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Russia Siege
Title:
SD
Summary: Footage of school; troops outside; relatives await news
Story No: 426822
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/02/2004 08:08 AM
People: Vladimir Putin
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Security forces and people in the street near tank

2. Soldiers standing in the street (AUDIO of EXPLOSION)

3. Soldiers walking into building passing residents waiting in the street

4. Women sitting outside with blankets around them burying their heads in their hands

5. Women standing talking

6. Soldiers walking in the street

7. Various of troops gathered around a tank

8. Woman standing rubbing her face then walking towards others waiting

9. Security members walking quickly into building

10. Crowd gathered outside Hall of Culture, several hundred metres (yards) from Number One School

11. Design on the wall

12. Crowd gathered around official shouting

13. Soldiers standing

14. Crowd bound official

13. Women listening

14. Soldiers with dog on porch of house

15. Various of soldiers in the street

16. Security at roadblock

17. Close shot, gun

18. Soldiers

19. Roadblock, pan across road

20. Various, women looking on

21. Woman crying

22. Soldiers

23. Set up shot

24. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Major General Valery Andreyev:

"We identified several of the hostage takers. We're trying to locate their relatives to help us to convince their relatives to help us influence hostage takers."

25. Soldiers

26. Close shot, gun

27. Various exteriors of gymnasium where hostages are being held including close ups of windows

28. Various, tank and people on street

29. Body lying on grass outside school

STORYLINE:

Heavily armed militants, many strapped with explosives, were holding more than 350 hostages including children for a second day on Thursday inside a provincial Russian school as negotiators scrambled to find a way out of the tense stand-off.

Crowds of distraught relatives and townspeople waited helplessly for news of their neighbours and loved ones, their distress sharpened by the sporadic rattle of gunfire from the cordoned-off crisis site.

The raiders reportedly have threatened to blow up the school if police storm it, but what they wanted and who they were remained unclear.

Negotiations via phone continued on-and-off throughout the night and early morning, involving well-known paediatrician Leonid Roshal, who aided hostages during the deadly seizure of a Moscow theatre by Chechens in 2002.

The hostage-takers had demanded his participation.

The school in Beslan, a town of about 30-thousand is in North Ossetia, near the republic of Chechnya where separatist rebels have been fighting Russian forces since 1999 and suspicion in the raid fell on Chechen militants although no claim of responsibility has been made.

Casualty reports in the raid varied widely, but an official in the joint-command operation for the crisis said on condition of anonymity early on Thursday that 16 people were killed - 12 inside the school, two who died in hospital and two others whose bodies still lay outside the school and could not be removed because of gunfire - and 13 others wounded.

However, an aide to the North Ossetian president, Lev Dzugayev, said on Thursday that seven were killed.

He also gave the number of hostages at 354.

President Vladimir Putin, who interrupted his working holiday in the Black Sea resort of Sochi to return to Moscow for the second time in a week, also postponed a planned two-day visit to Turkey, due to start on Thursday, the Kremlin said.

However, he has made no public statement - a characteristic Putin strategy during crises.

Heavily-armed militants wearing masks descended on Middle School No. 1 shortly after 9 am on the opening day of the new school year

on Wednesday.

About a dozen people managed to escape by hiding in a boiler room, but hundreds of others were herded into the school gymnasium and some were placed at windows as human shields.

Little was known about food and sanitary condition inside the school; offers to deliver food and water to the school were turned down.

Camouflage-clad special forces carrying assault rifles encircled the school, while the militants placed a sniper on an upper floor of the three-story building.

More than 1,000 people, including many distraught parents, crowded outside police cordons demanding information and accusing the government of failing to protect their children.

Many of the parents spent the night at the town's cultural centre a few hundred metres from the school, weeping, pacing and trying to sleep.

From inside the school, the militants sent out a list of demands and threatened that if police intervened, they would kill 50 children for every hostage-taker killed and 20 children for every hostage-taker injured, Kazbek Dzantiyev, head of the North Ossetia region's Interior Ministry, was quoted as telling the ITAR-Tass news agency.

Dzugayev estimated there were between 15 and 24 militants.

How the police could end the standoff without a storming was unclear.

The Moscow theatre hostage-taking ended after an unidentified knockout gas was pumped into the building, but the gas was responsible for almost all of the 129 hostage deaths.

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Subjects: War and unrest, General news
People: Vladimir Putin
Locations: Russia, Moscow, Eastern Europe, Europe
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Russia Relatives
Title:
SD
Summary: Latest from siege area, anxious relatives, reax
Story No: 426803
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/01/2004 11:46 PM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. People at the steps of Hall of Culture, several hundred metres (yards) from Number One School

2. Man pouring tea for women

3. Tired looking woman

4. Turret of armoured personnel carrier

5. Soldiers

6. AK47 rifle

7. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Valery Andreyev, Chief of the Federal Security Bureau (FSB) in Northern Ossetia:

"Once again (Doctor) Leonid Mikhailovich Roshal demonstrates his civil braveness. He has arrived in Beslan and at the moment is in contact with the terrorists. The talks are in progress."

8. Pan of people crowding around building

9. Relatives

10. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Koba, a schoolboy who escaped from the school at the start of the siege:

"They (the terrorists) told us that if the building was stormed they would blow it up. If any of them were killed they would kill fifty of us, if any of them wounded - they will kill twenty. If there are talks they only want to meet (Ossetian President Alexander) Dzasokhov, or the Ingushetian Prosecutor, or this doctor from Moscow (Leonid Roshal)."

11. Crowd around the Hall of Culture

12. Various of relatives

13. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Zalina, Relative (but not a parent) of some of the hostages:

"We cannot go home and we will not leave. We will wait for an answer. We expect assistance from the authorities. Let our republic (North Ossetia) and the Russian federal power help us. We think that they have to help us. We cannot go home and leave our children there. They are innocent."

14. Various of relatives

15. Zoom in of sleeping woman

STORYLINE:

Relatives of the hostages seized in a school in North Ossetia faced a sleepless night on Wednesday, as they waited for more information about their loved ones.

Hundreds of relatives gathered at a cultural centre several hundred metres (yards) from the school.

The Federal Security Service chief for North Ossetia, Valery Andreyev, said there might be 120-300 captives, while an official at the Emergency Situations Ministry branch for southern Russia said authorities believed the number was 336.

Earlier, officials had said up to 400 people were taken captive.

Andreyev said the hostage-takers had refused offers of food and water.

Earlier, the school attackers demanded talks with regional officials and a well-known paediatrician, Leonid Roshal, who aided hostages during the deadly seizure of a Moscow theatre in 2002.

Andreyev later said Roshal was in contact with the captors.

Attackers wrapped in suicide-bomb belts raided the school in the region bordering Chechnya, threatening to kill captives or blow up the building if it was stormed by encircling Russian troops.

Camouflage-clad troops carrying heavy-calibre machine guns scrambled into positions around the School No. 1 in the North Ossetian town of Beslan.

In a tense standoff, the militants placed a sniper on an upper floor of the building, and throughout the day the Russian media reported sporadic gunfire and the sound of explosions coming from the building.

The school seizure began after a ceremony marking the first day of Russia's school year, a big event in which students, often accompanied by parents, arrive at school carrying bouquets for their new teacher.

Most of the children taken hostage were believed to be under 14 years old.

The attackers are believed to include men and women.

Most of the hostages were herded into the school gym, but others - primarily children - were ordered to stand at the windows.

The attackers warned they would blow up the building if the police tried to storm it.

At least 12 children and one adult managed to escape after hiding in the building's boiler room during the raid, said Ruslan Ayamov, spokesman for North Ossetia's Interior Ministry.

Media reports suggested that as many as 50 children managed to flee in the chaos of the raid.

Lev Dzugayev, an aide to North Ossetia's president, said brief contact with the captors indicated they were treating the children "more or less acceptably" and were holding them separately from the adults. He said their demands were unclear.

Dzugayev said the attackers night be from Chechnya or another neighbouring region, Ingushetia - which could be explosive because relations between Ingush and Ossetians have remained tense since an armed conflict in 1992.

The hostage-takers also demanded the release of fighters detained over a series of attacks on police facilities in Ingushetia in June, ITAR-Tass reported, citing regional officials.

Chechen warlord Shamil Basayev, who Russian media say has close contacts with Ingush extremists, claimed responsibility for those well-coordinated raids, which killed more than 90 people.

Russia called for an emergency meeting of the UN Security Council, which scheduled consultations for later on Wednesday.

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Subjects: War and Unrest, Ammunition, Weapons production, Children, Legal, General News, Defense
Locations: Moscow
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Russia Siege
Title:
SD
Summary: Fighting at siege school; children reunited with parents; injured
Story No: 426947
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/03/2004 12:20 PM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Dozens of soldiers moving along wall - AUDIO of gunfire and explosions

2. Wide shot of school, smoke coming from the building and zoom into people running from building AUDIO gunfire

3. Close up hostages running from the scene, soldiers running

4. Wide of the scene with children running down the street guided by soldiers, pulls out to wide shot

5. Two girls taken from the site by a soldier

6. Top shot of children running away to triage area

7. Soldiers helping two semi- naked girls away, they run to triage area

8. Wide shot of soldiers and medics tending to injured victims on stretchers

9. Children drinking water, girl with back wounds drinking water

10. Woman being taken away faints and is put on stretcher

11. Little boy is carried into triage area by soldiers

12. Wide of stretchers and zoom into treatment, lots of people drinking water

13. Girl with bloody shirt helping boy to drink

14. Man and woman hug

15. Top shot triage area

16. Man carrying two boys through the triage area

17. Soldiers running round side of building- audio of gunfire

16. Wide shot of building and pan to smoke as shot hits gym

17. Wide shot people running away from firing including naked boy

18. Woman with bloody dress escorted from a car to triage area

19. Tilt up from one stretcher with a boy on it to another boy on stretcher, with bloody legs, being put into ambulance

20. Wide shot of scene and zoom into girl being carried away in soldier's arms

21. Soldier pointing weapon

22. Soldier on the ground pointing weapon

23. Distraught women leaving building

24. Little girl with bandage on her head being carried from the building and put into a car

25. Various soldiers helping people away from scene outside school

26. Helicopter in the sky and pan down to the street and people running past

27. Woman on stretcher being taken in to ambulance

28. Injured boy with other people in back of landrover shouting, as it drives off

29. Little boy being helped into of jeep

30. Ambulances leaving

31. Ambulances arriving at hospital

32. Woman being helped by two men

33. SOUNDBITE: (Ossetian ) Woman with son, (no translation available)

34. Wide shot crowds outside hospital

35. SOUNDBITE: (Ossetian ) Boy (no translation available)

36. People on stretchers outside hospital

37. Woman lying on stretcher tilt up to two boys

38. SOUNDBITE (Ossetian ) Young man with boy on his knee (no translation available)

39. Large plume of smoke rises from school, loud boom of explosion

STORYLINE:

Russian commandos stormed a school in southern Russia where hundreds of hostages had been held for three days.

Dozens of hostages fled the building, some bloodied and screaming, and reports said some of the

militants had escaped.

Hundreds of wounded hostages - most of them children - were rushed to hospitals.

Five hostage-takers were killed but 13 others escaped, the ITAR-Tass news agency said.

Troops were pursuing the militants, some of whom were said to be holed up in a house in the area.

Tank fire could be heard in the surrounding area.

The scene around the school was chaotic: people running through the streets, columns of smoke overhead and the wounded carried off on stretchers.

Women escaping the building were seen fainting and others, some covered in blood, were carried away on stretchers.

Many children were only partly clothed because of the stifling heat in the gymnasium where they had been

held since the militants took the building Wednesday.

Russian authorities claimed to have control of the school, and the Interfax news agency reported that all the hostages had been evacuated from the school gymnasium.

But gunfire rang out some two hours after the raid.

Some 200 hostages were rushed to hospitals with injuries and regional emergency officials said some 120 of the wounded were children.

The commandos stormed the building on the third day of the hostage crisis in Beslan.

The raid came after about 30 women and children hostages broke out of the building.

Interfax said militants fired at children who ran from the building, and unconfirmed reports said some of the hostage-takers, possibly including women bearing suicide belts, may have taken hostages with them.

Interfax said the school's roof had collapsed - possibly from the explosives some militants had strapped to their bodies.

The militants had reportedly threatened to blow up the building if authorities tried to storm.

There were conflicting reports of the number of hostages, with official saying about 350 and people among a small group freed on Wednesday saying there were about 1,500.

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Subjects: War and Unrest, Sports, Children, Track and field, General News
Locations: Russia
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Russia Siege Wrap
Title:
SD
Summary: WRAP Smoke from blast, officials; Putin; relatives: negotiator; school
Story No: 426841
Source: RTR, POOL, APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/02/2004 12:58 PM
People: Vladimir Putin, Abdullah II
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

Beslan

APTN

1. Various, smoke rising above school

2. Security forces and people in the street near tank

3. Soldiers standing in the street (AUDIO of EXPLOSION)

4. Soldiers walking into building passing residents waiting in the street

5. Women sitting outside with blankets around them

6. Soldiers walking in the street

7. Troops gathered around a tank

8. Woman standing rubbing her face then walking towards others waiting

8a. Crowd gathered outside Hall of Culture, several hundred metres (yards) from Number One School

9. Design on the wall

10. Crowd gathered around official shouting

11. Soldiers standing

12. Panning shot, crowd around official

13. Roadblock, pan across road

14. Various, women looking on

15. Woman crying

16. Various, soldiers

17. Close shot, gun

18. Various exteriors of gymnasium where hostages are being held including close ups of windows

19. Tank and people on street

20. Various, body lying on grass outside school

21. Tank driving past on street

22. Soldiers walking through barrier

23. Relatives watching

24. Soldiers walking through barrier

25. Various, relatives

26. Mid shot, two women watching

27. Man walking down street past waiting relatives

28. Various, relatives on street

29. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Lev Dzugayev, North Ossetian Government Spokesman:

"Contact with hostage-takers is continuing. Unfortunately we cannot yet say we achieved any progress in these contacts. And unfortunately there are no results in transferring food to hostages."

30. Various, people on street

31. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Valery Andreyev, Chief of the Russian Federal Security Service (FSB) Department for North Ossetia:

"Investigative work was conducted actively during the night. In the process of this work we identified some of the terrorists which are located in the school. We are working through their relatives database."

32. People on street

POOL

Moscow

33. Putin walking in room

34. Putin greeting King Abdullah II of Jordan

35. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Vladimir Putin, Russian President:

"What is happening now in North Ossetia is terrible. It is terrible because children are among the hostages. And also because this event can explode the already fragile balance of relations between confessions and nations in the region."

36. King Abdullah and officials

37. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Vladimir Putin, Russian President:

"And our most important task in the current situation is, of course, to save the lives and health of those who were taken hostage."

38. Cutaway

RTR

Moscow- 1st September 2004

39. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Leonid Roshal, Paediatrician:

"I learned about this sad event literally thirty minutes ago. I am not getting in touch with the government in North Ossetia. I am ready to fly out any minute, when it becomes necessary."

40. Roshal at scene of Moscow hostage-taking

RTR FILE

October 2002

41. Various, Moscow theatre, scene of hostage taking

STORYLINE:

Two large explosions roared out on Thursday afternoon near a school where armed and explosive-strapped militants were holding hundreds of people hostage, about half of them children.

Large plumes of black smoke rose over the school area after the blasts, which took place about 30 hours after the school was seized.

The immediate area around the school had been cordoned off and details of the blasts could not be seen.

The raiders reportedly had threatened to blow up the school if police tried to storm it.

Meanwhile, Russian President Vladimir Putin pledged on Thursday to do everything possible to save the lives of more than 350 hostages including children being held for the second day by militants who threatened to blow up the provincial Russian school they seized.

The comments were his first public remarks since the Wednesday morning hostage-taking, and came as he met with Jordan King Abdullah II.

Putin said: "Our main task is, of course, to save the life and health of those who became hostages."

As negotiators scrambled to find a way out of the tense stand-off, crowds of distraught relatives and townspeople waited helplessly for news of their neighbours and loved ones, their distress sharpened by the sporadic rattle of gunfire from the cordoned-off crisis site.

But as talks via phone continued on-and-off throughout the night and morning, details about who the militants are and what they wanted remained unclear.

The school in Beslan, a town of about 30-thousand is in North Ossetia, near the republic of Chechnya where separatist rebels have been fighting Russian forces since 1999 and suspicion in the raid fell on Chechen militants although no claim of responsibility has been made.

An official in the joint-command operation for the crisis said on condition of anonymity early Thursday that 16 people were killed - 12 inside the school, two who died in hospital and two others whose bodies still lay outside the school and could not be removed because of gunfire - and 13 others wounded.

The series of attacks were seen as a blow to Putin, who cut short his working vacation in the Black Sea resort of Sochi to return to

Moscow and postponed a planned two-day visit to Turkey, due to start Thursday.

But his delay in making a public statement was characteristic as was his decision to comment on the seizure during a meeting with visiting Jordan King Abdullah II rather than in a direct address to the nation.

Heavily-armed militants wearing masks descended on Middle School No. 1 shortly after 9 a.m. on the opening day of the new school year

Wednesday.

About a dozen people managed to escape by hiding in a boiler room, but hundreds of others were herded into the school gymnasium and some were placed at windows as human shields. Dzugayev said 354 people were seized.

Little was known about food and sanitary condition inside the school; offers to deliver food and water to the hostages were turned

down, adding to the distress of the more than 2,000 waiting relatives and friends outside.

Many of the parents spent the night at the town's cultural centre a few hundred meters from the school, weeping, pacing and trying to

sleep, while the camouflage-clad special forces maintained their positions encircling the school.

Valery Andreyev, the Federal Security Service's chief in North Ossetia, told reporters that elders from Chechnya and Ingushetia had

offered to come to the school and act as stand-in hostages for the women and children inside.

He also said that some of the militants had been identified, and investigators were attempting to find their relatives and bring them to the school to help in negotiations.

The school covers grades 1-11, but most of the children taken hostage were under 14 years old. Russia's Izvestia newspaper reported many

of the older children had managed to escape.

Well-known paediatrician Leonid Roshal, who aided hostages during the deadly seizure of a Moscow theatre by Chechens in 2002, was leading the talks.

Russia's NTV television reported that Roshal, whose participation the militants had demanded, conveyed to the hostage-takers the promise of a safe corridor out, but the offer was refused.

The hostage-takers had demanded his participation.

The school in Beslan, a town of about 30-thousand is in North Ossetia, near the republic of Chechnya where separatist rebels have been fighting Russian forces since 1999 and suspicion in the raid fell on Chechen militants although no claim of responsibility has been made.

From inside the school, the militants sent out a list of demands and threatened that if police intervened, they would kill 50 children for every hostage-taker killed and 20 children for every hostage-taker injured, Kazbek Dzantiyev, head of the North Ossetia region's Interior Ministry, was quoted as telling the ITAR-Tass news agency.

It was estimated there were between 15 and 24 militants.

How the police could end the standoff without a storming was unclear.

The Moscow theatre hostage-taking ended after an unidentified knockout gas was pumped into the building, but the gas was responsible for almost all of the 129 hostage deaths.

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Subjects: Social issues, Violent crime, War and Unrest, Violence, Hostage situations, School shootings, School violence, Crime, School safety, Social Affairs, Children, School violence, Education, General News, School violence, International incidents, Guerrilla warfare
People: Vladimir Putin, Abdullah II
Locations: Moscow
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EU Silence
Title:
SD
Summary: Minute's silence for Beslan victims at EU
Story No: 427200
Source: Various
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/06/2004 03:42 PM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

Council of Europe TV

Strasbourg, France

1. Wide shot of European flags at half mast at Council of Europe

2. SOUNDBITE: (French) Alexandre Orlov, Russian Ambassador to Council of Europe:

"It's true that life in Russia - your fight against terrorism will no longer be as before. The drama in Beslan is a definitive moment. We must stop our carelessness and take responsibility for the harsh reality of the terrorists who dared to kill children."

3. Parliamentary officials observing one minute's silence

4. Staff returning to work

European Commission TV

Brussels, Belgium

5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Reijo Kempinnen, Spokesman of the European Commission:

"We condemn all forms of terrorism fully and unconditionally. The blame cannot be put on anyone else but those who committed this horrible crime. In the name of the Commission, the President expressed his condolences to the families of the victims who will have to live with the memory of this terrible day. In Russia this week begins with two days of mourning with a national vigil being held tomorrow. In respect and in the memory of the victims I would like to ask you all of you to join me in a minute's silence."

6. Officials stand for a minute's silence

7. Various of officials standing

8. Officials sit down

STORYLINE:

Council of Europe staff members in Strasbourg held a one minute silence for the victims of the Beslan school siege on Monday.

Flags flew at half mast as the Russian ambassador to the Council told staff his country would have to "take responsibility for the harsh reality of the terrorists who dared to kill children."

At the European Commission in Brussels a minute's silence was also observed.

Commission spokesman Reijo Kemppinen said: "The blame cannot be put on anyone else but those who committed this horrible crime."

Earlier the European Union insisted that a diplomatic incident over the handling of the siege at Beslan was based on a misunderstanding, and expressed full solidarity with Moscow in the fight against terrorism.

Over the weekend, Russia lashed out against the EU's Dutch presidency, accusing it of "blasphemy" for allegedly asking Moscow to explain the bloody denouement of the school hostage crisis in Beslan that claimed more than 350 lives.

Deputy Russian Foreign Minister Boris Chizhov called the Dutch ambassador into the ministry on Saturday to demand an explanation for Dutch Foreign Minister Ben Bot's remarks.

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Subjects: War and Unrest, Government bodies, Government and Politics, Terrorism, Armed conflicts, Military affairs, Terrorism, General News, Defense
Locations: Europe
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Basayev Interview
Title:
SD
Summary: Interview with Shamil Basayev, Chechen insurgent leader
Story No: 457300
Source: Various
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 07/29/2005 04:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

ABC - NO ACCESS INTERNET

MANDATORY COURTESY ABC NEWS"Nightline"

Unknown location - Recent

1. Various of Shamil Basayev, Chechen Rebel Leader

2. UPSOUND: (Russian with English translation) Andrei Babitsky, Russian Journalist:

"...that you are responsible for the lives of those children, perhaps sharing this responsibility with Putin?"

3. SOUNDBITE: (Russian with English translation) Shamil Basayev, Chechen Rebel Leader:

(overlaid with NTV ++Amateur Video++ - No Access Russia - of children inside the school during the Beslan siege - 3 September 2004)

"Why should I share it with Putin? Officially, over forty thousand of our children have been killed and tens of thousands mutilated. Is anyone saying anything about that?"

4. UPSOUND: (Russian with English translation) Andrei Babitsky, Russian Journalist:

"And you mean to say that now their children are to be responsible?"

+++SOUNDBITES IN SHOTS 5-7 OVERLAID WITH SHOTS 8-12+++

5. SOUNDBITE: (Russian with English translation) Shamil Basayev, Chechen Rebel Leader:

"It's not the children who are responsible. Responsibility is with the whole Russian nation, which through its silent approval gives a 'yes' (gives its consent), a nation that feeds these aggressors who ravage Chechnya, they collect food, things for them, they supply them, they pay taxes, they give approval in word and in deed - they are all responsible."

6. UPSOUND: (Russian with English translation) Andrei Babitsky, Russian Journalist:

"What kind of feelings did you experience after Beslan?"

7. SOUNDBITE: (Russian with English translation) Shamil Basayev, Chechen Rebel Leader:

"To tell you honestly, I was shocked. I swear, I never expected that. I never though Putin was so bloodthirsty, that he would manifest his thirst for blood. I didn't think he would. When confronted with the most serious situation, I thought they'd try to make some move, like gas or something, that at least they wouldn't do anything against children."

RTR

Beslan, 1 September, 2004

8. Soldiers hiding behind a tank

9. Soldiers behind tank pointing guns at school

10. Body in grass at side of road as parents watch in distance

11. Distraught man being pulled away by soldiers

SKY - No Access UK/CNNi/Ireland

Beslan, 03 September, 2004

12. Soldiers entering school window, audio of gunshots

ABC - NO ACCESS INTERNET

MANDATORY COURTESY ABC NEWS "Nightline"

Unknown location - Recent

13. UPSOUND: (Russian with English translation) Andrei Babitsky, Russian Journalist:

"And what about the blown up planes?"

14. SOUNDBITE: (Russian with English translation) Shamil Basayev, Chechen Rebel Leader:

(overlaid with APTN pictures of wreckage of plane - APTN Clients Only - near Buchalki, Tula region - 25 August 2004)

"Who says they'd been blown up? Where are the facts that they'd been blown up? Why didn't they blow them up? Why doesn't it occur to you that they shot them down?"

15. SOUNDBITE: (Russian with English translation) Shamil Basayev, Chechen Rebel Leader:

(partly overlaid with RTR pictures of children being led away from school - No Access Russia - Beslan, September 3, 2004)

"Of course they can. As long as the genocide of the Chechen nation continues, as long as this mess continues, anything can happen. OK, I admit, I'm a bad guy, a bandit, a terrorist. OK, so I'm a terrorist, but what would you call them? If they are the keepers of constitutional order, if they are anti-terrorists then I spit on all these agreements and nice words. And I want to spit on the whole world if the whole world spits on me."

16. Medium shot of Basayev with his men

STORYLINE:

The Chechen rebel leader, Shamil Basayev, who claimed responsibility for a deadly hostage-taking attack on a Russian school last year admitted he was a "terrorist" but said in an interview being broadcast on Thursday that each Russian had to feel the impact of war before it would stop in Chechnya.

The Kremlin denounced the network's decision to run the interview, which was conducted by well-known Russian journalist Andrei Babitsky and aired on the ABC network in the United States.

The interview "runs counter to the spirit of Russian-American partnership in our joint fight against the global threat of terrorism," said the written Russian statement, also broadcast by ABC's "Nightline" current affairs program.

Basayev, who has a 10 (m) million dollar bounty on his head and rarely speaks to journalists, was interviewed in his Chechen hideout by Babitsky, who said the rebels live in primitive conditions, eating mainly "instant soups and canned food" and sleeping on barren ground.

Despite the hardships, Basayev struck a defiant note.

"I admit, I'm a bad guy, a bandit, a terrorist ... but what would you call them?" he said of the Russians. "If they are the keepers of constitutional order, if they are anti-terrorists, then I spit on all these agreements and nice words."

In 2004, gunmen held more than 1,000 hostages for nearly three days in the Russian town of Beslan. The raid ended in gunfire and explosions, killing more 330 people, mostly children.

"It's not the children who are responsible," Basayev said. But he added: "Responsibility is with the whole Russian nation... If the war doesn't come to each of them individually, it will never stop in Chechnya."

Basayev also questioned the cause of the crash of two Russian airliners in August 2004, saying "Who says they'd been blown up? Where are the facts that they'd been blown up? Why didn't they blow them up? Why doesn't it occur to you that they shot them down?"

Russia has argued that the two planes were brought down by suicide bombers, killing all 89 people aboard.

Asked if a Beslan-type attack could occur again, Basayev said: "Of course... As long as the genocide of the Chechen nation continues, as long as this mess continues, anything can happen."

Among other attacks, Basayev has been linked to a 2002 hostage-taking assault on a Moscow theatre that left 170 people dead, a 2003 suicide attack in the Moscow subway that killed 41 people, and a 2003 double suicide bombing at a Moscow rock concert that killed 17 people.

The Kremlin sent troops into Chechnya in 1994 to crush its separatist leadership, but they withdrew after a devastating 20-month war that left the region de facto independent.

Russian forces returned in 1999 after blaming rebels for a string of apartment building blasts that killed about 300 people.

The New York-based Human Rights Watch accused Russian forces of "a crime against humanity" in March, noting local human rights groups estimate up to 5,000 people have gone missing in Chechnya since 1999.

Babitsky has focused on human rights abuses by Russian troops in previous reports from Chechnya.

Russian authorities accuse him of being a Chechen sympathiser.

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Subjects: Rebellions and uprisings, War and unrest, Terrorism, TV news, Suicide bombings, Genocides, Bombings, General news, News media, Media, TV news, Television, Terrorist attacks
Organisations: Human Rights Watch
Locations: Russia, Chechnya, Eastern Europe, Europe
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Russia Putin 2
Title:
SD
Summary: President visits wounded in hospital, crisis meeting
Story No: 427002
Source: RUSSIAN POOL
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/04/2004 03:54 AM
People: Vladimir Putin
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

Night shots (early morning)

1. President Vladimir Putin gets into van after flying into Beslan

2. Putin being escorted by doctors into hospital

3. Interior hospital, various of Putin walking along corridors as doctors explain to him the situation

4. Various as Putin enters room and comforts patients - a woman and a child

5. Exterior, Emergencies Minister Sergei Shoigu and Putin exit van, escorted by North Ossetian President, Alexander Dzasokhov, at city administration headquarters for meeting with local officials

6. Interior Putin walks in

7. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Vladimir Putin, Russian President (SOUNDBITE STARTS OVER SHOT 6)

"It is not the first time that Northern Ossetia has been attacked hit by terrorists. This republic is Russia's outpost in the south. But this terrorist act is especially cruel and inhuman, because children were attacked this time. Today, the whole of Russia is mourning together with you, thanking you and praying with you. While in Moscow, I made several orders regarding our further actions for searching for the people involved in this terrorist act. The city is to be blocked off and the state border in the region is to be closed. One of the aims of the terrorists was to unleash inter-ethnic hatred and inflame the whole Northern Caucasus, so I ask you to understand that anyone who yields to such provocations will be considered as associates in the terrorist attacks and supporters of terrorism."

8. Pull out to wide shot of meeting as Putin heaves sigh and starts talking again (Dzasokhov sitting on Putin's right)

STORYLINE

President Vladimir Putin made a surprise visit to the southern Russian town of Beslan early on Saturday, hours after commandos stormed a school in which militants were holding hundreds of children hostage.

Putin made the unannounced trip before dawn, with smoke still rising from the shattered school, only hours after the last scattered shooting died away.

Estimates of the death toll varied but the ITAR-Tass news agency quoted Russian Deputy Prosecutor Sergei Fridinsky as saying 322 bodies, including those of 155 children, had been recovered from the school.

That raised the death toll well beyond the 250 officials had previously cited.

Officials said more than 500 were wounded in the crisis, which ended in a wave of violence Friday, and there were fears the toll would rise.

Visiting a local hospital, he saw some of the victims and talked to hospital officials.

He then travelled to the city administration's headquarters, where he told officials that "the whole of Russia is mourning together with you".

He said targeting children made the hostage crisis worse than other acts of terrorism,

"This terrorist act is especially cruel and inhuman, because children were attacked this time," he said.

Putin ordered the region's borders closed while officials search for everybody that was connected with the attack.

He also warned against letting the attack stir up tensions in the multi-ethnic North Caucasus region.

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Subjects: Children, War and Unrest, Political unrest, Terrorism, Armed conflicts, Military affairs, Terrorism, Legal, General News, Ethnic conflicts, Defense
People: Vladimir Putin
Locations: Russia
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Russia Negotiator
Title:
SD
Summary: Negotiator says storming was not planned
Story No: 427147
Source: RTR
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/06/2004 02:05 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Lev Roshal, paediatrician who acted as negotiator in Beslan school siege

2. Cutaway, hands

3. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Lev Roshal, Negotiator/Paediatrician

"But it is so sad. I can confirm there was no plan to storm the building. It was totally spontaneous and unexpected. There was definitely an explosion inside. Definitely. After the explosion, the children started jumping out of the windows, and the rebels started shooting at the children. If I'd have had a machine gun I would also have gone there. Children must be protected, all that has been done was done for the sake of the children."

4. Wide shot, Roshal with journalist

STORYLINE:

The Russian doctor who acted as a negotiator during the Beslan school siege has confirmed that the storming of the school building by the Russian military was totally "spontaneous and unexpected".

Paediatrician Lev Roshal, who aided hostages during the deadly seizure of a Moscow theatre by Chechens in 2002, led talks with the hostage takers at Beslan after they asked for him by name.

Speaking to Russian broadcaster RTR on Sunday, Roshal said that if he had had a gun in his hands when the situation in the school began to escalate, he would have gone into the school himself for the sake of the children.

Earlier, Russia's NTV television reported that Roshal conveyed to the hostage-takers the promise of a safe passage out,

but the offer was refused.

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Locations: Moscow, Moscow, Russia
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Russia Beslan
Title:
SD
Summary: Defendant pleads not guilty to all charges
Story No: 450750
Source: RTR
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 05/19/2005 04:33 PM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Defendant Nur-Pashi Kulayev being lead into court cage

2. Close up woman screaming at Kulayev

UPSOUND: (Russian) "Raise your hands like you made us do there (during the Beslan siege)"

3. Woman trying to break through to Kulayev with newspaper spread of victim's photos UPSOUND: (Russian) "Make him look at the children."

4. Wide of courtroom

5. Kulayev in cage behind policemen

6. Close up judge

7. Close up woman crying

8. Nurses walking towards courtroom

9. Ambulance car parked outside court

STORYLINE:

The sole defendant in the trial over the Beslan massacre pleaded innocent in Moscow on Thursday in an emotional session that saw angry relatives hurling themselves at court bailiffs in frustration over the slow pace of the proceedings.

As prosecutors concluded nearly two days of reading lists of victims and medical details, Nur-Pashi Kulayev was asked if he wanted to plead guilty to any of the charges including terrorism and murder. "No," he said.

Kulayev also told the judge in a low voice that his brother had introduced him to the group that seized more than 1,000 hostages at Beslan's School No. 1 on Sept. 1. The attack ended on Sept. 3 in the deaths of more than 330 people - more than half of them children.

With more than two dozen relatives and survivors in attendance, the trial has alternated between tedium and shrill emotion as prosecutors read the lengthy indictment and spectators occasionally cried, shrieked and sometimes demanded Kulayev be turned over to them for punishment.

Kulayev, dressed in black shirt and trousers and black shoes, stood in a courtroom cage for the day's proceedings, his eyes downcast. In television footage last year, he was shown confessing to participating in the raid, but said he personally did not kill anyone.

More than 1,200 hostages were held in a sweltering gymnasium at the Beslan school by more than 30 heavily armed militants last September. The raid ended in a maelstrom of explosions, gunfire and frightened, bloodied children fleeing the mayhem; more than half those killed were children.

Officials say 31 of the terrorists were killed.

Survivors of the attack and others have called for the death penalty, but Russia imposed a moratorium on the death penalty in 1996 to join the Council of Europe.

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Subjects: Legal proceedings, Law and order, General news
Locations: Russia, Eastern Europe, Europe
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Russia Update
Title:
SD
Summary: More fighting and injured at siege school
Story No: 426965
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/03/2004 02:30 PM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

1. Wide of school building, white smoke rising from collapsed roof, UPSOUND of gunfire

2. Pan from smoke rising from collapsed roof to men gathering near the building walls, UPSOUND of gunfire

3. Wide of scene, people rushing

4. Tilt up from riffles to fire engine

5. Various of people crouching down near the building to men hosing down fire inside the building, UPSOUND of gunfire

6. Military and civilians pulling a hose to stop the fire in the school building

7. Mid shot of photographers behind military in position

8. Mid shot of men hosing down fire inside the building

9. Wide of scene

10. People watching

11. Firemen and aid workers standing at an entrance of the school building, men crouching down under a big broken window

12. Various of scene, men crouching down, protecting themselves from gunfire, UPSOUND of gunfire

13. Man rushing a stretcher to the scene

14. Pan from shell to school pavilions, troops running along the building

15. People protected by building, watching school, UPSOUND of gunfire

16. Pan of medical staff and ambulance to school building

17. Mid shot of broken windows

18. Wide of scene

19. Pan from pile of stretchers to school building

20. Mid shot of of men with automatic riffle in position behind a tree

21. Tracking shot of man rushing with young boy on his arms

22. Tracking shot of injured semi-naked girl in a stretcher

STORYLINE

Russia's hostage crisis came to a chaotic climax on Friday, as commandos stormed the school where militants strapped with bombs had held hundreds of captives for a third day.

More than 100 people were killed and 400 others wounded, reports said.

The private British television channel ITN and the Interfax news agency said around 100 bodies lay on the floor of the school gymnasium - some apparently killed when the roof collapsed.

The militants had reportedly threatened to blow up the building if authorities tried to storm.

In a chaotic scenes around the school, hundreds of people ran through the streets, columns of smoke soared overhead and the cries of children - many of them naked - and the wounded filled the air.

Local news reports said more than 10 militants were killed in crossfire but that 13 others escaped.

Troops backed by tanks were pursuing the militants, some of whom were said to be holed up in a house in the area as others attempted to blend in with the former hostages and crowd of towns people in Beslan, ITAR-Tass said.

Police said the hostage-takers had split into three groups during the storming, which appears to have been unplanned.

It was not immediately clear what led to the events on Friday.

Early reports suggested the militants had agreed to let Russia retrieve the bodies of 10 to 20 hostages who had been killed. A local legislator, Azamat Kadykov, had told the hostages' relatives that 20 adult men had been executed.

Emergency personnel went to get the bodies, and the militants began setting off bombs and opening fire on people around the school, ITAR-Tass said.

Some 30 women and children broke out of the building, some bloodied and screaming, and commandos then launched the assault.

Interfax said militants fired at children who ran from the building, and unconfirmed reports said some of the hostage-takers, possibly including women bearing suicide belts, may have taken hostages with them.

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Subjects: Children, War and Unrest, Building collapses, Hostage situations, Structural failures, Accidents, Accidents and Disasters, General News, International incidents
Locations: Russia
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