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Chile Miners Wrap
Title:
SD
Summary: Bore hole for rescue reaches miners, reactions
Story No: 658319
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/18/2010 02:53 AM
People:
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SHOTLIST:

GOVERNMENT TV

1. Zoom into drill

2. Close up of drill

3. Medium of miners with flashlights

4. Close up of drill

5. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Mario Sepulveda, trapped miner:

"We want all of Chile and everyone around the world to know that we are really happy for what has been achieved today. Thank you so much to the government, thank you so much to the business leaders and to all those who have been working their tails off for us."

AP TELEVISION

6. Wide of mine and drills

7. Mid of "Plan A" drill

8. Mid of "Plan B" drill

9. Close of drillers and drill near hole

10. Mid of drill

11. Mid of drill extracting from hole

12. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Andre Sougarret, Search and rescue coordinator:

"We have completed the first stage (of digging) on the Plan B drill. At 10:35 AM(1435 GMT), we reached the six-hundred and thirty metre mark. This means that we have now been able to expand the first perforation from 5 inches (12,7 cm) to 12 inches (30,5 cm)."

13. Mid of base of drill

14. Tilt down drill

15. Large mining truck driving near drill

16. Pan of red truck with "Plan B" written on side

17. SOUNDBITE: (English) Brandon Fisher, Centre Rock Incorporated driller:

"We drill for oil and gas, we drill for water and minerals things like that, drilling for human life is a completely different task at hand, so much more important than anything else that we have ever drilled for in our careers."

18. Wide of "Camp Hope"

19. Mid of Cristina, relative of a trapped miner, and her daughter walking off of the bus

20. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Cristina, Relative of trapped miner:

"You can only imagine how happy I am to know that they made such a breakthrough. To know that they will be able to get them out."

21. Mid of relatives embracing and celebrating

22. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Griselda Godoy, stepmother of trapped miner:

"I am preparing this altar for when my family comes. We have bought some coal and some meat to have a nice barbeque when he comes out. We are doing this in honour of all the miners, not just for my family."

23. Wide of "Camp Hope"

24. Mid of relatives

STORYLINE:

Drilling equipment has pounded its way into one of the caverns of the San Jose copper and gold mine in Chile's Atacama desert where 33 miners have been trapped for a month and a half.

The bore hole that was completed ahead of schedule on Friday has raised hopes that the men can be pulled out earlier than expected.

The 12-inch-wide (30-centimetre-wide) drill guided by a pilot hole half its diameter reached 2,070 feet (633 metres) beneath the surface, puncturing the top of a passage near the chamber where the men have taken refuge.

The next step is to place a wider drill on the rig and start a hole 28 inches (71 centimetres) across - wide enough for the miners to get out.

Video shot by the miners and released by the government later Friday showed scenes of bedlam below when the drill broke through, sending a shower of water and rock down into the chamber.

"Viva Chile!" the miners cried, hugging each other and posing for the camera with broad smiles and headlamps beaming.

"We want all of Chile and everyone around the world to know that we are really happy for what has been achieved today," said Mario Sepulveda, who has become a spokesman of sorts for his fellow miners and relays most communications from the depths.

The government previously said it would take until early November to rescue the miners under the most optimistic scenario, but Mining Minister Laurence Golborne said they were now ahead of schedule.

The earlier estimate had built in the possibility of more setbacks than the effort has seen so far, he said.

Golborne did not provide a new estimate.

The government did not provide any reaction from the miners on Friday's breakthrough; it has made a habit of waiting a day to release video of the trapped men.

The miners have endured sweltering conditions for weeks, and the discipline and resiliency they have shown through their ordeal has been a point of pride among Chileans - perhaps especially so as the nation celebrates the bicentennial of its independence Saturday.

The miners celebrated the bicentennial Thursday, with beef and empanadas, and they decorated their chamber with a plastic Chilean flag.

Two rigs have been drilling holes separately to ensure that rescuers wouldn't have to start from the beginning if a major problem arose. A third, much larger rig is to begin drilling on Monday.

The piston-driven air compression drills being used on the Schramm T-130 rig that broke through the passage chips away at rock like a jackhammer. Its hammers are made of of diamonds, tungsten carbide and other alloys.

The 12-inch drill was down for several days after a bithead broke - but still beat the more traditional competing drill down to the trapped miners.

Once the larger hole is dug, it will be reinforced with a metal sleeve. The miners will be hoisted up in an steel "escape capsule" that is still being designed but will be fitted with oxygen tanks and a communications system.

Widening such a deep hole has its dangers, including cave-ins that could trap the drill and halt the operation.

American driller Brandon Fisher, who is one of several who is working on the rescue mission, told AP television this is an entirely new challenge for him.

"We drill for oil and gas, we drill for water and minerals things like that, drilling for human life is a completely different task at hand, so much more important than anything else that we have ever drilled for in our careers," Fisher said.

Three smaller holes drilled earlier have allowed rescuers to supply the men with food, water, medical supplies and extra air, as well as lines to communicate with relatives and officials above.

"You can only imagine how happy I am, to know that they made such a breakthrough. To know that they will be able to get them out," Cristina told AP Television, after arriving at the San Jose mine with her daughter.

The trapped miners work for a company with a history of safety violations that has pursued bankruptcy protection since the collapse and has said it can't afford to pay the men.

They have been offered new jobs with larger mining companies in Chile that apply modern technology and safety standards to extracting the copper, gold and other minerals that provide for about 40 percent of the government's revenue.

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Subjects: Gold mining, Mining accidents, Search and rescue efforts, Oil and gas drilling, Government and politics, Mining, Copper mining, Precious metal mining, Metal mining, Metals and minerals, Materials, Industries, Business, Production facility outages, Production facilities, Facilities, Corporate capital, Corporate news, Mining accidents, Industrial accidents, Accidents, Accidents and disasters, General news, Oil and gas support services, Oil and gas, Energy, Base metal mining
Locations: Copiapó, Chile
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US Mine 4
Title:
SD
Summary: WRAP 25 dead in US mine blast, worst since 1984, reax; CEO s''bte
Story No: 642184
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 04/06/2010 08:47 PM
People: Joe Manchin, Don Blankenship
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

Montcoal, West Virginia

1. Wide shot police roadblock at entrance to Massey mine

2. Mid shot of building in Massey mine site

3. Close-up police officer talking to people in car

Dry Creek, West Virginia

NOTE: THESE SHOTS ARE NOT FROM MASSEY MINE

4. Various shots of coal from nearby site

Montcoal, West Virginia

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Joe Manchin, Governor of West Virginia:

"They''re telling me that the first hole could be as late as tomorrow evening before the first hole is down. Knowing what the conditions would be then to send the rescue teams in. So, it''s going to be a very long, slow process. Of course the families, you know, we went through the whole thing again about the 4 that we haven''t located. We have 18 people in the mine; 14 have been located and we know have been passed away, 4 we don''t know."

6. Manchin during briefing

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Kevin Stricklin, An administrator for the federal Mine Safety and Health Administration:

"It''s quite evident that something went very wrong here for us to have the magnitude of this explosion. So, it''s apparent that something was wrong and I would just ask to give us an opportunity to conduct a full investigation and we''ll leave no stone unturned to get to the bottom and tell you exactly what was not going right here when this explosion did occur."

Julian, West Virginia

8. Sign outside Massey Coal Services headquarters

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Don Blankenship, Massey Chief Executive:

"When I first heard that there was CO (carbon monoxide) at the mine, I was hopeful it was just a smoking bearing or something. But we''ve scrambled to get in place and of course as the seriousness of it progressed we''ve become more and more concerned and of course we launched the rescue effort at an early stage."

10. Cutaway of interview

11. SOUNDBITE (English) Don Blankenship, Massey Chief Executive:

"Well, it''s not possible to put production ahead of safety because you can''t be productive if you''re not safe."

12. Pan of headquarters

Montcoal, West Virginia

13. SOUNDBITE (English) Candice Atkins, Family friend of one of the miners:

"Profit over human life is what I think; all they care about is money. Cause all the citations they did not care of it, money over human life. That''s basically my opinion."

Dry Creek, West Virginia

NOTE: THESE SHOTS ARE NOT FROM MASSEY MINE

14. Pan of coal

Whitesville, West Virginia

15. SOUNDBITE (English) Name not known, Resident:

"My brothers, my dad; all of them was miners. My son used to work in the mines, which, you know, he had got hurt. He is not working in the mines no more, he has been trying to get back in, I don''t want him back in. I don''t care if he has to clean toilets, I don''t want him back in the mines."

16. Wide of restaurant

17. Close-up of decoration on wall

18. SOUNDBITE (English) Larry Asbury, Has two sons who work for Massey mines:

"Well, everybody knows mining is dangerous but if you''re going to live here, which is our home, if you''re going to live here you''re probably going to end up working in the mines. Young kids know that and any middle aged person that is working out of state and decides to come home, he knows he is probably going to end up going underground, working in the mines."

19. Wide Asbury walking inside restaurant

STORYLINE:

A huge underground explosion blamed on methane gas killed 25 miners in the worst US coal mining disaster since 1984, and rescuers on Tuesday began a dangerous and possibly futile attempt to rescue four others still missing.

Crews were bulldozing an access road so they could drill 1-thousand feet (300 meters) into the earth to release gases and make it safe to try to find the missing miners.

They were feared dead after the Monday afternoon blast at a mine with a history of violations for not properly ventilating highly combustible methane.

Rescuers were being held back by poison gases that accumulated near the blast site, about 1 1/2 miles (2 1/2 kilometres) from the entrance to Massey Energy Company''s sprawling Upper Big Branch mine.

They had to create an access road above it before they could begin drilling four shafts to release methane and carbon monoxide.

Governor Joe Manchin said at a news briefing on Tuesday that it could be Wednesday night before the first hole is drilled, but rescuers had to try.

Manchin said rescuers observed that some of the rails and heavy equipment at the explosion site had "twisted like a pretzel."

Kevin Stricklin, an administrator for the federal Mine Safety and Health Administration, said the situation looked grim for the missing miners.

Stricklin acknowledged that "something went very wrong for us to have the magnitude of this explosion," and that the investigation continued.

Officials hoped the four were able to reach airtight chambers stocked with food, water and enough oxygen for them to live for four days, but rescue teams checked one of two such chambers nearby and it was empty. The build-up of gases prevented teams from reaching other chambers.

Massey Chief Executive Don Blankenship said in an Associated Press interview on Tuesday that he has attended briefings with family members, but largely left contact to federal Mine Safety and Health Administration and Massey representatives.

He said he was in the room when relatives were notified of the full extent of the tragedy, but the scene was so emotional that he did not interact with them.

Blankenship said a carbon monoxide warning was the first sign of trouble.

Mine crews were checking on the alarm when they discovered an explosion had occurred deep inside the mine.

"As the seriousness of it progressed we''ve become more and more concerned and of course we launched the rescue effort at an early stage," he said, refuting that production was put ahead of safety.

A total of 31 miners were in the area during a shift change when the explosion rocked the mine, about 30 miles south of Charleston.

Some of those killed may have died in the blast and others when they breathed in the gas-filled air, Stricklin said.

Eleven bodies had been recovered and identified, but the other 14 have not. Names weren''t released.

Manchin said investigators still don''t know what ignited the blast, but methane likely played a part.

The death toll is the highest in a US mine since 1984, when 27 died in a fire at Emery Mining Corp.''s mine in Orangeville, Utah.

If the four missing bring the total to 29, it would be the most killed in a US coal mine since a 1970 explosion killed 38 at Finley Coal Co., in Hyden, Kentucky.

In Monday''s blast, nine miners were leaving on a vehicle that takes them in and out of the mine''s long shaft when a crew ahead of them felt a blast of air and went back to investigate, Stricklin said.

They found seven workers dead. Others were hurt or missing.

Massey Energy, a publicly traded company based in Richmond, Virginia, has 2.2 (b) billion tons of coal reserves in southern West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, southwest Virginia and Tennessee.

It ranks among the country''s top five coal producers and is among the industry''s most profitable. It has a spotty safety record.

In the past year, federal inspectors fined the company more than 382-thousand US dollars for repeated serious violations involving its ventilation plan and equipment at Upper Big Branch.

Methane is one of the great dangers of coal mining, and federal records say the Eagle coal seam releases up to 2 (m) million cubic feet of methane gas into the Upper Big Branch mine every 24 hours.

In mines, giant fans are used to keep the colourless, odourless gas concentrations below certain levels. If concentrations are allowed to build up, the gas can explode with a spark roughly similar to the static charge created by walking across a carpet in winter, as at the Sago mine, also in West Virginia.

The Eagle seam produced 1.2 (m) million tons of coal in 2009, according to the mine safety agency, and has about 200 employees.

The communities around the mine site were angry about the accident.

One woman, who is a family friend of one of the miners, said Massey was putting profits in front of human life.

Another area resident said she did not want her son, who was previously a miner, to ever go back to mining.

One resident, however, said the community was made up of miners.

Larry Asbury, who has two sons working for Massey, said "if you''re going to live here you probably are going to end up working in the mines."

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Subjects: Mining accidents, Coal mining, Occupational accidents, Explosions, Production facilities, Search and rescue efforts, Accidents and disasters, Production facility outages, Facilities, Corporate capital, Corporate news, Business, Mining accidents, Industrial accidents, Accidents, General news, Energy, Industries, Workplace safety, Personnel
People: Joe Manchin, Don Blankenship
Locations: West Virginia, United States, North America
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China Mine 2
Title:
SD
Summary: More than 100 miners rescued; new rescue; hospital
Story No: 641993
Source: AP TELEVISION, CCTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 04/05/2010 04:21 AM
People:
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SHOTLIST

CCTV - NO ACCESS CHINA

Wangjialing

++DAYS SHOTS++

1. Mid of rescuers bringing out rescued miner on stretcher

2. Wide of rescuers and ambulances

3. Mid of rescue workers bringing out second rescued miner, miner claps from stretcher and shakes hands with emergency workers, pan to mine shaft, third rescued miner is carried out of mine shaft on stretcher by rescue workers

4. Wide of mine area and ambulances

5. Wide of ambulance driving away from scene

AP TELEVISION

Wangjialing

++EARLY MORNING SHOTS++

6. Rescue workers carrying miners on stretchers to ambulance

7. Wide shot of ambulance and scene

8. Ambulance doors being shut

9. Various shots of ambulances leaving

CCTV - NO ACCESS CHINA

Wangjialing

++EARLY MORNING SHOTS++

10. Zoom in of ambulances near the entrance to the mine shaft

11. Close shot of miners

12. Miner being carried out through mine shaft on stretcher by rescuers

13. Miners being carried on stretchers to the ambulance

14. Miner being carried out through shaft by rescuers

CCTV - NO ACCESS CHINA

Hejin

++EARLY MORNING SHOTS++

15. Hospital staff lifting stretcher with miner out of ambulance

16. Various of hospital staff wheeling miner into hospital

CCTV - NO ACCESS CHINA

Linfen, Shanxi province

++DAY SHOTS++

17. Wide of medical staff pushing injured person down corridor into ward

18. Wide of medical team surrounding bed, zoom into bed

19. Close of intravenous drip, pan down to injured miner lying in bed, zoom out

20. Mid of official talking to miner, zoom in, UPSOUND: (Mandarin): Miner, no name given:

(Official asking injured miner how he feels)

"I don''t feel well around my lower back area."

21. Close of injured miner Jin (no first name given) talking to official

22. Mid of official talking to injured miner Jin (no first name given)

23. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Liu Qiang, chief medical officer during the mine rescue operation:

"These patients have similar symptoms such as abnormally low body temperature, severe skin infection from staying in water for such a long period of time, severe dehydration and an imbalance in the body''s electrolytes. And some patients have an unstable blood pressure, some have a lower blood pressure. And also some patients are still in shock."

(SOUNDBITE IS PARTIALLY OVERLAID BY SHOT 24)

24. Mid of hospital staff caring for injured miners

25. Wide of rescue workers at the mine

26. Wide of ambulances and workers at the site

27. Mid of ambulance

28. Mid of policeman and People''s Liberation Army soldiers standing guard

AP TELEVISION

Hejin

++DAY SHOTS++

29. Wide exterior of Hejin City People''s Hospital that has been treating some of the survivors from the coal mine accident

30. Medium of policemen guarding hospital entrance beside security line

31. Medium of people walking in and out of hospital

32. Wide interior of media conference

33. Cutaway of cameraman

34. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin), Liu Dezheng, rescue headquarters spokesperson:

"These nine miners (rescued from trapped mine) are in stable condition now. These nine miners were rescued after being trapped in the dark and dangerous mine for around 180 hours, and this is a true miracle of life."

35. Cutaway of photographer

36. Medium of Liu in media conference

37. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin), Liu Dezheng, rescue headquarters spokesperson:

"There are still so many miners trapped in the mine and there are signs of life there. The rescue operation headquarters have given instructions to pump out the water and make sure there is good ventilation to assist with rescuing people. We will not give up or abandon these people, and we will continue to make every effort to rescue all the trapped miners."

38. Wide of media conference

STORYLINE:

More than 114 workers were pulled out alive on Monday after being trapped for more than a week in a flooded coal mine in northern China, according to state TV, sparking cheers among the hundreds of rescue workers who had raced to save them and almost given up hope.

A total of 153 workers had been trapped for more than seven and half days, 39 miners remain missing.

Nine miners were rescued initially, with Liu Dezheng, the rescue headquarters spokesperson labelling it as a "miracle."

Those miners were taken to hospital and a hospital official said they were suffering similar symptoms such as low body temperature, severe skin infection, dehydration and some were understandably in shock.

The first rescue at 40 minutes past midnight on Monday (1640 GMT on Sunday) had seemed beyond hope for days before crews heard tapping from deep underground on Friday.

It was hoped that even more survivors may be found, with rescuers reporting glimpses of swinging lights and new tapping sounds.

After rescuing the first nine miners, Liu Dezheng vowed that his team would do their up-most to rescue as many miners as they could.

"We will not give up or abandon these people, and we will continue to make every effort to rescue all the trapped miners," he added.

China Central Television said some of the miners managed to attach themselves to a wall with their belts when the water rushed in, and they hung there for three days before getting into a mining cart that floated by.

The miners had been trapped since March 28 when workers digging tunnels broke into a water-filled abandoned shaft.

Before rescuers heard tapping noises from below on Friday, they had feared this would be China''s deadliest mine disaster in more than two years.

A preliminary investigation last week found that the mine''s managers ignored water leaks before the accident, the State Administration of Work Safety said.

China''s coal mines are the world''s deadliest.

Accidents killed 2,631 coal miners in China last year, down from 6,995 deaths in 2002, the most dangerous year on record, according to the State Administration of Coal Mine Safety.

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Subjects: Mining accidents, Coal mining, Occupational accidents, Search and rescue efforts, Production facility outages, Production facilities, Facilities, Corporate capital, Corporate news, Business, Mining accidents, Industrial accidents, Accidents, Accidents and disasters, General news, Energy, Industries, Workplace safety, Personnel
Locations: China, Greater China, East Asia, Asia
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China Mine
Title:
SD
Summary: 27 dead in China mine explosion; seven still trapped
Story No: 568322
Source: CCTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 06/14/2008 05:29 AM
People:
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SHOTLIST

1. Cage with miners reaches surface, zoom in to rescued miner

2. Officials

3. Rescue workers

4. Pit head, tilt down to people waiting

5. Rescued miner, with paramedics

STORYLINE

Twenty-seven miners have been found dead after an explosion at a Chinese coal mine.

Rescuers were working on Saturday to free seven colleagues still trapped underground, state media reported.

The official Xinhua News Agency reported that explosives went off accidentally deep in the mine on the outskirts of Xiaoyi city in the northern province of Shanxi.

Fifteen workers made it to the surface following the blast, which ripped through the mine's main shaft shortly after 1300 (0500 GMT).

Another nine miners were rescued on Friday evening.

Some 27 bodies were pulled out early on Saturday.

More than 100 rescuers from three local mine disaster relief teams were continuing to search into the night for the 34 trapped miners.

China's mining industry is notoriously unsafe, although Xinhua said the mine, operated by the Anxin Coal Mining Corp., had passed a recent safety inspection.

Nearly 3,800 miners died in China last year, an average of about 10 a day, making the country's mining industry the most dangerous in the world.

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Subjects: Mining accidents, Coal mining, Search and rescue efforts, Explosions, Accidents and disasters, Metals and minerals industry, Industrial accidents, Accidents, General news, Energy industry, Industries, Business, Coal mining, Materials industry
Locations: Xiaoyi, Shanxi Sheng, China
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China Mine
Title:
SD
Summary: State media say death toll in China mine blast rises to 105
Story No: 546284
Source: CCTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 12/07/2007 04:07 AM
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SHOTLIST

1. Wide shot rescue team members standing

2. Pan of rescue team going into the mine

3. Wide shot of entrance to mine

4. Entrance of mine

5. Wide shot people gathering outside the mine

6. Close shot interior of the mine

7. Close shot facilities inside the mine

8. Close shot lamp in mine

9. Interior of the mine

10. Wide pan from ambulances to the entrance

11. People at entrance

STORYLINE

Rescue and recovery work continued on Friday as the number of dead in a massive gas explosion at a coal mine in northern China rose to 105 on Friday after 26 more bodies were recovered, the official Xinhua News Agency reported.

Exact figures were still unclear on the number of miners who were underground at the time of Wednesday night's explosion, although Xinhua put the figure at about 120 rather than the previously reported 111.

Officials were seeking to identify the dead on Friday.

Xinhua said managers of the mine in Shanxi province's Hongtong county had delayed reporting the accident overnight, wasting the crucial hours when coordinated rescue efforts could be most effective.

The cause of the accident has yet to be determined.

There was a delay of about six hours in reporting the explosion to the local authorities, who didn't learn of it until 0500 on Thursday.

The authorities said that they believed the colliery managers delayed in reporting the accident while they tried to mount their own operations, which meant that a crucial window of time for rescue passed and casualties probably increased.

Xinyao, owned by Ruizhiyuan Mining Co., held full, valid licenses at the time of the accident that allowed it to produce 210-thousand tons of coal annually.

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Subjects: Mining accidents, Coal mining, Explosions, Accidents and disasters, Metals and minerals industry, Media, Industrial accidents, Accidents, General news, Energy industry, Industries, Business, Coal mining, Materials industry
Locations: Shanxi Sheng, Shanxi Sheng, China
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China Mine Aftermath
Title:
SD
Summary: Daylight shots of damaged mine where 138 were killed
Story No: 468429
Source: CCTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 11/29/2005 09:54 AM
People:
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SHOTLIST:

1. Pan from the wide shot of the mine facility to hole in ground, caused by explosion

2. Various collapsed walls

3. Pan from the rescue map on wall to state officials sitting at table inside meeting room

4. Close up rescue worker escorting rescued miner away from scene

STORYLINE:

The death toll in a coal mine accident in northeast China rose to 138 with 11 others still missing on Tuesday as anxious

relatives demanded to be allowed into the mine.

The blast in the Dongfeng Coal Mine prompted national leaders to demand stricter enforcement of safety rules in China's mining industry, by far the world's deadliest, with more than 5-thousand fatalities a year in fires, floods and other accidents.

The disaster late on Sunday in Qitaihe came as the nearby city of Harbin was struggling to recover from a toxic spill in a river that forced the government to cut off water supplies for five days.

Outside the mine, security guards blocked the front gate as about a dozen people stood outside in freezing weather and fog on Monday evening.

The official Xinhua News Agency said 138 miners died in the explosion and hundreds of rescuers were searching for 11 others, but gave no indication whether they were believed to be alive.

The disaster is a setback for Chinese officials struggling to improve safety in the coal mining industry.

Most accidents are blamed on disregard of safety rules or lack of equipment for ventilation or fire control.

Local officials often are accused of helping mine owners or managers flout safety rules.

Beijing has unveiled one safety initiative after another in recent years.

It has announced the creation of a national network of safety inspectors, stricter fire standards and shorter working hours for miners to prevent fatigue.

Authorities say they have shut down more than 12-thousand coal mines this year for safety inspections.

Thousands have been ordered to improve their facilities and many others aren't expected to reopen.

The government said the explosion in Qitaihe was blamed on airborne coal dust that ignited.

But there was no word on whether it was believed to involve misconduct or human error.

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Subjects: Mining accidents, Search and rescue efforts, Coal mining, Explosions, Accidents, Accidents and disasters, Metals and minerals industry, Industrial accidents, General news, Energy industry, Industries, Business, Coal mining, Materials industry
Locations: Qitaihe Shi, Heilongjiang Sheng, China
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China Mine 3
Title:
SD
Summary: Gas explosion kills 203 - biggest accident since 1940s
Story No: 442002
Source: CCTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 02/15/2005 02:32 PM
People:
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SHOTLIST

1. Miners walking out

2. Various Zhang Wenyue, Governor of Liaoning province, visiting mine

3. Various miners

4. Lift doors being closed

5. Lift door opening and miners coming out

6. Wide shot Zhang Wenyue, Governor of Liaoning province, visiting mine

7. Various of provincial leaders looking at map

8. Zhang Wenyue, Governor of Liaoning province visiting injured man in hospital

STORYLINE

A gas explosion in a coal mine in northeastern China has killed at least 203 miners, the government said on Tuesday, in the worst disaster reported since communist rule began in 1949.

According to the official Xinhua News Agency, the explosion on Monday afternoon at the Sunjiawan mine in Liaoning province also injured 22 others and left 13 trapped underground.

Rescuers in the far northeastern province were faced with roads made wet by an overnight snowfall and below freezing temperatures.

Xinhua said the cause of the blast, which occurred 242 metres (794 feet) underground, was under investigation.

The Governor of Liaoning province, Zhang Wenyue, visited the mine on Tuesday to help organise rescue operations. He also visited injured miners in hospital.

Xinhua, citing the vice general manager of the Fuxin mine group, said the explosion at Sunjiawan happened about 10 minutes after an earthquake shook the mine.

China has suffered a string of deadly mining disasters in recent months, despite a nationwide safety crackdown.

A blast in the northern province of Shaanxi in November killed 166 miners. Another explosion in October killed 148. Before that, the deadliest reported mining accident in recent years was a fire in southern China that killed 162 miners in 2000.

Monday's disaster in Liaoning was the deadliest disclosed by the Chinese government since the 1949 communist revolution.

However, until the late 1990s, when the government began regularly announcing statistics on mining deaths, many industrial accidents were never reported.

In 1942, China's northeast was the site of the world's deadliest coal mining disaster when an accident killed 1,549 miners in Japanese-occupied Manchuria during World War II.

China's mines are by far the world's deadliest, with more than 6,000 deaths last year in mine floods, explosions and fires. The government said the toll was eight percent below the number killed in the previous year, although China's fatality rate per ton of coal mined is still 100 times that of the United States.

China says it accounted for 80 percent of all coal mining deaths worldwide last year.

Mine owners and local officials are frequently blamed for putting profits ahead of safety, especially as the nation's soaring energy needs increase

the demand for coal.

Underground explosions are often blamed on a lack of ventilation equipment to remove gas that seeps from the coal bed. The Chinese government says it has budgeted some four billion yuan (US$500 million) since 2000 to improve ventilation in mines and reduce other safety hazards.

Fuxin is one of China's oldest coal mining regions and many of its mines have already been depleted, according to state media reports. Miners in many such regions must tunnel far underground to reach coal seams, and the risk of explosion due to methane gas is high.

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Subjects: Mining accidents, Coal mining, Explosions, Industrial fires, Accidents, Accidents and disasters, Metals and minerals industry, Government and politics, Industrial accidents, General news, Energy industry, Industries, Business, Coal mining, Materials industry, Fires
Organisations: China government
Locations: Sunjiawan, Liaoning, China
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UKRAINE: 39 MINERS KILLED IN GAS EXPLOSION
Title:
SD
Summary: UKRAINE: 39 MINERS KILLED IN GAS EXPLOSION
Story No: 129225
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 05/25/1999 04:00 AM
People: Leonid Kuchma
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Natural Sound

Ukrainian officials say rescuers have recovered the bodies of at least 39 miners killed in an underground gas explosion.

Another 48 workers were taken to hospital with injuries from Monday's blast, including two miners in grave condition.

The methane gas blast occurred at a depth of about 4,125 feet in the Zasiadko mine, one of the largest in the Donetsk region and one of a few profitable mines in the former Soviet republic.

At least 39 Ukrainian miners died as a gas explosion ripped through a coal mine in the former Soviet republic.

And 48 mine employees were taken to hospital, some suffering from horrific burns over much of their bodies.

Officials said 551 miners were working at the time of the blast and 181 of them were immediately affected by the explosion.

All the miners including the dead and injured were brought to surface by Tuesday morning.

First Deputy Prime Minister Volodymyr Kuratchenko arrived in Donetsk late Monday and President Leonid Kuchma was expected there on Wednesday.

Kuchma also set up a government commission to investigate the accident and declared Wednesday a day of mourning in Ukraine.

Ukraine has the world's highest coal industry death rate, which is usually blamed on outdated equipment and miners' neglect of safety rules.

The industry has been devastated by the country's protracted economic decline, and mines lack the money to modernise equipment and improve safety.

Monday's accident brought the number of miners who have been killed on the job since the beginning of 1999 to at least 146.

Donetsk, Ukraine, 25 May 1999

1. Close up of injured miner in ward

2. Close up nurse spooning medicine to miner

3. Close up burnt hands in plaster

4. Close up of charred head of miner

5. Pan across ward, injured miners

6. Wide shot mine administration office

7. Wide shot convoy of buses with miners

8. Wide shot zoom in to rescuer workers

9. Mid shot of dead miner

10. Wide shot rescue workers, van

11. Mid shot rescuers talking

12. Mid shot miners walk past

13. Wide of ambulances

14. Close up of ambulance drives off

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Subjects: Mining accidents, Coal mining, Explosions, Accidents and disasters, Industrial accidents, Accidents, General news, Energy industry, Industries, Business, Coal mining, Metals and minerals industry, Materials industry
People: Leonid Kuchma
Locations: Ukraine, Donetsk, Eastern Europe, Europe
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UKRAINE: DONETSK: 31 COAL MINERS KILLED IN GAS EXPLOSION
Title:
SD
Summary: UKRAINE: DONETSK: 31 COAL MINERS KILLED IN GAS EXPLOSION
Story No: 76299
Source: RTR
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 04/04/1998 04:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

Natural Sound

A powerful methane gas explosion and fire tore through a deep Ukrainian coal mine on Saturday, killing at least 31 miners and injuring 48 others.

There were 269 miners at work at the time of the blast which was followed by a fire.

43 miners are in hospital and another five are seriously injured but still inside the mine.

The blast occurred at a depth of more than 1,100 metres (3,600 feet) in the Skachinskoho mine in the eastern city of Donetsk, about 650 kilometers (390 miles) southeast of Kiev.

Thirty one bodies had been recovered by Saturday evening, at least thirty miners are missing and the death toll is expected to rise.

More than 17 special safety teams are working to rescue the trapped miners, but the fire and the mine's depth are making their work difficult.

Emergency officials said they have not determined what triggered the blast.

Ukrainian coal trade unions have often warned the government that conditions in the country's 229 coal mines are dangerous.

Ageing equipment, negligence and shortage of funds have contributed to deteriorating safety conditions and accidents killed 290 coal industry workers last year.

More than 160 miners have died in accidents in Ukrainian mines in the first two months of this year.

Vice Premier Mykola Biloblotskiy called for a national day of mourning on Monday.

Donetsk, Ukraine - 4th April 1998

1. Mid shot of rescue team

2. Mid shot of rescue workers walking towards camera

3. Mid shot of officials

4. Close up of relatives

5. Pan right of ambulances

6. Rescue team bringing miner out of mine on stretcher

7. Mid shot of ambulance crew

8. Rescue team help injured miner on to stretcher

9. Rescue workers bringing injured miner out and giving him oxygen

10. Close up of injured miner being placed in ambulance

11. Mid shot of ambulances

12. Breathing sets on ground

13. Cutaway of rescue worker

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Subjects: Mining accidents, Coal mining, Occupational accidents, Search and rescue efforts, Explosions, Industrial fires, Fires, Accidents and disasters, Metals and minerals industry, Industrial accidents, Accidents, General news, Energy industry, Industries, Business, Coal mining, Materials industry
Locations: Ukraine, Eastern Europe, Europe
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RUSSIA: GAS EXPLOSION RIPS THROUGH COAL MINE IN SOUTHERN SIBERIA
Title:
SD
Summary: RUSSIA: GAS EXPLOSION RIPS THROUGH COAL MINE IN SOUTHERN SIBERIA
Story No: 67544
Source: RTR
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 12/02/1997 05:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

Natural Sound

A huge methane gas explosion ripped through a coal mine in southern Siberia early on Tuesday, killing at least 59 miners.

The blast during the overnight shift tore apart a shaft in the Zyryanovskaya mine, located in the heart of the Kuzbass, Russia's richest coal-producing region.

The cause of the explosion was not immediately known.

At least 59 Russian miners were killed when a methane gas explosion ripped through a coal mine in Siberia on Tuesday.

The blast occurred at 1:17 a.m. local time (1717 G-M-T Monday) in the city of Novokuznetsk, 500 kilometres (300 miles) north of the Mongolian border.

Officials said four miners made their way to the surface after the explosion and were hospitalised with gas poisoning.

By mid-afternoon, there were 59 confirmed deaths and eight other miners remained missing.

Fifteen bodies had been recovered and taken to the surface.

Rescue teams headed from Moscow to Novokuznetsk, 3-thousand kilometres (1,850 miles) southeast of the capital.

Rescuers were digging through the debris in hopes of finding survivors.

The governor of the Kemerovo region where the accident occurred, said a commission would be set up to provide aid to victims' families and investigate the cause.

He said the Zyryanovskaya mine has been the region's best but is troubled by the same problems faced by others nationwide since the Soviet collapse.

Mine safety in Russia has been steadily worsening because of aging equipment, lack of funds for upkeep and poor safety standards.

Novokuznetsk, Russia - 2 December 1997.

1. Name sign of mine, zoom out to people gathered outside building

2. Miners carrying stretcher out of mine

3. Various of stretcher with body being taken away

4. People leaving mine

5. People carrying stretcher

6. Medium shot of police

7. Various of people waiting for news

8. Women comforting each other

9. Emergency Services vehicle arriving

10. People opening entrance of mine

11. Inside mine

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Subjects: Mining accidents, Coal mining, Production facilities, Explosions, Accidents and disasters, Metals and minerals industry, Industrial accidents, Accidents, General news, Energy industry, Industries, Business, Coal mining, Materials industry, Corporate news
Locations: Russia, Eastern Europe, Europe
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