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Poverty Clipreel: Part 7
Title:
SD
Summary: Japan: Job Centre, Ethiopia: Villagers / Malnourished Children, Colombia: Prostitution / Prostitutes On The Street
Story No: X03770
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 31/12/2000 00:00 AM
People:
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Location: Tokyo, Japan: Job centre

Source: EF00/0126

Duration: 00:32

Location: Ethiopia: Villagers / malnourished children

Source: EF00/0423

Duration: 01:05

Location: Botota, Colombia: Prostitution / Prostitutes on the street

Source: EF00/0826

Duration: 00:17

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Subjects: Social Affairs, Prostitution, Social issues, Sex in society
Locations: Japan
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Poverty Clipreel: Part 5
Title:
SD
Summary: Peru: Straw Hut Settlement, South Africa: Begging In Streets, Colombia: Poor District
Story No: X03768
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 31/12/1999 00:00 AM
People:
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Location: Lima, Peru: Straw hut settlement

Source: EF98/1054

Duration: 00:38

Location: Johannesburg, South Africa: Begging in streets

Source: EF99/0240

Duration: 00:25

Location: Bogota, Colombia: Poor district

Source: EF99/0290

Duration: 01:14

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Locations: Peru
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Brazil Hunger
Title:
SD
Summary: Brazilian government campaign against hunger
Story No: 362113
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 31/01/2003 00:00 AM
People: Luiz Inacio Lula
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SHOTLIST:

1. Pan from Rocinha Shanty town to wide of shanty town

2. High angle shot of Shanty town narrow street

3. Zoom-out from an empty plate to wide of homeless man sleeping at the shanty town

4. Wide of homeless people sleeping on the street

5. Mid shot of homeless person sleeping

6. Wide of family in Leblon sleeping on the street

7. Zoom out from baby's foot to wide of mother sleeping on the street

8. Set up of homeless woman Sheila de Lima

9. SOUNDBITE: (Portuguese) Sheila de Lima, homeless woman:

"It's a long time since I had a proper meal. Sometimes I am able to find something to eat."

10. Set up of unemployed man Geraldo da Silva

11. SOUNDBITE: (Portuguese) Geraldo da Silva, unemployed man:

"It's a good idea, but new jobs would be better, wouldn't they?

(Question: Why?)

Because then lots of people will stop living in difficulty. With a job, the person has the conditions to buy food for the family."

12. Pan from famous Arch in Rio downtown to wide of facade of "Fundacao Sao Martinho"

13. Wide of street kids playing football

14. Close-up of meal being served on a plate

15. Wide of street girls eating

16. Wide of Jose Carlos de Souza getting his meal

17. Tilt-up from full plate to wide of street children Jose Carlos de Souza eating

18. SOUNDBITE: (Portuguese) Jose Carlos de Souza, street kid:

"You see, I think it's very cool ( the Zero Hunger Campaign) as there are a lot of people out there in need of a proper meal. Not only us, but also older people, adult people, elderly people that need to eat, that suffer from hunger."

19. Wide of street children eating

20. Set up Mauro Gaspar Filho, Press officer for "Fundacao Sao Martinho" (St Martin Foundation)

21. SOUNDBITE: (Portuguese) Mauro Gaspar Filho, Press Officer for "Fundacao Sao Martinho"

"This campaign, I understand, will be fundamental (in tackling hunger) if it is conducted in a serious, pro-active, manner and spreads across the rest of Brazil."

22. Set up of Dom Mauro Morelli, Bishop of Duque de Caxias

23. SOUNDBITE: (Portuguese) Dom Mauro Morelli, Bishop of Duque de Caxias:

"The question ( of fighting against the hunger in Brazil) still a political question. If the entire nation decides to confront the problem, I do believe that it's possible to sort out the problem of hunger in a short space of time."

24. Pull-out from shanty town street to wide of shanty town

STORYLINE:

Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva on Thursday launched his government's 'Zero Hunger' campaign, aimed at wiping out starvation and poverty in the Latin American country.

According to the Brazilian Institute for Geography and Statistics (IBGE), around 54 (m) million of the country's 175 (m) million population live below the poverty line, surviving on an income of less that one dollar a day.

Some six hundred shanty towns exist in Rio de Janeiro and it is not unusual to see entire families sleeping on the streets of the affluent suburbs, begging for money and food during the day.

Sheila de Lima and her children have spent the last two weeks on this street in Leblon, one of the most expensive areas of Rio. The 23 year old mother of three has been homeless for four years, and cannot recall the last time she had a decent meal.

The Brazilian government has allocated around 522 (m) million dollars (US) to the new Ministry of Food Security, who are responsible for Zero Hunger, in order to tackle the problem. The government aim to provide 14 dollars (US) a month to 1.5 (m) million families, mostly from the country's poverty-stricken northeast.

But, unemployed Geraldo da Silva, thinks the government should focus on creating new job opportunities for the impoverished population.

President Lula has said he wants to create conditions that would allow everyone in Brazil to eat a decent meal three times a day, with no need for handouts.

This Fundacao Sao Martinho or St Martin Foundation in downtown Rio has been providing free meals for street kids for the last eighteen years.

A press officer for the group, Mauro Gaspar Filho, thinks the new measures will be essential to combat starvation in Brazil, but only if the government initiatives are handled properly.

The first payments will start next week when 1,000 poor families in the arid northeastern state of Piaui each receive 14 dollars (US).

Eligible families living in towns and cities will receive a type of debit card to draw funds from a state-owned bank, while coupons will be used in remote regions without banks.

Bishop Dom Mauro Morelli has been actively campaigning to end starvation in Brazil for over twenty-one years. He believes that if the entire country pulls together to tackle the problem, it can be resolved in just 4 years.

The Brazilian government have also said it will maintain similar programmes developed by Lula's predecessor, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, including a project that gives families up to 13 US dollars per month for food as long as their children stay in school.

Another programme will give up to 13 dollars (US) a month to poor families with pregnant women or breast-feeding mothers.

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Subjects: Social Affairs, Homelessness, Poverty, Children, Social issues
People: Luiz Inacio Lula
Locations: Brazil
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Entertainment US UN Poverty
Title:
SD
Summary: Will.i.am and Kristin Davis attend UN campaign launch to end poverty
Story No: 579770
Source: Pool
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 26/09/2008 07:00 AM
People: Will.i.am, Kristin Davis, Elle MacPherson, Angelique Kidjo, Ban Ki-Moon, Desmond Tutu, Annie Lennox, Scarlett Johansson, Mischa Barton, Mary Robinson
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MUSICIANS, ACTORS AND WORLD LEADERS TEAM UP TO END POVERTY

Actors, musicians and royalty joined forces with United Nations Secretary-General Ban kimono to launch a new campaign to end poverty during a star-studded event outside of the United Nations in New York on Thursday (September 25).

Actor Kristin Davis, who plays Charlotte in the television series and movie, 'Sex and the City,' Australian model Elle MacPherson together with Will.i.am and Apl.De.Ap of the Grammy-winning group Black Eyed Peas helped launch the new campaign "In My Name" by aid organization Global Call to Action Against Poverty (GCAP).

Launching the initiative, the group's Kumi Naidoo was critical of the U.S. Government's $700 billion dollar bailout of the American economy, and said world leaders need to keep their promise to end world poverty.

"When we look at the money we are asking for, it's a fraction, one tenth at most of the $700 billion bailout package that magically seems to have been found to address the crisis caused by the greed and bordering on corruption on the part of bankers in the United States and elsewhere," Naidoo said.

Davis said nearly three billion people in the world live on less than two dollars a day, and that she didn't believe the aid organization was asking for too much.

"A little bit of money goes a long way and what the campaign is asking for is so much less than $700 billion," she said.

Will.i.am, Apl.De.Ap and singer Angelique Kidjo performed the new song "In My Name" which was written especially for the campaign, as Queen Rania Al Abdullah of Jordan and model Elle MacPherson looked on. Queen Raina said world leaders should be held to their promise to halve poverty by 2015.

"In the name of equality, justice and peace, in my name and in your name, let's fulfill the promise of the millennium," she said.

Gen. Ban Ki-Moon signed his name to the new campaign and said he is determined to see that world leaders honor their commitment to address the issue.

"As Secretary-General of the United Nations, I will be taking your message back to the many leaders, world leaders, I am meeting here this week," he said. "I'm determined to push them to keep the promises made here eight years ago."

The campaign has already garnered the support of various other dignitaries and celebrities including South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu, singer Annie Lennox and actresses Scarlett Johansson and Mischa Barton.

Pool

New York, 25 September 2008

1. UN secretary-general Ban Ki-Moon with actress Kristin Davis, Australian model Elle Macpherson, Will.i.am and Apl.de.ap of the Black Eyed Peas, singer Angelique Kidjo and former president of Ireland, Mary Robinson

2. More Kristin Davis, a Elle Macpherson, Will.i.am, Apl.de.ap and Ban Ki-Moon

3. Kristin Davis signing her name on perspex glass

4. Will.i.am and Apl.de.ap signing their names on perspex glass

5. SOUNDBITE (English), Kumi Naidoo, global call to action against poverty:

"When we look at the money we are asking for it's a fraction, one tenth at most of the 700 billion bailout package that magically seems to have been found to address the crisis caused by the greed and bordering on corruption on the part of bankers in the United States and elsewhere."

6. More of actor Kristin Davis, a Elle Macpherson and former president of Ireland Mary Robinson

7. SOUNDBITE (English), Kristin Davis, actress:

"A little bit of money goes a long way and what the campaign is asking for is so much less than 700 billion."

8. Will.i.am and Apl.de.ap of the Black Eyed Peas, singing their new song "In my Name"

9. Queen Rania al Abdullah of Jordan and model Elle Macpherson talking and listening to music

10. SOUNDBITE (English), Queen Rania al Abdullah of Jordan:

"In the name of equality, justice and peace, in my name and your name, let's fulfill the promise of the millennium"

11. UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon posing for photographs with Will.i.am and Apl.de.ap singer Angelique Kidjo and President of Benin, dr Boni yayi

12. Ban Ki-Moon signing his name on perspex glass.

13. SOUNDBITE (English), UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon:

"As Secretary General of the United Nations, I will be taking your message back to the many leaders, world leaders I am meeting here this week. I'm determined to push them to keep the promises made here eight years ago"

14. Elle Macpherson signing her name on perspex glass

15. Former president of Ireland Mary Robinson signing her name on perspex glass

16. More UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon with former president of Ireland Mary Robinson

16. More UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon with Black Eyed Peas musician Will.i.am and singer Angelique Kidjo

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Subjects: Government and politics, Hip hop and rap, Pop music, Rhythm and blues, Celebrity causes, Music, Poverty, Celebrity, Entertainment, Arts and entertainment, Human welfare, Social issues, Social affairs
People: Will.i.am, Kristin Davis, Elle MacPherson, Angelique Kidjo, Ban Ki-Moon, Desmond Tutu, Annie Lennox, Scarlett Johansson, Mischa Barton, Mary Robinson
Organisations: United Nations, Ireland government
Locations: Papua New Guinea, Papua New Guinea
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Poverty Clipreel: Part 1
Title:
SD
Summary: USA: Homeless Eating Dinner, Crowd Invades Employment Office, India: Scavenging From Rubbish Heap
Story No: X03764
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 01/01/2001 00:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

Location: USA: Homeless eating dinner

Source: Universal Newsreels 1929

Duration: 00:52

Location: New York, USA: Crowd invades employment office

Source: Universal Newsreels 1930

Duration: 00:32

Location: Calcutta, India: Scavenging from rubbish heap

Source: RR7338A

Duration: 00:59

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Locations: United States
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Poverty Clipreel: Part 2
Title:
SD
Summary: France: Soup Kitchen Queue, Russia: Homeless Begging, Mexico City Dump / Housing In Dump
Story No: X03765
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 01/01/2001 00:00 AM
People:
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Location: Paris, France: Soup kitchen queue

Source: G12128421

Duration: 00:31

Location: Moscow, Russia: Homeless begging

Source: G04019307

Duration: 00:38

Location: Mexico: Mexico City dump / housing in dump

Source: EF94/0066

Duration: 01:00

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Locations: Mexico
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(HZ) Cambodia  Computing
Title:
SD
Summary: A profitable Cambodian venture which is transforming lives of the poor
Story No: 578994
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 22/09/2008 08:59 AM
People:
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SHOTLIST:

Phnom Penh, Cambodia July 16th, 2008:

1. Moving pan shot of disabled girl Treng Kuy Chheng walking

2. Mid to close shot of girl preparing food

3.SOUNDBITE (Khmer): Treng Kuy Chheng, Employee at Digital Divide Data :

"This is my house. I lived here for about 18 years. Every morning I went to the market to buy vegetables which I sold just here. I never thought that I would have a life like I have today. I really thought I would just sell fruit forever."

4. Mid shot of girl riding to work on back of motorbike

5. Mid shot DDD office sign

6. Mid shot of girl sitting at computer in office

7. Tracking shot through office

8. Mid shot of man giving instructions on computer

9. SOUNDBITE (Khmer): Kunthy Kann, General Manager - Phnom Penh office, Digital Divide Data :

"We founded Digital Data Divide to provide data entry jobs to some of the most disadvantaged people in Cambodia - such as orphans, landmines survivors, polio victims and trafficked women."

10. Tracking mid shot of disabled employees walking through office

11. Wide of line of employees working at computers

12. Close shot of line of hands typing

13. Close shot of line of faces typing

14. Pan of woman walking into shot

15. SOUNDBITE (English): Lynn Watson, VP of client services, Phnom Penh office, Digital Divide Data :

"We've got young people coming on board who have never worked with a computer before, they certainly haven't worked in a large business environment. Part of what we do is to help train and teach what that's about: not only how to use a computer how - how to use it well, how to work in a business environment - skills that they can take and carry on to the next level in their careers."

16. Mid shot of employees on break relaxing around table

17. SOUNDBITE (Khmer): Thlok Srey Nay, 26, employee - Phnom Penh office, Digital Divide Data :

"Before I never used computers but in here I practice on them a lot. I'm learning to use a lot of computer programmes such as Word which I never used before. And most important for me, DDD also provides me with a scholarship to study at university."

18. Mid shot of computer monitor

19 Close of text being typed on computer screen

20. SOUNDBITE (Khmer): Sor Sontheary, external relations coordinator, Phnom Penh office, Digital Divide Data :

"We believe that developing human capital is the key to developing the Cambodian economy. We train people how to work because as the proverb says: it's better to teach a man to fish instead of just giving him fish to eat."

21. Mid shot of disabled employee at desk

22. Mid shot of face of disabled employee at desk

23. Mid of employees faces

24. SOUNDBITE (Khmer): Kunthy Kann, General Manager - Phnom Penh office, Digital Divide Data:

"We are competing with international companies in countries such as China and India which have access to a skilled workforce. We take people with no experience or suitable education and train them to compete."

25. Close shot of computer screen

26. Close of girl's face at desk

27. Close of mission statement sign in office

28. Mid to close shot of girl working at desk

LEAD IN:

Cambodia has tended to miss out on the IT revolution which has transformed much of east Asia and the poorest have had the most to lose.

But a radical scheme is underway to give technical and skilled jobs to the country's most disadvantaged and break the poverty cycle.

DDD is the set up of a non governmental organisation (NGO) operating in the capital Phnom Phen and unlike many other schemes it doesn't narrow people's career choices to traditional handicrafts.

Unskilled workers are trained until they can take better paying jobs elsewhere.

STORYLINE:

24 year old Treng Kuy Chheng had every reason to grow up believing that her life was going to be hard.

Not only was she born into grinding poverty, at the age of two she suffered polio.

Chheng was lucky to survive, but her illness left her badly disabled, badly affecting her future prospects.

Despite her disability she had to work every day at her family's food stall, before walking six miles to school.

Treng is now is one of five hundred disabled and disadvantaged people who have been offered the chance of a better life by Digital Divide Data (DDD).

The people who find themselves at this Phnom Penh office arrive for all sorts of reasons. General Manager Kunthy Kann says some are orphans, others are survivors of landmine explosions, some like Chhenghave had serious illnesses, while some of the women have suffered at the hands of human traffickers.

The scheme run by DDD doesn't just offer its employees work, it gives them control, independence and the opportunity to realise a better life for themselves.

Unlike traditional crafts to which many of the unemployed workers have to turn to, they are given skills in a constantly growing 21st century industry.

That was the goal of the company when it was founded in 2001 by an American entrepreneur.

Lynn Watson who is in charge of client services says it's not enough to teach the employees how to operate a computer, they are also given an understanding of how to operate in a business environment and more importantly they are given skills that can help them get to the next stage in their careers.

New employees start at the very beginning by learning to type, after six months training, they work on professional data entry projects, eventually some are promoted within the company while while others leave to take up job offers in the private sector.

Over one hundred and fifty people are now employed in DDD's Phnom Penh headquarters, with another three-hundred spread between the cities of Siem Reap, and Vientiane, as well as in neighbouring Laos.

The company competes for contracts on the international market and aims to turn a profit which is used to train new recruits.

It's clients include academic institutions such as Yale University and domestic mobile phone giant Mobitel.

The staff are well rewarded, they earn about (US)$90 each month, that's double the national average.

There's no doubt the company has been a success. Since 2007 DDD has made a working profit of over two million dollars (US).

Even so the working day at DDD is only six hours long, to ensure its workers are given the opportunity to study at university in the evening.

For 26 year old Thlok Srey Nay this scholarship is a vital ingredient by which she hopes to improve her life.

The company's goal is to build up human capital in Cambodia to tackle the root cause of poverty. Sor Sontheary, DDD's external relations coordinator recounts an old proverb, "It's better to teach a man to fish instead of just giving him fish to eat."

There are plans to increase the work force to 1500 people by 2012.

There are high hopes in Cambodia that projects such as DDD can play a key role in helping to reduce the country's dependency on aid.

It's success in helping people like Chheng has led to growing interest in the company a a business model from other poor countries in the region and beyond.

But for DDD, real success comes when employees graduate to better paying jobs elsewhere.

The employees say the best thing is gives them is the independence and earning power to take care of themselves and not have to rely on other people.

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Subjects: Digital divide, Scholarships, Poverty, Land mines, Technology issues, Technology, Education costs, Education, Social affairs, Human welfare, Social issues, War and unrest, General news
Locations: Phnom Penh, Krŏng Phnum Pénh, Cambodia
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UNifeed Access to Water
Title:
SD
Summary: Access to Water
Story No: UN00868
Source: UNDP (UNTV)
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 14/11/2006 14:15 PM
People:
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STORY: ACCESS TO WATER

TRT: 3:33

SOURCE: UNDP

RESTRICTIONS: NONE

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / SPANISH / LINGALA / NATS

DATELINE: RECENT, KINSHASA, DR CONGO / NAIROBI, KENYA / CARTAGENA, COLOMBIA

SHOTLIST:

KINSHASA, DR CONGO

1. Various shots, people gather water with buckets

2. Various shots, people collecting water

3. Med shot, woman with bucket of water on head

4. Med shot, people walking with water buckets on head

5. SOUNDBITE (Lingala) Marie Nugemba, Resident:

"I walk from very far every day. This is the only place we can get water from."

NAIROBI, KENYA

6. Wide shot, Kevin Watkins talking to producer

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Kevin Watkins, Lead Author and Director of the Human Development Report:

"The world's poorest people not only consume less water, they not only have to use water that is much more likely to be infected, to make their children sick, and even to kill their children-for the privilege of getting access to that dirty water, they pay ten times as much as wealthy people in their own country. And they're also paying more per unit of water as people living in cities like London and New York."

CARTAGENA, COLOMBIA

8. Various shots, water filling into bucket

9. Wide shot, woman carries buckets of water to house

10. Med shot, woman pours water into large bucket in house

11. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Resident:

"All of my life, ever since I can remember, we have been suffering because we don't have drinkable water here, we have to buy it. And when it rains we collect it to wash and to bathe, but the water for cooking and drinking we need to buy it from those expensive tanks."

12. Various shots, woman washes clothes in bucket

NAIROBI, KENYA

13. SOUNDBITE (English) Kevin Watkins, Lead Author and Director of the Human Development Report:

"We argue in the report is that the debate over whether 'should we have a market for water or not' is an irrelevance, the poor are already living in a water market. The real question is how do you regulate that market. How do you manage that market to make sure that water is available to the poor, on an affordable basis and on a sustainable basis? That doesn't mean water always has to be free-and sustainable financing of water provision is absolutely" critical-but in the report we draw attention to the importance of regulation, and that's an issue that goes beyond the ownership of the assets. And in many countries privatization is not a good idea, but the management of price

and quality through proper regulatory systems is the real challenge."

CARTAGENA, COLOMBIA

14. Tracking shot, man walks with water buckets

15. Various shots, man fills container with water

16. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Resident:

"We buy it or collect it (water) we have to get it in wherever means possible."

17. Wide shot, view of town and hillside

18. Various shots, streets in town

STORYLINE:

Residents of the Democratic Republic of Congo capitol Kinshasa sometimes have to walk for two to three hours a day to get water.

Millions of children and woman across the globe spend long hours trying to get water instead of being in school or working.

According to the 2006 Human Development Report (HDR), the world's poor pay a heavier price for clean, safe drinking water compared to their the more affluent neighbours.

In Kinshasa, Marie Nugemba spends one and half hours walking to a water source, after which carries 20 liters of water back to her home. "I walk from very far every day. This is the only place we can get water from."

Kevin Watkins the lead author and Director of the HDR said that the injustices in terms of water must be addressed now.

SOUNDBITE (English) Kevin Watkins, Lead Author and Director of the Human Development Report:

"The world's poorest people not only consume less water, they not only have to use water that is much more likely to be infected, to make their children sick, and even to kill their children-for the privilege of getting access to that dirty water, they pay ten times as much as wealthy people in their own country. And they're also paying more per unit of water as people living in cities like London and New York."

For 1.1 billion people around the world, water sources can be unreliable, unsafe or beyond their purchasing power.

The longstanding public-versus-private debate on water will not bring prices down, stresses the 2006 HDR. In recent years, public debate on water-delivery policy in developing countries has been dominated by a polarizing discussion on privatization versus public ownership.

But the report argues that this is a false choice, diverting attention from the ultimate goal of finding viable ways of getting potable water to those who can least afford to pay.

In the Colombian costal city of Cartegena, many residents of can only access water by buying from privately owned water trucks, and residents here pay ten times more for water then residents in the more affluent parts of the city.

SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Resident:

"All of my life, ever since I can remember, we have been suffering because we don't have drinkable water here, we have to buy it. And when it rains we collect it to wash and to bathe, but the water for cooking and drinking we need to buy it from those expensive tanks."

Watkins said that solutions must be found to regulate the price of water.

SOUNDBITE (English) Kevin Watkins, Lead Author and Director of the Human Development Report:

"We argue in the report is that the debate over whether 'should we have a market for water or not' is an irrelevance, the poor are already living in a water market. The real question is how do you regulate that market. How do you manage that market to make sure that water is available to the poor, on an affordable basis and on a sustainable basis? That doesn't mean water always has to be free-and sustainable financing of water provision is absolutely" critical-but in the report we draw attention to the importance of regulation, and that's an issue that goes beyond the ownership of the assets. And in many countries privatization is not a good idea, but the management of price and quality through proper regulatory systems is the real challenge." Watkins added.

Water and sanitation is not a donor-country priority, either, says the Report, with only five percent of Overseas Development Assistance spent on this sector. The authors say a doubling of aid flows-an extra US$3.4 billion to $4 billion annually is necessary to have any chance of reaching the MDG on water and sanitation.

Progress in water and sanitation requires large upfront investments with a very long payback period, says the 2006 HDR, so innovative strategies like the International Finance Facility are essential.

This would be money well spent, according to the authors, who estimate the economic return in saved time, increased productivity and reduced health costs at $8 for each $1 invested in achieving the water and sanitation target.

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Subjects: Population densities, Banking and credit regulation, Development aid, Demographics, Social affairs, Financial industry regulation, Industry regulation, Government business and finance, Business, Government business and finance, Government and politics, Industry regulation, Government regulations, Foreign aid, International relations
Locations: Kenya, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Colombia, Kinshasa, East Africa, Africa, Central Africa, South America, Latin America and Caribbean
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Middle East Poverty 2
Title:
SD
Summary: WRAP Poverty in Gaza on Eradication of Poverty Day
Story No: 582521
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 19/10/2008 13:53 PM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

Khan Younis, Gaza strip - 18 October, 2008

1. Wide of laundry hanging outside a mud-brick house

2. Bahjat Abdo El-Eshari, head of family, hanging laundry

3. Children sitting outside house

4. Close up of child

5. Various exteriors of house

6. Abdo El-Eshari walking into house

7. Woman walking into house

8. Woman folding clothes inside house

9. Wide of women folding clothes through interior window

10. Close-up of children

11. Various of Abdo El-Eshari and family members sitting on mattresses on floor

12. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Bahjat Abdo El- Eshari, head of family and resident of Khan Younis:

"The whole society is poverty struck. Even if we can buy basic food supplies, others might not be able to. Flour, sugar and basic supplies are generally very expensive. There is nothing but severe poverty. It became an epidemic in the Palestinian society."

13. Family member washing dishes

14. Child standing at door

Gaza City, Gaza strip - 19 October, 2008

15. Exterior of United Nations office in Gaza City

16. Wide of sacks of flour

17. Sign reads: "UNRWA Beach Distribution Center"

18. Various of people at distribution centre

19. Wide of men carrying sacks of flour

20. Men covered in white flour, loading sacks of flour into wheelbarrow

21. Sacks of flour being distributed to Palestinians

22. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Ibtehaj Doula, 75-year-old Palestinian resident of Shati Camp:

"Gaza's poverty level is even below zero. With the siege, there is no gas for cooking, no fuel. They are also cutting electricity and water. The people here doesn't have anything to spend. You can see children here with nothing. If people don't receive a little support they will die. It's real poverty."

Gaza City, Gaza strip - 19 October, 2008

23. Palestinians on cart with aid supplies on the back

24. Wide-shot of director of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) in Gaza Strip John Ging, being shown around a school

25. Close of poster ins chool

26. SOUNDBITE (English) John Ging, UNRWA Director in Gaza Strip:

"People don't need charity or handouts of food. There shouldn't be the unemployment that we have here if the crossings were open to allow the supplies to come in and for the exports to go out. It's as simple as that and it requires a change of policy, nothing more, nothing less."

27. Ging walking out through a crowd of people and getting into vehicle

28. UN vehicles driving away

STORYLINE:

Poverty in Gaza City and the West Bank was highlighted on the weekend as part of the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty.

The National Coalition for the Global Call to Action Against Poverty (GCAP) organised several events to mark the occasion.

The day is officially recognised on October 17, by the United Nations.

GCAP called on the international community and the Palestinian National Authority to act immediately to stop more Palestinian families living in poverty.

The coalition also called for better employment opportunities and social protection for Palestinians.

47-year old Bahjat Abdo El- Eshari lives with 11 family members in one small house in the central Gaza Strip city of Khan Younis.

His family is suffering from extreme poverty, and said he was pleased poverty was in the limelight.

El- Eshari has been out of work for many years.

He said he finds it hard to provide for his family from month to month.

The family lives on aid they receive from relief agencies and human rights organisations.

There seems to be no signs of improvement in the foreseeable future on the grievous conditions in which they live.

El- Eshari said his family's poverty is typical of the entire community.

Many are even worse off, he said.

The director of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) in Gaza Strip said during a visit to a school in Gaza City that crossings need to be opened in order for supplies to reach those in need. John Ging called for a change in policy.

Since Hamas took over the Gaza Strip in June 2007, the already poverty-stricken area, was hit even harder by Israeli closures and international sanctions.

According to United Nations figures, nearly 80 percent of Palestinians live below the poverty line, on less than two dollars a day.

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Subjects: Poverty, Human welfare, Social issues, Social affairs
Organisations: United Nations
Locations: Gaza, Gaza Strip, Palestine
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(V) Pakistan Water
Title:
SD
Summary: VOICER Acute water shortage results in daily violence
Story No: 378727
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 28/06/2003 00:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

VOICED BY: RICHARD VAUGHAN

SHOTLIST

00 00 Children waiting with their water containers

00 05 Wide shot of children and women waiting with their water containers

00 08 Close up of girl waiting

00 11 Various of containers with people waiting to use tap

00 14 Woman sitting as tap fills container

00 17 Close up of container filling with water

00 19 SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Juma Khan Gul, local resident

00 30 Family pushing cart carrying containers of water

00 35 Close up of woman waiting while container fills with water

00 37 Wide shot of protesters blocking road

00 40 Burning tyre on the road

00 43 FX Policeman firing tear gas at protester

00 46 Wide shot of police

00 49 Pull out from containers to wide shot of people waiting to fill containers

00 54 Close up of hose filling containers

00 56 Children looking on

00 59 Wide shot of Hub Dam

01 02 People sitting on rocks next to water

01 05 Wide shot of buildings in Karachi

01 10 ENDS

STORYLINE:

Ongoing water shortages have led to skirmishes between the Pakistani authorities and residents of the port city of Karachi.

Temperatures during the summer months are frequently hitting 45 degrees Celsius (113 Fahrenheit) in Karachi and rise above 50 (122) in many other parts of Pakistan.

SUGGESTED VOICE OVER:

00 02

Queueing for water.

00 05

Some have waited for hours in the blistering heat to get their allocation.

00 09

The residents of Karachi's urban slums have been facing severe shortages since October, when authorities began rationing water.

00 19

FX

00 22

This man says the children are missing school while they wait to make their collection.

SUPERCAPTION: Juma Khan Gul, local resident

00 30

Others say the water they have been given is dirty and they want the government to take immediate action.

00 37

Angered by the shortage, some protesters block roads and set fire to tyres.

00 43

FX

00 44

The police respond with tear gas.

00 47

These demonstrations are the latest in a series of protests that have taken place in the province.

00 54

Over the past few years rainfall levels in the area have dropped.

00 59

The lack of rain has reduced water levels in Karachi's main reservoir.

01 03

Southern and western districts of Karachi have been worst affected by the shortages.

01 10

ENDS

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Subjects: Water shortages, Protests and demonstrations, Water management, Water environment, Environment, Environment and nature, Water management, Natural resource management, Water shortages, General news, Political and civil unrest
Locations: Karachi, Pakistan, South Asia, Asia
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