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UK Riots
Title:
SD
Summary: Rioting in south London area of Clapham
Story No: 700389
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/09/2011 01:14 AM
People: David Cameron
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

++NIGHT SHOTS++

1. Mid of a looter walking towards the camera and hitting it; UPSOUND: (English) "Don''t be taking pictures man."

2. Mid of looters carrying goods; camera hit by one looter

3. Various of police stopping traffic

4. Pan of riot police guarding intersection

5. Pan of riot police

6. Pan from smashed window to riot police

7. Tilt from broken cash machine to ''HSBC'' sign

8. Tilt from sale poster to smashed window

9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Name not given, Local resident:

"We saw lots of youths and they actually just had gas masks over their faces. And they had so many TVs and microwaves and mobile phones they could barely carry them. There''s an HSBC ATM just pulled out onto the floor, just smashed to bits. All of the shops just have their windows smashed open. It''s just madness and there''s just more and more people joining and nobody seems to be actually stopping them."

10. Pan of damaged street

11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Name not given, Local resident:

"You can see more and more people just coming up the side streets to go and join in. You know these type of people because they''ve got big hoods over their faces and gas masks and scarves. You know what they''re there to do is to go and cause trouble, with their massive swag bags basically, but the police don''t seem to be doing anything."

12. Pan of damaged street

13. Tilt from glass on the ground to smashed doors of a department store

14. Tilt from ground to smashed store window display

15. Pan of inside of store

STORYLINE:

As violence and looting spread to new areas of London overnight on Monday one local resident in Clapham said police there "don''t seem to be doing anything".

Authorities struggled to contain the spiralling disorder on a third night of rioting in Britain''s capital and other major cities across the country.

In Clapham, in London''s south, looters spent more than an hour and a half smashing store windows, stealing electronic goods and even breaking into a bank cash machine.

Clapham Junction is home to one of Britain''s busiest train stations, which services Gatwick Airport and trains across the country.

One witness, who didn''t give her name, said she was disappointed by the police response.

"It''s just madness and more and more people just seem to be joining and nobody seems to be stopping them," she said.

The unrest began late on Saturday in London''s northern Tottenham district when a peaceful protest, over a fatal police shooting of a suspect, turned violent leaving parts of the high street charred and its shops looted.

Prime Minister David Cameron has cut short his summer holiday in Italy and will convene a meeting of the government''s crisis committee later on Tuesday to toughen the response to the escalating violence.

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Subjects: Riots, Political and civil unrest, General news
People: David Cameron
Locations: London, United Kingdom
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UK Tension
Title:
SD
Summary: Vigilantes on streets in bid to deter rioters, shops boarded up
Story No: 700554
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/10/2011 02:01 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

++NIGHT SHOTS++

New Addington, near Croydon, southeast London

1. Wide shot police and residents on street

2. Mid shot police in street

3. Mid shot police and residents

4. Mid shot residents talking

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Cliff Knight, New Addington resident:

"People just don''t want to have what''s happened in main Croydon happening in our community. We protect our own homes and we don''t want that up here. There''s generations of families that were born and lived up here, everybody knows everybody and they just want to make sure that we protect ourselves and our families really."

6. Various empty street with shops closed

7. Various people in street

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Billy Sharp, New Addington resident:

"We''re looking after our own community tonight because there''s too much going on, right? All around London and it''s getting stupid, ok? Right? We''re here and we''re making a stand today, we''re making a stand, right? We''re not having all these people coming up here and ruining our place, right? Burning our town down, right? We''re here and we''re going to make a stand."

9. Various people in street

10. Police on motorcycles

Enfield, north London

++NIGHT SHOTS++

11. Large group of local men patrolling the streets, cars honk horns in support

12. Group passes police officers

13. Various group of men patrolling streets

14. SOUNDBITE (English) Enfield resident (name not given)

"We are the Enfield army. We''re here for one reason: to stick up for our families. My girlfriend and my children are sitting at home. I''m here to protect them. These bastards take the piss mate and they are not English."

15. SOUNDBITE (English) Enfield resident (name not given)

"We''re here to help the police. We do believe, don''t we lads, that there''s not enough of them, there isn''t enough of them. There''s too much going on in too many different areas. They need back-up. They won''t bring the army in, they won''t bring no water cannons in, they need someone."

16. SOUNDBITE (English) Enfield resident (name not given)

"This is a small minority of London. This is not London. You see over there these people that are standing up for London, this is for London, this is London. These are people that are London, not the small minority that are going around smashing up stuff, that have got nothing to wake up for in the morning."

17. Group singing football songs as they patrol the streets

18. Group march over a bridge, smoke from the Sony depot fire is seen in the background

19. Car pulls up and a man in the back seat directs the group to where suspected rioters have been seen

20. Some men from the group spot several youths in side street and chase after them

Brixton, south London

++NIGHT SHOTS++

21. Exterior Brixton underground station, south London, with police outside

22. Mid shot police

23. Various police outside HSBC bank as it''s being boarded up

24. Police outside boarded up KFC fast food restaurant

STORYLINE:

Thousands more police officers flooded London streets on Tuesday in a bid to end Britain''s worst rioting in a generation as nervous shopkeepers closed early and some residents stood guard to protect their

neighbourhoods.

A number of residents of New Addington in southeast London took to the streets, saying they were aiming at preventing rioting and looting seen in nearby Croydon the night before.

Cliff Knight, a New Addington resident, said: "People just don''t want to have what''s happened in main Croydon happening in our community. We protect our own homes and we don''t want that up here."

There were similar scenes in Enfield, north London, where people marched through the neighbourhood to deter looters.

Scenes of ransacked stores, torched cars and blackened buildings frightened and outraged Britons just a year before London is to host the summer Olympic Games, and brought demands for a tougher response from law enforcement.

London''s Metropolitan Police department put thousands more officers on the streets and said that by Wednesday there would be 16,000 - almost triple the number on Monday.

Meanwhile, the leader of a British far-right group said its members were taking to the streets of British cities in an attempt to quell riots that have spread across the country for four nights.

Stephen Lennon, leader of the English Defence League, told The Associated Press that up to 1,000 members planned to turn out in Luton, where the group is based, and others areas that have suffered unrest, including the northwestern city of Manchester.

Lennon said some members were already carrying out patrols trying to deter rioters, and that hundreds more would join them on Wednesday.

The far-right group was cited as an inspiration to Anders Behring Breivik who has confessed to the July 22 massacre in Norway.

London saw no new unrest late on Tuesday, with many businesses boarded up and a significant police presence.

However, the chaos did spread to other British cities, with a police station in the central England city of Nottingham firebombed by a 40-strong mob, and hundreds of youths battling police in the northwestern city of Manchester.

Stores, offices and nursery schools across London closed early amid fears of fresh rioting. Many usually busy streets had an eerie calm as cafes, restaurants and pubs also decided to shut down for the night.

Many shops had their metal blinds pulled down, while other business owners rushed to secure plywood over their windows before nightfall.

London''s deputy assistant police commissioner Steve Kavanagh vowed that large numbers of officers would remain on London''s streets until calm was restored.

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Subjects: Riots, Political and civil unrest, General news
Locations: London, United Kingdom
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UK Riots 11
Title:
SD
Summary: Unrest in Hackney, Lewisham and Camden
Story No: 700385
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/09/2011 12:14 AM
People: David Cameron, Theresa May, Boris Johnson
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

Lewisham

1. Mid of riot police in street

2. Close-up car with smashed rear window, pan to police and debris in street

3. Burnt out car in street

4. People clearing glass from broken window in shop

Hackney

5. Wide of riot police running in street, with smoke and fires in background

6. Mid of riot police in street, with smoke and fires in background

7. Mid of street with people and damaged vehicles

8. Mid of riot police blocking street

9. Wide of riot police in street

10. Riot police escorting photographers away from area

11. Mid of riot police in street with fire burning in background

12. Riot police running in street, fire

13. Police vehicles in street AUDIO sirens sounding

++NIGHT SHOTS++

14. Crowds in street

15. Crowds and fire in street

Camden

++NIGHT SHOTS++

16. Riot police walking towards Camden Lock bridge

17. Police vehicle driving under bridge AUDIO sirens

18. Police line in street, AUDIO of breaking glass

19. Riot police running through street, police line moving back

20. Looted shop, pull out to police in street AUDIO burglar alarm

STORYLINE

Violence and looting spread to new areas of London on Monday as shops and cars were set ablaze and authorities struggled to contain the spiralling disorder on a third night of rioting in Britain''s capital.

The worst unrest in London in decades saw buildings, vehicles and rubbish dumps set alight, stores burgled and police officers pelted with bottles and fireworks, as groups of young people rampaged through neighbourhoods across the capital.

As authorities struggled to keep pace with the unrest, Prime Minister David Cameron cut short his summer holiday in Italy and will convene a meeting of the government''s crisis committee on Tuesday to toughen the response to the escalating violence.

The small groups of youths - most with their heads and faces covered - used SMS messages, instant messaging on BlackBerry cell phones and social media such as Twitter to coordinate their attacks and outwit the police.

In the Hackney area of east London, hundreds of youths attacked shops and set fire to cars.

Trouble also flared in Lewisham and Camden.

It began late on Saturday in London''s northern Tottenham district when a peaceful protest over the police''s shooting of a suspect turned violent, leaving parts of the high street charred and its shops looted.

As the unrest spread to districts in south and west London on Sunday, and to other neighbourhoods on Monday, some pointed to rising social tensions in Britain as the government slashes 80 (b) billion pounds (130 (b) billion US dollars) from public spending by 2015 to reduce the huge deficit, swollen after the country spent (b) billions bailing out its foundering banks.

The past year has seen mass protests against the tripling of student tuition fees and cuts to public sector pensions.

In November, December and March, small groups broke away from large marches in London to loot.

However, the full impact of spending cuts has yet to be felt and the unemployment rate is stable - although it is highest among youth, especially in areas like Tottenham, Hackney and Croydon.

The police urged communities to help clear the streets of people, and called on families to contact their children and ensure that they were not involved in the chaos.

Home Secretary Theresa May, the Cabinet minister responsible for policing, and London Mayor Boris Johnson also cut short summer vacations in an attempt to deal with the crisis.

May said 215 people had been arrested and 27 charged so far, including an 11-year-old boy accused of burglary.

About 100 of those arrested were 21 or younger and 35 police officers had been injured in the violence, police said.

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Subjects: Riots, Protests and demonstrations, Crime, Commercial fires, Political and civil unrest, General news, Fires, Accidents and disasters
People: David Cameron, Theresa May, Boris Johnson
Locations: London, United Kingdom
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UK Cameron
Title:
SD
Summary: British Prime Minister comments on riots after calling holiday short
Story No: 700445
Source: UK POOL
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/09/2011 10:39 AM
People: David Cameron
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

1. British Prime Minister David Cameron walks to microphone outside number 10 Downing Street

2. SOUNDBITE: (English) David Cameron, British Prime Minister:

"Good morning. I have come straight from a meeting of the government''s COBRA committee for dealing with emergencies where we have been discussing the action that we will be taking to help the police to deal with the disorder on the streets of London and elsewhere in our country. I have also met with the Metropolitan Police Commissioner and the Home Secretary to discuss this further. And people should be in no doubt that we will do everything necessary to restore order to Britain''s streets and to make them safe for the law-abiding. Let me first of all completely condemn the scenes that we have seen on our television screens and people have witnessed in their communities. These are sickening scenes - scenes of people looting, vandalising, thieving, robbing. Scenes of people attacking police officers and even attacking fire crews as they are trying to put out fires. This is criminality pure and simple and it has to be confronted and defeated. I feel huge sympathy for the families who have suffered, innocent people who have been burned out of their houses and to businesses who have seen their premises smashed, their products looted and their livelihoods potentially ruined. I also feel for all those who live in fear because of these appalling scenes that we have seen on the streets of our country. People should be in no doubt that we are on the side of the law abiding, law abiding people who are appalled by what has happened in their own community. As ever, police officers have shown incredible bravery on our streets in confronting these thugs, but it is quite clear that we need more, much more police on our streets and we need more robust police action and it''s that that I have been discussing in COBRA this morning. The Metropolitan Police Commissioner has said that compared with the six thousand police on the streets last night in London, there will be some 16 thousand officers tonight. All leave within the metropolitan police has been cancelled. There will be aid coming from police forces up and down the country and we will do everything necessary to strengthen and assist those police forces that are meeting this disorder. There''s already been 450 people arrested. We will make sure that court procedures and processes are speeded up and people should expect to see more, many more arrests in the days to come. I am determined, the government is determined that justice will be done and people will see the consequences of their actions. And I have this very clear message to those people who are responsible for this wrongdoing and criminality: you will feel the full force of the law and if you are old enough to commit these crimes you are old enough to face the punishment. And to these people I would say this: you are not only wreaking the lives of others; you are not only wreaking your own communities, you are potentially wreaking your own life too. My office this morning has spoken to the speaker of the House of Commons and he has agreed that Parliament will be recalled for a day on Thursday so I can make a statement to parliament and we can hold a debate and we are all able to stand together in condemnation of these crimes and also to stand together in determination to rebuild these communities. Now if you will excuse me there is important work to be done."

3. Cameron walks back inside

STORYLINE

British Prime Minister David Cameron recalled Parliament from its summer recess on Tuesday and tripled the number of police on the streets of London to deal with the crisis touched off by three days of rioting.

Cameron described the scenes of burning buildings and smashed windows in London and several other British cities as "sickening," but refrained from more extreme measures such as calling in the military to help beleaguered police restore order.

Instead, he said 16 thousand officers would be on the streets of the capital on Tuesday night - almost tripling the number on the streets Monday night.

"People should be in no doubt that we will do everything necessary to restore order to Britain''s streets and to make them safe for the law-abiding," Cameron told reporters after a crisis meeting at his Downing Street office.

A wave of violence and looting raged across London, as authorities struggled to contain the country''s worst unrest since race riots set the capital ablaze in the 1980s.

Some 450 arrests have been made.

Parliament will return to duty on Thursday, as the political fallout from the rampage takes hold.

The crisis is a major test for Cameron''s Conservative-led coalition government, which includes Liberal Democrats who had long suspected its program of harsh budget restraints could provoke popular dissent.

Cameron cut short his summer vacation in Italy, rushing home for the crisis meeting.

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Subjects: Riots, Arrests, Government and politics, Legislature, Political and civil unrest, General news, Law and order, Arrests, Crime
People: David Cameron
Locations: London, United Kingdom
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UK Cleanup
Title:
SD
Summary: Broom wielding volunteers help with cleanup after third night of rioting
Story No: 700487
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/09/2011 05:48 PM
People: Boris Johnson
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Volunteers hold their brooms in the air on Clapham High Street, UPSOUND: cheering

2. Mid of volunteers cheering as the last of the fires is put out by the fire brigade

3. Close of dust pan and brush in woman''s hands

4. Close of brushes resting next to their owners'' feet on the street

5. Mid of volunteers with brooms

6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Issy Krupski, 15, volunteer cleaner:

"These riots have been really awful and we just want to show our support for the community because everyone needs help to get back on their feet."

7. Close of brushes resting next to their owners'' feet on the street

8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tom Moriarty, 40, volunteer cleaner:

"I think it is a real show of strength from the community after something so negative to turn into something positive and look around and just see how cool it is that people have come down."

9. Mid of crowd gathered on street

10. Pan from street cleaning machine to official street cleaners in high visibility jackets standing in road

11. Mid of crowd

12. London Mayor Boris Johnson arrives with broom in his hand

13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Boris Johnson, London Mayor:

"I understand that there are calls for all sorts of measures including the army and I just want to stress that we have a system in this city and in this country of robust but consensual policing and that is what we propose to stick with."

14. Mid of Johnson talking to media

15. SOUNDBITE: (English) Boris Johnson, London Mayor:

"In 2012, next year, we are going to welcome the world to our city and it is a great city, it is a peaceful and a fundamentally safe city and when people come here they are going to find one of the safest, friendliest cities on earth."

16. Mid of Johnson talking to media

STORYLINE:

Britons swept up, patched up and feared further violence on Tuesday, demanding police do more to protect them after three nights of rioting left looted stores, torched cars and blackened buildings across London and several other U.K. cities.

In Clapham, a south London suburb, hundreds of volunteers gathered to clean the streets with brooms.

"These riots have been really awful and we just want to show our support for the community because everyone needs help to get back on their feet," one volunteer, 15 year old Issy Krupski said.

London''s Metropolitan Police force have vowed an unprecedented operation to stop more rioting, flooding the streets on Tuesday with 16,000 officers, nearly three times Monday''s total.

Although the riots started on Saturday with a protest over a police shooting, they have morphed into a general lawlessness that police have struggled to halt with ordinary tactics.

"I understand that there are calls for all sorts of measures including the army and I just want to stress that we have a system in this city and in this country of robust but consensual policing and that is what we propose to stick with," London''s mayor Boris Johnson said on a visit to the clean up.

Police in Britain generally avoid tear gas, water cannons or other strong-arm riot measures. Many shops targeted by looters had goods that youths would want anyway - sneakers, bikes, electronics, leather goods - while other buildings were torched apparently just for the fun of seeing something burn.

Police said plastic bullets were "one of the tactics" being considered to stop the looting. The bullets were common in Northern Ireland during its years of unrest but have never before been used in mainland Britain.

But police acknowledged they could not guarantee there would be no more violence. Stores, offices and nursery schools in several parts of London closed early amid fears of fresh rioting Tuesday night, though pubs and restaurants were open.

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Subjects: Riots, Municipal governments, Volunteerism, Political and civil unrest, General news, Local governments, Government and politics, Social affairs
People: Boris Johnson
Locations: Clapham, Australia
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UK Tension 8
Title:
SD
Summary: Thousands of extra police on London streets to deter rioters
Story No: 700713
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/11/2011 12:13 AM
People: David Cameron
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

++NIGHT SHOTS++

1. Police vans in street, police officers on pavement, pan left to police questioning man in red T-shirt

2. Police and police vans in street

3. Push forward to police questioning man in dark hooded top

4. Police and men in street

5. Wide of line of riot police and vehicles across road, with lights flashing

6. Riot police in street

7. Tracking shot of riot police moving

8. Riot police in street, pan right to police vans

9. Youths walking in street with police vans in background

10. Riot police walking across street to police vans

11. Various of riot police and vans in street

STORYLINE:

Thousands of extra police officers flooded the streets of London on Wednesday to deter rioters after Prime Minister David Cameron warned that the government would take any necessary action to restore order and confidence to Britain''s streets.

An eerie calm prevailed over most of the city as night fell, although in the south London neighbourhood of Eltham, the Metropolitan Police said some objects had been thrown at officers.

But the Met said the incident had been "dealt with" and that a group had been dispersed - leaving a highly-visible police presence on Eltham''s streets.

Earlier in the day, Cameron promised not to let a "culture of fear" take hold and recalled Parliament from its summer recess for an emergency debate on the riots on Thursday.

Scenes of ransacked stores, torched cars and blackened buildings have frightened and outraged Britons just a year before their country is to host next summer''s Olympic Games, bringing demands for a tougher response from law enforcement.

Police across the country have made almost 1,200 arrests since the violence broke out in the capital on Saturday.

The number of arrests in London alone has climbed to 805, with courts staffing around the clock to process alleged looters, vandals and thieves - including one as young as 11.

The surge in police numbers came on Tuesday, as armoured vehicles and convoys of police vans backed up some 16,000 officers on duty - almost triple the number who were out on Monday night.

The show of force seems to have worked - there were no reports of major trouble in London on Tuesday night, although there were scores of arrests.

England''s riots began on Saturday when an initially peaceful protest over a police shooting in London''s Tottenham neighbourhood turned violent.

That clash has morphed into a general lawlessness in London and several other cities that police have struggled to halt.

While the rioters have run off with goods many teens want - new sneakers, bikes, electronics and leather goods - they also have torched stores apparently just to see something burn.

They were left virtually unchallenged in several neighbourhoods, and when police did arrive they often were able to flee quickly and regroup.

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Subjects: Riots, Political and civil unrest, General news
People: David Cameron
Locations: Eltham, United Kingdom
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UK Birmingham
Title:
SD
Summary: Memorial for hit-and-run victims, clean-up, reax to rioting
Story No: 700786
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/11/2011 01:30 PM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

1. Mid of man placing flowers at makeshift memorial outside petrol station on Dudley Road where incident occurred in which three young men died

2. Close-up of man kneeling down and putting card into place

3. Close-up of man weeping while sitting in front of the petrol station

4. SOUNDBITE (English) David (no last name given), Birmingham resident:

"I think at this particular time, as Tariq (Jahan, father of 21-year-old Haroon Jahan) said yesterday, we are all part of the same community, black, white, Asian, Jew, Muslim, whatever. We are all part of the same city. We are all Brummies."

5. Close-up of card he wrote pinned to flowers reading (English) "We never met but we could have been best friends"

6. Close up of flowers with condolence cards

7. Tabloid newspaper front pages with photo and quotes from Tariq Jahan, father of 21-year-old Haroon Jahan who was killed, reading (English) "Why are we killing each other?" and "Don''t seek revenge for my son"

8. Various of Tariq Jahan in front of his home speaking to friends and well wishers on condolence visits

9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tariq Jahan, father of 21-year-old Haroon Jahan, killed in hit-and-run incident:

"If there is anything I can do to stop the situation from getting any worse, yeah, but I''m not aware of what''s happened (following his appeal on Wednesday). If the people are listening then please for god''s sake give it up. Stop this rioting and looting for no reason. I have said this a hundred times, you are not achieving anything, you know. People are losing their livelihoods, their homes. I have lost my family."

10. Jahan talking to friends, being photographed

11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tariq Jahan, father of 21-year-old Haroon Jahan, killed in hit-and-run incident:

"If you value your children, keep them at home, keep them off of the streets, to parents, and to the kids, if you are listening to a grey bearded old fellow that you have no respect for, then try and understand this: when you are my age, you will look back at your lives and think how stupid you were. Thank you very much."

12. Wide zoom in to Jahan walking away with arm around a man paying a condolence call

13. Mid of Jahan and same man walking with arms around each other

14. Wide of Asian-owned grocery shop across the street from the petrol station where fatal incident occurred

15. Mid of grocer''s son working outside

16. Two men talking in front of the shop

17. SOUNDBITE: (English) Danny Kahn, grocer''s son:

"Most of the shops on this road closed early on that day when, they were supposed to have, the lads were coming down, and now as you can see all of the shops are back open on the road and traffic is passing through and hopefully it will get back to normal today."

18. Women in headscarves walking by the petrol station memorial site

19. Flowers at makeshift memorial site, people walking past

20. Man putting flowers on lamp post in front of petrol station

21. Close-up of flowers with message on card reading (English) "RIP boys"

STORYLINE:

Outside a Birmingham petrol station where three young Asian men were killed during rioting in the early hours of Wednesday, a makeshift memorial of flowers and messages is growing.

Witnesses say a carload of rioters sped into a fleeing crowd of locals who had been trying to defend their shops from looters, hurling three young men into the air.

Amateur boxer Haroon Jahan, 21, and brothers Shazzad Ali, 30, and Abdul Musavir, 31 were all killed.

Their deaths have laid bare racial tensions underlying this week''s riots in Birmingham, Britain''s second-largest city and its most ethnically diverse.

One of the people leaving flowers at the memorial on Dudley Road said he hoped people would ignore their differences and come together as a community.

"We are all part of the same city. We are all Brummies," said David, who did not want to give his last name.

A fifth of the city''s one (m) million residents, or "Brummies" as they are known, are Muslims, most commonly of Pakistani origin.

About seven percent are black, mostly Caribbean, in background.

Many residents of Dudley Road and its surrounding Winson Green district said the attackers were black and accused them of deliberately targeting Muslim shops.

Haroon Jahan''s father, Tariq Jahan, appealed on Wednesday for the South Asian community not to seek revenge against the car''s occupants.

On Thursday, he repeated his message and called for an end to looting and rioting.

"I have said this a hundred times, you are not achieving anything, you know. People are losing their livelihoods, their homes. I have lost my family," he said.

Jahan was at his home on Thursday, receiving condolence visits from friends and wellwishers.

Elsewhere on Dudley Road, life appeared to be returning to normal.

Grocer''s son, Danny Kahn, said all the shops had closed early on Tuesday ahead of the riots, but most were now back open.

The commander of the 60-strong police team hunting the killers said on Thursday that they had already arrested the suspected driver and 11 others potentially linked to the shop attacks on Dudley Road.

But many members of the local community have accused police of not doing enough to prevent the killings in the first place.

With police nowhere to be seen on Tuesday night, the residents of Dudley Road say they were forced to arm themselves with bricks and stones, clubs and cricket bats to fend off the gangs.

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Subjects: Riots, Hit-and-run, Political and civil unrest, General news, Crime
Locations: Birmingham, United Kingdom
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