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Myanmar Suu Kyi
Title:
SD
Summary: Aung San Suu Kyi released from house arrest
Story No: 337260
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 05/06/2002 04:00 AM
People: JOURNALIST
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Various of Aung San Suu Kyi walking though street swamped by crowd

2. SOUNDBITE: (English) Aung San Suu Kyi, Democracy campaigner

"I am very glad that they have said that because this is certainly what all the Burmese have been wanting to hear for a very long time. We only hope that the dawn will move over very quickly into full morning."

QUESTION FROM JOURNALIST: (Inaudible)

AUNG SAN SUU KYI: "Carry on with the same old grind. My role has always been to try to do my duties as the general secretary for the National Movement for Democracy which is the party at the service of the people. The party was founded in order to bring democracy to Burma, so that is our task, that is what we have to do. And I, as general secretary of the party, must do everything I can to make sure that democracy comes to Burma quickly and comes in the right way."

3. Aung San Suu Kyi on stage being cheered by crowd

4. Crowd cheering

5. Crowd surrounding car as it drives through street

6. Man cheering, waving arm in the air

7. people surrounding car.

STORYLINE:

Burmese Opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi was freed Monday after 19 months of house arrest, and immediately pledged to do all she could to bring back democracy to military-ruled Myanmar.

Speaking after her release, Suu Kyi told a news conference that it was a new dawn for her country, "we only hope that the dawn will move over very quickly into full morning".

Suu Kyi arrived at the ramshackle building housing her National League for Democracy party to a tumultuous welcome by thousands of cheering supporters, a few hours after her release was announced by the junta.

The 56-year-old Nobel laureate drove out of her lakeside villa in a white Toyota sedan, which inched its way through the crowds of party workers in white shirts and sarongs, chanting "Long Live Aung San Suu Kyi."

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Subjects: Automobiles
People: JOURNALIST
Locations: Myanmar
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BURMA: KAREN REBELS THREATEN GAS PIPELINE BOMBINGS
Title:
SD
Summary: BURMA: KAREN REBELS THREATEN GAS PIPELINE BOMBINGS
Story No: 3435
Source: APTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 02/09/1995 05:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

English/Nat

Burma's Karen rebels have threatened to strike at the heart of the country's economy by blowing up a major gas pipeline.

APTV is the first camera crew to gain access to the rebels since they were driven out of border strongholds which they had held for decades.

These are desperate times for the Karen rebels who have been fighting Burma's dictatorship since for almost five decades.

Burmese soldiers loyal to the SLORC dictatorship are reported to have destroyed nine Karen villages in the Tavoy area.

Hundreds of villagers have flocked to one of the few remaining Karen bases. Hungry, homeless and over 100km from escape over the Thai border.

Boys, some as young as 14 have been given a gun and told to fight as their fathers and grandfathers have since 1948.

SOUNDBITE:

"We are prepared for war. We are prepared to fight to protect

ourselves, our villages and our position."

SUPER CAPTION: Commander Karay, 0 Battalion, Karen National Union, KNU.

In the same week that America threatened Burma with increased

isolation for its attacks on the Karen, American oil giant Unocal

and the Thai Prime Minister signed a deal with the Burmese junta to

buy $400 million dollars a years worth of gas.

Now a Karen commander has told APTV his men will destroy the new pipeline which will have to run through Karen strongholds to reach Thailand.

SOUNDBITE:

"The pipeline is for the economies of Thailand

and Burma. The pipeline will allow SLORC to give us more trouble.

Hard or easy we must destroy it."

Some military experts think that without having to defend the

many bases they have now lost, Karen guerillas could become more

lethal to the Burmese military.

If the pipeline were damaged Burma has a contractual obligation to pay Thailand for each days loss of gas, something which could quickly cost the country millions of dollars. Right now, though, victory seems a long way off for the Karen.

1. Refugee baby cries

2. ws refugees that have gone to last Karen base

3. sick woman

4. wounded man

5. KNU army

6. Young soldiers look at new guns

7. soldiers fall out

8. SOT: Commander Karay

9. GVs and CAs of pipeline function last Friday.

10. Thai PM Chuan Leekpai & Burma Energy Minister toast each other

11. Karen army shots

12. SOT: Commander Karay

13. KNU load shells and prepare for next battle.

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Subjects: War and unrest, Bombings, General news
Locations: Myanmar, Thailand, Southeast Asia, Asia
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BURMA: GENERAL BO MYA APPEALS FOR INTERNATIONAL AID
Title:
SD
Summary: BURMA: GENERAL BO MYA APPEALS FOR INTERNATIONAL AID
Story No: 3048
Source: APTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 01/30/1995 05:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

Natural Sound

The President of Burma's rebel guerrilla force, the Karen National Union, has appealed to the international community to help his people.

APTV was invited exclusively to meet General Bo Mya and his guerrilla army in a small village near the Thailand-Burma border.

President Bo Mya prays with refugee children exiled to northern Thailand.

He is responsible for the strongest resistance to Burma's military regime, fighting government forces since 1948.

But General Mya has ordered his guerrilla force to pull back from their frontline positions after they were pushed out of their Manerplaw stronghold.

Thailand has allowed the General to take refuge in the country's north but has placed him under virtual house arrest, banning all interviews and meetings with the media.

These pictures are the first to be smuggled past the tight Thai security.

Two checkpoints have stopped nearly all journalists getting anywhere near the General.

Meanwhile Thailand has allowed 10-thousand Karen refugees to pour across their border to settle wherever they can. But the Thai government is also eager not to damage growing economic and political ties with Burma's military dictatorship.

The Karen office has been ordered to close and with the fall of Manerplaw in Burma, the union is now without headquarters and General Mya's people without a home.

Many are now questioning whether the Karen flag will fly again.

Near Thai-Burma border, January 30 1995, File footage Manerplaw, Burma December 1994.

1. General Bo Mya in prayer with Karen children.

2. File footage of Karen troops at Frontline (December 1994).

3. General Mya reads prayer.

4. Thai border police stop all access to General Mya.

5. Shots of Karen refugees.

6. Karen office in Thailand ordered to pack up and shut shop.

7. File footage of Karen flag ceremony at Manerplaw (December 1994).

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Subjects: Foreign aid, International relations, Government and politics
Locations: Myanmar, Thailand, Southeast Asia, Asia
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Myanmar Monks
Title:
SD
Summary: Buddhist monks stage anti-govt protests
Story No: 537055
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/19/2007 08:54 PM
People: Aung San Suu Kyi
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

1. Wide of monks walking along main road in heavy rain

2. Wide side shot of monks walking along road in heavy rain

3. Top shot of monks walking around corner

4. Mid of monks walking through street

STORYLINE

Buddhist monks staged anti-government protests in Myanmar on Wednesday for the second day, witnesses said.

Around 500 monks marching in disciplined ranks, temporarily took over Sule pagoda, after being turned away from their first gathering point, the golden hilltop Shwedagon pagoda, whose gates had also been locked to keep them out.

The Yangon march and rallies in other cities on Wednesday were to protest hardship brought on by the government's economic policies, in particular a sudden, major hike in fuel prices last month that first sparked the persistent demonstrations.

Crowds following the monks cheered and clapped in expressions of popular support that had been lacking at smaller demonstrations carried out by laymen last month.

The rallies also reflect long pent-up opposition to the repressive military regime.

Monks in Myanmar, which is also known as Burma, have historically been at the forefront of protests - first against British colonialism and later military dictatorship.

They also played a prominent part in the failed 1988 pro-democracy rebellion.

Authorities know that restraining monks poses a dilemma: monks are highly respected in the predominantly Buddhist Myanmar: abusing them in any manner could cause public outrage.

Tuesday marked the 19th anniversary of the 1988 crackdown in Myanmar in which the current junta took over after crushing a failed pro-democracy rebellion that sought an end to military rule, imposed since 1962.

The junta held a general election in 1990, but refused to honour the results when pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy party won.

Suu Kyi has been detained under house arrest for more than 11 years.

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Subjects: Protests and demonstrations, Political and civil unrest, General news
People: Aung San Suu Kyi
Locations: Yangon, Yangon, Myanmar [Burma]
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Myanmar Funeral
Title:
SD
Summary: Funeral of General Bo Mya, a longtime leader of Myanmar's largest guerrilla group
Story No: 507661
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 12/26/2006 08:47 PM
People:
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SHOTLIST

1. Wide shot of line of soldiers preparing for funeral ceremony

2. Various of Bo Mya's son Ner Dah carrying a cross at front of procession

3. Soldiers slowy marching in single file with Bo Mya's coffin being carried

4. Soldiers carrying Bo Mya's coffin through crowd

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Ner Dah, Bo Mya's son:

"He is passing away (he has passed away), but for me he is always alive. He is alive. He is in our hearts. He will be remembered and victory will be ours. I guarantee. Thank you."

6. Procession carrying body to burial site

7. Various of guard of honour firing rifles in air as gun salute, standing by coffin which is draped in Karen flag

8. Various of soldiers and mourners observing minute's silence

9. Mid shot of soldier with his head bowed, bugle playing

10. Various of officials delivering speeches at funeral

11. Soldiers folding up flag

12. Coffin lid being opened

13. Body of Bo Mya in open coffin

STORYLINE

Three thousand people turned out to attend the funeral on Tuesday of General Bo Mya, a long-time leader of Myanmar's largest guerrilla group.

The ceremony was held at a military camp in Karen state near Myanmar's border with Thailand where relatives and other mourners could pay their final respects. Bo Mya was buried with full military honours.

Bo Mya, who for decades led the fight for greater autonomy for the Karen people and most recently held the post of defence minister, died at a private hospital in western Thailand, near the Myanmar border after suffering a long illness.

Bo Mya is survived by his wife Naw Lar Pow, seven children and two dozen grandchildren.

One of his sons, Ner Dah, told AP Television News that his father's memory would live on.

"For me he is always alive. He is alive. He is in our hearts. He will be remembered and victory will be ours. I guarantee," he said.

The Karen National Union (KNU) has fought for autonomy since Myanmar gained independence from Britain in 1948.

Over the years, Bo Mya essentially became the face of the movement, leading its fighters in the jungles of Myanmar, then known as Burma.

A barrel-chested, anti-communist and fervent Christian, Bo Mya inspired fear in both friends and enemies and refused over the years to compromise his dream of greater rights for the Karen in Myanmar.

Once in control of large swathes of the Thai-Myanmar border, the KNU has seen its territory shrink to virtually nothing following the capture of their stronghold of Manerplaw in 1995.

According to expert estimates hundreds of thousands of people have died in the conflict, which has been largely hidden from the international spotlight.

However, human rights groups have documented continuing killings, rapes, forced relocations and burning of villages, as the military seeks to control areas of Myanmar regarded as sympathetic to the KNU and other insurgent groups.

The ruling military junta has denied the claims.

Some experts said the death of Bo Mya will not have an impact on the "ongoing dialogue" between the KNU and the junta, while others said it could help bring an end to the long-running conflict.

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Subjects: Funerals and memorial services, General news
Locations: Kayin State, Kayin, Myanmar [Burma]
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Myanmar Protest Wrap
Title:
SD
Summary: WRAP Protesting monks marching in Yangon, analyst ADDS soundbite
Story No: 537416
Source: AP TELEVISION, AP PHOTO
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/22/2007 11:34 PM
People: Aung San Suu Kyi
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

AP TELEVISION

Yangon, Myanmar - 22 September 2007

1. Various shots of monks chanting

AP TELEVISION

Yangon, Myanmar - 22 September 2007

2. Various of monks marching from Buddhist shrine, Sule Pagoda

AP TELEVISION

Yangon, Myanmar - 22 September 2007

3. Various of monks walking out of Sule Pagoda

4. Wide of monks gathered in front of Sule Pagoda

AP TELEVISION

Yangon, Myanmar - 22 September 2007

5. Monks gathered in front of the Sule Pagoda

6. Wide of monks marching along street

7. Monks' feet as they march past, tilt-up to monks marching past

AP TELEVISION

Bangkok, Thailand - 22 September 2007

8. Set-up of Myanmar analyst, Larry Jagan

9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Larry Jagan, Myanmar analyst:

"It's clear that we have got to the tipping point, that this is the beginning of the end. There is no doubt that the whole movement is gathering momentum, momentum that many analysts weren't able to predict. We are seeing an escalation of numbers. The monks in Rangoon said they were going to take a break after 3 days of protest, and what have we seen, we've seen other monks in Bago and in Mandalay take to the streets in even larger numbers. There is little doubt that we have reached the tipping point."

AP PHOTO - NO ACCESS CANADA/INTERNET

Yangon, Myanmar - 22 September 2007

10. STILL: Wide of monks marching near Sule Pagoda

AP TELEVISION

Bangkok, Thailand - 22 September 2007

11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Larry Jagan, Myanmar analyst:

"The fact that the monks are coming out is going to give people confidence, and we're going to see these marches escalate. I would suspect that in the middle of next week we are going to see the students and ordinary citizens join the monks in marches in Rangoon and Mandalay and the numbers are going to be astronomic."

AP PHOTO - NO ACCESS CANADA/INTERNET

Yangon, Myanmar - 22 September 2007

12. STILL: Wide of monks marching

AP TELEVISION

Bangkok, Thailand - 22 September 2007

13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Larry Jagan, Myanmar analyst:

"The key thing to remember is that the monks and Aung San Suu Kyi have one thing in common; peaceful protest. They want to see change through peaceful means, and what we're seeing is a coming together - be it small, be it symbolic - between the main political force in the country and the main religious leaders of the country."

AP TELEVISION

FILE: Yangon - May 2002

14. Detained pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi walking through crowd

AP TELEVISION

FILE: Yangon - September 1996

15. Suu Kyi waving to crowd

STORYLINE

The wave of anti-government demonstrations sweeping Myanmar touched the doorstep of the country's democracy heroine Aung San Suu Kyi, as Buddhist monks allowed to march past her home on Saturday, said they were greeted by the detained political leader.

The encounter occurred after police unexpectedly let more than 500 monks and other protesters through at a roadblock on University Avenue, where Suu Kyi's house is located.

Monks have been marching for the past five days in the country's biggest city and elsewhere, as a month-long series of protests against economic condition under the junta has ballooned into the biggest grass-roots challenge to its rule in two decades.

The monks, who have already increased pressure on the junta by taking over leadership of demonstrations that had been faltering, have now upped the ante by symbolically linking their cause to Nobel laureate's Suu Kyi's struggle for democracy, which has seen her detained for about 12 of the last 18 years.

It also sets up the possibility of a violent confrontation, as the ruling junta seems increasingly forced to decide whether to crack down or to compromise with the demonstrators, whose numbers have grown as monks draw ever greater numbers with their defiant, well-disciplined marches.

The government has been handling the monks' protests gingerly, aware that forcibly breaking them up in predominantly Buddhist Myanmar would likely cause public outrage.

"The key thing to remember is that the monks and Aung San Suu Kyi have one thing in common; peaceful protest," said Larry Jagan, a Bangkok-based journalist specialising in Myanmar.

"They want to see change through peaceful means, and what we're seeing is a coming together - be it small, be it symbolic - between the main political force in the country and the main religious leaders," he said.

The monks stopped briefly in front of Suu Kyi's house and said some prayers before leaving at the other end of the street, said witnesses, who asked not to be named for fear of being harassed by the authorities.

The part of University Avenue where Suu Kyi's house is located has been closed to traffic since 17 September.

After the monks passed, the road was closed again.

Photos posted on the Web site of Mizzima News, run by Myanmar exile journalists in India, shows a crowd gathered outside the gate of Suu Kyi's home, with uniformed security men standing immediately in front of it.

Suu Kyi cannot be distinguished, though reports posted on Mizzima and other Myanmar overseas news sites said she was wearing yellow and broke into tears at one point.

Jagan said the current protests could mean Myanmar is on the verge of change.

"The fact that the monks are coming out is going to give people confidence, and we're going to see these marches escalate," he said.

He said by the middle of next week students and others will join the march and "the numbers are going to be astronomic".

"It's clear that we have got to the tipping point, that this is the beginning of the end," for the military government.

Suu Kyi, 62, has been under detention continuously since May 2003, when a convoy carrying her on a political trip through northern Myanmar was ambushed by pro-junta thugs.

She is the leader of the National League for Democracy party, which won a 1990 general election but was not allowed to take power by the military.

The latest protest movement began 19 August after the government raised fuel prices, but has its basis in long pent-up dissatisfaction with the repressive military regime.

Using arrests and intimidation, the government had managed to keep demonstrations limited in size and impact, but they gained new life when the monks joined.

About one-thousand monks, led by one holding his begging bowl upturned as a sign of protest, marched on Saturday in Yangon, the country's biggest city, starting from the Shwedagon Pagoda, Myanmar's most revered shrine and a historic centre for protest movements.

AP Television footage showed a group of around 200 monks gathered outside the Buddhist shrine, the Sule Pagoda in Yangon.

And in the central Myanmar city of Mandalay, a crowd of 10-thousand people, including at least four-thousand Buddhist monks, marched in one of the largest demonstrations since the 1988 democracy uprising, witnesses said.

Some monks have started a religious boycott of the junta, symbolised by holding their black begging bowls upside down as they march.

In the Myanmar language, the word for boycott comes from the words for holding the bowl inverted.

On Friday, about 1,500 barefoot Buddhist monks marched more than 16 kilometres (10 miles) through Yangon's flooded streets, sometimes in knee-deep water, in a raging tropical downpour.

More than one-thousand sympathisers marched with them.

Meanwhile, a monks' organisation for the first time urged the public to join in protesting "evil military despotism" in Myanmar, also known as Burma.

"In order to banish the common enemy evil regime from Burmese soil forever, united masses of people need to join hands with the united clergy forces," the All Burma Monks Alliance said in a statement received on Saturday by The Associated Press.

Little is known of the group or its membership, but its communiqu�s have spread widely by word of mouth and through opposition media in exile.

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Subjects: Protests and demonstrations, Buddhism, Religion and politics, Government and politics, Online news media, Political and civil unrest, General news, Religion, Social affairs, Religious issues, Religious issues, Social issues, Online media, Media, Online news media, News media
People: Aung San Suu Kyi
Locations: Myanmar, Yangon, Thailand, Bangkok, Southeast Asia, Asia
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Myanmar Aftermath 3
Title:
SD
Summary: WRAP Health of cyclone survivors worsens, villages where many died
Story No: 564401
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 05/12/2008 11:01 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

Pyapon

1. Wide of remains of houses

2. Mid of remains of house and trees

3. Tilt up of house

4. Mid of man cleaning

5. Pan of interior of destroyed house

6. SOUNDBITE: (Burmese) U Pinyatale, local resident:

"When the cyclone came the water flooded my house reaching above the waist. The water destroyed everything in the village."

7. Close-up of lady watching people clear up the destruction

8. People clearing up remains of destroyed houses

9. SOUNDBITE: (Burmese) U Pinyatale, local resident:

"Here in our village, 30 people are missing, so I presume they are all dead."

10. Residents fixing part of a house

11. Various of destroyed houses

Daedaye

12. Tracking view of damaged house by the river

13. Boat travelling down the river

14. Military helicopter flying overhead

15. Tracking view of more destroyed buildings

16. Wide of village devastated by cyclone

17. Pan of flattened houses

18. Mid of fallen trees on houses

19. Woman fetching water

20. Child carrying buckets of water

21. Pan of destroyed schoolhouse

22. Interior of a house left standing

23. Mid of people sitting on the floor

24. Close-up of a child

25. Interior of damaged roof

26. Debris through a window

27. Man standing in the middle of debris

28. Wide of temporary shack amid debris

29. Pan from destroyed house to family sitting under temporary shelter

30. Mid of a family

31. Tracking view of destruction

32. Young boys chasing after relief being given out from a truck

33. People running towards the truck

34. Wide of people waiting for aid by the road

35. People waiting

36. Wide of a truck giving out aid

37. Various of a private individual giving out relief

38. Children holding bottles of water

STORYLINE:

As the United States delivered its first relief supplies to Myanmar on Monday, the UN continued to urge the country's military rulers to cooperate with international donors.

It's thought two million cyclone victims are facing disease and starvation.

Myanmar's junta said on Sunday the official death toll from Cyclone Nargis on May 3 had jumped by about 5,000 to 28,458 with another 33,416 still missing.

Residents in Pyapon continued to clear up what remains of their homes.

In the worst affected Irrawaddy delta, people were surviving in miserable conditions.

Hundreds were cramped in monasteries, sleeping on the floor.

Others were camping in the open, drinking dirty water contaminated by human faeces or dead bodies and animal carcasses.

Heavy rains were forecast this week, which would further hinder aid delivery.

The town, situated along the Pyapon River was badly hit by the natural disaster, destroying houses and leaving many people missing presumed drowned in the rice collecting centre of the Irrawaddy Delta.

One local man told AP Television of his experience of the floods.

"When the cyclone came the water flooded my house reaching above the waist. The water destroyed everything in the village" explained U Pinyatale.

"Thirty people are still missing," he added "so I presume they are all dead."

The recovery process in Pyapon is taking place as the US begins its first airlift of relief goods for Myanmar cyclone victims, following prolonged negotiations with the country's military rulers.

In Daedaye, residents living in the hardest hit area of the Myanmar river delta area struggling to survive.

People are trying to sift through what remains of their possessions.

AP Television filmed people sitting under make-shift shelters made from bits of destroyed houses.

Many buildings were flattened, including a school house.

Out in the streets, people were waiting for passing vehicles giving out bottles of water.

Relief aid from the government has been slow to come to some areas of the country.

AP Television filmed a private individual giving out bottles of water to local villagers.

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Subjects: Property damage, Natural disasters, Tropical cyclones, Accidents and disasters, General news, Tropical cyclones, Storms, Weather
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Myanmar Suu Kyi
Title:
SD
Summary: Protesters demand Myanmar junta honour 1990 elex results, release Suu Kyi
Story No: 524195
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 05/27/2007 07:08 PM
People: Aung San Suu Kyi, Than Shwe, George H. Bush, Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton, John Major, Margaret Thatcher
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

++VIDEO QUALITY AS INCOMING++

1. Aung San Suu Kyi supporters marching together before being stopped by several men

2. Aung San Suu Kyi supporters sitting on the ground after they were stopped

3. Aung San Suu Kyi supporters holding banner and chanting slogans

4. Mid shot of Aung San Suu Kyi supporters talking to men who blocked the march

5. Mid shot of Aung San Suu Kyi supporter holding banner and chanting slogans

6. Aung San Suu Kyi supporters clapping

STORYLINE:

Hundreds of supporters of pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi clashed with supporters of Myanmar's military junta on Sunday on their way to a prayer vigil for the detained Nobel laureate, witnesses said.

Holding photos of the 61-year-old, about 500 members of her National League for Democracy party shouted "Free Aung San Suu Kyi" as they staged a rally outside the party's headquarters in Myanmar's largest city, Yangon.

They then planned to proceed to a Buddhist pagoda in downtown Yangon to pray for Suu Kyi's release but were blocked by supporters of the junta.

Angry words were exchanged and, according to one witness who asked to remain nameless, one NLD elected member was led away before the rally ended peacefully.

The junta is believed to hold about 1,200 political prisoners, most of them elected members of the NLD which has called for the immediate release of prisoners of conscience.

Sunday's rally follows a decision by the junta to extend the order placing Suu Kyi's under house arrest to a fifth year.

The Nobel Peace Prize laureate has spent more than 11 of the past 17 years in detention.

Authorities have also beefed up security near Suu Kyi's lakeside residence and extended barbed wire barricades on her street.

Her street was closed to traffic and police with batons were deployed near roadblocks.

The NLD has condemned the move, saying in a statement the government was "ignoring calls by world leaders for her release."

In a letter last week to Senior General Than Shwe, the junta's chief, 59 former world leaders - including ex-US Presidents George H. W. Bush, Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton, and former British Prime Ministers John Major and Margaret Thatcher - urged Suu Kyi's release.

Meanwhile, pro-democracy activists urged the military junta to accept the results of the 1990 election on Sunday - the 17th anniversary of the ballot,

in which Suu Kyi's party won an overwhelming victory.

The results were rejected by the military regime, saying it first needed to draft a constitution. It has never been completed.

Suu Kyi has been held continuously since May 30, 2003, when her motorcade was attacked by a pro-junta mob during a political tour of northern Myanmar.

The military originally took power in 1988, after crushing vast pro-democracy demonstrations in Myanmar, then known as Burma.

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Subjects: Protests and demonstrations, Government and politics, Political and civil unrest, General news
People: Aung San Suu Kyi, Than Shwe, George H. Bush, Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton, John Major, Margaret Thatcher
Locations: Yangon, Yangon, Myanmar [Burma]
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Thailand US Ships
Title:
SD
Summary: US navy ships awaiting permission to drop aid to Myanmar
Story No: 563997
Source: DoD HANDOUT
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 05/08/2008 09:46 PM
People: Robert Gates, Bernard Kouchner
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

++QUALITY AS INCOMING++

1. Various aerial shots of Navy ships

2. People boarding a helicopter

3. Close of sailor with other sailors in background

4. Mid of man giving hand signals

5. Helicopter taking off

6. Man waving flag

7. Marines exiting a landing craft

8. Mid of Marines waiting to exit the landing craft

9. Marines from behind as they set foot on land

10. Front shot of Marines stepping off a landing craft

11. Local military officers watching Marines

12. Marines exiting landing craft

13. Various of Marines setting up a satellite dish

STORYLINE:

Myanmar's military regime allowed in the first major international aid shipment on Thursday, but snubbed a US offer to help cyclone victims, deeply suspicious of Washington's motives despite the tragedy of unimaginable scale.

The junta in Myanmar, also known as Burma, also continued to stall on visas for UN teams and other foreign aid workers anxious to deliver food, water and medicine to survivors amid fears the death toll could hit 100-thousand.

US Defence Secretary Robert Gates said on Thursday the US military was stepping up preparations for a relief mission in Myanmar, but he said he could not imagine air dropping aid without permission from the closed

regime.

His comments followed those earlier Thursday by Ky Luu, director of the US Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance, that an air drop was one option being considered as Myanmar's junta continued to stall on accepting assistance from the United States.

Gates said the military was moving aircraft, ships and Marines closer to Myanmar in case permission is granted to deliver humanitarian supplies.

The US Air Force moved more airplanes to a staging area in Thailand and the Navy transported Marines of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit and helicopters into Thailand from an aviation combat element of the USS Essex

expeditionary strike group, officials said.

The Essex and other Navy ships began heading later on Thursday toward waters off Myanmar, a journey that officials said would take five days.

The Navy happened to have ships and thousands of service members in the Gulf of Thailand for a multinational exercise on humanitarian missions - an exercise called Cobra Gold that started on Thursday.

The United States and other donor countries continue to wait for permission to enter with tons of assistance and disaster relief personnel to assess what the needs are and move toward distributing the aid.

Among other countries considering air drops are Italy and France, whose foreign minister has suggested the possibility of forcing assistance into Myanmar, officials said.

Pentagon officials have said they are wary of such a scenario because it could be considered an invasion.

But French Foreign Minister Bernard Kouchner said this week that air drops could be allowed under the UN's

"responsibility to protect" mandate, which applies to civilians.

Officials said there were several problems with unauthorised air drops, especially if there are no experts on the ground to monitor the distribution of aid.

Desperate people could riot over the assistance and there is the possibility that security forces might confiscate it and keep it out of the hands of the needy, they said.

The government has reported more than 20-thousand deaths and more than 40-thousand missing from Cyclone Nargis that hit Myanmar, particularly the Irrawaddy River delta, last weekend.

A US diplomat said on Wednesday that the death toll in the delta could exceed 100-thousand. The U.N. estimates that a million people have been left homeless.

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Subjects: Emergency management, Foreign aid, Tropical cyclones, Government and politics, International relations, Natural disasters, Accidents and disasters, General news, Tropical cyclones, Storms, Weather
People: Robert Gates, Bernard Kouchner
Organisations: United States military, U.S. Navy, United States government
Locations: Myanmar, Thailand, Southeast Asia, Asia
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USA: WASHINGTON: STUDENTS PROTEST ABOUT BURMESE MILITARY REGIME
Title:
SD
Summary: USA: WASHINGTON: STUDENTS PROTEST ABOUT BURMESE MILITARY REGIME
Story No: 39908
Source: APTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 12/13/1996 05:00 AM
People: Aung San Suu Kyi, Warren Christopher
Subscription:

English/Nat

A small group of Burmese students marched and chanted in front of the White House in Washington, protesting against the Burmese military regime's crackdown on student demonstrations in the capital Rangoon.

The students in Washington also voiced their strong objections to the continued house arrest of democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi.

The demonstration in Washington came as one of Burma's top generals vowed on Wednesday to annihilate anyone disrupting his government's work.

The remarks by General Tin Oo were published following six days of student protests in the Burmese cities of Rangoon and Mandalay.

Protesters in Washington said they were marching in front of the White House to try and get President Clinton to act on sanctions already imposed on Burma to halt the repression in the country.

Dr Sein Win, who described himself as the Burmese Prime Minister in exile, led the demonstrators calling for action from the United States government.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

"The biggest problem is the military government's rigidity. They are still refusing to have a dialogue with Aung San Suu Kyi, who is a legitimate leader of Burma, and they are refusing to talk with the students who are now demonstrating in the streets of Rangoon - so they are the ones who are blocking every improvement, so they are the problem, the biggest problem there."

SUPER CAPTION: Dr Sein Win, Protester

Burma's military government has vowed it would never allow the recurrence of the 1988 uprising in which more than 3-thousand civilians were gunned down by the military, thousands more jailed and schools were closed for three years.

U-S Secretary of State, Warren Christopher, denounced Burma Thursday when talking about human rights at the State Department.

SOUNDBITE: (English)

If we want to defeat terrorism and drug trafficking, we need partners whose governments are accountable, where no-one, no-one at all is above the rule of law. These are the points I tried to make while I travelled around the world and in countries I have been travelling and speaking to young people in places like Vietnam and China, and governments all around the world. It's certainly the point President Clinton made powerfully just two weeks ago when he said that political repression and drug trafficking in Burma are two sides of the same coin.

SUPER CAPTION: Warren Christopher, U-S Secretary of State

Stepping up U-S pressure on Burma's military government, U-S Ambassador to the UNMadeleine Albright - who is about to take over from Christopher as secretary of State - called Thursday on the regime to respect human rights.

She also urged Burma to permit UNinspectors to monitor civil liberties there.

Washington, DC, December 12, 1996

1. Wide shot of demonstrators

2. Various shots of demonstrators walking

3. Various shots of demonstrators holding signs

4. SOUNDBITE: Dr Sein Win, protester

5. Close-up of Dr Win marching

6. Various shots of marchers chanting

7. Wide shot of Christopher's presser

8. SOUNDBITE: Christopher

9. Wide shot of presser.

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Subjects: Protests and demonstrations, Government and politics, International relations, Human rights and civil liberties, Political and civil unrest, General news, Social issues, Social affairs
People: Aung San Suu Kyi, Warren Christopher
Organisations: United States military, United States government
Locations: Myanmar, Yangon, United States, District of Columbia, Southeast Asia, Asia, North America
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