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Iraq Attack
Title:
SD
Summary: Aftermath of Sunday suicide car bomb; 30 dead, 50 wounded
Story No: 512633
Source: AGENCY POOL
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 02/12/2007 01:49 PM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide pan of people gathered around a building that collapsed in the explosion

2. Close of men walking through the rubble

3. Wide of people moving debris from a collapsed building

4. Various of damaged vehicles

5. Various of bodies wrapped up in cloth or blankets

6. Zoom in of rubble and debris from collapsed building

7. Various of blood stained debris from explosion

8. Pan of three destroyed houses/buildings to a flattened vehicle

9. Various of boxes and debris with blood stain on the wall

10. Close of people gathered near a vehicle

11. Med of damaged vehicle with people standing around it

12. Wide of collapsed building

13. Pan of people gathered around the area of the explosion, some of the people holding guns

STORYLINE:

A suicide truck bomber slammed into a crowd of police lining up for duty on Sunday near Tikrit, killing at least 30 people and wounding 50, police said.

Minutes later, a roadside bomb struck a car on a highway on the western outskirts of Tikrit, 130 kilometres (81 miles) north of Baghdad, killing two civilians and wounding two others, police said.

Blood and debris littered the site of the attack.

The first blast occurred about 8 am (5:00 GMT) on Sunday as police were arriving for work at the Adwar police

station, a provincial police Captain said, giving the casualty toll.

He said 21 of the 30 killed were policemen.

The bomber drove a small truck that was packed with explosives covered by hay and the force of the blast caused the building to collapse.

Three houses close to the station, along with municipal offices and the post office, also were heavily damaged.

A total of 76 people were killed or found dead across Iraq on Sunday.

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Subjects: Building collapses, Bombings, Accidents and disasters, Improvised explosives, Suicide bombings, Structural failures, Accidents, General news, War and unrest, Terrorist attacks, Terrorism
Locations: Tikrit, Şalāḩ ad Dīn, Iraq
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Iraq Curfew
Title:
SD
Summary: Empty streets in Baghdad on 4th anniversary of fall of capital
Story No: 518715
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 04/09/2007 11:16 AM
People: Saddam Hussein, Saddam Hussein, Muqtada al-Sadr
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide shot of empty street with barbed wire in foreground

2. Wide shot of al Fardous Square, where the statue of Saddam Hussein used to stand and was toppled during the fall of Baghdad

3. Close-up of mosque and statue

4. Various shots of empty streets

5. Iraqi soldiers at roadblock

6. Wide shot of roadblock

7. Various shots of closed shops

STORYLINE:

A 24-hour vehicle curfew was imposed in Baghdad on Monday, on the fourth anniversary of the fall of the capital to US forces.

Streets were largely empty of both people and cars, and most shops were closed up.

Only pedestrians were allowed on the streets.

The anniversary is officially a public holiday.

Similar bans have been imposed in the past to prevent vehicle bombings.

Meanwhile, thousands of demonstrators marked the anniversary in the holy city of Najaf, 160 kilometres (100 miles) south of Baghdad.

The rally was called by powerful Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr to protest at the continuing occupation of Iraq by US-led forces.

Al-Sadr commands an enormous following among Iraq's majority Shiites and has close allies in the Shiite-dominated government.

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People: Saddam Hussein, Saddam Hussein, Muqtada al-Sadr
Locations: Baghdad, Baghdād, Iraq
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Iraq Blast 3
Title:
SD
Summary: Second car bombing in Baghdad killed 17 people, wounding 55
Story No: 524425
Source: AGENCY POOL
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 05/29/2007 05:04 PM
People: Nouri al-Maliki
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Police pickup arriving at blast site

2. Collapsed buildings and rubble, people carrying wounded

3. People walking among rubble of buildings, men evacuating wounded man drenched with blood

4. Large crater caused by blast and people walking among rubble of buildings

5. People searching among rubble for people

6. Various of people searching among rubble for people

7. People among rubble of building

8. People carrying body draped in blanket out of rubble of house

9. Injured man with face and shirt covered with blood walking out of rubble

10. Wounded man covered with blood walking among rubble

11. People at blast site/ women crying

12. people amidst rubble of buildings

13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Voxpop, Resident:

"A truck was driving from here and heading towards the mosque. When I saw it I shouted "a car bomb, a car bomb" and people started to run and took shelter in that house."

14. Police vehicle with wailing siren leaving site carrying wounded from earlier blast in Tayaran square

15. Sign "al-kindi hospital"

16. Ambulance leaving hospital

17. Wounded on stretcher being taken into hospital

18. exterior "emergency"

19. Ambulances speeding up to hospital

20. Wounded on stretcher taken out from ambulance and wheeled into hospital

21. Ambulance leaving hospital

STORYLINE:

A pickup truck parked in a market for spare car parts exploded in the Amil district in western Baghdad on Tuesday afternoon, killing 17 people and wounding 55 others, police said.

The blast damaged 10 nearby houses and a Shiite mosque and set eight cars ablaze, police said.

"A truck was driving from here and heading towards the mosque. When I saw it I shouted "a car bomb, a car bomb" and people started to run and took shelter in that house," one man said at the scene.

An hour earlier a parked minibus packed with explosives blew up in an area filled with bus stops and shops in Tayaran Square, central Baghdad, killing 23 people and injuring 68 others, police said.

Also on Tuesday eight U.S. soldiers were killed in roadside bombings and a helicopter crash in the restive Diyala province north of Baghdad, the military reported, making May the deadliest month of the year for U.S. troops in Iraq.

Three German citizens working for a German computer company were kidnapped from an Iraqi Finance Ministry office in Baghdad, an Iraqi government official said, and two car bombings killed 40 people in the capital, police said.

And in Samarra, 95 kilometres (60 miles) north of Baghdad, set up fake checkpoints on the outskirts of the city and abducted more than 40 people, most of them soldiers, police officers and members of two tribes that had banded together against local insurgents, police said.

The violence and kidnappings came a day after U.S. and Iranian officials met in Baghdad under the auspices of Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki to try to end it.

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Subjects: Bombings, War and unrest, Improvised explosives, General news
People: Nouri al-Maliki
Locations: Iraq, Baghdad, United States, Middle East, North America
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Iraq Explosions
Title:
SD
Summary: At least 26 killed in huge explosion, hospital
Story No: 510798
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 01/25/2007 08:26 PM
People: Nouri al-Maliki
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Various of thick plume of black smoke

2. US helicopter flying over the Green Zone

3. Various of thick plume of black smoke

4. Various of men running towards hospital

5. Pan from hospital sign to woman running

6. Woman running, pan to ambulance arriving, UPSOUND: siren

7. Bloodstained man walking to hospital

8. More ambulances arriving

9. Sign in Arabic reading "Ibn al Nafees Teaching Hospital"

10. Various of ambulances driving UPSOUND: sirens

11. Various of injured men walking

12. Ambulance leaving UPSOUND: siren

STORYLINE:

A suicide car bomber struck a mostly Shiite neighborhood Thursday in central Baghdad, killing 26 people, hours after the prime minister promised the coming U.S.-Iraq security sweep in the capital would pursue militants wherever they were hiding.

The blast occurred shortly after two rockets slammed into the heavily fortified Green Zone. Two hours later, a second huge explosion rocked the

area.

Police said they had blown up a second car bomb that had been disabled before its second suicide bomber could detonate it.

A massive plume of black smoke rose into the air on the east bank of the Tigris River and heavy gunfire rang out in the aftermath of the explosions.

The suicide bomber struck in the central neighborhood of Karradah, the second to hit the area in three days.

At least three policemen were among the dead.

Angry Shiite residents took to the streets chanting "We want the Sunnis out!" There is a small Christian and Sunni population in that section of the city.

The blast destroyed three minivans, 11 cars and dozens of shops, as well as the neighborhood's post office, according to a resident.

It struck shortly after the explosions in the Green Zone, which houses the U.S. and British embassies and Iraqi government offices. The public address system inside the massive compound could be heard warning in English that people should take cover because "this is not a drill."

The U.S. military said initial reports indicated that at least two rockets struck the Green Zone, but it said it could not give more details.

Karradah has been the site of several bombings, including one on Tuesday that killed four people and wounded seven.

Ambulances raced from the scene, at least one with the back door still open and bodies stacked in the back.

Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki told lawmakers that the coming U.S-Iraqi security sweep in Baghdad would not be the last battle against militants, and he said the insurgents would not be safe anywhere in the country.

Al-Maliki did not reveal the details of the plan, which he has dubbed "Operation Imposing Law," or say when it would begin.

But he promised to go after those behind Baghdad's rampant violence no matter where they tried to hide, although he promised to ensure the human rights of innocent Iraqis.

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Subjects: Bombings, Suicide bombings, Accidents and disasters, Improvised explosives, War and unrest, General news, Terrorist attacks, Terrorism
People: Nouri al-Maliki
Locations: Baghdad, Baghdād, Iraq
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Iraq UK 6
Title:
SD
Summary: WRAP UK PM in Iraq, pressers, Blair sndbte; sound of explosion
Story No: 523276
Source: POOL
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 05/20/2007 01:49 AM
People: Tony Blair, Nouri al-Maliki, Jalal Talabani, Saddam Hussein, George W. Bush, Gordon Brown
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

Basra

1. Wide, exterior, British military base, AUDIO: sirens and explosion

Basra

2. SOUNDBITE: (English), Tony Blair, British Prime Minister:

"What you are doing here is of fundamental importance to the whole future, not just of Iraq, but of the wider region and the wider world. And if we don't sort this region out, then there is in my view a very troubled and difficult future for the world ahead of us."

Basra

3. Pan to close up of British Prime Minister, Tony Blair

4. Close up of soldier

5. Blair at table with troops (++PART MUTE++)

Baghdad

6. Blair greeted by Iraqi prime minister Nouri al-Maliki

7. Zoom-in to Blair and al-Maliki holding talks

8. Pan from Blair to al-Maliki in talks

9. Iraqi President Jalal Talabani and al-Maliki walking towards news conference

Baghdad

10. Blair, al-Maliki and Talabani entering news conference

11. SOUNDBITE (English) Tony Blair, British Prime Minister:

"I have no doubt at all that Britain will remain steadfast in its support for Iraq, for the Iraqi people and for the Iraqi government as it tries to make sure that it overcomes the threat of terrorism and continues to make progress. The policy that I pursued is a policy for the whole of the government, so even when I leave office I am sure that that steadfast support will continue."

12. Cutaway of news conference

13. SOUNDBITE (English) Jalal Talabani, Iraqi President

"If you look to all Iraq, the situation is improving. A place like Anbar is now mainly liberated from terrorism. In other places people are cooperating with security forces. Kurdistan is calm and quite secure. The south is also. So even if you look to the car bombs, which were used in Baghdad, the number was from 10-14 before now it is daily two or three. And if you look to Baghdad, the eastern part of Tigris is totally liberated from terrorist activities. And in the western part also many good steps have been done for the section and places."

14. SOUNDBITE (English) Tony Blair, British Prime Minister:

"Every time there is an attempt to make progress, of course the terrorists redouble their efforts and our response should not be then to walk away or to give in. It should be to stand up to them. Because they don't represent the true will of the Iraqi people, these people do (indicating Talabani and al-Maliki). They were elected. You can't just write them out of the picture and say they don't have a voice."

(Journalist: I am not writing them out of the picture.)

"Hang on a minute. Let's just wait and see today, when he talks on behalf of Iraq and when he talks on behalf of Iraq (indicating Talabani and al-Maliki) how much that is covered as having some authentic voice of what is actually happening here. Because these guys are facing this danger every single day all the time. But they are not giving in in the face of it, they are standing up to it. And we should be standing up to it."

15. Cutaway of news conference

16. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Nouri al-Maliki, Iraqi Prime Minister:

"If people only knew the extent of the support (the insurgents were receiving from forces outside of Iraq) they would know just how much the Iraqi government has achieved in curbing the insurgency and rising up to the challenge of cutting off support given to terrorists both internally and externally. What they (insurgents) are doing now is nothing compared to what they had planned for the destruction of the political process in Iraq."

Baghdad

17. Cutaway of news conference

18. SOUNDBITE (English) Tony Blair, British Prime Minister:

"The only choice we can make if we're serious about what we believe in is too support them against those who want violence and terrorism to decide the future.

(Journalist: So, no regrets then about removing Saddam?)

"No regrets about removing Saddam, no."

Baghdad

19. Blair, al-Maliki and Talabani leave news conference

STORYLINE:

The outgoing British prime minister Tony Blair told British troops at their base in Basra, Southern Iraq, on Saturday that they were doing a vital job for the region and the world, while separately a large explosion is heard during his visit.

"What you are doing here is of fundamental importance to the whole future, not just of Iraq, but of the wider region and the wider world," he said, adding : "if we don't sort this region out, then there is, in my view, a very troubled and difficult future for the world ahead of us."

Almost as he arrived, the base trembled from a large explosion nearby, thought to be an insurgent attack.

It was Blair's seventh visit to Iraq, probably the last of his premiership, and it started with top-level talks with the government in Baghdad, where he was hoping to persuade them to call new provincial elections with increased efforts to bring those linked to violence into the political process.

After meeting with Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, the two leaders, along with Iraqi President Jalal Talabani, attended a news conference in Baghdad.

Blair said he told al-Maliki and Talabani that Britain would continue to support them after he left office in June, and he urged them to speed up reconciliation between Iraq's divided communities by calling new provincial elections and increasing efforts to bring tribal leaders and others linked to violence into the political process.

"I have no doubt at all that Britain will remain steadfast in its support for Iraq," Blair told reporters at the news conference.

"The policy that I pursued is a policy for the whole of the government, so even when I leave office I am sure that that steadfast support will continue," he said.

Blair appeared irritated at repeated news conference questions about levels of violence, saying Iraqi officials had assured him in talks that there were signs of progress on security.

Blair insisted that the Iraqi insurgency does not "represent the true will of the Iraqi people, these people do (indicting Talabani and al-Maliki). They are elected. You can't just write them out of the picture and say they don't have a voice."

But Prime Minister al-Maliki said that journalists question the situation in Iraq simply because they do not know what is really going on in the country.

"If people only knew the extent of the support (the insurgents were receiving from forces outside of Iraq) they would know just how much the Iraqi government has achieved in curbing the insurgency and rising up to the challenge of cutting off support given to terrorists both internally and externally. What they (insurgents) are doing now is nothing compared to what they had planned for the destruction of the political process in Iraq," said al-Maliki following Blair's comments.

Blair also told reporters that he had "no regrets" about the removal of former Iraqi president Saddam Hussein.

During his 45-minute meeting with al-Maliki, which Talabani joined after it was under way, the British leader injected a sense of urgency into attempts to increase political representation for Sunnis, Blair's spokesman said.

Blair did not win an agreement from the Iraqi leaders to hold new provincial elections, the spokesman said.

Blair had hoped provincial elections could take place in 2007 and that Sunni groups, who boycotted the last similar poll, would field candidates, the spokesman said.

Britain does not favour talks with foreign terrorists, the spokesman said, but would support moves to bring those whose violence was motivated by concerns about whether their community will have a place in the new Iraq into the political sphere.

Blair, whose premiership has been dominated by his unpopular decision to join the 2003 invasion to topple Saddam, arrived in Iraq via Kuwait, following talks in Washington with President George W. Bush on Thursday.

Britain has almost completed the process of pulling about 1,600 troops out of Iraq, leaving a force of around 5,500 based mainly on the fringes of the southern city of Basra.

Troops levels are likely to fall below 5,000 in late summer, but Blair has said British soldiers will stay in the Basra region until at least 2008 to train local forces, patrol the Iran-Iraq border and secure supply routes.

A mounting military death toll - 148 British troops have died in Iraq since the start of the 2003 invasion - has led some Britons to call for Blair's successor, current Chancellor (finance minister) Gordon Brown to speed up the withdrawal of British soldiers and to cool relations with Bush.

Brown said last Sunday that Britain was divided over Iraq but claimed most citizens - even those opposed to the invasion - accepted that it is in their interests to support al-Maliki's administration.

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Subjects: War and unrest, Government and politics, War casualties, Government policy, Terrorism, General news
People: Tony Blair, Nouri al-Maliki, Jalal Talabani, Saddam Hussein, George W. Bush, Gordon Brown
Organisations: Iraq government, United Kingdom government, British armed forces
Locations: United Kingdom, Iraq, Baghdad, Middle East, Western Europe, Europe
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Iraq Violence 2
Title:
SD
Summary: Samarra attack destroys Askiriya shrine minarets; Baghdad emptying for curfew
Story No: 526202
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 06/13/2007 05:15 PM
People: Muqtada al-Sadr, Nouri al-Maliki, David Petraeus
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

Samarra

+++QUALITY AS INCOMING+++

1. Distant shot of the damaged Askariya shrine

2. Askariya shrine, clock tower in foreground, destroyed minaret behind, pan left to another dome

3. Closer shot separate dome pan right to destroyed minaret of Askariya shrine, clocktower in foreground

4. Various of destroyed minaret, clocktower in foreground

5. Wide shot of skyline, destroyed minaret and separate dome, zoom in closer

6. Shakey shot destroyed minaret pan left to separate dome

7. Pull out from shrine to street

Baghdad

8. Deserted street in centre, barbed wire in foreground (people staying off the streets in anticipation of curfew announced)

9. Closer shot street, American Humvees passing as they patrol

10. Various of nearly deserted streets, Iraqi police on the street

STORYLINE:

Saboteur bombers on Wednesday destroyed the two minarets of the Shiite holy shrine of Askariya in Samarra, in a repeat of a 2006 bombing that shattered its famous Golden Dome and unleashed a wave of retaliatory sectarian violence that still plagues Iraq

Police said the attack at about 9 a.m. (0500gmt) involved explosives and brought down the two minarets, which had flanked the dome's ruins. No casualties were reported.

Sunni extremists of al-Qaida were quickly blamed, and the attack immediately stirred fears of a new explosion of Sunni-Shiite bloodshed.

Meanwhile in Iraq, streets in the centre were almost deserted, except for US military patrols and Iraqi police, as a curfew was enforced following the Samarra shrine attack.

The repeat assault on a revered Shiite shrine immediately stirred fears of a new explosion of intra-Muslim bloodshed, and prompted the 30-member bloc of radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr to suspend its membership in Iraq's parliament, threatening a deepened political crisis.

To try to ward off an upsurge in Iraq's unending violence, Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki quickly imposed a indefinite curfew on vehicle traffic and large gatherings in Baghdad - at first set for 3 p.m. (1100gmt) on Wednesday, later delayed to (1400gmt) 6 p.m.

It wasn't clear how the attackers evaded the shrine's guard force to mount the stunning operation, detonating the

blasts around 9 a.m., and bringing down the two slender golden minarets that flanked the dome's ruins at the

century-old mosque.

Policemen at the shrine were subsequently detained and will be questioned as part of the investigation, al-Maliki

said.

In addition to ordering the curfew, al-Maliki's office said, the Iraqi leader met U.S. Iraq commander General

David Petraeus and U.S. Ambassador Ryan Crocker to ask that American reinforcements be sent into Samarra, 95 kilometres (60 miles) north of Baghdad, and U.S. troops in the capital be put on heightened alert.

Al-Maliki later, in a nationally televised address, said he had ordered security forces to beef up protection of

religious shrines and mosques across Iraq.

The Shiite prime minister also warned against reprisal sectarian attacks.

An unnnamed official close to the prime minister, citing intelligence reports, said Wednesday's bombing was likely the work of al-Qaida, whose militants have recently moved into Samarra from surrounding areas.

Black banners were hoisted outside the Najaf residence of radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr, who called for a three-day mourning period to mark the minarets' destruction.

The cleric, who criticised the government for not doing enough to protect the site, also called for peaceful demonstrations following the blasts.

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Subjects: War and unrest, Government and politics, General news
People: Muqtada al-Sadr, Nouri al-Maliki, David Petraeus
Organisations: Iraq government, Al-Qaida
Locations: Baghdad, Iraq, United States, Middle East, North America
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Iraq Hospital 2
Title:
SD
Summary: WRAP Wounded in hospital after massive truck bombing kills over 120
Story No: 511758
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 02/03/2007 09:44 PM
People:
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SHOTLIST:

1. Man with injured head walking past security

2. Dead body on stretcher inside room

3. Mid of ambulance rushing to scene AUDIO siren

4. Various of injured arriving at hospital

5. Various of injured in crowded hospital corridor

6. Young man with bandage around his head

7. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Vox pop, Injured man (no name given):

"A big bomb went off in the market and everyone took cover, that's all I remember."

8. Man on stretcher

9. Various of injured being rushed through hospital corridor on stretchers and in wheelchairs

10. Man with bandaged leg in wheelchair

11. Various of injured in ward

12. Young man being carried into hospital by two men

13. Man on drip being wheeled out of hospital ward

STORYLINE:

A suicide truck bomber struck a market in a predominantly Shiite area of Baghdad on Saturday, killing as many as 121 people and wounding more than 200, the biggest strike in the capital in more than two months.

The attacker was driving a truck carrying food when he detonated his explosives, destroying stores and stalls that had been set up in the busy outdoor Sadriyah market, police said.

The blast occurred at 1640 local time (1340 GMT) as the market was crowded with people buying food for their evening meal.

Nearby hospitals were flooded with victims from the blast.

Many were driven to the hospitals in pickup trucks and lifted onto stretchers while several men helped overwhelmed medics by holding plastic drips.

"A big bomb went off in the market and everyone took cover, that's all I remember," said one of the survivors.

It was the deadliest attack in the capital since November 23, when suspected al-Qaida in Iraq fighters attacked the capital's Sadr City Shiite slum with a series of car bombs and mortars that struck in quick succession, killing at least 215 people.

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Subjects: Bombings, Improvised explosives, General news, War and unrest
Locations: Baghdad, Baghdād, Iraq
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Iraq Talks 3
Title:
SD
Summary: WRAP Talks between US, Iran on security in Iraq; ADDS presser by US amb.
Story No: 524271
Source: POOL
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 05/28/2007 04:31 PM
People: Nouri al-Maliki
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

1. US delegation, headed by Ambassador Ryan Crocker, arrives

2. Iranian delegation, headed by Ambassador Hassan Kazemi Qomi, arrives

3. Wide of delegations at table, headed by Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki

4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Ryan Crocker, US Ambassador to Iraq:

"I would characterise the atmosphere of the talks as businesslike. The Iranians as well as ourselves laid out the principles that guide out respective policies towards Iraq. There was pretty good congruence right down the line and support for a stable, democratic federal Iraq, in control of its own security, at peace with its neighbours.

5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Ryan Crocker, US Ambassador to Iraq:

"I made clear from the American point of view that this is about actions, not just principles. And I laid out before the Iranians a number of direct specific concerns about their behaviour in Iraq."

6. SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Nouri al-Maliki, Iraqi Prime Minister

"We are confident that achieving any progress in this meeting will strengthen no doubt the bridges of confidence between the two states."

7. Wide of al-Maliki at table

8. Qomi and officials

9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Ryan Crocker, US Ambassador to Iraq:

"The Iranians did not go into any great detail. They made the assertion that the coalition presence was an occupation and that the effort to train and equip the Iraqi security forces was inadequate to the challenges faced. We of course responded on both points, making it clear that coalition forces are here at the Iraqi government's invitation and under (UN) Security council authority and that we have put literally billions of dollars into training and equipping an increasingly capable set of iraqi security forces."

10. Wide of delegates at table

11. Crocker and officials

STORYLINE:

The United States ambassador in Baghdad said he and his Iranian counterpart agreed broadly on policy towards Iraq during four-hour groundbreaking talks on Monday, but insisted that Iran end its support for militants.

During a meeting in the Iraqi capital that U.S. Ambassador Ryan Crocker described as "businesslike", the American said Iran proposed setting up a "trilateral security mechanism" that would include the U.S., Iraq and Iran.

Crocker said the proposal would need study in Washington.

The U.S. envoy also said he told the Iranians their country needed to stop arming, funding and training the militants.

"I made clear from the American point of view that this is about actions, not just principles. And I laid out before the Iranians a number of direct specific concerns about their behaviour in Iraq," Crocker told a news conference in Baghdad's Green Zone.

Crocker said the Iranians "made the assertion that the coalition presence was an occupation and that the effort to train and equip the Iraqi security forces was inadequate to the challenges faced."

"We of course responded on both points, making it clear that coalition forces are here at the Iraqi government's invitation and under (UN) Security council authority and that we have put literally billions of dollars into training and equipping an increasingly capable set of iraqi security forces," he added.

Monday's talks were held at Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki's Green Zone office.

Al-Maliki told both sides that Iraqis wanted a stable country free of foreign forces and regional interference.

He also said that the U.S.-led forces in Iraq were only here to help build up the army and police and the country would not be used as a launching ground for a U.S. attack on a neighbour, a clear reference to Iran.

Monday's meeting, as predicted, had a pinpoint focus: What Washington and Tehran - separately or together - could do

to contain the sectarian conflagration in Iraq.

But much more encumbers the narrow agenda - primarily Iran's nuclear programme and more than a quarter-century of

diplomatic estrangement after the 1979 Islamic revolution in Iran.

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Subjects: Diplomacy, International relations, National governments, Government and politics
People: Nouri al-Maliki
Organisations: Iraq government, United Nations Security Council, United Nations
Locations: Baghdad, Baghdād, Iraq
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Iraq Violence 3+
Title:
SD
Summary: WRAP 8 killed in Baghdad; three bombs kill 18 in Kirkuk; victims of chemical attack
Story No: 516484
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 03/19/2007 11:25 PM
People: Tariq Al-Hashimi
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

Kirkuk

1. Wide of vehicles on fire and plume of smoke near market in a predominantly Arab neighbourhood in the south of the city

2. People around police pick up

3. Men lifting body onto truck

4. Various of fire fighters dousing burning vehicles UPSOUND Sirens

5. Tracking shot of damaged bus

6. Bodies being taken off bus and put into ambulance

7. Tilt up from oil and blood to body being put into ambulance

8. Soldier standing in front of bus

9. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Police officer, no name given:

''At 1300 local time, a car bomb exploded killing 13 people and wounding scores others.''

10. Soldiers walking across street

11. Various of burnt out cars

12. Armed man walking in street

13. Woman on floor crying being comforted by man

14. Wreckage of house damaged in mortar attack

15. Close-up of wreckage of nearby car

16. Pan from damaged wall to electricity pylon

17. Wreckage of car bomb in mixed Kurdish and Turkomen area in the centre of the city

18. People standing around wreckage of another vehicle

19. Pan from building housing a bank to wreckage

20. Man being lifted onto bed in Kirkuk Hospital

21. Close-up of injured man

22. Doctors treating another injured man

23. Medic helping injured man

Baghdad

24. Sign reading ''Hussein Ibn Roh Mosque'' tilt down to men standing outside the entrance

25. Wide interior of Mosque

26. Close-up of rubble and clock on floor

27. Various of rubble

28. Men trying to hang up a banner that fell down during the attack and photographers inside the building

29. Pan from street to exterior of Mosque

Baghdad

30. Iraqi Vice President Tariq al-Hashimi visiting hospital, talking to a patient on respirator

31. Mid of patient

32. Close-up of child with swollen eye, various tubes attached to face

33. Al-Hashimi adjusting child's blanket

34. Close-up of hospital monitor

35. Al-Hashimi standing to next to another ill child lying on stomach in hospital bed, receiving briefing from army doctor

36. Sign reading: "Intensive Care Unit"

37. Al-Hashimi at ill child's bedside with David Doresy, Medical Director of the Intensive Care Unit

STORYLINE

A series of car bombs struck the oil-rich city of Kirkuk in northern Iraq on Monday, killing at least 18 people and wounding more than 50 others, police said.

The blasts came shortly after an explosion ripped through a Shiite mosque in the capital Baghdad killing at least eight worshippers during prayers.

In Kirkuk, four blasts occurred in a 35-minute period in different areas of the city, 290 kilometres (180 miles) north of the capital.

One car bomb exploded near a market in a predominantly Arab neighbourhood in southern Kirkuk, killing fourteen civilians and four policemen, and wounding about 40, police said.

AP Television News footage showed a pockmarked bus nearby. Some of the passengers and the driver were killed in their seats.

There were conflicting reports about casualty figures. Initial reports from police at the scene suggested 13 people were killed.

A mortar shell also landed on a house in the same area, wounding five civilians, police said.

The target of the attack was not clear, however, there is also a police station about 500 metres (yards) from the site.

Meanwhile, a parked car packed with explosives blew up as a police patrol passed by in a mixed Kurdish and Turkomen area in the centre of the city, killing four policemen and wounding 19 people, according to police.

Another parked car bomb exploded near the house of an Iraqi army officer, wounding two people.

A number of people wounded in the various attacks were taken for medical treatment at Kirkuk hospital.

In another attack, a bomb exploded during prayers at a Shiite mosque Monday in Baghdad, killing at least eight worshippers and wounding nearly three dozen, police said.

The attack occurred about 1230 local time (0930 GMT), shattering windows and damaging a wall of the small green-domed mosque situated near several shops in the central Shorja market area.

Police initially blamed it on a suicide bomber trying to enter the building but later said the blast was caused by a bomb placed in the corner behind the preacher's podium, leaving a crater in the floor.

AP Television filmed damage to the floors and walls of the mosques.

Meanwhile, Iraq's Sunni Vice-president Tariq al-Hashimi visited victims of Friday's chlorine gas bomb attacks at a military hospital inside Baghdad's Green Zone on Monday.

Al-Hashimi spent a few minutes at the bedsides of several of the patients, many of them children.

Some of the patients were on respirators.

On Friday, three suicide bombers driving trucks rigged with tanks of toxic chlorine gas struck targets in heavily Sunni Anbar province, killing at least two people and sickening 350 Iraqi civilians and six US troops, the US military said.

Seven children were among those affected in the attacks.

The US military has warned that insurgents were adopting new tactics in a campaign to spread panic.

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Subjects: Bombings, War and unrest, Suicide bombings, Health, Improvised explosives, General news, Terrorist attacks, Terrorism
People: Tariq Al-Hashimi
Locations: Baghdad, Iraq, Middle East
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Iraq Explosion 4
Title:
SD
Summary: WRAP Truck bombing near mosque kills 78, more than 200 wounded
Story No: 526795
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 06/19/2007 04:37 PM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

1. Wide of plume of thick smoke billowing over the city centre

2. Various of plume of smoke billowing from behind buildings

3. Top shots of ambulances driving to the scene, UPSOUND of siren

4. Wide of the area where the blast occurred, huge whole in wall surrounding mosque, policemen at the site

5. People gathered in midst rubble, ambulance driving

6. People clearing rubble, burnt out cars and damage in background

7. Wide shot of the mosque with damaged wall

8. Iraqi military vehicle, pull out to long shot of street

9. Sign reading ''Imam Ali bin Abi Talib Hospital''

10. Various of injured being wheeled into emergency ward

11. Various of injured receiving medical treatment

12. Various close-ups of injured

13. Mid of door to emergency ward

STORYLINE:

A truck bomb packed with explosives hidden under appliances struck a Shiite mosque Tuesday in central Baghdad, killing at least 78 people.

The thunderous explosion at the Khillani mosque in the capital's commercial area of Sinak sent smoke billowing over concrete buildings.

Gunfire erupted shortly after the blast, which a police officer said went off near the Khillani mosque in the commercial area of Sinak.

A police officer, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of security concerns, said the car that exploded was parked in a lot near the mosque and it damaged the outer wall of the building.

One officer said the explosives-packed truck was loaded with fans and air coolers to avoid arousing the suspicions of security forces guarding the surrounding area, which is full of shops selling electrical appliances.

Police and hospital officials said at least 78 people were killed and 218 were wounded, adding that the toll could rise as bodies were pulled from the debris.

The injured were taken to nearby Imam Ali bin Abi Talib Hospital in Sadr City.

On Sunday, officials lifted a curfew aimed at preventing retaliatory violence after last week's bombing of a Shiite mosque in Samarra.

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Subjects: Bombings, Improvised explosives, General news, War and unrest
Locations: Baghdad, Baghdād, Iraq
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