AP Archive
Welcome  Guest
Sign in or Register

 

Displaying 1 - 10 of 42 results

Indonesia Search 3
Title:
SD
Summary: WRAP Search for survivors in collapsed hotel, aerials, swiss rescue team
Story No: 622025
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/03/2009 08:16 AM
People: Jusuf Kalla
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

AP Television

1. AERIAL: Wide of area

2. AERIAL: Various of damage

3. AERIAL: Heavy machinery at work near damaged building

4. AERIAL: Various of damage and collapsed buildings

AP Television

5. Wide of heavy machinery shifting through rubble at Ambacang hotel

6. Close-up of machinery and rubble

7. Mid of rescuers

8. Mid of crowd waiting

9. Man looking for his missing wife, holding photo of his missing wife, believed trapped in hotel

10. Close-up of photo

11. SOUNDBITE (Indonesian) Firmansyah, husband of missing woman:

"She was going up the hotel stairs to room 338 at about 4:30 pm, and the quake hit at 5:15 pm. I don't know what happened to her since."

12. Wide of Australian man looking for friend, believed trapped in hotel

13. SOUNDBITE (English) Eric Van Druten, Australian tourist:

"There is a text message being sent out that there is a person alive in there. He's got access to his phone and it's being sent out."

14. Wide of rescue operation at hotel

AP Television

15. Wide of Swiss rescue team working at a collapsed school

16. Various of Swiss rescuers on rubble

17. Tilt down from rescuer to sniffer dog

18. Mid of rescuers

19. Pan of dog walking through rubble

20. SOUNDBITE (German) Thomas Zeiter, Swiss rescuer:

"Our objective is to rescue lives, we are trying to detect people, to localise them with our dogs, and as soon as we have localised someone, we proceed with the rescue team to save that person's life."

21. Mid of dog on rubble

22. Wide of Swiss rescuers on rubble

STORYLINE

Rescuers in Indonesia continued their search for survivors trapped under rubble on Saturday after a massive earthquake killed at least 715 people and left nearly 3-thousand people missing.

At the site of Padang's Ambacang Hotel, an earthquake survivor trapped beneath the rubble sent a text message saying he and some others were alive, triggering a frantic search and rescue operation.

Padang's police chief said voices and claps were heard from survivors buried in the Ambacang Hotel since Wednesday's 7.6-magnitude quake

He said one survivor - who had been staying in Room 338 - sent a text message to relatives Friday, saying he and some others were still alive.

But hopes faded on Saturday as sniffer dogs failed to detect life.

As he spoke, rescuers used backhoes and drills to try and break a passage through thick slabs of concrete of the six-story hotel.

Australian tourist Eric Van Druten said he believed his friend to be trapped inside the collapsed building.

Another man waited anxiously nearby and said that he last heard from his wife as she went up to her hotel room shortly before the quake struck.

Swiss and Japanese rescue teams searched the rubble but reported no success in finding survivors.

The quake devastated more than 60 miles (100 kilometres) along the western coast of Sumatra island, prompting a huge international aid operation in a country that sits on a major geological fault zone and has dozens of quakes every year.

The United Nations estimated the death toll could rise to 1,100.

More than 2,400 people have been hospitalised, said Priyadi Kardono, a spokesman for the national disaster agency.

Block after block of toppled hotels, hospitals, office buildings and schools had yet to be searched in Padang, a port city of 900-thousand.

Dozens of unclaimed corpses were laid out in the scorching sun at Dr. M. Djamil General Hospital, Padang's biggest, which was damaged in the quake.

More than 20-thousand houses and buildings were destroyed across seven districts.

Fuel was being rationed amid a power outage, water and food were in short supply and villagers dug out the dead with their bare hands.

As the scale of the destruction became clearer, Vice President Jusuf Kalla told reporters in the capital, Jakarta, that the recovery operation would cost at least 400 (m) million US dollars.

Military and commercial planes shuttled in tons of emergency supplies, although rural areas remained cut off due to landslides that reportedly crushed several villages and killed nearly 300 people.

While the damage was most severe around Padang, an Associated Press reporter saw virtually no remaining structures in the rural, hilly district of Pariaman, a community of about 370,000 about 50 miles to the north.

Landslides had wiped away roads and there was no sign of outside help.

Officials said more than 10-thousand homes and buildings had been destroyed there.

It was unclear how many died.

Dozens took shelter under a canopy at a makeshift centre for the homeless.

Millions of dollars in aid and financial assistance came from Australia, Britain, China, Germany, Japan, the European Union, Malaysia, the Netherlands, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, Denmark and the United States, Indonesian officials said.

Wednesday's quake originated on the same fault line that spawned the 2004 Asian tsunami that killed 230-thousand people in a dozen nations.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: Landslides and mudslides, Earthquakes, Disaster planning and response, Natural disasters, Accidents and disasters, Search and rescue efforts, Missing persons, Hotel operators, Building collapses, Emergency management, General news, Landslides and mudslides, Mass movements, Natural hazards, Environment, Environment and nature, Earthquakes, Hospitality and leisure industry, Consumer services, Consumer products and services, Industries, Business, Structural failures, Accidents, Government and politics
People: Jusuf Kalla
Locations: Indonesia, East Asia, Southeast Asia, Switzerland, Australia, Asia, Western Europe, Europe, Australia and Oceania
Show story thumbnails
Kenya Collapse
Title:
SD
Summary: Three storey building collapses; at least 6 dead, 13 injured
Story No: 623930
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/20/2009 02:38 PM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

1. Pan across area where building collapsed

2. Tilt up of rubble

3. Wide of military police and rescue workers trying to remove body from rubble

4. Police putting dead body into body bag

5. Red Cross workers carrying body away

6. Rescue workers helping grieving woman

7. Woman being carried away on stretcher

8. Pan across local residents watching recovery effort

9. Red Cross workers carrying away dead body in body bag

10. Close-up of woman crying

11. Various of police and rescue workers sifting through rubble

STORYLINE

Six people died and 14 were still missing after a three-story building collapsed on the outskirts of Nairobi, Kenyan police said on Tuesday.

A police official said two people died while receiving treatment at a Nairobi hospital.

The bodies of three men were pulled from the rubble at the building site in Kiambu.

Another victim, a woman, was crushed to death.

Police said 13 people were injured.

The Kenya Red Cross said 14 people were still unaccounted for after being reported missing by their relatives and friends.

Police and rescue workers struggled to free those believed trapped under the wreckage.

Bulldozers were brought in to help the rescue effort and remove debris.

Monday's disaster came barely a week after the Kenya Architectural Association said in a report that 65 percent of structures in the country were substandard.

A spokesman for the Institution of Engineers of Kenya, said the organisation was receiving almost daily reports of buildings collapsing because of poor construction.

He said the building collapsed on Monday because of its substandard construction material and poor workmanship.

Building collapses are common in Africa. Corrupt planning officials, substandard materials and poor workmanship are often to blame.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: Accidents and disasters, Search and rescue efforts, Building collapses, Missing persons, General news, Structural failures, Accidents
Locations: Kenya, Nairobi, East Africa, Africa
Show story thumbnails
Kenya Collapse
Title:
SD
Summary: Building collapses, unknown number of people trapped
Story No: 623865
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/19/2009 09:48 PM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

ALL NIGHT TIME

1. Tilt up from rubble to destroyed building

2. Various of local residents digging in rubble

3. Various of survivor being pulled from building

4. Survivor being taken to a waiting ambulance

5. Various of rescuers cutting rubble

6. Various of military police at site

7. SOUNDBITE (Swahili) Peter Kariuki, eyewitness

"We blame the contractors because they are the ones who brought construction workers that are not qualified and they do not follow building codes such as letting the concrete on a new building site set before they continue building. In reality, I blame the contractors."

8. Various of survivor being pulled from building

9. Ambulance carrying survivors

STORYLINE

An unknown number of people were trapped on Monday and two people were reported killed by local media after a building under construction collapsed near the Kenyan capital.

A large scale rescue effort was under way in Kiambu with fire services, police and military, as well as local people, digging through the rubble in search of survivors.

A number of people were pulled alive from the wreckage and taken to hospital by waiting ambulances.

Local media said as many as 35 people could still be trapped inside the five-storey building in the town, 20 kilometres (12.4 miles) from Nairobi.

Twelve people were admitted to hospital, most of them with multiple fractures, according to local media reports.

An eyewitness said he blamed building contractors for the collapse, claiming they had not adhered to correct building practices.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: Accidents and disasters, Building collapses, Construction contractors, General news, Structural failures, Accidents, Construction and engineering, Industrial products and services, Industries, Business
Locations: Kenya
Show story thumbnails
Indonesia Aftermath 2
Title:
SD
Summary: WRAP Rescue efforts continue after earthquake, US admiral
Story No: 622302
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/06/2009 09:05 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

NOTE: SHOT 10 CONTAINS A GRAPHIC IMAGE

1. Wide of damaged Ambacang Hotel in Padang

2. Tilt up of digger

3. Various of Australian rescue team arriving to area

4. Various of Australian team being instructed by head of the rescue operation

5. Various of rescue team inspecting their equipment

6. Indonesian official talking in loudspeaker

7. Close of yellow body bag

8. Indonesian soldiers holding bag

9. Close of soldier during operation

10. Close of hand of body, zoom out to rescue team at area ++GRAPHIC SHOT++

11. Indonesian soldiers taking body away to ambulance

12. Rescue worker searching through damaged building

13. Various of crane in front of damaged building removing debris

14. Rescue worker sitting down on rubble

15. Men walking to damaged building

16. Mid of street in Padang

17. Various of people sitting in a tent in front of local government health office

18. Exterior of damaged building

19. SOUNDBITE: (Indonesian) Eka Lusti, Health official:

"Because our three storey office was heavily damaged, we, from Padang health department, are giving medical services under this tent. We must keep on providing medical services to residents."

20. Mid of street in Padang

21. Various of US military personnel putting up hospital tent

22. Various of US military personnel unloading goods from truck

23. US Navy Rear Admiral, Richard Landolt, walking in quake affected area surveying collapsed hotel in Padang

24. SOUNDBITE (English) Richard Landolt, US navy Rear Admiral:

"We have two to three ships coming in with helicopter support. These helicopters will allow a number of things to occur; first is to get our survey members out to the outlying territories that are inaccessible because some of the roads have been destroyed, they will also be able to transport medical supplies and water to those outlying areas."

25. Mid of US personnel putting up hospital tent

26. Wide of personnel outside tent

STORYLINE

Rescuers have rushed back into the rubble on Tuesday after a woman's cries for help were reported coming from a collapsed hotel six days after Indonesia's devastating earthquake, but the search was in vain.

Australian experts used specialised voice detection equipment to scour the remnants of the Ambacang hotel in four different places after a worker said he heard a woman's voice.

The team leader said they found no sign of life and demolition of the building's remnants resumed.

The episode underscored the agony of the families of thousands of people who are missing after last Wednesday's 7.6-magnitude quake collapsed buildings in Padang city and sent landslides crashing down onto villages in the surrounding hills in West Sumatra province.

The official death toll rose on Tuesday to 704 and could reach into the thousands, officials said.

Demolition crews had begun knocking down damaged structures around Padang and hauling off debris in trucks.

Around six bodies were removed and loaded into waiting ambulances to be taken to hospital morgues.

Meanwhile, officials from the local government health office in Padang were using a makeshift tent to treat those in need, after their building was also damaged in the quake.

The broader search for survivors was halted on Monday - five days after the 7.6-magnitude quake struck off the coast of Western Sumatra.

Aid workers from at least 20 countries were focused on caring for the hundreds of thousands left homeless.

A US relief operation in Padang also started on Tuesday with US military personnel setting up a makeshift hospital.

US navy Rear Admiral, Richard Landolt arrived in the region to survey the damaged area and see the destruction first hand.

US navy ships are also expected to arrive in the next few days carrying aid and supplies.

Along with the ships the US Air Force will also provide helicopters to facilitate the relief operation.

"These helicopters will allow a number of things to occur; first is to get our survey members out to the outlying territories that are inaccessible because some of the roads have been destroyed, they will also be able to transport medical supplies and water to those outlying areas," Landolt said.

Heavy rain since Sunday and thick wet mud also made it difficult for aid workers to reach the stricken areas, said a spokesman for the Indonesian Search and Rescue Agency.

The Meteorological and Geophysics Agency warned the region could see strong winds and storms for the next two days.

It was unclear precisely how many people are without shelter, but more than 88-thousand houses were flattened, UN and Indonesian agencies said.

Another 100-thousand public buildings were damaged.

A government minister said 600 (m) million US dollars was needed to repair infrastructure.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: Earthquakes, Disaster planning and response, Accidents and disasters, Natural disasters, Military healthcare, Search and rescue efforts, Natural hazards, Building collapses, Local governments, Emergency management, General news, Earthquakes, Environment, Environment and nature, Military affairs, Military and defense, Government and politics, Structural failures, Accidents
Locations: Indonesia, Australia, Sumatra, Southeast Asia, Asia, Australia and Oceania
Show story thumbnails
Indonesia Aftermath 2
Title:
SD
Summary: Landslide aerials, search for hotel survivors, US team
Story No: 622060
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/03/2009 03:08 PM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

Pariaman district, 3 October 2009

1. Various aerials of landslides, whole areas wiped away, houses in disaster zone

Padang, 3 October 2009

2. Mid of rescuer using welding torch to cut through rubble

3. Wide of rescue workers at Padang's collapsed Ambacang hotel

5. Mid of rescuers going into man-made tunnel to search for survivors

6. Wide of rescuers going into tunnel

7. Wide of American rescue worker Alex Pollack looking at damage

8. Mid of Pollack talking with other rescuers

9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Alex Pollack, American rescue worker:

"We are right now also trying to work with the employees here to create a map of where the different rooms were, where the different meetings were, so that we can really try to assist the search and rescue teams in a precise way as far to where to do the searching."

10. Various of Pollack and other rescuers at work amidst rubble

Padang, 3 October 2009

11. Wide of rescue workers getting into tunnel at the Ambacang hotel

12. Close up of tunnel entrance

13. Wide of rescuers inside hotel

14. SOUNDBITE: (English) Alex Pollack, American rescue worker

"The quarter is going this way. We found two bodies already and we're following the same way along."

15. Various of rescuers crawling deep into the hotel

16. Mid of rescue worker

17. Rescue worker with mask

18. Rescue worker crawling

19. What was believed to be meeting room,

20. Various of rescue team inside

++NIGHT SHOTS

21. Close up of mosque sign

22. Wide of mosque behind the hotel rubble

STORYLINE

At least four Indonesian villages were obliterated by earthquake-triggered landslides that buried as many as 644 people, including a wedding party, under mountains of mud and debris, officials said on Saturday.

The full extent of Wednesday's 7.6-magnitude earthquake was becoming apparent three days later as aid workers and government officials reached remote villages in the hills along Sumatra island's western coast.

If all 644 are confirmed dead - as is likely - the death toll in the disaster would jump to more than 1,300.

More than three-thousand people were listed as missing before the news about the obliterated villages emerged.

The government's death toll currently is 715, with most casualties reported from the region's biggest city, Padang, where aid efforts are focused.

Search operations continued at the collapsed Ambacang hotel, where voices and claps were heard from survivors in the days since the quake.

One survivor reportedly sent a text message on Friday saying he and some others were alive, triggering a frantic rescue operation, but hopes faded on Saturday as sniffer dogs failed to detect life.

Even so, local and international teams continued to search through the rubble of the six-storey collapsed building, creating a narrow tunnel from which they could gain access into various rooms inside the hotel.

Alex Pollack, a US rescue worker who has been living in Indonesia for the past 12 years, said teams were working with hotel employees to pinpoint the locations of the various rooms, in order to enhance search efforts.

Across the rest of the disaster zone, fuel was being rationed amid a power outage, water and food were in short supply and villagers dug out the dead with their bare hands.

The government has estimated that the quake damaged about 17 percent of buildings in the worst-hit areas and that the recovery operation would cost at least 400 (m) million US dollars.

Military and commercial planes have been shuttling in tons of emergency supplies.

Millions of dollars in aid and financial assistance came from Australia, Britain, China, Denmark, the European Union, Germany, Japan, Malaysia, the Netherlands, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland and the United States, Indonesian officials said.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: Landslides and mudslides, Accidents and disasters, Municipal governments, Search and rescue efforts, Hotel operators, Building collapses, Natural disasters, General news, Landslides and mudslides, Mass movements, Natural hazards, Environment, Environment and nature, Local governments, Government and politics, Hospitality and leisure industry, Consumer services, Consumer products and services, Industries, Business, Structural failures, Accidents
Locations: Indonesia, East Asia, Southeast Asia, Asia
Show story thumbnails
Indonesia School
Title:
SD
Summary: Grieving relatives return to school that collapsed; survivor in hospital
Story No: 622032
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/03/2009 11:29 AM
People: Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

PLEASE NOTE, EDIT CONTAINS SHOT OF DEAD BODIES

1. Wide of collapsed roof of the Foreign Language School of Prayoga

2. Pan of rescuers standing on rubble, digger

3. Wide of rescuers finding trapped bodies

4. Close-up of hands of trapped bodies covered in dust amid rubble, rescuers

5. Wide of bodies trapped in rubble, rescuers preparing to recover body

6. Wide interior of woman lying in hospital bed, after being rescued from the language school

7. Mid of woman lying in hospital bed

8. SOUNDBITE (Indonesian) Ratna Kurniasari Virgo, 19-year-old school survivor:

"We had our headphones on during a listening course and suddenly there was an earthquake. At first there was a small tremor, but it got bigger and bigger and everyone ran out of the classroom. There was a man running in front of me. I was trying to catch up to him, but the stairs fell down."

9. Close-up of woman's hand with IV drip

10. SOUNDBITE (Indonesian) Ratna Kurniasari Virgo, 19-year-old school survivor:

"I screamed help! Help! And someone heard me because it was quiet at night. Someone heard my cries and he started removing the rubble towards me. I told him I wanted to drink some water."

11. Close-up of woman whose daughter is missing in the school collapse, crying

12. Wide of woman and relatives

13. Zoom in to relatives crying

14. SOUNDBITE (Indonesian) Waster Sipayung, father of missing child:

"My feeling is that I only want to see my daughter, that's all."

15. Close-up of photo of missing 19-year-old Sri Pautila Sipayung

16. Wide of grieving relatives

STORYLINE

Rescue teams continued their search on Saturday for survivors at a foreign language school in Padang that collapsed after a powerful earthquake rocked Indonesia on Wednesday.

The 7.6-magnitude quake toppled thousands of buildings and killed at least 715 people.

Some 3-thousand people remain missing.

Rescuers pulled 19-year-old student Ratna Kurniasari Virgo after being trapped for 40 hours in the rubble of her school.

Her teacher Suci Ravika Wulan Sari extracted almost exactly 48 hours after the college crumbled in the 5:16 p.m (10.16 GMT) quake, killing dozens of students.

The rescues promoted hopes of finding more survivors, but instead they came across several dead bodies trapped in the devastation.

Rescuers were still trying to recover bodies from the school on Saturday.

From her hospital bed on Saturday, Virgo said she was taking a listening course when the earthquake hit.

Virgo said most students ran out of the classroom, but as she ran the stairs collapsed in front of her.

Virgo was wedged between the collapsed walls of her college and the bodies of her dead friends, suffering from a broken leg.

Buried beneath the rubble for a second night, Virgo spoke of her joy when someone heard her cries for help.

"I screamed help! Help! And someone heard me because it was quiet at night. Someone heard my cries and he started removing the rubble towards me," she said.

But many students remain missing.

The family of 19-year-old Sri Pautila Sipayung had been looking for their daughter in the hospital since the day of the quake and said they are desperate to find their daughter.

The quake devastated more than 60 miles (100 kilometres) along the western coast of Sumatra island, prompting a huge international aid operation in a country that sits on a major geological fault zone and has dozens of quakes every year.

The United Nations estimated the death toll could rise to 1,100.

More than 20-thousand houses and buildings were destroyed and 2,400 people hospitalised across seven district, said Priyadi Kardono, a spokesman for the national disaster agency.

Military and commercial planes shuttled in tons of emergency supplies, although rural areas remained cut off due to landslides that reportedly crushed several villages and killed nearly 300 people.

While the damage was most severe around Padang, an Associated Press reporter saw virtually no remaining structures in the rural, hilly district of Pariaman, a community of about 370-thousand about 50 miles to the north.

Landslides had wiped away roads and there was no sign of outside help.

In Padang, Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono told a crowd of people whose relatives are missing to "please be patient," assuring them the government was doing everything in its power to save lives.

Millions of dollars in aid and financial assistance came from Australia, Britain, China, Germany, Japan, the European Union, Malaysia, the Netherlands, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, Denmark and the United States, Indonesian officials said.

Wednesday's quake originated on the same fault line that spawned the 2004 Asian tsunami that killed 230-thousand people in a dozen nations.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: Earthquakes, Landslides and mudslides, Disaster planning and response, Natural disasters, Accidents and disasters, Search and rescue efforts, Emergency management, General news, Earthquakes, Natural hazards, Environment, Environment and nature, Landslides and mudslides, Mass movements, Government and politics
People: Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono
Locations: Indonesia, East Asia, Southeast Asia, Asia
Show story thumbnails
(HZ) US Tornado
Title:
SD
Summary: Town devastated by tornado lives up to its green name
Story No: 563239
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 05/02/2008 04:51 AM
People: Dennis McKinney, George W. Bush
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

AP Television

Greensburg, Kansas - 23 April 2008

1. Wide shot, workers on water tower

2. Close-up workers painting water tower

3. Pan shot of debris and ruined buildings in Main Street

4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Daniel Wallach, Executive Director of Greensburg GreenTown:

"First thing that came to my mind was how can we help this community come back, and very soon after that it popped into my mind that if we could build this community green what a fantastic story that would be, and given the name of the town it was just a natural."

AP Television

Greensburg, Kansas - 7 May 2007

5. Travelling shot showing destroyed homes, cars blown against trees

AP - No Access Canada/For Broadcast use only - Strictly No Access Online or Mobile

Greensburg, Kansas - 7 May 2007

6. Zoom-in of aerial photograph showing house moved off its foundation by tornado

7. Pull-out shot of people looking at destruction

AP Television

Greensburg, Kansas - 7 May 2007

8. UPSOUND: (English) Tornado Survivor:

"It is a wedding ring ... (cries)"

9. Mid shot of troops on patrol in Main Street, damaged buildings

AP Television

Greensburg, Kansas - 23 April 2008

10. Camera dissolves to empty Main Street

11. Close-up shots of damaged awnings, sign on building

12. SOUNDBITE: (English) Dennis McKinney, Kansas State Representative, Democrat from Greensburg:

"This was Main Street. This was our business district, now in the process of being rebuilt."

13. Wide and close-up of City Hall in temporary buildings

14. SOUNDBITE: (English) Dennis McKinney, Kansas State Representative, Democrat from Greensburg:

"Population is about half of what it was right now and we are rebuilding, regaining ground. Those of us who are here are much closer. As a friend of mine said, we used to say 'hey, how are you?' now we say 'it's good to see you' and we mean it when we say it."

15. Wide and close-up ruined super market

16. Close-up rebuilding sign

17. SOUNDBITE: (English) Ron Shank, Greensburg Chevrolet Dealer with company his father started in 1973:

"There wasn't a single wall left standing anywhere at the dealership more than a couple of feet high was the tallest wall anywhere."

18. Wide and close-up Chevrolet trucks for sale

19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Ron Shank, Greensburg Chevrolet Dealer:

"We packed all the cars inside trying to keep them out of the hail that we knew was coming and so we had the whole building packed as full of cars as we could and then the building of course collapsed on them."

20. Wide shot, empty paved ground where car dealership used to be located

21. Wide and close-up workers building new show room

22. SOUNDBITE: (English) Ron Shank, Greensburg Chevrolet Dealer:

"One of the nice things about the steel building is it is a good starting point because steel is a very recyclable and readily recycled material. So by going the green building we are already get some of the sustainability and recycling aspects in. Then we are going with extra insulation to make it more energy efficient - we are going with Solatube lighting which is a system that lets daylight into some areas what would not normally be day lit so we can cut down on the energy consumption. Of course we using all energy efficient light fixtures throughout with energy efficient bulbs and that will help a lot, with sensors that will turn the lights off when the rooms are not occupied. Another major thing we are doing is some water recycling and rainwater capture. We actually have a system installed back here that will capture the rainwater and then when it is fully functional it will filter the rainwater and we'll be able to use it for things like washing cars."

23. Wide shot, Arts Centre being built behind ruins of other buildings

24. Various shots construction

25. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jenny Kibett, Studio 804 Graduate Student with University of Kansas' School of Architecture:

"Right now it is the only city that is building all of their public buildings to LEED platinum levels, which is the highest level of LEED and I think that is a tremendous feat to take on and I think if they accomplish that it is going to be a huge example to the entire country."

26. Wide shot construction of Arts Centre

27. Various shots, construction of moderate income homes

28. SOUNDBITE: (English) (English) Daniel Wallach, Executive Director of Greensburg GreenTown:

When people move in, it will be just like living in a quote unquote 'normal' home, but it is going to be more comfortable and their utility bills are going to be a whole lot less - so people I think are going to love them."

29. Wide and close-up high efficiency air conditioners

30. Various shots of High School, trailers and temporary offices

31. SOUNDBITE: (English) Lindsey Heft, Senior Greensburg High School Student:

"The whole west wing was completely flattened, but you could get into the commons area where the lockers are and the gym was still standing, but the roof was blown off."

32. Wide shot, school gym

33. SOUNDBITE: (English) Kacey Fulton, Senior Greensburg High School:

"It is just something new we can show not only our state but the world that it can be done and maybe people will follow us once they see it can be done ."

34. Mid shot students waiting after school

35. Close-up sign 'We're making a tornado history'

LEAD IN:

The Kansas town of Greensburg is recovering from a tornado that damaged 95% of the buildings and dwellings in the town, when it hit nearly a year ago.

But inspired by the town's name, all the new buildings are being constructed with environmental concerns a top priority.

STORYLINE:

Going green in Greensburg ....already the water tower is back in business.

Painters are putting the final coats on the highly visible sign that the small Kansas town is attempting to make a comeback - with an environmentally conscious twist that is unusual in rural America.

Already struggling to survive a constant population drain, the small town of Greensburg could have been literally wiped off the map May 4 2007 when an F5 tornado touched down.

Daniel Wallach, Executive Director of Greensburg GreenTown, says that the town's need inspired him to help the community rebuild their lives with a 'green' focus.

It is an idea that has caught on with the town's remaining residents - young and old.

Killing twelve residents and destroying 95 per cent of the town, the tornado left the survivors devastated.

Houses were reduced to matchsticks and emotional home owners were left to pick through the rubble.

And the business district was scrubbed bare.

State Representative, Dennis McKinney, says although the town's population has been cut in half, "those of us who are here are much closer."

Now, Greensburg is planning a greener future that flies in the face of local tradition.

In rural Kansas, many local townships do not even offer basic recycling services and environmentalism was largely considered a fad.

But as McKinney puts it, the plan to become the first United States town to have all municipal projects built to high environmental standards, wasn't too much of a hard sell to families who had been raised on the land.

And the town's elders say going green was the only way to save a community that was already dying.

The town is building an eco-lodging project, a recycling centre and a water conservation system to turn rain into drinking water.

Local Chevrolet dealer, Ron Shank moved to Greensburg in 1973 when his father opened the dealership.

The 2007 tornado wiped out the family home and much to his shock the entire car dealership as well.

Shanks says "there wasn't a single wall left standing anywhere at the dealership more than a couple of feet high was the tallest wall anywhere."

Shank already had rebuilding designs in hand when new plans came together to turn his dealership into a 'green' facility.

With some help from Chevrolet and the state, Shank amended his plans and has started on a new, larger showroom.

He says the new plans include using, among other things, steel framing, extra insulation, energy efficient light fixtures and capturing rainwater.

Twenty-two graduate architecture students from the University of Kansas have designed and are building the town's new art centre on a lot that is still surrounded by ruins.

Student Jenny Kibett says Greensburg's plans are ambitious and "a tremendous feat to take on".

She believes if the town gets its green approval rating "it is going to be a huge example to the entire country."

A large part of the rebuilding includes local residents.

Home builders have been encouraged to buy energy efficient appliances, use alternative fuel sources and recycled building materials.

One of the major challenges facing the town's leaders was to convince the community what building green meant.

Greensburg GreenTown director Daniel Wallach said his group helped show residents that they were already environmentalists - whether they knew it or not.

Wallach knows many of the new homes look conventional, but he says tremendous design effort went into the houses to make them energy efficient.

The town's high school was also severely damaged by the tornado.

Greensburg High School Senior Lindsey Heft says "the whole west wing was completely flattened, but you could get into the commons area where the lockers are and the gym was still standing, but the roof was blown off,"

The high school students are strong proponents of the green rebuild.

High School Senior Kacey Fulton says the community wants to show people across the state, the country and beyond that building a 'green' town is achievable.

To mark the town's rebuilding progress, US.President George W. Bush will speak to the local high school's graduation ceremony, exactly one year after the storm hit Greensburg.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: School infrastructure, Tornadoes, School shootings, Natural disasters, Environment, Population growth and decline, Energy efficiency and conservation, Recycling, State legislature, Education, Social affairs, Weather, General news, Tornadoes, Accidents and disasters, Shootings, Violent crime, Crime, Environment and nature, Demographics, Energy and the environment, Eco-friendly practices, Recycling, Waste management, Legislature, Government and politics, State legislature, State governments
People: Dennis McKinney, George W. Bush
Locations: Kansas, United States, North America
Show story thumbnails
US Weather 2
Title:
SD
Summary: Over 50 people killed and hundreds injured by tornadoes
Story No: 553367
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 02/07/2008 05:27 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Damaged house

2. Debris from damage

3. Toy truck

4. Storm shelter

5. SOUNDBITE: Barbie McCuan, storm survivor

"We were in the shelter for about 15 seconds and then the tornado flew, you know, hit our area and the storm shelter that we were in, the top came off of it, and we could see our house flying over us while we were down in the shelter, so the only thing we could do was pray and lay on top of our boys, we have two little boys, Chase and Hayden, we were laying on top of them, and after about three minutes it was all over and everything was gone."

6. Storm shelter

7. SOUNDBITE: Barbie McCuan, storm survivor

"It's really sad because there's nothing that's going to bring back these belongings, we're really sad but we're lucky to be alive so none of this matters because it can all be replaced, but our lives couldn't."

8. Pan from shelter to damaged house

9. Turned over car

10. Damaged and turned-over cars

11. Damaged building

12. Debris and belongings

13. Damaged roof

14. Various of damaged dormitories

15. Students looking at dormitories

16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Lauren Jackson, Student

"It felt like it sucked you in to the middle of the hallway then throw you back up against the wall."

17. Student going through belongings inside room

18. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jesse Daigle, Student,

"I came inside and ran into the bathroom amd about 10 seconds later everything went quiet. When it went over the toilets flushed and our ears popped."

19. Damaged room

20. Damaged cars

21. Students looking at dormitory

22. Damaged cars

STORYLINE:

The tornado hit the McCuan's house just as dozens of other tornadoes blasted across five states Tuesday and Wednesday, obliterating buildings, flipping trucks, snapping trees in two and killing at least 55 people.

Barbie McCuan, her husband, and two kids hid in their storm shelter, a shelter they built six years ago - just in case.

McCuan said he tornado ripped off the doors to the shelter, and she and her husband held on to the kids.

She said she looked out and saw her house flying over her family.

"We were in the shelter for about 15 seconds and then the tornado flew, you know, hit our area and the storm shelter that we were in, the top came off of it, and we could see our house flying over us while we were down in the shelter, so the only thing we could do was pray and lay on top of our boys, we have two little boys", she said.

The barrage of twisters across Mississippi, Arkansas, Tennessee, Kentucky and Alabama was the nation's deadliest in almost 23 years. The storms injured hundreds, flattened entire streets, smashed warehouses and sent tractor-trailers flying.

Houses were reduced to splintered piles of lumber. Some looked like life-size dollhouses, their walls sheared away. Crews going door to door to search for bodies had to contend with downed power lines, snapped trees and flipped-over cars.

Meanwhile, students took cover in dormitory bathrooms as the storms closed in on Union University in Jackson, Tennessee.

More than 20 students at the Southern Baptist school were trapped behind wreckage and jammed doors after the dormitories came down around them.

The storm left more 50 people dead across the South. Remarkably, no one died here.

About 50 Union students were taken to a hospital, nine of them with injuries classified as serious, said the school's news director.

Though the small, private college was heavily damaged, school officials said students escaped life-threatening injury primarily because they quickly took shelter in dorm bathrooms and other interior spaces.

Tornadoes are a regular threat in Jackson, a city of about 60-thousand people 75 miles northeast of Memphis.

The campus suffered damage from tornadoes in 2001 and 2002.

In 2003, a tornado struck downtown Jackson, killing 10 people and tearing a path of crumpled buildings, twisted metal and toppled trees. In 1999, twisters killed 10 people in Jackson and Clarksville.

This time, emergency planning and broadcast warnings of the twisters prevented more serious injuries, university president David Dockery said.

Each dorm room and apartment on campus is required to have the school's tornado emergency procedures posted, according to a school handbook. All the buildings are equipped with alarms that warn of both tornadoes and fire.

The university was in the path of at least one tornado that plowed a 35-mile, west-to-east swath across Madison County, up to a half-mile wide, said the emergency management director for the county.

The trapped included three young men who were surrounded by, but not buried by, rubble for more than four hours. Rescuers used a mechanical digger to clear a path to them, and they were freed without serious injury.

The university's main dormitory complex of 13 two-storey apartment buildings was damaged beyond repair.

Some buildings collapsed, and others were missing walls and roofs. The complex parking lot was strewn with wrecked cars and small trucks, many flipped on their backs and other stacked in small piles here and there.

The college, which is affiliated with the Southern Baptist Convention, has about 3,200 students, with 1,200 living on campus.

Jesse Daigle, who was among the students who gathered inside to ride out the storm together, said he "hid in the bathroom, when it went over the toilets flushed and our ears popped."

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: Property damage, Storms, Tornadoes, Natural disasters, Disaster planning and response, Building collapses, Weather, Automotive accidents, General news, Tornadoes, Accidents and disasters, Structural failures, Accidents, Transportation accidents, Transportation accidents, Transportation
Locations: Jackson, Mississippi, United States
Show story thumbnails
US Weather 3
Title:
SD
Summary: WRAP Over 50 people killed and hundreds injured by tornadoes
Story No: 553392
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 02/07/2008 10:29 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

Jackson, Tennessee

1. Various of house damaged by tornado

2. Debris

3. Toy truck lying in the debris

4. Various of storm shelter

5. Pan from damaged house to storm shelter

6. SOUNDBITE: Barbie McCuan, storm survivor:

"We were in the shelter for about 15 seconds and then the tornado flew, you know, hit our area and the storm shelter that we were in, the top came off of it, and we could see our house flying over us while we were down in the shelter."

7. Various of damaged vehicles

8. Damaged building

9. Wide of damaged dormitory building

10. Various of student belongings inside dorms

11. Wide of damaged building

12. Various of debris and damage around university dorms

13. Students looking at damaged buildings

14. Wide of woman standing in the middle of debris and damaged cars

15. Pull out and pan of damaged cars stacked on top of each other

16. Students gathered looking at building with damaged roof

17. Pan right to left of damaged cars in field

Lafayette, Tennessee

18. Various of damaged church and power line

19. Turned over cars in field

20. Close up of turned over car

21. Search team with dog looking for victims in pond area

22. Various of search dog by pond

23. Resident walking with her dog near her destroyed house

24. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jasmine Clark, Tornado survivor:

"We heard a big roaring sound and the house was shaking from side to side. The next thing I know we're all flying up in the air with the house, and it's like no longer than sixty seconds, and I was the first one up, and I was hollering for my daddy and my step mom and my sister, and about five minutes later my sister and stepmom were together and they were three houses down. My daddy was over two football fields down the road."

Clinton, Arkansas

25. Various of damaged house and mailbox

26. Various of damaged trees and debris strewn among them

27. Wide of remains of house

28. Woman collecting belongings from destroyed house

27. People going through debris

29. Wide of damaged house

30. Toy horse among debris

31. Truck leaving with belongings on the back

STORYLINE:

A tornado hit the McCuan's house just as dozens of other tornadoes blasted across five states on Tuesday and Wednesday, obliterating buildings, flipping trucks, snapping trees in two and killing at least 55 people.

Barbie McCuan, her husband, and two kids hid in their storm shelter that they built six years ago just in case.

McCuan said the tornado ripped off the doors to the shelter, and she and her husband held on to the kids.

She said she looked out and saw her house flying over her family.

"We were in the shelter for about 15 seconds and then the tornado flew, you know, hit our area and the storm shelter that we were in, the top came off of it, and we could see our house flying over us while we were down in the shelter", she said.

Meanwhile, students took cover in dormitory bathrooms as the storms closed in on Union University in Jackson, Tennessee.

More than 20 students at the Southern Baptist school were trapped behind wreckage and jammed doors after the dormitories came down around them.

The storm left more 50 people dead across the South. Remarkably, no one died here.

About 50 Union students were taken to a hospital, nine of them with injuries classified as serious, said the school's news director.

Though the small, private college was heavily damaged, school officials said students escaped life-threatening injury primarily because they quickly took shelter in dorm bathrooms and other interior spaces.

Tornadoes are a regular threat in Jackson, a city of about 60-thousand people 75 miles northeast of Memphis.

The campus suffered damage from tornadoes in 2001 and 2002.

In 2003, a tornado struck downtown Jackson, killing 10 people and tearing a path of crumpled buildings, twisted metal and toppled trees. In 1999, twisters killed 10 people in Jackson and Clarksville.

This time, emergency planning and broadcast warnings of the twisters prevented more serious injuries, university president David Dockery said.

Each dorm room and apartment on campus is required to have the school's tornado emergency procedures posted, according to a school handbook. All the buildings are equipped with alarms that warn of both tornadoes and fire.

The university was in the path of at least one tornado that ploughed a 35-mile, west-to-east swath across Madison County, up to a half-mile wide, said the emergency management director for the county.

The trapped included three young men who were surrounded by, but not buried by, rubble for more than four hours. Rescuers used a mechanical digger to clear a path to them, and they were freed without serious injury.

Some buildings collapsed, and others were missing walls and roofs. The complex parking lot was strewn with wrecked cars and small trucks, many flipped on their backs and other stacked in small piles here and there.

The college, which is affiliated with the Southern Baptist Convention, has about 3,200 students, with 1,200 living on campus.

The barrage of twisters across Mississippi, Arkansas, Tennessee, Kentucky and Alabama was the nation's deadliest in almost 23 years. The storms injured hundreds, flattened entire streets, smashed warehouses and sent tractor-trailers flying.

Houses were reduced to splintered piles of lumber. Some looked like life-size dollhouses, their walls sheared away. Crews going door to door to search for bodies had to contend with downed power lines, snapped trees and flipped-over cars.

Jasmine Clark, a resident of Lafayette, Tennessee, said the tornado picked up and carried her house while her family was inside.

"The next thing I know we're all flying up in the air with the house...I was the first one up and I was hollering for my daddy and my step mom and my sister, and about five minutes later my sister and my step mom were together and they were three houses down. My daddy was over two football fields down the road," Clark said.

31 people died from severe thunderstorms and tornadoes in Tennessee, Tennessee Emergency Management Agency officials confirmed.

At least 12 people died in and around Lafayette, and search teams were looking for victims in a pond with the help of search dogs.

Meanwhile, in Arkansas 13 were killed, emergency officials said.

The storm had winds estimated at between 136-165 mph when it hit Clinton, Arkansas, according to forecasters.

Nationwide, at least 133 people were injured.

It was one of the 15 worst tornado death tolls since 1950, and the nation's deadliest barrage of tornadoes since 76 people were killed in Pennsylvania and Ohio in May 31, 1985.

While the weather was unusually severe, winter tornadoes are not uncommon.

The peak tornado season is late winter through midsummer, but the storms can happen at any time of the year with the right conditions.

The tornadoes could be due to La Nina, a cooling of the tropical Pacific Ocean that can cause changes in weather patterns around the world.

Recent studies have found an increase in tornados in parts of the South during the winter when La Nina occurs.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: Disaster planning and response, Storms, Property damage, Building collapses, Weather, Automotive accidents, Emergency management, El Nino, Dogs, Accidents and disasters, General news, Structural failures, Accidents, Transportation accidents, Transportation accidents, Transportation, Government and politics, Weather patterns, Climate, Environment and nature, Pets, Lifestyle, Dogs, Mammals, Animals, Living things
Locations: Tennessee, Arkansas, Jackson, Ohio, United States, North America
Show story thumbnails
Germany Fire
Title:
SD
Summary: Parents throw baby 4 flights to safety during fire, police presser, newspaper
Story No: 553192
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 02/05/2008 08:19 PM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

Ludwigshafen, Germany - 5 February 2008

1. Mid of burnt out window

2. Mid of wreaths left for those who died in the fire

3. Mid of burnt out windows

4. Mid of woman

5. Flowers left in fence, fire-engine in background

6. Mid of people gathered around woman holding newspaper

7. Woman holding newspaper up to camera

8. Close of women

9. SOUNDBITE (German) Kenan Kolat, Head of Turkish Community in Germany:

"Shock, mourning, and anger because we don't know for sure whether it was an attack or not. Children have died, children are important, so the Turkish population is of course enormously shocked. But on the other hand there is huge support from the local authorities. And the German people are ready to give a lot which is a relief, but you cannot give a life back."

10. Mid of building

11. Firemen on crane moving towards window

London, UK - 5 February

12. Mid of Metro newspaper

13. Close of photo of baby that was thrown out of building

Ludwigshafen, Germany - 5 Feb 2008

14. Pan of news conference

15. SOUNDBITE (German) Lothar Liebig, Head of prosecutor's office for Ludwigshafen:

"We need to be sure on the facts before we draw any conclusions. At this stage we cannot rule out any case, any reason for the fire. We do not have any facts yet, that lead us in any direction. We've got clues which we got, from among other sources, through the press. We will use all those clues during our investigations especially those statements made by witnesses to the press."

16. Cutaway of assembled media

STORYLINE

Trapped by smoke and with no other way out after flames destroyed the staircase, the parents of a 9-month-old baby girl faced an excruciating dilemma: if they threw her out of the window, would she be caught four stories below?

The split-second gamble paid off: Onur fell safely into the arms of a policeman below. The parents also survived, although the mother was still in hospital on Tuesday, two days after the blaze in which at least nine people, including five children, died.

Sixty more were injured.

The drama at a building in southwestern Germany was captured in a series of photographs of the baby in freefall as a group of anguished adults, thick smoke billowing around them, looked on.

The building was inhabited by several Turkish immigrants, and Turkey's prime minister expressed concern Tuesday about possible arson.

A small girl told Germany's RTL television that she saw a man setting fire to something in the building.

"At this stage we cannot rule out any case, any reason for the fire. We do not have any facts yet, that lead us in any direction," Head of the prosecutor's office for Ludwigshafen Lothar Liebig said at a news conference on Tuesday.

"We've got clues which we got, from among other sources, through the press. We will use all those clues during our investigations especially those statements made by witnesses to the press," he added.

Police and rescue workers recounted how adults also jumped for their lives while others formed human ladders to help save people trapped inside.

Children from lower floors were handed to rescue workers atop an ambulance.

Others jumped, in some cases missing rescue nets laid out by police.

The fire broke out during carnival celebrations in the city.

The four-story house's wooden staircase swiftly collapsed.

Rescue officers and investigators were still unable to enter the building on Tuesday because of the danger it might collapse.

Police say that two Turkish families lived in the building, and that 24 people in total were registered as living there.

It was unclear exactly how many people were in the house at the time.

Police spokeswoman did not release the name of the policeman who caught the child, but said he was injured after he fell to the ground and struck his head.

He was treated at a hospital and released.

Meanwhile the Turkish community in Ludwigshafen continued to mourn on Tuesday.

Head of the Turkish Community in Germany Kenan Kolat said that locals felt "shock, mourning, and anger because we don't know for sure whether it was an attack or not. Children have died, children are important, so the Turkish population is of course enormously shocked."

"But on the other hand there is huge support from the local authorities. And the German people are ready to give a lot which is a relief, but you cannot give a life back," he added.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: Fires, Search and rescue efforts, Building collapses, Transportation safety, Accidents and disasters, General news, Structural failures, Accidents, Transportation
Show story thumbnails

Displaying 1 - 10 of 42 results

 
Share Story
 
*
*
*
 

You have successfully shared item(s).
Share
Cancel
Close
 
Message Box

OK
No
Yes