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Mexico Drug War
Title:
SD
Summary: Marines capture 30 suspected members of the Gulf drug cartel
Story No: 659742
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/30/2010 12:27 AM
People:
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SHOTLIST

++AUDIO AS INCOMING++

1. Wide of Navy hangar at airport

2. Soldiers escorting detainees

3. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Jos� Luis Vergara, Navy Spokesperson:

"This detention was in made by the Navy personnel thanks to intelligence work."

4. Mid of detainees lined up

5. Close up of male detainee

6. Pan right of detainees lined up

7. Wide pan right of detainees lined up behind weapons

8. Close up of detainee

9. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Jos� Luis Vergara, Navy Spokesperson:

"During the last 48 hours several operations took place in the northern zone of the Tamaulipas state. These operations resulted in the arrest of these 30 alleged members of the organised crime."

10. Tilt down of handcuffed detainee

11. Wide of displayed weapons

12. Wide of media

13. Mid of firearms

14. Pan right of firearms

15. Mid of grenades

16. Wide of weapons

17. Wide of soldiers escorting detainees away

STORYLINE

Thirty alleged members of the Tamaulipas based Gulf Cartel arrested in possession of heavy weapons, including two rocket launchers, were presented to the media on Wednesday.

The suspects, including one woman, were paraded before reporters at an air base in Mexico City, handcuffed and flanked by masked marines in black-and-white combat gear.

They were lined up in front of a helicopter on Wednesday, the arsenal of weapons laid out in front of them.

Mexican Navy spokesperson, Rear Admiral Jose Luis Vergara said that the alleged traffickers were arrested in a series of raids held in the last 24 hours in the cities of Matamoros and Reynosa in the Mexican northern state of Tamaulipas, one of the states most affected by the war between rival drug cartels.

Marines seized more than 50 guns, two shoulder-fired rocket launchers, 21 grenades and ammunition as well as 393-thousand US dollars.

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Subjects: Drug cartels, Prisoner rights, Drug-related crime, Crime, General news, Drug cartels, Organized crime, Human rights and civil liberties, Social issues, Social affairs, Prisoner rights, Treatment of prisoners, Human welfare
Locations: Mexico, North America, Mexico, Central America, Latin America and Caribbean
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Mexico Drug War 3
Title:
SD
Summary: At least 13 youths killed, 20 wounded in shoot-out at party; presser
Story No: 662462
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/23/2010 11:36 PM
People: Felipe Calderon
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SHOTLIST

EDIT CONTAINS SOME GRAPHIC IMAGES OF DEAD BODIES

++NIGHT SHOTS++

1. Wide high view of the crime scene with police with emergency lights on

2. Mid of police vehicle at the crime scene with lights on

3. Mid of two police investigators at the scene

4. Mid of numbered police markers outside the house

5. Mid of numbered police markers, blood stain on the ground and a chair turned upside-down

6. Wide top shot of house where shootings took place

7. Wide of policeman standing close to a body partially hidden by car

8. High wide view of the house where the shooting took place with policemen around it

9. Mid of policemen standing outside gate of the house

10. Mid of a body laying on the ground, with police numbered markers around it, seen through fence

11. Wide of exterior of hospital emergency department with police and their vehicles parked outside

12. Mid of the same, sing reading (Spanish) "Emergencies"

13. Mid of police in a group

14. Mid of police roadblock

15. Wide of police cordon

++DAY SHOTS++

16. Wide front of the house where gunmen massacred people at a birthday party

17. Close of bloody cushions seen through fence

18. Tracking shot of blood on floor of house

19. Mid of bottles, plastic cups and blood on the table

20. Close of cups and blood as investigator examines computer

21. Mid of plates, cups and bottles in the kitchen

22. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Relative of three people killed in the party, filmed from behind (no name given):

++AUDIO AS INCOMING++

"They arrived and asked for a person but I think they did not recognise him or they did not see him and they started shooting at those who were outside. Some ran into the house, others to the back of the house, others just stayed there. My wife was lying there, my cousin outside, three guys over there. I don't know, nobody knows anything, they arrived, went inside and they did whatever they wanted to do."

23. Close of stain of blood on the floor

24. Mid of blood on the table

25. Wide of interior of the house

26. Mid of stain of blood on a chair

27. Mid of picture of one of the dead men

28. Mid of ashtray and baby shoes

29. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Carlos Salas, Chihuahua State Attorney General:

"It is sad that the criminals don't have any respect, this type of violence is lamentable. How is it possible to have a 9 year-old boy with injuries? How is it possible to have two young women -14 and 15 year-old - dead? How is it possible that 6 women have died when all they were doing was getting together with friends to have a good time just as hundreds or thousands of people from Chihuahua, from Juarez, do. These are difficult times for the State."

30. Wide of candle outside the house where 13 people were killed

31. Close of the candle

STORYLINE:

Gunmen stormed two neighbouring homes in Ciudad Juarez and massacred 13 young people at a birthday party late on Friday night in the latest large-scale attack in this city, even as a new government strategy seeks to restore order with social programmes and massive police deployments.

Attackers in two vehicles pulled up to the houses in a lower-middle-class Ciudad Juarez neighbourhood and opened fire on about four dozen partygoers gathered for a 15-year-old boy's birthday party.

Chihuahua state Attorney General Carlos Salas told reporters at a news conference at the crime scene on Saturday that the dead identified so far were 13 to 32 years old, including six women and girls.

"It is sad that the criminals don't have any respect, this type of violence is lamentable," Salas said.

The majority of the victims were high school students, a survivor said.

Relatives of the victims gathered outside prosecutors' office, some weeping laments, some shouting demands for justice.

All asked not to be identified for fear of reprisals.

Salas said a total of 20 people were wounded, including a 9-year-old boy.

Authorities earlier gave lower numbers for the wounded because some victims were taken by relatives to hospitals throughout the city and were not immediately located.

Residents of Ciudad Juarez, one of the world's deadliest cities, no longer go out much to celebrate because of a violent turf war between the Sinaloa and Juarez cartels, who frequently attacks their rivals in bars, restaurants, drug rehabilitation centres and other public places.

One survivor of Friday's massacre said the birthday boy's mother had decided to hold the party at their home, precisely because she thought it was safer.

The party spilled over into the neighbouring home.

The 16-year-old boy, who did not want to be identified, said an attacker entered one of the homes and asked partygoers about a car parked in front of the home, suggesting the killers may have been following the vehicle.

He survived the attack by throwing himself to the floor and other partygoers fell on top of him, shielding him from the bullets.

The survivor said the gunman he saw appeared to be about 20, wearing a baseball cap and carrying a pistol, and simply opened fire after no one answered his questions.

Another survivor said the attackers arrived, went inside and "they did whatever they wanted to do."

Police found 70 bullet casings from assault weapons typically used by drug gangs whose bloody turf battles have killed more than two-thuosand people this year in Ciudad Juarez, across the border from El Paso, Texas.

Salas said the attackers escaped, and police said had no immediate information on any suspects or possible motive.

"These are difficult times for the State," he said.

The Interior Department condemned the killings in a statement and pledged "to help the efforts of state and local authorities re-establish order in Ciudad Juarez."

Some recent attacks on private homes have resulted in apparently innocent people being killed, either because a targeted person was at the gathering or because gunmen simply had the wrong address.

Most recently, attackers stormed two homes on October 17, killing seven people at a party and two others in another house nearby.

And in January, gunmen massacred 15 people at a party in a house not far from the site of Friday's killings. Most of the victims were

teenagers, students and athletes.

Investigators later said the attack was apparently carried out by Juarez cartel gunmen looking to kill allies of the Sinaloa cartel.

There is no evidence the youths were the targets, and police said the killers may have hit the wrong house.

The city was outraged by the January massacre, leading President Felipe Calderon's government to vow to implement a new strategy for restoring order in Ciudad Juarez, where the army had by then had replaced the disorganised, outgunned local police.

In April, federal police took over public security duties from the army, and about five-thousand federal officers were deployed in Ciudad Juarez.

The federal government also stepped up social programmes to try to break the cycle of poverty, broken homes and lack of opportunities that make the city's youths a fertile recruiting ground for the gangs.

Cash aid programmes, neighbourhood improvement initiatives, educational and job-training programs were part of the new strategy, together with ubiquitous convoys of blue federal police trucks patrolling "safe corridors" throughout the city.

But in light of the recent mass attacks, it is unclear whether the new strategy for the city is having an effect so far.

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Subjects: Assault and battery, Violent crime, Municipal governments, Crime, Armed forces, Drug cartels, Army, General news, Local governments, Government and politics, Military and defense, Drug-related crime, Drug cartels, Organized crime
People: Felipe Calderon
Locations: Ciudad Juárez, Mexico
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Mexico US Tunnel
Title:
SD
Summary: US officers find drug smuggling link crossing border
Story No: 663782
Source: AP TELEVISION, US CUSTOMS
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 11/04/2010 05:33 PM
People:
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SHOTLIST

COURTESY: US IMMIGRATION AND CUSTOMS ENFORCEMENT

San Diego, California, United States - 3 November 2010

1. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents arranging packages of marijuana

2. Close tilt down of agent checking contents of package

3. Wide down shot of ICE agents looking down at tunnel

4. Mid of tunnel entrance opening

5. Tracking shot of interior of tunnel

AP TELEVISION

Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico - 3 November 2010

6. Various of army soldiers guarding exterior of warehouse where tunnel and drugs were found

7. Wide of packages of marijuana displayed for the media

AP TELEVISION

San Diego, California, United States - 3 November 2010

8. SOUNDBITE (English) John Morton, director of US Immigration and Customs Enforcement:

"The Mexicans responded on their end, find the opening and the warehouse on the Mexican side, another 4 tons are discovered there for a total of somewhere between 25 and 30 tons. There is so much of it we haven't yet being able to fully weigh everything and come up with a final tally."

9. Police officer watching cameraman filming drugs inside truck

10. Wide of truck interior loaded with boxes full of drug packages

STORYLINE

Federal authorities in San Diego have made one of the largest marijuana seizures in the United States, confiscating more than 20 tons of pot that was smuggled into the country through an underground tunnel connecting warehouses on either side of California's border with Mexico, officials said on Wednesday.

Mexican authorities seized more than four tons of pot from the warehouse on their side of the border in an industrial park near the Otay Mesa truck crossing.

The marijuana is worth more than 20 (m) million US dollars if sold on the streets of San Diego, said US Immigration and Customs Enforcement Director John Morton.

The bricks of pot were packaged for sale.

Morton said at a news conference it was obviously the work of a cartel.

"The Mexicans responded on their end, find the opening and the warehouse on the Mexican side, another 4 tons are discovered there for a total of somewhere between 25 and 30 tons. There is so much of it we haven't yet being able to fully weigh everything and come up with a final tally," he said.

Officials said the lightening-speed, 12-hour operation started on Tuesday night when US authorities watching a warehouse under surveillance followed a tractor-trailer as it left the building.

ICE agents called in the California Highway Patrol, whose officers stopped the rig near Temecula, California, about 60 miles away.

Authorities say they found 10 tons of marijuana inside the tractor-trailer.

The driver, a US citizen, and his Mexican wife were arrested and will be arraigned in San Diego on Thursday.

Authorities quickly obtained a federal search warrant to enter the warehouse, where they discovered 10 to 15 more tons of marijuana, Morton said.

The tunnel had lighting, ventilation and a rail system to send loads of illegal drugs into California.

The clandestine passageway was too low to stand up in and was believed to be in operation for only a brief time, Morton said.

Officials said the seizure was the largest ever in California and was believed to be the second-largest in the US.

The largest amount of marijuana seized by Drug Enforcement Administration agents was in 2008 in Oregon, where 33 tons were found, DEA special agent Ralph W. Partridge said.

Wednesday's announcement comes only weeks after Mexican officials made their largest marijuana seizure ever, confiscating a massive 134 tons believed to belong to the powerful Sinaloa cartel.

Morton said officials haven't determined which cartel was running the drug tunnel.

Officials have found 125 underground tunnels along the border built by Mexican drug cartels to elude detection since the early 1990s, ICE officials said.

Of those, 75 have been found in the past four years.

Many were discovered before they were completed.

The majority were found along the California and Arizona borders with Mexico.

Morton credited the increase in tunnel discoveries to "good old-fashioned law enforcement" efforts, with agents keeping a close eye on the thousands of warehouses storing goods moved back and forth across the border.

Morton said such a rapid bust, which came after a month-long investigation, was possible because of cooperation between US and Mexican authorities.

He said that cooperation is better than ever, making it tougher for Mexican drug traffickers to move their loads and forcing their smuggling businesses to move underground.

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Subjects: Drug trafficking, Drug-related crime, Drug cartels, Smuggling, Immigration, Crime, General news, Drug trafficking, Drug cartels, Organized crime, Social issues, Social affairs
Organisations: U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, United States government
Locations: California, Mexico, San Diego, United States, North America, Mexico, Central America, Latin America and Caribbean
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Mexico Arrest
Title:
SD
Summary: Police say arrested a leading member of the "La Linea" drug gang
Story No: 652332
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 07/25/2010 09:02 PM
People:
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SHOTLIST

1. Wide of Luis Carlos Vazquez Barragan, known as "El Veinte" ("The 20") presented at police warehouse

2. Close up of Vazquez Barragan's handcuffed hands

3. Various of Vazquez Barragan and armed masked police guarding him

4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Ramon Eduardo Pequeno, head of Federal Police Anti-drug division ++AUDIO AS INCOMING++

"Members of Mexico's Federal Police detained Luis Carlos Vazquez Barragan, known as 'The 20', one of the leaders of a crime gang known as La Linea, an armed wing of the Juarez Cartel headed by Vicente Carrillo Fuentes, known as 'The Viceroy', from whom he got direct orders."

5. Cutaway camera

6. Vazquez Barragan flanked by masked armed policemen

7. Close up of weapon seized during capture operation

8. Cutaway masked policemen on vehicle inside warehouse

9. Weapon seized

10. Pan left of masked police escorting Carlos Vazquez to police car

11. Cutaway cameramen

12. Police motorcade leaving

STORYLINE:

A leading member of Mexico's La Linea drug gang, blamed in recent killings and a car bombing in the border city of Ciudad Juarez, was arrested and presented to the media on Sunday by Mexican federal police.

Ramon Eduardo Pequeno, head of Federal Police Anti-drug division, said suspect Luis Vazquez Barragan, 39, was a top member of the gang and received orders directly from Vicente Carrillo Fuentes, the leader of the Juarez drug cartel.

Vazquez Barragan was shown to the media, handcuffed and surrounded by masked policemen, in a police warehouse in Mexico City.

The La Linea gang serves as the enforcement arm of the Juarez cartel.

Police said Vazquez Barragan organised payments, moved drugs and oversaw a system of safe houses in and around Ciudad Juarez.

They said he held the same rank as fugitive gang leader Juan Pablo Ledezma.

But Vazquez Barragan is not included on reward or most wanted lists published by the US Attorney General's Office, as Ledezma is.

The La Linea gang has been blamed for a Ciudad Juarez car bomb that killed three people on July 15, and March 13 shootings that killed a U.S. consular employee and two other people connected to the consulate.

Police did not say when they caught Vazquez Barragan, but said they seized about a half-kilogram (pound) of cocaine and two guns when they arrested him.

His arrest led to a raid on a safe house, where police detained four suspects and freed a kidnap victim.

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Subjects: Drug cartels, Arrests, Bombings, Gang-related crime, Drug-related crime, Crime, General news, Drug cartels, Organized crime, Violent crime
Locations: Mexico City, Mexico
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Mexico Saint
Title:
SD
Summary: Shrine built to 'narco saint' worshipped by drug traffickers
Story No: 510512
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 01/23/2007 09:42 AM
People:
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SHOTLIST:

1. Various of people walking along streets where Malverde altar is located

2. Altar on the street, girl sweeping the street

3. Tilt up from girl sweeping to Malverde figures on the altar

4. Bottom half of Malverde figure, small figure in corner

5. Maria Alicia Pulido Sanchez, owner of the altar

6. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish), Maria Alicia Pulido Sanchez, owner of the altar:

"We make saints by the power of our belief, we can believe in anyone who fulfills our petitions."

7. Tilt up Malverde figure

8. Close up of figure with money and small gun on chain

9. Figure and glasses of wine

10. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish), Maria Alicia Pulido Sanchez, owner of the altar:

"He wasn't a drug trafficker. He was what you might call a thief, but he helped his community."

11.Various of Malverde figure

STORYLINE:

A Mexico City family has built what could be the first public shrine in the Mexican capital to Jesus Malverde, the so-called "narco saint" worshipped by many drug traffickers in the north of the country.

Malverde, whose original shrine is located in the city of Culiacan in northern Sinaloa state - considered the cradle of Mexico's top drug clans - has become a controversial and sometimes revered figure.

Supporters say he robbed from the rich and gave to the poor before being hanged for his crimes in Culiacan in 1909. Critics say he has become a symbol of crime.

Maria Alicia Pulido Sanchez erected the glass-encased shrine with a fully dressed mannequin representing Malverde on a sidewalk in the city's rough Doctores neighbourhood in November.

Pulido Sanchez said on Monday that she did it because Malverde helped poor people.

"He wasn't a drug trafficker. He was what you might call a thief, but he helped his community," Pulido Sanchez said.

The life-size mannequin shows Malverde wearing his trademark neckerchief, a gold chain with a bejewelled pistol charm and a huge belt buckle with a gun motif.

The figure's pockets are stuffed with dollar bills, which Pulido Sanchez says were donated by worshippers, who also leave candy, cigarettes and glasses of wine at the shrine.

Malverde isn't recognised by the Roman Catholics or any other church, but Pulido Sanchez says that doesn't matter.

"We make saints by the power of our belief," she said. "We can believe in anyone who fulfills our petitions."

She says lawyers, policemen and "men with big bunches of jewellery" visit the shrine, as well as housewives, secretaries "and people from every walk of life."

"I don't know if people who are involved in bad things" also worship the Malverde figure, Pulido Sanchez said.

Pulido Sanchez said she was inspired to build the shrine after her son Marcos Abel miraculously recovered from serious injuries suffered in a December 2005 car crash in just three days when she prayed to a small Malverde statue a friend had given her.

There is also a small shrine to Malverde outside the border city of Tijuana, but until now, there hasn't apparently been any public shrine to him in the country's south, or the nation's capital.

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Subjects: Drug-related crime, Drug trafficking, Crime, General news, Drug trafficking, Smuggling
Locations: Mexico City, The Federal District, Mexico
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US Mexico
Title:
SD
Summary: Clinton on drug war, says US needs to back Mexican government
Story No: 603885
Source: POOL
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 04/23/2009 09:00 PM
People: Hillary Clinton, Felipe Calderon
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SHOTLIST

1. Pan from US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton to Congressional panel

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Hillary Rodham Clinton, US Secretary of State:

"On the Merida Initiative, I share your frustration at how slow it has been getting the money out. Now, some of that reason I'm sure David Johnson talked to you about this, is we have to be sure we have in place the safeguards so that the money goes where we intend it to go. But that doesn't explain it. It's just too slow."

3. Wide shot of Clinton from the side

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Hillary Rodham Clinton, US Secretary of State:

"We've got to figure out why this takes so long. Why does this take so long? Now, if we don't want to do it, let's just say we don't want to do it. But if it's winding its way through the bureaucracy and it needs 900 sign-offs before a dollar is spent, we're just wasting time, and we're losing ground."

5. Cutaway of congressional hearing

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Hillary Rodham Clinton, US Secretary of State:

"Mexico needs our help. We should deliver the help. In the supplemental, we are providing funding for three Black Hawk helicopters for their public security secretariat to provide them urgently needed air transport. I went down and visited their new police academy. They're really trying hard to end the corruption, build morale and an esprit de corps."

7. Shot of hearing room, after hearing is over

STORYLINE

US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton admitted on Thursday that the US had been "just too slow" in providing promised financial aid for Mexico's war on drugs.

The Secretary of State made the comments in Washington while appearing before a congressional appropriations panel that is reviewing the administration's request for 7.1 (b) billion US dollars in additional funds for the State Department this budget year.

Clinton said that "Mexico needs our help" and admitted that the government needed to find out what was causing the bureaucratic delays.

Clinton said part of the money would be used to beef up security on the US Mexico border, including "providing funding for three Black Hawk helicopters for their public security secretariat".

Four-hundred-and-fifty (m) million US dollars is also set to be used for the so-called Merida initiative, a multi-year programme designed to combat the drug trade in Mexico and Central America.

The initiative was first approved in 2008 but Clinton said on Thursday that she had been frustrated "at how slow it has been getting the money out"

More than 10,000 people have been killed in Mexico in drug-related violence since Mexican President Felipe Calderon first stepped-up efforts against the cartels in 2006.

The US State Department says contract killings and kidnappings on US soil, carried out by Mexican drug cartels, are on the rise as well.

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Subjects: International relations, Cabinets, Government and politics
People: Hillary Clinton, Felipe Calderon
Locations: Mexico, Central America, Latin America and Caribbean, Mexico, North America
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Mexico Kidnap
Title:
SD
Summary: Police rescue two journalists kidnapped by drug gang
Story No: 652968
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 08/01/2010 12:01 AM
People: Genaro Garcia Luna
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SHOTLIST:

1. Wide of helicopter landing on tarmac

2. Helicopter on tarmac, pan to news cameramen getting out of helicopter escorted by policemen

3. Sign reading (Spanish) 'Federal Police'

4. Pan of officials arriving for news conference

5. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Genaro Garcia Luna, Mexico's Public Safety Secretary:

"Their specific goal was to transmit organised crime messages that would have an impact on the community. Initially, they wanted to use the reporters as the transmission channel for those messages."

5. Cutaway of Milenio Multimedia Television cameraman Javier Canales

6. Wide of news conference

7. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Alejandro Hernandez, cameraman Televisa:

"Yes, they treated us badly, a kidnapping is always a delicate situation and they treat people badly and yes, there was intimidation. All day and all night, they would intimidate us psychologically and it was very hard. And yes, they beat us, in fact, they did so yesterday. Here are the scars. But they saw themselves encircled so they thought twice before hitting us."

8. Cutaway of masked Federal Police officer

9. End of news conference

STORYLINE:

Federal police have rescued two kidnapped news cameramen in northern Mexico, five days after they were seized by drug traffickers in a bid to get their employers to broadcast cartel messages.

Local journalists in Mexico have long been under siege from drug traffickers, but Monday's kidnapping of journalists with national television networks, including the nation's largest Televisa, shocked many Mexicans.

Two other journalists abducted the same day were released earlier.

Public Safety Secretary Genaro Garcia Luna said Javier Canales of Milenio Multimedia Television and Alejandro Hernandez of Televisa were freed before dawn on Saturday in the city of Gomez Palacio, where the men had been held in a residential area.

Garcia Luna, who was accompanied by the two cameramen at a Mexico City news conference, said the Sinaloa drug cartel was responsible for the abductions and that the kidnappers guarding the reporters escaped.

"Their specific goal was to transmit organised crime messages that would have an impact on the community.," Garcia Luna said.

Shortly after the abductions, the kidnappers demanded that the journalists' employers broadcast videos of two police officers and two civilians being interrogated and accusing officials of favouring the rival Zetas drug gang.

Milenio Television on Tuesday aired the three short videos.

Media advocates called the new tactic an escalation of a campaign by drug gangs to control information.

The cameramen were abducted along with a Televisa reporter after leaving a prison where they had covered a protest against the arrest of its warden.

The reporter, Hector Gordoa, was freed on Thursday after authorities negotiated his release, Garcia Luna said.

A journalist for a local newspaper was abducted the same day in a separate incident in Gomez Palacio.

Garcia Luna said that reporter, Oscar Solis, had been released earlier in the week.

Garcia Luna said the federal police decided to raid the house after the kidnappers failed to free the cameramen.

Hernandez said his captors tortured them physically and psychologically. "All day and all night, they would intimidate us psychologically and it was very hard," Hernandez said.

He said he was beaten Friday with a wood board. "Here are the scars," Hernandez said pointing to a bloody gauze on his head.

Canales said their kidnappers also threatened to hurt their families.

Authorities say a dispute between the Zetas and the Sinaloa cartel has resulted in rising violence in the Laguna region, which includes Gomez Palacio and Lerdo in Durango state and Torreon in neighbouring Coahuila.

Press freedom groups say Mexico is one of the deadliest countries for journalists.

More than 60 have been killed there since 2000, according to the National Human Rights Commission, and many have been harassed and threatened by drug gangs.

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Subjects: Gang-related crime, Kidnapping, Drug-related crime, Drug trafficking, Journalism, Drug cartels, Crime, Violent crime, General news, Drug trafficking, Smuggling, News media, Media, Drug cartels, Organized crime
People: Genaro Garcia Luna
Locations: Mexico City, Mexico
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Mexico Drug War
Title:
SD
Summary: Police arrest associate of Mexico's most-wanted drug lord
Story No: 664342
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 11/09/2010 04:33 AM
People: Arturo Beltran Leyva, El Chapo, Felipe Calderon
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

1. Wide of presentation of alleged drug dealers to media

2. Alleged drug dealer getting out of police truck escorted by police officers

3. Wide alleged drug dealers lined up flanked by federal police officers

4. Various of Manuel Fernandez Valencia, also know as "La Puerca", (The Sow), flanked by federal police officers

5. Zoom out from weapons to Valencia and alleged accomplices

6. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Ramon Eduardo Pequeno, Mexican Federal Police spokesperson:

"Intelligence reports indicate Manuel Fernandez Valencia, 42 years old, native of Michoacan (state of Morelia) was allegedly in charge of introducing 100 to 400 kilograms of cocaine in shipments sent to Mexicali (Baja California state) to be delivered in Los Angeles, California."

7. Cutaway of media

8. Wide of alleged drug dealers and weapons displayed to the media

9. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Ramon Eduardo Pequeno, Mexican Federal Police spokesperson:

"After the capture of Alfredo Beltran Leyva (former leader of the Beltran-Leyva cartel) on January 21, 2008, Fernandez Valencia received an invitation from Arturo Beltran to become part of his organisation, however he decided to continue with the organisation of Joaquin Guzman Loera, and thus, staying under the orders of 'El Chapo'."

10. Various of alleged drug dealers

11. Various of alleged drug dealers boarding truck

12. Police truck driving away

STORYLINE

Federal Police in Mexico paraded a number of alleged drug dealers on Monday in Mexico City, including an associate of Mexico's most-wanted drug lord.

Federal Police say Manuel "The Sow" Fernandez Valencia worked with Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, the head of the Sinaloa cartel, trafficking drugs into the US.

Mexico officials said Fernandez Valencia has been wanted since September 2009 by federal officials in Illinois for trafficking cocaine and heroin.

He was arrested on Monday after a 20-minute standoff between police and armed associates.

Ramon Eduardo Pequeno, Mexican Federal Police spokesperson, said that according to their intelligence Fernandez Valencia was allegedly in charge of sending 100 to 400 kilograms (220 to 880 pounds) of cocaine in shipments to Mexicali, Baja California state, which would eventually find its way onto the streets of Los Angeles.

Police said he also met with El Chapo recently about plans to bring eight tonnes of marijuana to the US by the end of the year.

Pequeno said following the capture of Alfredo Beltran Leyva, former leader of the Beltran-Leyva cartel on January 21, 2008, Fernandez Valencia was approached by Arturo Beltran to become part of their drug cartel.

However according to police Fernandez Valencia declined the offer and stayed with the organisation of Joaquin Guzman Loera, and stayed under the orders of 'El Chapo'.

Leyva died in a raid outside Mexico City on December 16, 2009.

More than 28-thousand Mexicans have been killed in drug-related violence since Mexican President Felipe Calderon launched a national assault on organised crime in late 2006.

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Subjects: Drug-related crime, Drug trafficking, Drug cartels, Arrests, Crime, General news, Drug trafficking, Smuggling, Drug cartels, Organized crime, Law and order, Arrests
People: Arturo Beltran Leyva, El Chapo, Felipe Calderon
Locations: Mexico City, Mexico
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Mexico Drug War 2
Title:
SD
Summary: Major Mexican drug dealer with US$2m bounty on head arrested
Story No: 643702
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 04/22/2010 09:07 PM
People: Arturo Beltran Leyva
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SHOTLIST:

1. Wide exterior of Mexico attorney general''s office

2. Pan left of group of detainees being led into presentation

3. Suspected drug trafficker Jose Gerardo Alvarez Vazquez being presented to media

4. Four detainees being photographed

5. Cutaway of masked soldier guarding detainees on stage

6. Alvarez Vazquez flanked by masked soldiers

7. Six detainees on stage during presentation

8. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Brigadier General Edgard Luis Villegas Melendez, Deputy Chief of military operations:

"Gerardo Alvarez Vazquez is presumed responsible for drug trafficking activities in the municipalities of Naucalpan and Huixquilucan in Mexico State as well as the Costa Grande and Acapulco regions in the state of Guerrero, for raising the levels of drug violence in Morelos and Guerrero, for disputing the leadership of the Beltran Leyva cartel in conjunction with Edgar Valdez Villarreal, alias "La Barbie, " against Hector Beltran Levya, alias "The ''H''" and Sergio Villarreal Vargan, alias ''El Grande.'' He is also presumed responsible for being the trafficking contact with South and Central American countries."

9. Wide of detainees being presented to media

10. Zoom out pan right from close of Alvarez Vazquez to group of detainees being led off stage

STORYLINE

Mexican officials presented to reporters suspected drug traffickers on Thursday that were apprehended the night before, including one man with a 2 (m) million dollar bounty on his head.

Jose Gerardo Alvarez Vazquez - known as "El Indio" or "El Chayan" - is suspected of being responsible for a spike in violence in states near the capital as part of a struggle for control of the Beltran Leyva drug cartel, the military and the federal Attorney General''s Office said.

Authorities said Alvarez Vazquez, 45, was arrested along with 14 other suspected drug traffickers during a Wednesday night shootout in Huixquilucan, just west of the capital.

Three died in the shooting and two alleged traffickers were wounded. Investigators did not say whether the dead were soldiers or suspected drug dealers. The military said it seized more than a dozen guns and a grenade.

Among those arrested was Ascencion Sepulveda Salto, also known as "El Gato," believed to be a powerful cartel lieutenant in Guerrero state.

The U.S. State Department says Alvarez Vazquez is a key member of the Arturo Beltran Leyva drug cartel and that he has overseen major deals involving crystal methamphetamine and other drugs between Mexico, Central America, South America and the U.S.

He was indicted on four drug-related counts in 1997 in the Southern District of California and the U.S. State Department had issued a 2 (m) million dollar reward for information leading to his arrest and conviction.

Mexican General Edgar Luis Villegas Melendez said Alvarez Vazquez had partnered with Edgar Valdez Villarreal, a U.S.-born enforcer known as "La Barbie," in his quest for control over the Beltran Leyva cartel.

The presentation followed a battle between troops and a suspected drug gang in a wealthy neighbourhood on the outskirts of Mexico City Wednesday night.

Authorities say a battle for the cartel began after Mexican marines killed drug kingpin Arturo Beltran Leyva during a December shootout at an upscale apartment complex in Cuernavaca, south of Mexico City.

The struggle for power has triggered dozens of killings in Morelos state, where Cuernavaca is located, and in neighbouring Guerrero, authorities say.

At least seven major drug cartels operate in Mexico and an estimated 22,700 people have been killed in Mexico''s drug war since December 2006, when a stepped-up military crackdown on the cartels began.

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Subjects: Drug trafficking, Drug cartels, Drug-related crime, Shootings, War and unrest, Arrests, Crime, General news, Drug trafficking, Smuggling, Drug cartels, Organized crime, Violent crime
People: Arturo Beltran Leyva
Organisations: U.S. Department of State, United States government
Locations: Mexico City, Mexico
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Mexico Arrest
Title:
SD
Summary: Attorney General presents top cartel member after arrest
Story No: 603877
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 04/23/2009 08:32 PM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide exterior of Attorney General's special offices for the Investigation of Organised Crime

2. Police leading detainees into presentation room where media are awaiting

3. Close of detainee Isaac Manuel Godoy Castro, alleged top member of the Arellano Felix Cartel

4. Various of detainees

5. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Ricardo Najera, Attorney Generals spokesperson:

"This is the presentation for six people as well as Isaac Manuel Godoy Castro, known as 'El Dany' or 'El Martin,' detained yesterday in the city of Tijuana."

6. Close of Godoy Castro

7. Medium of three detainees

8. Zoom out from Godoy Castro to detainees being led away by police

STORYLINE:

Mexican authorities presented a top member of the Arellano Felix cartel to the media on Thursday in Mexico City following the announcement of his arrest a day earlier in Tijuana.

The defence department said Isaac Manuel Godoy Castro led a cell of the cartel and answered directly to its suspected leader, Fernando Sanchez Arellano, known as the "the engineer."

Godoy Castro was arrested on Tuesday, along with six other alleged members of his cell, the department said.

They were found with four guns and marijuana.

Godoy Castro also appears on a poster published by the United States Drug Enforcement Administration in January seeking information about the cartel's top members.

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Subjects: Drug cartels, Arrests, Crime, Organized crime, General news, Drug cartels, Drug-related crimes
Locations: Mexico City, Mexico, Central America, Latin America and Caribbean, Mexico, North America
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