail

7. Low angle of broken parts of airplane with bloodstains on ground

STORYLINE

Investigators on Monday found the black box from a passenger jet that broke to pieces on impact while trying an emergency landing in a snowstorm in northwestern Iran, killing at least 77 people.

The pilots of the Boeing-727, operated by Iran's national airline and carrying 104 passengers and crew, reported a technical failure to the control tower before trying to make the landing Sunday night, state-run TV reported.

The IranAir aircraft broke into several pieces, but head of the rescue department of Iran's Red Crescent Society, said there was no explosion or fire.

TV footage showed the plane's crumpled fuselage lying in a field, torn apart in several places.

Heavy snow hampered rescue efforts, the semi-official Fars news agency cited the head of the state emergency centre, Gholam Reza Masoumi, as saying.

That report also mentioned fog in the area.

State TV said the aircraft disappeared from radar and went down in farmland after making a second attempt to land at the airport in the northwestern city of Orumiyeh.

The nature of the technical failure was not clear.

Iran's Transport Minister Hamid Behbahani said 77 people died and 27 were injured, some critically.

Behbahani said the flight was carrying 104 passengers and crew, correcting earlier reports of 105 on board.

The state news agency IRNA said two children were among the dead.

Behbahani said the plane's flight data recorder, known as the black box, has been recovered and was being checked by a "committee probing the

crash."

Some of the passengers were able to walk away from the landing, said a spokesman for the civil aviation authority.

There were conflicting accounts on whether all 104 on board were accounted for, with some TV reports saying all were found and others saying two remained missing.

President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad sent a message of condolence to the families of the victims and ordered a quick investigation of the cause of the crash.

The aircraft was headed from Tehran to Orumiyeh, capital of West Azerbaijan province, a distance of about 460 miles, or 700 kilometres.

Iran has a history of frequent air accidents blamed on its aging aircraft and poor maintenance.

Many of the Boeing aircraft in IranAir's fleet were bought before the country's 1979 Islamic Revolution, which disrupted ties with the US and Europe.

Iranian airlines, including those run by the state, are chronically strapped for cash, and maintenance has suffered, experts say.

US sanctions prevent Iran from updating its 30-year-old American aircraft and make it difficult to get European spare parts or planes as well.

The country has come to rely on Russian aircraft, many of them Soviet-era planes that are harder to get parts for since the Soviet Union's fall.

In July 2009 a Russian-made jetliner crashed in northwest Iran shortly after taking off from the capital, killing all 168 on board.

In February 2003 a Russian-made Ilyushin 76 carrying members of the Revolutionary Guard crashed in the mountains of south-eastern Iran, killing 302 people aboard.

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Subjects: Plane crashes, Accidents, Airport operation, Aviation accidents, Passenger airlines, Media industry regulation, Transportation accidents, Accidents and disasters, General news, Transportation accidents, Transportation, Transportation infrastructure, Transportation and shipping, Industrial products and services, Industries, Business, Airlines, Industry regulation, Government business and finance, Government business and finance, Government and politics, Industry regulation, Government regulations
People: Mahmoud Ahmadinejad
Locations: Urmia, Iran
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Cuba Crash 4
Title:
SD
Summary: AP pics of scene of Cuban plane crash site that killed 68
Story No: 664057
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 06/11/2010 22:52 PM
People:
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SHOTLIST

1. Tilt up from cockpit to entire incinerated plane

2. Zoom out of burned engine

3. Tilt up of burned wing

4. Pan of sign on fuselage reading: (English/Spanish) "Caution, flight recorders here"

5. Mid of forensic team working

6. Zoom out from plane windows to wide of wreckage

7. Pan from life vest among wreckage to lavatory door on ground

8. Travelling shot of around bushes reveals aircraft nose in brush

9. Tilt up from exit door on ground to incinerated cockpit

10. Wide of crane on truck

11. Zoom out as crane lifts engine with propeller

12. Wide of propeller lowered onto truck

13. Close pan of wreckage

14. Close of aircraft's first aid kit among wreckage

15. Wide of forensics team and firefighting truck at crash site

STORYLINE

Recovery teams removed the last charred bodies from the wreckage of an airliner that went down in mountainous central Cuba, as officials vowed on Saturday to get to the bottom of what caused the crash and said they have the capacity to do it alone.

All 68 people aboard the AeroCaribbean Flight 883 were killed when the turboprop plane went down Thursday afternoon, in a remote area near the village of Guasimal in Sancti Spiritus province.

Twenty-eight foreigners were among the dead.

"The recovery of the mortal remains of the victims of the crash has ended," local state-run newspaper Escambray said Saturday.

The bodies were brought by refrigerated truck to the medical examiner's office at a military site in the capital.

Chief investigator Rolando Diaz Vergal painted a grim scene of what rescue workers discovered at the crash site, saying those on board hardly had time to react as the plane plummeted to the ground.

In Guasimal, about 220 miles (350 kilometres) east of Havana, emergency vehicles lined a road about 2 miles (3 kilometres) from the site.

Video from the scene showed a large piece of the plane's fuselage largely intact, but other parts reduced to small fragments.

The plane's flight recorders were visible among the wreckage.

Authorities formed an investigative commission comprising solely Cubans.

Outside experts are commonly brought in to help probe air disasters, particularly when the planes involved were manufactured in Europe or America.

The turboprop plane that went down was built in 1995 by Toulouse, France-based ATR, which said it stood prepared to help in any way with technical assistance.

"Cuba has all the necessary capacity to conduct the investigation," read a headline in the Communist Party-newspaper Granma.

Those killed included nine Argentines, seven Mexicans, and citizens of Germany, Holland, Spain and Italy.

One Japanese national was also on board, and Australia's government said in a statement that Cuban officials confirmed two Australian women were on the plane.

The twice-a-week AeroCaribbean flight goes from Port-au-Prince, Haiti, to Santiago de Cuba, to Havana.

The crash is the deadliest in Cuba since a chartered Cubana de Aviacion plane en route from Havana to Milan, Italy, went down shortly after takeoff in September 1989, killing all 126 people on board, as well as 24 people on the ground.

Keyword aircraft crash aviatio

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Subjects: Plane crashes, Accidents, Transportation accidents, Aviation accidents, Aircraft manufacturing, Accidents and disasters, General news, Transportation accidents, Transportation, Aerospace and defense, Industrial products and services, Industries, Business
Locations: El Guasimal, Mexico
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Pakistan Plane
Title:
SD
Summary: WRAP Plane crash kills 152; relatives identify bodies, ADDS bodies arrive in Karachi
Story No: 652669
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 29/07/2010 02:19 AM
People: Qamar Zaman Kaira, Chaudhry Ahmed Mukhtar
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

Near Islamabad, 28 July, 2010

1. Wide of forested hills where plane crash took place

2. Various of smoke rising from crash site

Near Islamabad, 28 July, 2010

3. Various of plane wreckage and rescuers at crash site, amid smoke and trees

Near Islamabad, 28 July, 2010

4. Helicopter hovering over crash site, rescuers on ground

5. Smouldering wreckage on side of hill

6. Reverse shot of rescuers at crash site

7. Helicopter departing with body of victim

8. Various of plane wreckage among tree branches

9. Rescuers carrying away body

10. Helicopter departing with body of victim

11. Army soldiers arriving at the scene

12. Smouldering wreckage on side of hill

13. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Bin Yameen, Deputy Inspector General of Police:

"We did not find any intact bodies, we found pieces under the wreckage, we put the body parts in bags, the recovery (operation) has almost been completed."

Islamabad, 28 July, 2010

15. Various of covered bodies being taken into morgue from ambulance at the Pakistan Institute of Medical Science (PIMS) Hospital

16. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Qamar Zaman Kaira, Pakistani Information Minister:

"For the procedure of the inquiry, we found the black box. The black box will be read and we will find out about the conversation with the terminal, that should be calibrated and the experts will determine what happed."

17. Coffins being unloaded from back of truck

Islamabad, 28 July, 2010

18. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Name not known, Doctor at Institute of Medical Science Hospital:

"We are working on the identification, like clothes and other elements. As and when we get information, we'll make it available. At the moment we are expecting more dead bodies, as we receive them, we will share the information."

19. Relatives crying

Islamabad, 28 July, 2010

20. Wide exterior of Islamabad airport

21. Various of relatives of victims inside airport

22. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Zulfiqar Qadri, Relative of crash victim:

"We are not getting proper information. They just put a list in our hands and said that this is the list of dead passengers. They are not releasing details about how many are injured, and how many are dead, how they are going about recovering bodies or how the rescue operation is progressing. Civil aviation officials have also not given us any proper information as yet."

23. Information desk at Islamabad airport

Karachi, 28 July, 2010

24. Various exteriors of Karachi's International Airport

25. Wide of relatives waiting at airport

26. Relatives of crash victims searching for names of their relatives on official list

27. Close of list

28. Various of crash victims' relatives crying

Islamabad, 28 July, 2010

++NIGHTSHOTS++

29. Wide of PIMS Hospital morgue exterior, crowds of relatives waiting for news

30. Official announcing the names of identified dead passengers

31. Mid of relatives listening to the names

32. Relatives and morgue workers carrying coffin of dead passenger after identification

33. People wheeling coffin on trolley

34. Men loading coffin onto roof of van

35. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Manzoor Mohammad, relative of eight dead passengers:

"We have been informed that up to now 22 dead bodies have been identified, and relatives are taking those away, and for the remaining ones they are saying they will give us details in the morning."

Karachi, 29 July 2010

++NIGHTSHOTS++

36. Coffin leaving Karachi airport cargo area, and put in ambulance

37. Cutaway of ambulance light

38. Various of the two remaining coffins being carried and put into ambulance

39. Various of ambulances leaving

STORYLINE

A passenger jet that officials suspect veered off course in monsoon rains and thick cloud crashed into hills overlooking Pakistan's capital Islamabad on Wednesday, killing all 152 people on board and scattering body parts and twisted metal far and wide.

The Airblue jet's crash Wednesday was the deadliest ever in Pakistan, and just the latest tragedy to jolt a country that has suffered numerous deaths in recent years.

The plane left the southern city of Karachi at 7:45 a.m. (0245 GMT) for a two-hour flight to Islamabad and was trying to land when it lost contact with the control tower, said Pervez George, a civil aviation official.

Airblue is a private airline based in Karachi, Pakistan's largest city.

On Wednesday night, relatives of the victims gathered outside the PIMS Hospital in Islamabad, waiting for the bodies of their loved ones to be released after identification.

One man who lost eight relatives in the disaster said that 22 bodies had been identified so far, and he would have to come back the next morning for further news.

Later three recovered bodies were also flown into Karachi early on Thursday morning, the first to arrive in the city.

The aircraft, an Airbus A321, crashed some 15 kilometres (nine miles) from the airport, scorching a wide stretch of the Margalla Hills, including a section behind Faisal Mosque, one of Islamabad's most prominent landmarks.

Twisted metal wreckage hung from trees and lay scattered across the ground. Smoke rose from the scene as helicopters hovered.

The exact cause of the crash was not immediately clear, and rescue workers were seeking the "black box" flight data recorder amid the wreckage.

But Defence Minister Chaudhry Ahmed Mukhtar said the government did not suspect militarism.

Rescue workers and citizen volunteers were hampered by the rain, mud and rugged terrain.

The crash was so severe it would have been nearly impossible for any of the 146 passengers and six crew members to survive, rescue officials said.

As the government declared Thursday would be a day of mourning and condolences poured in from the US, Britain and other nations, hundreds of people showed up at Islamabad's largest hospital and the airport seeking information on loved ones.

They swarmed ambulances reaching the hospital, but their hopes fell as rescue workers unloaded bags filled with body parts.

A large cluster of people also surrounded a passenger list posted near the Airblue counter at the airport.

As of Wednesday night, when rescue work was suspended till the morning, 115 bodies had been recovered, federal Information Minister Qamar Zaman Kaira said.

DNA tests would be needed to identify most of them, he said.

Airbus said it would provide technical assistance to the crash investigators.

The aircraft was initially delivered in 2000, and was leased to Airblue in January 2006.

It accumulated about 34-thousand flight hours during some 13,500 flights, it said.

The Pakistan Airline Pilot Association said the plane may have strayed off course, possibly because of the poor weather.

Several officials noted the plane seemed to be an unusual distance from the airport, which was some nine miles (15 kilometres) away.

Keyword aircraft crash aviation

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Subjects: Plane crashes, Transportation accidents, Search and rescue efforts, Science, Accidents, Aviation accidents, Accidents and disasters, General news, Transportation accidents, Transportation
People: Qamar Zaman Kaira, Chaudhry Ahmed Mukhtar
Locations: Pakistan, Karachi, Islamabad, South Asia, Asia
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