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Tibet - Struggle for buddhism
Title:
SD
Summary: Tibet - Struggle for buddhism
Story No: w003736
Source: WTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 06/11/1998 04:00 AM
People: Dalai Lama
Subscription:

T/I: 11:15:03

Life in Lhasa literally revolves around the now empty Potala Palace, the former residence of the 14th Dalai Lama who lives in exile in Darmsala, India. In the morning, as is their custom, huge numbers of people take to the streets to walk around the Potala and other religious sites with their family members and offer respect, praying and prostrating in the hope that their faith will be recognized by the deities. At Sera Monastery, what once was a powerful monastic city of several thousand monks and nuns on the outskirts of Lhasa is now limited by the central Chinese government to only about 550 monks. As the monks engage in animated debate over the meaning of life and death, the abbot admits that times are changing for Tibetan Buddhism. In a society with more religious controls, fewer monks may be needed. The question on everyone's mind here is whether the Dalai Lama will return.

Inside the Potala Palace, what was a thriving religious and political complex is quiet and subdued. Priceless artifacts and religious treasures are locked away in the shadowy halls.

SHOWS:

POTALA PALACE MUSEUM, LHASA TIBET, RECENT

00.00 ws sunrise

00.04 ms old woman with spinning prayer wheel walking along

00.07 ms person praying, dog beside him

00.12 cu old man walking along spinning prayer wheels as he goes

SERA MONASTERY, OUTSKIRTS LHASA, TIBET, RECENT

00.15 ws monastery (UPSOT)

00.16 ms ornamental bell tower seen from below (UPSOT)

00.17 pull from mouth of monster (UPSOT)

00.24 ms monks whipping each other

00.30 cu monk sitting, gesticulating

00.33 ms man standing under tree

00.36 ms two monks - one standing, one sitting talking to him

00.38 SOT Lopsang Abot of Sera Minastery (Tibetan):"I think there is hope that the two sides can get..

00.50 ms monks saying mantra, seated

00.53 cu monk chanting

00.56 ms different monk chanting

POTALA PALACE MUSEUM, LHASA, TIBET. RECENT

00.59 cu candles - pulls out to reveal cabinet full of artefacts

01.04 cu picture of Dalai Lama

01.07 cu headed female buddha

01.10 ws ext palace -used to be Dalai Lama's bedroom

01.13 ms pan across from roof (Dalai's bedroom) to public square

01.22 Vision Ends

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Keywords: DSSA2 BUDDHISM STRUGGLE, far east, daybreak, sunrise ss, devout, pious, religion, worship, animals, monks, paintings, art, flagellation, hand gestures, ornaments, gilt, portraits, spiritual leaders, landscapes, heritage, culture,
Subjects: Buddhism, Religion, Social affairs
People: Dalai Lama
Locations: Tibet, China, Greater China, East Asia, Asia
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Tibet - Human Rights
Title:
SD
Summary: Tibet - Human Rights
Story No: w075735
Source: WTN, SUE LLOYD-ROBERTS
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 12/26/1994 05:00 AM
People: Dalai Lama
Subscription:

RR9452/A - TIBET: HUMAN RIGHTS

(Dur: 6 min 31 sec/eng. sot: 1 min 8 sec/Tibetan sot: 53 sec)

Thirty five years after China invaded Tibet, the spiritual

leader of the country, the Dalai Lama, says that pacifism has

not worked for him or his people and Tibetans now faces cultural

extinction by the Chinese. Some exile groups like the Tibetan

Youth Congress are pushing for a more aggressive solution to

their country's problems.

SHOWS:

Daramsala, India, November 1994: mountains; temple; Dalai Lama;

chanting monks; Dalai Lama sot; reception centre; torture victim

Jampa Monlam, sot in Tibetan with English translation; students;

Tibetan Nun sot in Tibetan with English translation; Lhasa,

Tibet, recent: Chinese trucks; Tibetans on temple rooftop and

repairing building; stalls with Dalai Lama cards; Tibetan

children in classroom; Daramsala, November: children in school

playground; child crying; child playing; Himalayan foothills

recent: Tibetan Youth Congress members studying; students

reading; Lobsang Nyandak of the Tibetan Youth Congress sot;

Daramsala: monks with prayer wheels; monks studying; Dalai Lama

sot; monks praying and chanting (WTN/SUE LLOYD-ROBERTS).

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Keywords: Roving Report, far east, religion, monument, mountains ss, stockshot, persecution, lorry, repair, renovation, education, worship, politics,
Subjects: Human rights and civil liberties, Social issues, Social affairs, Education, Buddhism, Religion
People: Dalai Lama
Locations: Tibet, China, Greater China, East Asia, Asia
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Tibet - Labour market
Title:
SD
Summary: Tibet - Labour market
Story No: w003846
Source: WTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 06/15/1998 04:00 AM
People: Dalai Lama
Subscription:

T/I: 10:00:30

Some Tibetans are now trying to build capital in areas of strength such as manufacturing of traditional handicrafts and souvenirs. The labour-intensive work attracts young peasants from the countryside around Lhasa where conditions hover on the poverty line. Tibetan carpets, incrasingly popular in the West, have been produced largely in neighbouring Nepal. But traditional weaving skills have been passed down through generations in Tibet and attractive handmade carpets are sold for thousands of dollars. Carpet factory workers, paid on average 500 yuan (US$60) per month, see little of the enormous profits. Rapid development of Tibet's economy and infrastructure is largely in the hands of workers from the "lowlands" - Han Chinese. Huge numbers of Han Chinese come in to Tibet as "skilled labourers" both for private construction and goverment infrastructure projects. In this major Lhasa building project, workers (both from Sichuan in southwestern China) said that all the workers here were from Sichuan, except for some of the renovators who were from Jiangsu in central China. No Tibetans.

Chinese already dominate the economic and mercantile sectors. According to Vice-chaiman of the Tibetan Autonomous region Mr. Gyalpo, most Tibetans just haven't got the skills to develop their own area.

SHOWS:

LHASA, TIBET - RECENT

WS Potala Palace Museum;

MS people;

MS monk walking along street;

WS exterior Dragon and Phoenix carpet factory;

Interior steaming cauldron of dye pan to ws workers preparing yarn;

CU man stirring yarn in dye;

MS man stirring yarn in dye;

MS people untangling yarn;

MS girls singing at loom;

CU girls singing at loom;

CU hands weaving;

CU faces;

WS faces;

Exterior rooftop of factory where girls pound knots into carpet;

CU pounding knots in carpet;

SOT (in Mandarin) with young female factory worker, saying: "Well, it's especially mundane work, but for people like us with no education and no other place to go, it is something. They are pretty strict here, which is good for business. So, a lot of people want these jobs.";

VS work carpets;

WS exterior of building under construction on Lhasa to Sichuan road;

MS workers;

MS workers talking to cameraman;

MS man waving from scaffolding;

Pull out to ws of building site;

SOT (in Mandarin) with Mr Gyalpo, vice chairman Tibetan Autonomous Region, saying: "These are migrant workers. We can't just say "Get out we don't need you anymore." As I've said, if we just close the door on Tibet and turn it into a zoo, how would that help anyone?";

VS traffic;

Man riding by on bike;

WS busy street;

MS child begging and playing music in front of Lupalinka (Dalai Lama's former summer residence);

Spinning prayer wheels;

MS music playing beggar;

Man begging;

MS singing beggar;

MS old women and traffic pull out to WS street with old women and traffic.

3.10 mins

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Keywords: DSSOE LABOUR MARKET, far east, landmarks, religion, buddhism, clergy, textiles, interior furnishings, wool, colour, pigment, child labour, slave labour, working conditions, physical work, carpet manufacturers, cottage industries, poor wages, boring work, handiwork, crafts, photographers, media, masonry, labourers, businessmen, vehicles, bicycles, street scenes, poverty, streetchildren, instruments, headwear, desperate, devout, worship, pious, economy, exploitation,
Subjects: Textiles manufacturing, Labor economy, Street and highway construction, Economy, Child labor, Textiles, apparel and accessories manufacturing, Consumer product manufacturing, Consumer products and services, Industries, Business, Civil engineering, Heavy construction, Construction and engineering, Industrial products and services, Labor issues, Social issues, Social affairs, Child labor, Child welfare, Human welfare
People: Dalai Lama
Locations: Greater China, East Asia, Asia, Tibet, China
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Tibet: Riots
Title:
SD
Summary: Latest Spate Of Violent Unrest In Lhasa And The Imposition Of Martial Law
Story No: X06606
Source: WTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 03/17/1989 12:00 AM
People: Dalai Lama
Subscription:

Full Story: w040362, RR8912B: TIBET: RIOTS

Shows: file 1950 Chinese troops invade Tibet; 1987, stills of Lhasa riots; 1988, Chinese television coverage of Lhasa riots; 1988 Chinese police video of rioting, showing

monks beaten and kicked by police; looking towards Tibet from India; Dharmsala, Tibetans in exile sing national anthem; Delhi, Tibetan women in exile, demonstrate and burn Chinese flags.

Story: Tibet's exiled spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, has spoken of his fears for the future of hims homeland following the latest spate of violent unrest in Lhasa and the imposition of martial law by the Beijing authorities. There's a Tibetan saying "even though the fire burns you, you have to attack the fire"; after 39 years of Chinese rule, many Tibetans feel they are now engaged in a bloody battle for survival rather than a fight for independence.

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Subjects: War and Unrest, Martial law, Riots, General News
People: Dalai Lama
Locations: Tibet
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Tibet Economy
Title:
SD
Summary: Tibetans marginalized as economy develops
Story No: 426275
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 08/27/2004 10:13 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

Lhasa, Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) - 16 August 2004

1. Wide shot of tourist rickshaws passing through Chinese business quarter of Lhasa

2. Mid shot of inflatable Chinese mock-lanterns with Chinese advertising

3. Wide shot of Chinese shop workers standing to attention

4. Close up on female Chinese shop workers in uniform

5. Shop workers during a drill

6. Chinese shop manager looks on

Lhasa, TAR - 15 August 2004

7. Set up shot of press conference by Tibetan Reform Commission

8. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Yu Heping, Deputy Director of Development and Reform Commission of Tibet:

"The Tibetan Autonomous Region lacks the skilled workers for its modernisation drive so in its economic construction, it is only normal that we have some technicians and skilled workers coming here to help us with the construction."

Lhasa, TAR - 13 August 2004

9. Wide shot of busy street in Tibetan quarter of Barkhor

10. Close up on woman sewing on side street

11. Pan right from shop selling temple altars to woman painting frames

12. Mid shot of woman painting a frame

13. Close up on brushwork

Lhasa, TAR - 19 August 2004

14. Mid shot of cigarette shop

15. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Ci Ren, 42 year-old Tibetan shop owner:

"You can learn Tibetan language in school and you can take Tibetan language exams but when you work, it does not help because Mandarin dominates."

Outside Lhasa, TAR - 14 August 2004

16. Wide shot of partly constructed Qinghai-Tibet railway line on bridge, Communist flag in foreground

17. Long shot of workers on the line

18. Mid shot of construction workers working

19. Close up on worker handling construction material

20. Wide shot of construction underway

Lhasa, TAR - 19 August

21. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Ci Ren, 42 year-old Tibetan shop owner:

"There's too many businesses and there'll be more when the railway line is finished. The profit margin now is already thin."

Bayi, TAR - 17 August 2004

22. Wide shot of town centre

23. Close up on poster advertising Chinese Police

24. Pan left from street to shop selling oil

25. Man shovelling oil ingredients into machine

26. Close up on machine

27. Oil deposit coming out

28. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Mr Ma, Chinese shop owner from Gansu Province:

"When we came here, the government did not offer too much help. They let you do your business here but you have to to do everything on your own."

29. Wide shot of convenience store

30. Close up on brooms

31. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Miss Li, 50 year old Chinese shopkeeper from Henan:

"Business now isn't very good. There's too many people doing business here."

32. Mid shot of Chinese government workers walking on street

33. Customer leaving Chinese clothes shop

34. Close up on T-Shirt with design reading: "I Am Watching You."

STORYLINE

China's drive to lift Tibet out of poverty has seen millions of US dollars poured into improving the region's infrastructure and transport links.

A brief stroll away from the capital Lhasa's landmark Potala Palace, the city's downtown business district reveals a telling tale.

Large Chinese signs, Chinese businesses and Chinese shoppers fill the street of Yuthok, just east of Potala Square.

Here, a prospering Tibet has benefited thousands of migrants from the Chinese mainland.

In a recent press conference, Wu Jilie, the autonomous Tibet's Chinese vice chairman, said that China had done much to the alleviate one of the country's poorest regions.

Gross Domestic Product in 2003 is quoted at just over 2.3 (b) billion US dollars compared to 39.5 (m) million US dollars before the Autonomous Region was established in the mid-60s.

Wu pointed out that in four decades, Tibetan literacy rates shot up from 2 to 91 per cent.

Good news for Tibetans, and good news also it seems, to the growing Chinese community who now number as the majority ethnic group in Lhasa.

Yu Heping, a Chinese Deputy Director of Tibet's Development and Reform Commission claim the only movement of people from the mainland into Tibet are workers with skills that Tibetans lack.

Whether Chinese expertise is handed down to Tibetan hands is moot. A walk through the streets of Barkhor show an increasingly ghettoized ethnic community.

Tibetan literacy rates may be high, but if you can't speak Mandarin, the mainland's official language, you can't do business.

Ten miles outside of the city, a nearly completed railway bridge over the Lhasa River is set to herald in a new era of trade.

Set to open in July 1, 2007, the track, which cost 3.3 (b) billion US dollars to construct, will link Lhasa with central China's Qinghai province.

Up to now the only way to reach Tibet was by plane or vehicle through rugged terrain.

With 51,000 kilometres of road built, a modern airport and a long awaited railway nearing completion, China has reason to feel excited. But do Tibetans ?

The railway is controversial because activists worry that it will bring a flood of ethnic Chinese settlers who will dilute Tibet's Buddhist culture and endanger the region's fragile environment.

Bayi Town is located in Tibet's South Eastern Nyingchi prefecture.

Unremarkable except for the surrounding mountains, the town is named after the Chinese word for August 1st, the date when the Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) was founded over fifty years ago.

As with other towns in Tibet, Bayi receives aid to develop itself from two supporting provinces in mainland China: Guangdong and Fujian.

But like many parts of Lhasa, Bayi retains little of what is distinctively Tibetan, with urban designs that are akin to many Chinese cities across the mainland.

Many of the Chinese who migrated here did so because they had relatives in the PLA who are based in the region.

For them, working conditions in Tibet are no different to life in their hometowns.

Chinese attempts to spur economic development may have led to increased urbanisation in Tibet, but not all Chinese have found their pot of gold.

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Subjects: Civil engineering, Heavy construction, Business, Construction and engineering, Economy, Industries, Railway construction, Industrial products and services
Locations: China
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China Tibet Olympics
Title:
SD
Summary: Tibetans look ahead to Beijing Olympics
Story No: 532057
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 08/05/2007 02:44 AM
People: Dalai Lama
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

Lhasa City, Tibet - 31 July, 2007

1. Wide of people waking past Potala Palace

2. Tibetans walking

3. Young boy, La Wang Zhu Zha, walking with his grandmother

4. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) La Wang Zhu Zha, young Tibetan, Vox Pop:

"It's great for Beijing to be holding the Olympic Games. I hope I can go to Beijing to watch the Olympic Games with my grandma."

5. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Jia Huojie, Tibetan, Vox Pop:

"I know the Olympic flame will be carried to Mount Everest. We are looking forward to seeing the Olympics flame in Tibet as soon as possible."

Shigatze Prefecture, Tibet - 30 July, 2007

6. Wide exterior of Sagya Monastery

7. Pan from monk talking to people to Monastery

8. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Pal Den Dhon Yu, Chief Monk of Sagya Monastery:

"We are very happy that the country can hold such a grand event (the Olympics). It is a world event. I wish it a success and I am sure it will be successful as the country is in a good condition. As a Buddhist, I will pray for that."

Lhasa City, Tibet - 31 July, 2007

9. Wide exterior of Lhasa Train Station

10. Volunteers distributing Olympic brochures

11. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Ge Sang Zhuo Ma, Tibetan Olympics Volunteer:

"Beijing is going to hold the Olympic Games next year, that is in 2008. Tibetans know there is going to be a big event, but they don't really know much about the Olympic culture. We are holding these activities here today in order to help more Tibetans know more about the Olympics."

12. Pan from Potala Palace to street

13. Tibetan monks on street

New Delhi, India - 2 August, 2007

14. Wide of camp of Tibetan hunger strikers

15. Pan across banner reading: (English) "No Olympics in China until Tibet is free. China plays with human rights."

16. Pan from sleeping hunger strikers to man praying

17. Wide of hunger striker Kalsang Youdon sitting on her bed

18. SOUNDBITE: (Hindi) Kalsang Youdon, Tibetan Hunger Striker:

"There are a lot of problems, sir. There are no human rights in Tibet. So we don't want the Beijing Olympics to happen in China. We don't want them to progress."

19. Close-up sleeping hunger striker

20. Wide of hunger striker sleeping with man reading book in foreground

21. Wide of President of Tibetan Youth Congress, Kalsang Phuntsok Godrukpa, working in his makeshift office

22. SOUNDBITE: (English) Kalsang Phuntsok Godrukpa, President of Tibetan Youth Congress:

"Unless and until freedom is restored in every part of China, in Tibet, in Xinjiang where people have the equality among the races, freedom of religion, freedom of education, you know unless and until these things are guaranteed, you know, to their own people, how can you, you know, expect China to have an Olympic and then project themselves as, you know, not among equals but better than other nations in the world?"

23. Tilt-up from close-up of face of child to photograph of Tibet's exiled spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama

STORYLINE:

Almost one year ahead of the start of the 2008 Olympics to be held in Beijing, Tibetans appear to have mixed opinions about the forthcoming event.

Some told AP Television they were looking forward to the event.

"It's great for Beijing to be holding the Olympic Games. I hope I can go to Beijing to watch the Olympic Games with my grandma," said La Wang Zhu Zha, a young student who was visiting the Potala Palace in Lhasa with his grandmother.

"We are very happy that the country can hold such a grand event (the Olympics). It is a world event. I wish it a success and I am sure it will be successful as the country is in a good condition. As a Buddhist, I will pray for that," said Pal Den Dhon Yu, Chief Monk of the Sagya Monastery in the Tibetan Prefecture of Shigatze.

At the same time, a number of Tibetans believe more work needs to be done on promoting the Olympics in their region.

Ge Sang Zhuo Ma, an Olympics volunteer in Tibet, was distributing leaflets about the event in Lhasa to increase local awareness.

"Tibetans know there is going to be a big event, but they don't really know much about the Olympic culture. We are holding these activities here today in order to help more Tibetans know more about the Olympics," she said.

Other groups are opposed to China holding the games.

In India, some Tibetan activists have been carrying out a hunger strike, calling on China to fulfil its promises of restoring human rights freedoms in their country.

"There are no human rights in Tibet. So we don't want the Beijing Olympics to happen in China. We don't want them to progress," said Kalsang Youdon, a Tibetan refugee who has come to New Delhi from her refugee settlement home in Chhattisgarh in eastern India.

President of the Central Executive Committee of Tibetan Youth Congress in New Delhi, Kalsang Phuntsok Godrukpa, called for freedom and equality for all the peoples of China.

He said that unless this was the case; "How can you, you know, expect China to have an Olympics and then project themselves as, you know, not among equals but better than other nations in the world?"

Some groups who oppose Chinese rule in Tibet have launched a campaign to have Tibetan representation at the Beijing Olympics, despite China's insistence that Tibet is an integral part of China.

Next year's games are being seen as a rare opportunity for protesters to air their grievances against China's communist government.

Attempts by disaffected groups to leverage the games present a security nightmare that could spoil China's big moment, analysts say, threatening the communist leadership during an Olympics it hopes will boost its legitimacy at home and its image abroad.

To counter any protests, government spy agencies and think tanks are compiling lists of potentially troublesome foreign organisations, looking beyond the human rights groups long critical of Beijing, said security experts and a consultant familiar with the effort.

Although foreign governments often monitor potentially disruptive groups ahead of big events, Beijing is ranging further afield, targeting groups whose activities would be considered legal in most countries.

Evidence the communist government is withholding visas or engaged in heavy-handed policing to suppress protests likely would draw negative press and could unnerve the International Olympic Committee and corporate sponsors.

After four Americans unfurled a banner calling for Tibetan independence on the Chinese-controlled side of Mount Everest in April, China tightened access to Tibet for foreigners, especially Americans, Western diplomats in Beijing said.

China faces a plethora of disaffected domestic groups - Tibetans eager to cast off Chinese rule, farmers upset at land confiscations and Falun Gong, a once-popular spiritual movement the government suppressed as a cult.

On the international stage, potential troublemakers include evangelical Christians eager to end China's religious restrictions, activists wanting Beijing to use its oil-buying leverage with Sudan to end the strife in Darfur and environmental campaigners angry about global warming.

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Subjects: Summer Olympic games, Olympic games, Human rights and civil liberties, Protests and demonstrations, Buddhism, Religion, Legislature, Government and politics, Events, Social issues, Social affairs, Political and civil unrest, General news, Sports
People: Dalai Lama
Organisations: China government
Locations: Tibet, Beijing, China, India, New Delhi, Greater China, East Asia, Asia, South Asia
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INDIA TIBETANS MARCH
Title:
SD
Summary: SYND 11-3-69 HUNDREDS OF TIBETANS MARCH THROUGH NEW DELHI
Story No: z000100
Source: AP Television
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 03/11/1969 12:00 AM
People: Dalai Lama
Subscription:

Hundreds of Tibetans march through New Delhi on tenth anniversary of Tibetan uprising against Chinese rule.

1) ms buddhist temple, Tibetans gathered outside

2) ms various shots Tibetans singing, monks playing chanters

3) ms bonfire to scare away demons

4) ms Tibetans chanting 3 shots

5) ms procession starts off, children leading

6) ms Tibetans move towards gandhi memorial

7) ms portrait of Dalai Lama driven on float

8) various Tibetans carrying banners on march towards Old Delhi

Film: Neg - Sound: Mute - B&W - NYFilm: a0055697 - LN Number: LN58646 - Available in HD

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People: Dalai Lama
Locations: New Delhi
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TIBET: CHINESE EMBARK ON MASSIVE ECONOMIC AID PROGRAM
Title:
SD
Summary: TIBET: CHINESE EMBARK ON MASSIVE ECONOMIC AID PROGRAM
Story No: 62165
Source: APTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/22/1997 04:00 AM
People: Dalai Lama, Frank Wolf
Subscription:

Mandarin/Nat

A propaganda war for the hearts and minds of the Tibetan people has been heating up again between Chinese authorities and the Dalai Lama's so-called government in exile.

Chinese central authorities have taken up what appears to be a two-pronged strategy to try to further establish their influence and control in Tibet.

First, they have clamped a tight security lid on the province -- estimates indicate that there is roughly one Chinese soldier for every ten Tibetans.

Secondly, they've embarked on a massive economic aid program in Tibet with the apparent hope that a well-fed and prospering people will be less likely to resist Chinese rule - a strategy which some Tibetans say is working.

A-P-T-V has this exclusive report from Tibet -- the first television agency to get into Tibet since the scathing criticisms of Chinese policy there which followed the recent visit of U-S Congressman Frank Wolf.

This is one of the most remote corners of modern China's territory.

It's a corner which the nearly two-decade long surge in national wealth has failed to reach.

This family of pilgrims has travelled across Tibet to reach the Buddhist temples around the capital Lhasa.

Each day they live hand-to-mouth.

Tibet remains China's poorest province as well as one of its most vexing problems.

It is here perhaps more than in any other province where China's economic reforms -- and political legitimacy -- are being severely tested.

The isolated Himalayan region lived in a primitive cocoon for centuries -- a feudal society ruled by Buddhist monks, based on agriculture and animal husbandry.

Jolted into the twentieth-century when the Chinese central government seized direct control of Tibet in the 1950s, the society is still grappling with a new identity.

Now Chinese authorities are determined to end centuries of isolation and bring Tibet's economy into the mainstream -- an effort which the authorities say has already borne fruit.

SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin)

"In more than thirty years, it can be said that the changes in Tibet are like from earth to heaven."

SUPER CAPTION: Gyamtso (one name only), Vice Chairman, People's Government of Tibet Autonomous Region

This is what government authorities want more of - industry.

The Lhasa Beer Factory has capitalised on copious free supplies of fresh mountain water to brew a successful beer.

They've even listed shares this year on China's Shenzhen stock exchange.

The share price has more than doubled, and profits and production are up.

Factory directors, however, do face enormous challenges.

The nearest export markets outside Tibet are a few thousand kilometres (miles) away over treacherous mountain roads.

But they say only industrialisation can raise the rock-bottom standard of living of many Tibetans.

SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin)

"Tibet's development needs an industrial base. Without an industrial base, agriculture and animal husbandry will only provide a very slow pace of development. So, our beer factory plays a good role in the industrial development of Tibet."

SUPER CAPTION: Tsedeng (one name only), Deputy General Manager, Lhasa Beer Factory

Most Tibetans are devout Buddhists.

Their religion has both provided scarce nourishment in a harsh environment and yet, many say, it has also held back their economic development.

Before Beijing took direct control of Tibet, as many as one-third of Tibet's young men and women entered monasteries and nunneries - removing themselves from the region's economy.

Chinese authorities have restricted the number of followers at religious institutions - a move applauded even by many Tibetan Buddhist leaders.

But China has come under harsh criticism for its attempts at political control in monasteries.

In recent years reports of arrests and expulsions of monks have increased.

Along with development, the Chinese have also installed a massive military presence in Tibet.

Army trucks far outnumber lorries carrying goods along the main Lhasa-Shigatse highway.

It was in 1951 that China invaded and conquered Tibet.

Previously the region had much autonomy while usually operating within the Chinese sphere of influence.

After a failed uprising in 1959, Tibet's supreme leader, the Dalai Lama, fled into exile in India where he remains today.

Since then the Chinese have consolidated their power in Tibet and have tried to integrate the so-called "Autonomous Region" with the rest of China.

Development has been dramatic.

Lhasa's streets are now lined with storefronts and restaurants.

While even in recent years Tibet was considered an economic desert, investment from the central government and various business incentives have made the region profitable, according to local businessmen.

This one -- an ethnic Han Chinese -- moved from neighbouring Sichuan Province to take advantage of the opportunities.

SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin)

"It's getting steadily better and better -- the conditions here are improving."

SUPER CAPTION: Li Shaoli (ethnic Han Chinese), restaurant owner, Lhasa

Tibet's economy and culture are now in a period of fundamental change perhaps never seen here before.

And for some Tibetans, the quality of life has never been better.

In a region where most people are farmers, average farm income has increased more than ten times over the 1959 level.

Provincial officials say median per capita income has just about reached the national average for rural areas.

Besides the basic tasks of developing industry and infrastructure which are now well underway, provincial officials claim a psychological transformation is needed as well.

They say the Tibetan people -- culturally isolated for so long -- have to find their place in the wider world around them.

To lift themselves from centuries-old poverty, they say, requires a completely new way of thinking.

SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin)

"What has been brought into Tibet is not only money and technology, but more important are the new perspectives, new mentality, and new methods of management."

SUPER CAPTION: Yu Yungui, Vice Director, Tibet Academy of Social Science

The massive investment from the central government in Beijing -- which often accounts for up to half of county budgets across the region -- is quite literally buying and building a new Tibet.

Some observers have said China's central government hopes to accomplish with money what it failed to succeed with force -- securing the hearts and minds of the Tibetan people.

Lhasa and surrounding areas, Tibet - 1-5 September 1997

1. Wide shot pilgrim family at campsite, mountains in background, dogs barking background

2. Medium shot of three children eating noodles

3. Close up of father

4. Close up smallest child

5. Medium shot of mother standing at entrance to tent with fire burning behind

6. Low-angle wide shot of workers harvesting wheat in field, women singing in background

7. Tibetan women in traditional clothing harvesting wheat

8. Man harvesting wheat

9. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin): Gyamtso (one name only), Vice Chairman, People's Government of Tibet Autonomous Region

10. Wide shot of production line, Lhasa Beer Factory

11. Medium shot of bottles passing quality check woman

12. Medium shot of woman putting wrapper on neck of bottles

13. Full, finished beer bottles moving along production line

14. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin): Tsedeng (one name only), Deputy General Manager, Lhasa Beer Factory

15. Wide shot of entrance to small village Buddhist temple, outskirts of Lhasa, with pilgrim chanting at entrance

16. Medium shot of pilgrim chanting at entrance to temple

17. Women exit temple into courtyard after praying

18. Women spin prayer wheels as they pass

19. Chinese People's Liberation Army (P-L-A) trucks approach camera on Lhasa-Shigatse Highway

20. Reverse angle - truck drives into frame and away from camera

21. Medium shot of soldiers in truck, soldiers wave at camera

22. Wide shot of truck passing into distance

23. Wide shot of Lhasa street with new shops and restaurants lining the side

24. Medium shot of sign with Chinese characters

25. People on street

26. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin): Li Shaoli, (ethnic Han Chinese), Restaurant owner

27. Wide shot of square in front of Potala Palace, Lhasa, with visiting monks being photographed

28. Medium shot of monks being photographed

29. Close up Chinese national flag flying in front of Potala Palace

30. "Pabst Blue Ribbon" beer billboard

31. "Mobil Oil" billboard

32. Family crossing square in front of Potala Palace

33. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin): Yu Yungui, Vice Director, Tibet Academy of Social Science

34. Wide shot Lhasa skyline with new buildings

35. Medium shot China Telecom tower

36. Medium shot construction workers on roof of new building

37. Wide shot factory on outskirts of Lhasa with smokestacks

38. Wide shot old woman walks off into distance, rock cliff in background, Lhasa outskirts

Lhasa and surrounding areas, Tibet - 1-5 September 1997

1. Wide shot pilgrim family at campsite, mountains in background, dogs barking background

2. Medium shot of three children eating noodles

3. Close up of father

4. Close up smallest child

5. Medium shot of mother standing at entrance to tent with fire burning behind

6. Low-angle wide shot of workers harvesting wheat in field, women singing in background

7. Tibetan women in traditional clothing harvesting wheat

8. Man harvesting wheat

9. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin): Gyamtso (one name only), Vice Chairman, People's Government of Tibet Autonomous Region

10. Wide shot of production line, Lhasa Beer Factory

11. Medium shot of bottles passing quality check woman

12. Medium shot of woman putting wrapper on neck of bottles

13. Full, finished beer bottles moving along production line

14. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin): Tsedeng (one name only), Deputy General Manager, Lhasa Beer Factory

15. Wide shot of entrance to small village Buddhist temple, outskirts of Lhasa, with pilgrim chanting at entrance

16. Medium shot of pilgrim chanting at entrance to temple

17. Women exit temple into courtyard after praying

18. Women spin prayer wheels as they pass

19. Chinese People's Liberation Army (P-L-A) trucks approach camera on Lhasa-Shigatse Highway

20. Reverse angle - truck drives into frame and away from camera

21. Medium shot of soldiers in truck, soldiers wave at camera

22. Wide shot of truck passing into distance

23. Wide shot of Lhasa street with new shops and restaurants lining the side

24. Medium shot of sign with Chinese characters

25. People on street

26. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin): Li Shaoli, (ethnic Han Chinese), Restaurant owner

27. Wide shot of square in front of Potala Palace, Lhasa, with visiting monks being photographed

28. Medium shot of monks being photographed

29. Close up Chinese national flag flying in front of Potala Palace

30. "Pabst Blue Ribbon" beer billboard

31. "Mobil Oil" billboard

32. Family crossing square in front of Potala Palace

33. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin): Yu Yungui, Vice Director, Tibet Academy of Social Science

34. Wide shot Lhasa skyline with new buildings

35. Medium shot China Telecom tower

36. Medium shot construction workers on roof of new building

37. Wide shot factory on outskirts of Lhasa with smokestacks

38. Wide shot old woman walks off into distance, rock cliff in background, Lhasa outskirts

Expand shotlist extract
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Subjects: Wheat farming, Prayer, Grain farming, Buddhism, Women's fashion, Economy, Production facilities, Brewery operation, Agriculture, Government and politics, Camping, National governments, Livestock farming, Crop farming, Industries, Business, Religion, Social affairs, Fashion, Beauty and fashion, Lifestyle, Corporate news, Alcoholic beverage manufacturing, Beverage manufacturing, Food, beverage and tobacco products manufacturing, Consumer product manufacturing, Consumer products and services, Outdoor recreation, Recreation and leisure
People: Dalai Lama, Frank Wolf
Organisations: Chinese armed forces, China government
Locations: China, Tibet, Beijing, Greater China, East Asia, Asia
Show story thumbnails
Tibet - Pilgrims travel to Lhasa
Title:
SD
Summary: Tibet - Pilgrims travel to Lhasa
Story No: w049495
Source: WTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/25/1996 04:00 AM
People: Dalai Lama
Subscription:

T/I: 10:26:53

Religious pilgrims continue to stream into the Tibetan city of Lhasa daily to pray - some still evidently devotees of the Dalai Lama, despite official Chinese disapproval. The people are drawn to participate in a ritual that dates back centuries by faith in Buddhism and a belief that their lives will be improved if they visit the sacred shrines of Lhasa. Thousands of Tibetan pilgrims and smaller numbers of Buddhists from around the world choose the seventh-century Jokhang Temple, the oldest and most sacred in Tibet, as their spiritual destination. They travel mostly by foot for days and even months.

Hundreds of pilgrims, including red and saffron-robed monks and nuns, perform a variety of traditional forms of worship.

Twirling prayer wheels and whispering mantras, a repeated line of prayer, the pilgrims circle the temple along a path known as the Barkhor. Pilgrims in prayer perform the kora - a circuit around the temple walked clockwise. The greatest degrees of merit are acheived thorugh prostration. Devotees touch their hands, upright in prayer, to their heads then to their throats and then to their hearts before falling to the ground.

SHOWS:

LHASA, TIBET RECENT

Pilgrims walking into Lhasa at sunrise

Feet of pilgrims walking

Reverse of walking; exterior of Jokhang Temple

Golden symbol on roof of temple

Vs of pilgrims at Jokhang walking with prayer wheels and faces of pilgrims

Vs pilgrims

Monks prostrate repeatedly on Barkhor walkway

Overhead shot of prostrate pilgrims

Prayers seen from ground

Vs praying

High shot of unloading sacks of Juniper incense

Cu of smouldering incense

Women throwing incense onto burner

Prayer lamps burning

Man at stall selling colourful cloth

Golden Buddha images for sale

Furs and hats on sale

Pictures of Panchen Lama on sale

US tourist giving booklet to old woman

SOT of woman saying, "would you like to take home?"

Tourist and Tibetan woman looking at picture book

Child playing banjo and singing in Potala Square with palace in background

Long, wide shot of palace with music overlay

3.46

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Keywords: DSSE2 PILGRIMS, far east, asia, religion, buddhism, landmarks, tradition, culture, instruments, dawn,
Subjects: Prayer, Buddhism, Women travelers, Religion, Social affairs, Travel, Lifestyle
People: Dalai Lama
Locations: Tibet, China, Greater China, East Asia, Asia
Show story thumbnails
G27059102
Title:
SD
Summary: G27059102
Story No: w087043
Source: Not available
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 05/27/1991 04:00 AM
People: Dalai Lama
Subscription:

}QUOTE REF TIBET: Tibetan exiles mark 40th anniversary of the

GS27059102 signing of the Sino-Tibetan agreement of 1951 which re-

27.5.91 established direct Chinese control over Tibet, with a

protest demonstration through Delhi.

Date Shot: 23.5.91 +

FILE

WTN/CCTV 1.16mins

GS TAPE & CASSETTE GS270591

-------------------------------------------------------------

00:17:15

INDIA 23.5.91 Girl chanting: GVs Tibetan protesters:

New Delhi

TIBET FILE Rioting in 1987: Dalai Lama (Tibetan Spiritual ldr):

mountains around Lhasa: small child; man: elderly couple:

GV building:

GS27059102

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Keywords: 27.5.91, 40TH, ANNIVERSARIES, CHANTING, CHINA*, DALAI LAMA, DELHI, DEMONSTRATION, EXILES, G27059102, GS, INDIA, LHASA, MOUNTAINS, RIOTS, TIBET
Subjects: War and Unrest, Riots, General News
People: Dalai Lama
Locations: Tibet
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