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Indonesia Volcano 2
Title:
SD
Summary: Evacuations underway after eruption that killed at least 25
Story No: 662769
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/27/2010 04:08 AM
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SHOTLIST

Near Mount Merapi

1. Various of Merapi volcano with smoke coming out of it

Kaliadem

2. Motorcycles riding through the ash-covered road in the village

3. Dead cows in a pen covered with ash

4. Dead cow at the back yard covered with ash

5. Close up of volcanic ash in the Gendol river

6. Tilt up of the flow of volcanic ash that covered the Gendol river due to volcanic eruptions

7. Wide of the ash-covered Gendol river with Merapi volcano in background

8. Wide of the river covered with ash

9. Police guarding the road leading to affected areas

10. Police convoy passing by

Umbulharjo

11. Close of sign of Umbulharjo evacuee camp

12. Wide of evacuees sitting outside camp

13. Mid of woman refugees wearing protective masks

14. Rescue vehicle passing by carrying three dead bodies inside body bags

STORYLINE

A volcanic eruption of Mount Merapi on Tuesday killed at least 25 people, forced thousands to flee down its slopes and spewed burning ash and smoke high into

the air on the island of Java.

Meanwhile, off the coast of Sumatra, about 800 miles (1,300 kilometres) west of the volcano, rescuers battled rough seas to reach Indonesia's Mentawai islands, where a 10-foot tsunami triggered by an earthquake on Monday night swept away hundreds of homes, killing at least 113 villagers, said Mujiharto of the Health Ministry's crisis centre. Up to 500 others are missing.

The twin disasters happened hours apart in one of the most seismically active regions on the planet.

Scientists have warned that pressure building beneath Merapi's lava dome could trigger its most powerful explosion in years.

But a government volcanologist, expressed hope the 9,737-foot (2,968-metre) mountain, which sent rocks and debris cascading down its southern slope, could be releasing steam slowly.

A 2006 eruption at Merapi killed two people, one in 1994 killed 60 people, and a 1930 blast killed 1,300.

After refusing to budge from the volcano's fertile slopes, saying they wanted to tend to their crops and protect their homes, villagers started streaming by the thousands into makeshift emergency shelters late on Tuesday.

Many carried sleeping mats, bags of clothes and food as they settled in.

Officials said earlier that by closely monitoring the volcano 310 miles (500 kilometres) southeast of the capital of Jakarta, they thought they could avoid casualties.

But the death toll rose quickly.

A spokeswoman at the main hospital dealing with victims, tallied 25 bodies and said more than a dozen others were admitted with injuries.

Local media showed police and volunteers pulling several ash-covered bodies and carrying them to waiting vehicles.

Among the dead was a 2-month-old baby, said a hospital worker.

Three people at Panti Nugroho hospital died of burns after being hit by a searing cloud of ash, officials said.

Even as they contended with the volcano - one of 129 to watch in the world's largest archipelago - officials were trying to assess the impact of Monday night's 7.7-magnitude earthquake off Sumatra that triggered the killer tsunami.

The quake, just 13 miles (20 kilometres) beneath the ocean floor, was followed by at least 14 aftershocks, the largest measuring 6.2, according to the US Geological Survey.

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Subjects: Volcanic eruptions, Natural disasters, Tsunamis, Earthquakes, Accidents and disasters, Vulcanology, Evacuations, General news, Earth science, Science, Disaster planning and response
Locations: Sumatra, Indonesia, Southeast Asia, Asia
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Iceland Volcano 2
Title:
SD
Summary: WRAP Aerials of Iceland''s volcano sending ash into sky
Story No: 643270
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 04/17/2010 11:53 AM
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1. Various of Eyjafjallajokull volcano erupting

2. Various of eruption

STORYLINE

A lingering volcanic ash plume forced extended no-fly restrictions over much of Europe on Saturday, as Icelandic scientists warned that volcanic activity had increased and showed no sign of abating - a portent of more travel chaos to come.

Although the ash plume has grown, a northerly wind was expected to allow enough visibility for scientists to inspect the volcano on Saturday.

Scientists want to see how much ice has melted to determine how much longer the eruption could spew ash.

Because the volcano is situated below a glacial ice cap, the magma is being cooled quickly, causing explosions and plumes of grit that can be catastrophic to plane engines if prevailing winds are right.

An expansive cloud of grit hovered over parts of western Europe on Saturday, triggering extended flight bans that stranded people around the globe. Continued volcanic activity could produce more plumes if the weather patterns stay the same.

Iceland, a nation of 320-thousand people, sits on a large volcanic hot spot in the Atlantic''s mid-oceanic ridge and has a history of devastating eruptions.

One of the worst was the 1783 eruption of the Laki volcano, which spewed a toxic cloud over Europe, killing tens of thousands.

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Subjects: Volcanic eruptions, Vulcanology, Natural disasters, Accidents and disasters, General news, Earth science, Science
Locations: Iceland, Western Europe, Europe
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Ecuador Volcano
Title:
SD
Summary: Volcanic activity continues on island in Galapagos
Story No: 603635
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 04/21/2009 04:39 PM
People: Charles Darwin
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SHOTLIST:

April 18, 2009, Fernandina Island, Galapagos Islands

++MUTE++

++NIGHT SHOTS++

1. Various of "La Cumbre" volcano with and lava pouring into the ocean.

April 20 2009, Galapagos National Park

2. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Washingtong Tapia, Director of Projects of the Galapagos National Park:

"Apparently the volcano activity has increased in comparison to what it was during the weekend, when the lava had almost disappeared. It is not a big volcano eruption, on the contrary, it is a small eruption which is part of the natural regulation process of the island's ecosystem."

April 18, 2009, Fernandina Island, Galapagos Islands

++MUTE++

++NIGHT SHOTS++

3. "La Cumbre" volcano with and lava pouring into the ocean.

April 20 2009, Galapagos National Park

4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Washingtong Tapia, Director of Projects of the Galapagos National Park:

"As we know, Galapagos is an archipelago of volcanic origins. So far we have registered one sea wolf and various fish (who have died as a result of the eruption), however this is a normal process, it is not a catastrophe but a normal part of the evolution of both species and the island. This has been happening for millions of years, and will continue to happen."

April 17, 2009, Fernandina Island, Galapagos Islands

++MUTE++

5. Various aerial shots of island and volcano

STORYLINE:

Reports suggest lava flows from a volcano which erupted over the weekend in the Galapagos islands for the first time in four years have subsided.

On Monday the flow had been increasing.

"Apparently the volcano activity has increased in comparison to what it was during the weekend, when the lava had almost disappeared," said Washingtong Tapia, Director of Projects of the Galapagos National Park on Monday.

But a later report issued on Tuesday by the Geophysical Institute of Ecuador said that the volcano activity had tapered off in the last 24 hours.

The Galapagos National Park said that La Cumbre volcano began spewing lava, gas and smoke on uninhabited Fernandina Island on Saturday after four years of inactivity.

The park said in a statement that the eruption was not a threat to people living on nearby Isabela Island.

Tapia also said that the islands' flora and fauna were not liable to suffer widespread damage as a result of the eruption.

The Galapagos are home to unique animal and plant species that became the basis for Charles Darwin's theory of

evolution.

Scientists say Fernandina is the island with the most volcanic activity in the archipelago.

La Cumbre has erupted several times in the last decades, however its last significant eruption occurred in 1968, producing several earthquakes and sending up a tall pillar of thick ash that travelled for many miles (kilometres).

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Subjects: Natural disasters, Accidents and disasters, General news, Natural hazards, Environment, Environment and nature, Land features, Land, Volcanic eruptions, Volcanoes, Volcanic eruptions
People: Charles Darwin
Locations: South America, Latin America and Caribbean, Galapagos Islands, Ecuador
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(HZ) Hawaii Volcano
Title:
SD
Summary: Living with Hawaii's volcanoes
Story No: 591993
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 01/13/2009 05:47 AM
People:
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SHOTLIST:

AP Television

Hawaii September 2-4, 2008

1. Wide aerial shot and zoom in of smoke rising where the lava enters the ocean

2. Rotating mid shot from the air of lava flow

3. Zoom in aerial shot of the lava flow

4. Wide aerial shot and zoom of a hole in the lava plateau revealing lava flowing in underground tunnel to the sea

5. Wide of Kiauea (Kilauea) Volcano's Halema`uma`u Crater

6. Pan right to left of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park - with smoke pouring out into the air in the distance

7. Set up shot of rangers walking along a trail in the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

8. Set up shot of Supervisory Park Ranger, Mr. Kuono McDaniel showing berries on a tree at the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Kuono McDaniel, Supervisory Park Ranger, Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park

"This is an incredibly powerful place. You see this erupting volcano and yet all around it is life springing quickly from the lava flows."

10. Mid shot of street sign along "Crater Rim Drive" inside the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

11. Aerial shot of smoke filled Kiauea volcano's Halema`uma`u Crater

12. Shot of visitors looking at the crater area at the Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park

13. Aerial shot approaching the coastline where lava flows into the ocean

14. SOUNDBITE: (English) Kuono McDaniel, Supervisory Park Ranger, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

"There's Pele, the best known deity around here who is the deity of the volcanoes, but also her younger sister, Hiiaka-i-ka-poli-o-Pele, bringing life back to the lava flows after she stops creating new land so it's a constant cycle. It's all tied in with the chants and legends and the stories of Hawaii."

15. Shot of Ohia lehua Haole, the flower of Big Island Hawaii.

16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Kuono McDaniel, Supervisory Park Ranger, Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park:

"This isn't a destructive process as far as the volcanology goes, but a creative process. Without it we wouldn't have life. When Pele wants to come to an area, we've learned over a couple of millennia to move out of the way and you can come back when she's finished."

17. Farmer picking up a piece of lava rock

18. SOUNDBITE: (English) Alan Yosa, Noni Farmer:

"Behind is is all the new land created by the lava flows through the 80s and the 90s and so forth, and even to this day the island is increasing and so forth. It's the newest island."

19. Aerial shot from the coast and zoom to a shot of new houses recently built on the lava flow at Kalapana.

20. Pan left to right looking inside a crack in the lava with vegetation growing

21. SOUNDBITE: (English) Alan Yosa, Noni Farmer

(speaking about the people who returned to live on the lava flow) - "They're not very concerned about the lava flow, just like people live near tornadoes and hurricanes. They're a little concerned of course, but not very much at all. As far as I'm concerned if the lava covers the farm, we just replant again and within a few short months we'll have the noni farm all over again."

22. Wide aerial shot of hole in lava plateau with lava showing

23. Close up of hole in lava plateau

24. Close up shot of lava flowing at high speed into the ocean

25. Mid shot of "Hazardous" sign at the viewpoint in Kalapana

26. Wide of plume of smoke rising near the end of the highway at Kalapana

27. Pan left to right of tourists gathered at Kalapana waiting for signs of activity near the ocean

28. Mid shot of tourists gathered at Kalapana

29. Mid shot at dusk of smoke turning orange because of lava activity on the coast

30. SOUNDBITE: (English) Kalapana resident originally from Germany (name no given):

"I just visited some friends that live really close and I saw the fire actually coming out and it's still special to me you know. It still ... I always look at the steam and say 'wow, what's smoking there? What is going on there every day?"

31. Close aerial shot of lava pouring into the ocean

32. SOUNDBITE: (English) Eric Gibson, Helicopter Pilot:

"The volcano here at Kiauea is a huge part of what we do here. Without the volcano the tourism industry here would be significantly different. It draws so many people and the constant activity really draws people from all over the whole world."

33. Wide shot of street lava rock cutting off a street

34. Mid shot of the sea where the lava enters the ocean

35. SOUNDBITE: (English) Eric Gibson, Helicopter Pilot:

"On any given day it can be vastly different. Some days lots of gas, lots of smoke. Other days lava flow on the surface. Some days you have trees on fire from where the lava flows down into the forest. Other times towns at risk."

36. Mid shot of "Old Volcano Rd." street sign in Volcano village

37. Mid shot of laundry shop in Volcano village

38. Mid shot of the Volcano Village Centre sign

39. Mid shot of Lava Rock Cafe sign

40. Set up shot of Mr. Gordon Morse, former journalist for the Honolulu Advertiser

41. SOUNDBITE: (English) Gordon Morse, owner of My Island Bed and Breakfast Inn:

"When that trade wind dies to nothing, just, then the fumes from the crater will come by and you'll have this hard time breathing, some people are really bad, they have to go to the hospital for it and everything."

42. Shot of Mr.Morse holding an old copy of the Honolulu Advertiser and showing article he wrote about March eruption UPSOUND (English): Gordon Morse "Pretty soon that one little crack became a hell of a big crack."

43. Close of the date on the newspaper

44. Wide shot of front page of the Honolulu Advertiser - March 14, 1955

45. SOUNDBITE: (English) Gordon Morse, owner of My Island Bed and Breakfast Inn:

"In the forest was a pond, a warm pond, and the lava was still coming so we were waiting for it to cover the pond and we took off our clothes and went swimming in the pond. We took orchids out of the trees and made sail boats out of them and we were sailing the boats in the pond. Suddenly lava came right out of the forest and right into the pond and we were still in the pond."

46. Wide shot of smoke turning orange from the lava at the entry point in the ocean at night.

LEAD IN :

Volcanoes are synonymous with Hawaii's Big Island and with good reason.

Kilauea on the Big Island has been erupting continuously since 1983.

It's the largest tourist attraction on the island.

STORYLINE :

The views are spectacular.

Molten lava pours into the Pacific ocean, throwing clouds of steam into the air.

Black lava flows cover the scene, with the occasional glimpse of fiery liquid below.

Hawaii's Big Island is home to the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, a UNESCO designated world heritage site.

The Big Island is basically a series of five volcanoes one next to the other: Kilauea, Mauna Loa, Mauna Kea, Kohala, and Haulalai.

The National park contains two of the most active volcanoes in the world, Kilauea and Mauna Loa.

Kilauea volcano has been erupting since 1983 both from its crater and through side vents.

Lava has flowed through miles of underground tunnels all the way out into the ocean, creating more land.

The volcano is considered a deity in Hawaiian culture and provides a constant source of data for volcanologists and geologists.

Park Ranger Kuono McDaniel says far from being destructive volcanoes create more life.

Thousands of visitors a day come to Hawaii Volcanoes National Park to watch Kilauea erupt.

But some residents live with the boiling lava every day and enjoy the idea that their homes and lives are subject to the whims of earth's awesome underground forces.

In the last 25 years lava from Kilauea has not directly caused any deaths, according to National Park Service rangers.

But there have been five fatalities when sightseers fell, got burned or suffered heart attacks.

Kuono says that some Hawaiians believe in volcano deities and that locals accept that the volcano goddess, Pele will flow wherever and whenever she pleases.

Kilauea has not been the kind of volcano that shoots lava from its summit into the sky, causing widespread destruction for miles around.

Instead, it has been a shield volcano, or one that oozes lava from fissures in its sides, giving residents at least a few hours' warning before it reaches their property.

An estimated 8,500 people live in the Pahoa-Kalapana area at the volcano's base on the southeastern section of the Big Island.

Local fruit farmer Alan Yosa says the island is increasing in size due to the constant eruption.

Yosa's farm is located in Kalapana.

The area was covered by lava in the early-mid 1990s when lava flows from Kilauea volcano destroyed homes and cut off large chunks of road.

Yosa says if his land is covered by lava he will just replant his noni plants. (a type of fruit)

Indeed ferns can be seen growing in cracks of recently solidified lava rock.

Yosa says local people's attitudes are similar to those who live near earthquake or hurricane zones.

The flowing molten lava is mesmerising and tourists come to Hawaii to witness the natural spectacle.

A twenty minute walk from the highway across lava rock, visitors reach the shoreline.

Here, plumes of smoke generated by the hot lava enter the ocean.

Eric Gibson of Paradise helicopters takes tourists on daily flights over Kilauea volcano.

Gibson says the volcano is always changing - sometimes lava flows can be seen and other times gas is visible.

Occasionally towns are put at risk from the river of molten rock and gas.

High levels of sulphur dioxide gas levels in the atmosphere led Hawaii Volcanoes National Park to close several days last year and evacuate thousands of visitors.

Sulphur dioxide from Kilauea envelops the region in "vog," or volcanic smog.

The nearest village to Hawaii Volcanoes National Park is the village of Volcano, on the slopes of another volcano - Mauna Loa.

When the trade winds drop

A former local journalist, Gordon Morse says the vog makes breathing difficult when the trade winds drop (easterly winds in the tropics).

Sulphur dioxide is a pollutant that is also generated by burning coal and oil.

If breathed in it can lead to asthma and other respiratory illnesses and aggravate lung and heart disease.

When combined with dust and sunlight, sulphur dioxide makes vog.

Mixed with atmospheric moisture, it produces acid rain.

Morse who know now owns a bed and breakfast in the village of Volcano, is a former journalist for the Honolulu Advertiser.

During his career he covered many eruptions.

He recalls one incident many years ago when he and a photographer had gone behind police lines to wait for the lava flow to make its way towards them.

"Suddenly lava came straight out of the forest and right into the pond and we were still in the pond," he recalls.

For Morse and many other residents of these volcanic islands the unpredictable environmental forces that surround them are just a part of daily life.

Keyword locations

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Subjects: Volcanic eruptions, Volcanoes, Vulcanology, Travel, Hotels and resorts, Fires, Oceans, Winds, Coastlines and beaches, Natural disasters, Accidents and disasters, General news, Volcanic eruptions, Natural hazards, Environment, Environment and nature, Land features, Land, Earth science, Science, Lifestyle, Accommodations, Water bodies and features, Water, Weather
Locations: Hawaii, United States, North America
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US Hawaii Lava
Title:
SD
Summary: Latest pix of Kilauea volcano erupting
Story No: 570828
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 07/10/2008 06:03 AM
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SHOTLIST

1. Aerial: Lava 'fountains' at Kilauea Volcano

2. Aerial: Lava flowing down mountain

3. Aerial: River of lava flowing down mountain, tracking to lava fountaining from fissure

4. Aerial: River of lava

5. Aerial: Wide of river of lava

6. Aerial: Lava pouring from fissure

7. Aerial: River of lava flowing

8. Aerial: Lava pouring from fissure

STORYLINE:

Lava continued to pour from the Kilauea Volcano on Hawaii's Big Island on Wednesday.

The spectacular fountain of lava was flowing from one large fissure, with another smaller fountain nearby.

Scientists at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory said the lava had also once again started flowing into the ocean in the middle east rift zone and flow field.

Over the last few days, lava flows threatened the only remaining homes in the Royal Gardens housing area.

Kilauea's eruption, which began 25 years ago, has already destroyed 66 homes and other structures in the area.

About five houses are still standing, but only two homeowners remain.

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Subjects: Volcanic eruptions, Volcanoes, Natural disasters, Accidents and disasters, General news, Environment and nature
Locations: Hawaii, United States, North America
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US Volcano
Title:
SD
Summary: Volcano in Hawaii spewing lava
Story No: 556982
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 03/07/2008 09:10 PM
People: Harry Kim
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SHOTLIST

++NIGHT SHOTS++

1. Long shot of lava falling off rock cliffs into ocean water below

2. Wide of lava meeting ocean water with smoke and steam billowing in the air

3. Close of stream of lava pouring into ocean water as waves crash against rocks

4. Mid of lava falling into water with rising steam clouds

STORYLINE:

Lava flow from a Hawaiian volcano, that coursed its way through an all-but-abandoned Big Island subdivision, reached the ocean early on Thursday morning, according to the US Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

Late on Tuesday night, the flow from Kilauea crossed a road at the end of Highway 130, cutting access to a viewing site.

County and state crews were preparing a new road to a new lava viewing site in a safe spot, and Mayor Harry Kim wanted preparations, including portable toilets, completed by Friday.

Based on past experience, Kim said he expected more than one thousand sightseers to visit the site per day.

About a half dozen area residents were told to evacuate the Royal Gardens subdivision on Tuesday.

The subdivision has been inundated by lava since Kilauea, one of the world's most active volcanoes, began erupting on January 3, 1983.

Four or five abandoned structures were destroyed over the past two weeks, leaving only a few standing.

A scientist in charge at the observatory, and Hawaii County Civil Defence officials used a helicopter to travel to the location where the molten rock entered the water.

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Subjects: Volcanic eruptions, Volcanoes, Oceans, Natural disasters, Accidents and disasters, General news, Environment and nature
People: Harry Kim
Locations: Hawaii, United States, North America
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US Volcano
Title:
SD
Summary: Kilauea Volcano continues to spews lava for a second day
Story No: 556058
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 02/29/2008 07:55 AM
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SHOTLIST

1. Aerial view of volcano filmed from helicopter, lava flow with clouds of smoke among greenery

2. Lava and flames seen through the trees

3. Close of red hot lava flowing down hill

4. Various of lava flow

5. Pull out from close of flames to wide of burnt ground and vegetation

STORYLINE:

Scientists on the Hawaiin island called Big Island reported that lava from Kilauea volcano has claimed another long-vacated house in the all-but-abandoned Royal Gardens area.

The US Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory said a lava flow entered the Royal Gardens area on Sunday and two structures were burned by Tuesday.

They said on Thursday that a third house had fallen victim to the volcano.

More than 60 homes and other structures in the area have been destroyed over the past 25 years.

Only two homeowners remain in Royal Gardens.

Jack Thompson and Dean Schneider say they are in no danger.

Schneider said it was easy to outrun a lava flow.

Since it began in 1983, the eruption has destroyed 190 structures, covered nearly nine miles of roadway and has been responsible for the deaths of five sightseers.

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Subjects: Volcanic eruptions, Volcanoes, Natural disasters, Accidents and disasters, General news, Environment and nature
Locations: Hawaii, Hawaii, United States
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US Volcano
Title:
SD
Summary: Lava continues to flow from fissures east of crater on Kilauea volcano
Story No: 530829
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 07/25/2007 08:44 AM
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SHOTLIST

1. Various aerials of lava flowing from volcano

2. Aerial from inside helicopter of lava flowing from volcano

3. Various aerials of lava flowing from volcano

4. Aerial from inside helicopter of lava flowing from volcano

5. Various aerials of lava flowing from volcano

STORYLINE:

Lava continued to flow from a set of fissures east of Pu'u O'o crater on Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, one of the world's most active volcanoes, scientists said.

Molten rock began oozing in the remote area known as the east rift zone, on the Big Island of Hawaii, on Saturday for the first time in 15 years.

Scientists have set up a Webcam in the area, but visibility has been poor because of the weather, with the best view available from the air.

A few glimpses overnight showed lava feeding channelled flows and a lava pond at the far eastern edge of the flows, the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory said.

A scientist at the observatory said on Monday that it was a low energy eruption and he was not sure how long the volcano would continue to erupt.

He added that the flow posed no danger to wildlife since it was covering ground already covered by older flows.

The lava formed three ponds about 3 yards (2.74 metres) to 5 yards (4.57 metres) high and 100 yards (91.41 metres) wide.

Ponds are typically formed when lava slowly moves to the surface, as opposed to vigorous activity that will move lava away from a vent.

The eruption, along a one-mile (1.6-kilometre) long line of fissures, is occurring within the state's Kahaualea Natural Area Reserve.

It is the first time lava has erupted east of Pu'u O'o since February 7, 1992.

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Subjects: Volcanoes, Volcanic eruptions, Vulcanology, Environment and nature, Natural disasters, Accidents and disasters, General news, Earth science, Science
Locations: Kilauea, Hawaii, United States
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US Volcano
Title:
SD
Summary: Hawaii's Kilauea volcano spews lava into the Pacific Ocean
Story No: 492881
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 08/11/2006 03:01 PM
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SHOTLIST:

1. Various shots of Kilauea volcano spewing lava

STORYLINE:

One of the world's most active volcanoes, Hawaii's Kilauea, once again spewed hot lava into the Pacific Ocean.

On Thursday the lava was hitting the ocean four miles from the end of the famous "Chain of Craters Road" in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

The lava's temperature was estimated at two thousand degrees when it hit the water.

Kilauea volcano is not just one of the worlds youngest volcanos, but also one of the world's most active.

During its 23 year long active life it has had 55 eruptive episodes.

keyword - volcano

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Subjects: Volcanoes, Volcanic eruptions, Environment and nature, Natural disasters, Accidents and disasters, General news
Locations: Hawaii, United States, North America
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Indonesia Merapi 3
Title:
SD
Summary: Clouds of deadly hot ash and gas shoot down slopes of volcano
Story No: 483582
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 05/15/2006 08:29 AM
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SHOTLIST

1. Three shots of gas clouds rising from volcano

2. Various of gas clouds rising from volcano

++NIGHT SHOTS++

3. Various of lava coming from Merapi Volcano

4. Various of villagers watching volcano, some wearing hard hats

5. Various of lava spilling down volcano

STORYLINE

Clouds of deadly hot ash, rock fragments and volcanic gas surged down Merapi's slopes on Monday, as activity at the towering mountain intensified to its highest level yet.

One of the eruptions sent an avalanche of debris and ash rolling almost four kilometres (2.5 miles) down the mountain's western flank, said Ratdomopurbo, the region's chief vulcanologist.

It was followed by several other huge explosions on the crater.

Villagers who had not evacuated their homes gathered on road sides along the slopes of the volcano, which rises from the plains of Indonesia's densely populated Java Island.

They were told to stand by for possible evacuation.

Scientists raised the alert status for Merapi on Saturday to the highest level after weeks of volcanic activity, and by Sunday more than 4,500 people living in villages closest to the crater or next to rivers that could provide paths for hot lava had been evacuated.

They are living in mosques, government buildings and schools.

Some 18,000 others who live lower down the slopes of the 3,000-metre (9,800-foot) mountain and were not considered to be in immediate danger stayed behind on Sunday.

It was not clear if that situation had changed as result of Monday's activity, which did not cause any known injuries or damage to property.

Not all people in the danger zone were leaving, however.

Merapi, which is one of 129 active volcanoes in Indonesia, sent out a searing cloud of gas that burned 60 people to death when it last erupted in 1994.

About 1,300 people died in a 1930 eruption.

The deadly clouds of ash, gas and debris, known to volcanologists as pyroclastic flows, are the biggest worry for emergency services, said Sugiono, one of the scientists on a team monitoring the volcano 24 hours a day.

He said a glowing dome of lava being formed by magma forced to the surface was poised to collapse and could a trigger a surge in the clouds.

Locals call the clouds "Wedhus Gembel," or "shaggy goat clouds," because they resemble tightly curled balls of wool as they avalanche down the mountain at speeds of more than 100 kilometres (60 miles) an hour.

Many mystic beliefs are associated with the mountain.

On Sunday, holy men burned incense and floated offerings of rice, fruit and vegetables in a river that runs down the volcano's slopes, a special ceremony they believe will ward off an eruption.

Although most Indonesians are Muslim, many also follow animist beliefs and worship ancient spirits, especially in central Java province.

Often at full moons, they trek to crater rims and throw in rice, jewelry and live animals to appease the volcano.

Keyword-dramatic pictures

Keyword- volcano

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Subjects: Volcanoes, Vulcanology, Evacuations, Mountains, Environment and nature, Earth science, Science, General news
Locations: Java, Indonesia, Southeast Asia, Asia
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