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(HZ) US Turtles Oil Spill
Title:
SD
Summary: Conservationists attempt to rescue turtle nests from oil spill
Story No: 651461
Source: AP Television News
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 15/07/2010 23:42 PM
People:
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SHOTLIST:

AP FILE

San Juan Del Sur, October 28 & November 15

1. Close up sea turtle on beach

2. Wide sea turtle walking across beach

3. Various sea turtle laying eggs in sand

4. Wide beach

5. Various hatchlings leaving the nest

6. Hatchling walks through shot

AP Television

Gulf Shores, Alabama - July 12, 2010

7. Close sign warning of Sea Turtle Nest

8. various volunteers pulling eggs out of nest

9. Mid of volunteer marking top of egg and other volunteer removes egg

10. Mid of cooler loaded with eggs as volunteer adds them

11. Mid of U.S. Fish and Wildlife official, Dianne Ingram directing volunteers

12. SOUNDBITE: (English) Dianne Ingram, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Biologist:

"We know 20 to 50% of mortality is of the norm and so we know we'll have about that much this year. But knowing that whatever would crawl to the water this year likely wouldn't survive at all, we feel like any that we could save by taking to the Atlantic is what we need to do."

13. Close Unidentified Volunteer clearing sand from nest UPSOUND: (English) "Oh, there's a bad one."

14. Close volunteers' hands arranging eggs

15. SOUNDBITE: (English) Dianne Ingram, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Biologist:

"And the oil floats, gets caught up in the same currents that the hatchlings would be. So they would be, they would end up right where most of the oil is now anyway."

18. Wide volunteers and biologist carrying coolers loaded with eggs through crowd to a waiting van

19. Mid volunteer in van, zooms in as he places egg crate on air-cushioned platform

20. SOUNDBITE: (English) Cindy Dohner, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Southeast Regional Director:

"We're going to move the sea turtle nests that are here in the North Gulf area, because we want to make sure that we have the, that they have, the hatchlings have the best chance possible to make it - to go out into the water and make it into the population."

AP Television

Gulfport, Mississippi - July 12, 2010

21. Mid dolphin sculptures, zooms out to show Institute for Marine Mammal Studies

22. Close map of Gulf of Mexico on monitor, pans to Moby Solangi pointing to parts of the Gulf

23. Close up hand

24. SOUNDBITE: (English) Moby Solangi, Executive Director of the Institute for Marine Mammal Studies:

"It is not only hatching them, it is providing them a habitat that they'll be able to survive. It's within the food web how they are positioned because then they would be prone to interspecies and intraspecies competition for the food, for the territory and for the environment."

AP Television

New Orleans - July 11, 2010

25. Mid sign for "Discovery Walk" kids area at Audubon Zoo

26. Close boys scrubbing turtle

27. Close toothbrush scrubbing turtle

28. Mid girl scrubbing turtle, travels in to close, tilt down to turtle UPSOUND: (English) "am I supposed to clean his face?"

29. Mid of children taking cleaned turtles away from cleaning station

30. Pan of girls carrying cleaned turtles to put them in " rehabilitation pool"

31. SOUNDBITE: (English) Lainey, 9

"I think I've learned that taking care of the animals that got hurt by the oil is very important."

NASA

Kennedy Space Centre (KSC) Hatchery, Kennedy, U.S. 9th July 2010

32. KSC Turtle hatchery sign

33. Tilt down interior of hatchery

34. Mid boxes with hatchlings

35. Biologist Jane Provancha with assistant looking into boxes

36. Close up hatchlings covered with sand

37. UPSOUND: (English) Jane Provancha, Lead Biologist, Merritt Island national Wildlife Refuge, "this means they survived the excavation process, they survived the rip across the state of Florida, they made it into our facility and they are doing what they would normally do and this is just great."

38. Various Provancha checking hatchlings, UPSOUND: (English) Jane Provancha, Lead Biologist, Merritt Island national Wildlife Refuge, "He's got good rigour - see that - and he's getting a thing going on there."

39. Provancha puts hatchling into a box

40. Close assistant taking notes

41. Hatchlings being put into a box, UPSOUND: (English) Jane Provancha, Lead Biologist, Merritt Island national Wildlife Refuge, "He gives you kick back, you know."

42. Close up hatchlings

+++NIGHT SHOTS+++

43. Wide Provancha and assistant taking hatchlings to the sea

44. Various hatchlings being taken out of box

45. Mid hatchlings on the sand

46. Hatchlings being put into the sea

47. Various hatchlings in the water

LEAD IN:

The giant BP oil spill is threatening to snuff out a generation of sea turtles off the Gulf of Mexico.

Now hundreds of volunteers, scientists and government wildlife officials are carrying out a huge task - evacuating some 700 turtle nests to Florida's Atlantic coast.

STORYLINE:

A female turtle drags herself across a Nicaraguan beach and finally settles to lay her eggs in the nest she has created.

She deposits up to 200 eggs into the cavity before covering them with sand to help protect them from surface predators and making her way back to the sea.

If the nest remains undisturbed, two months later the first hatchlings start to scramble their way to the surface.

Less than 1% of them will reach adulthood. Opportunist predators lie in wait and many won't even make it as far as the sea.

Over in Alabama, conservationists say this year's hatchlings will have even less of a chance of survival if humans to do not intervene.

It's a dicey proposition. Many scientists say such species relocations have, at best, a mixed record.

But backers of the effort say the hatchlings would almost surely all die in the oil swirling in the Gulf.

So dozens of volunteers from the turtle rescue group, 'Share the Beach' joined biologists in digging up a loggerhead nest on the beach in Gulf Shores.

After digging about two feet into the sand, they carefully take out each ping-pong-ball-sized egg.

One rescuer draws a line with a grease pencil on top of each egg to show which side was facing up in the nest. Others lift each egg out and softly tuck it into a sand filled cooler.

Even such careful work can kill the vulnerable turtle within.

"We know 20 to 50% of mortality is of the norm and so we know we'll have about that much this year. But knowing that whatever would crawl to the water this year likely wouldn't survive at all, we feel any that we could save by taking to the Atlantic is what we need to do," says U.S. Fish and Wildlife Biologist Dianne Ingram.

A crowd has swiftly formed to watch as the rescuers take out 127 eggs.

The nest is far enough away from the water that no oil has reached it, but Ingram says they would eventually encounter it if the turtles aren't taken to the Atlantic Ocean.

"And the oil floats, gets caught up in the same currents that the hatchlings would be. So they would be, they would end up right where most of the oil is now anyway."

The packing job is high-pressure. Temperature changes, vibration, even a slight shift in position can kill the hatchlings. The eggs must be oriented upwards - the bottom of the egg has liquid in it. Turning them over will cause them to drown in their own fluid.

Once all the eggs are loaded in the coolers, they are driven hundreds of miles to Kennedy Space Center on Florida's east coast.

"We're going to move the sea turtle nests that are here in the North Gulf area because we want to make sure that we have the, that they have, the hatchlings have the best chance possible to make it - to go out into the water and make it into the population," says U.S. Fish and Wildlife Southeast Regional Director Cindy Dohner.

Teaming up with conservationists, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, the National Park Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service plan to carefully move around 700 nests deposited on Florida Panhandle and Alabama beaches during the next few months.

The Institute for Marine Mammal Studies has seen firsthand the oil's effect on turtles.

Though necropsies have not yet been completed on hundreds of dead turtles that have already been recovered, the number of strandings (dead or debilitated turtles found in the sea or on the beach) is up this year.

Institute director, Moby Solangi, says even if the turtles hatch, the relocated animals may not make it. They will be in a different environment, with different sources of food and face different predators.

"It is not only hatching them, it is providing them a habitat that they'll be able to survive. It's within the food web how they are positioned because then they would be prone to interspecies and intraspecies competition for the food, for the territory and for the environment."

The institute is caring for turtles found in Alabama. Some came in oiled and had to be cleaned. But most were caught by fishermen. Solangi says that number is way up, likely because the turtles are foraging closer to shore - away from the spill.

The Audubon Zoo in New Orleans is hoping to inspire the next generation of turtle rescuers.

An educational exhibit lets kids clean "oiled turtles." The animals are really turtle replicas covered in cocoa mixed with vegetable oil.

But the kids vigorously scrub their patients. Dressed in surgical gowns and rubber gloves, they scrub the shells, feet and even heads.

"I think I've learned that taking care of the animals that got hurt by the oil is very important," says 9 year-old Lainey.

It's a lesson that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has already taken on board - and has already seen positive results.

The first group of hatchlings was released into the Atlantic Ocean near the Kennedy Space Center on July 11.

The eggs had been transported by a specially-equipped truck to the secure, climate-controlled facility at Kennedy where they were monitored until incubation was complete.

Twenty-two Kemp's ridley turtles were set free on a Canaveral National Seashore beach. Now it's up to them to make it through the next stages.

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Subjects: Oil spills, Wildlife management, Marine mammals, Mammals, Wildlife, Oceans, Coastlines and beaches, Oceanography, Volunteerism, Environment and nature, Turtles, Nature reserves, Zoology, Pollution, Environmental concerns, Environment, Oil spills, Industrial accidents, Accidents, Accidents and disasters, General news, Wildlife management, Natural resource management, Marine animals, Animals, Marine mammals, Science, Social affairs, Reptiles, Biology
Locations: United States, Florida, Alabama, New Orleans, North America, Louisiana
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US Oil Spill
Title:
SD
Summary: Latest on spill, one month after the leak began
Story No: 646200
Source: AP TELEVISION, BP Handout
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 20/05/2010 20:14 PM
People: Edward Markey, Henry Waxman, Robert Gibbs, Lisa Jackson
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

BP HANDOUT

Gulf of Mexico - 20 May 2010

1. Video of oil spilling into the ocean underwater ++MUTE++

AP TELEVISION

Washington, DC - 20 May 2010

2. Wide of US Representative Edward J. Markey, Democrat from Massachusetts, and Representative Henry Waxman, Democrat from California, walking into news conference

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Representative Edward J. Markey, Democrat-Massachusetts:

"One of the major points that we should take away from this video is that the five thousand barrels a day estimate that BP pushed all along is dead wrong. Today, BP is claiming that they are siphoning off five thousand barrels a day. But if you look at the video you can see plumes of oil spilling into the Gulf far in excess of five thousand barrels per day."

BP HANDOUT

Gulf of Mexico - 20 May 2010

4. Video of oil spilling into the ocean underwater ++MUTE++

AP TELEVISION

Washington, DC - 20 May 2010

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Representative Edward J. Markey, Democrat-Massachusetts:

"The EPA (US Environmental Protection Agency) has responded to questions about the use of toxic dispersants and said that they will direct BP to use less toxic oil dispersants as they try to contain the spill. It is very important that we not allow BP to conduct a science experiment in the oceans of the United States without the closest supervision in terms of the amount of toxic material that is put into the ocean as a way of controlling this spill."

6. Mid of news conference

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Representative Edward J. Markey, Democrat-Massachusetts:

"Now, we are beginning to understand that we cannot trust BP. People do not trust the experts any longer. BP has lost all credibility, now the decisions will have to be made by others, because it is clear they have been hiding the actual consequences of this spill and that is just one more example, dispersants, where they no longer should have that responsibility."

BP HANDOUT

Gulf of Mexico - 20 May 2010

8. Video of oil spilling into the ocean underwater ++MUTE++

AP TELEVISION

Washington, DC - 20 May 2010

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Robert Gibbs, White House spokesman:

"Pursuant to the Clean Water Act, we are asking for them (BP) to provide the data, put it on a website, update that website daily, provide whatever access they have to video to both fully to the government and to the public."

10. Back shot of Gibbs at news conference

STORYLINE

BP conceded on Thursday that more oil than it estimated is gushing into the Gulf of Mexico as heavy crude washed into Louisiana's wetlands for the first time, feeding worries and uncertainty about the massive month-long spill.

A live video feed of the leak posted online on Thursday at the insistence of Democratic Representative Edward Markey shows what appears to be a large plume of oil and gas still spewing next to the tube that's carrying some of it to the surface.

Mark Proegler, a spokesman for oil giant BP PLC, said a mile-long tube inserted into a leaking pipe over the weekend is capturing 210,000 gallons a day, the total amount the company and the Coast Guard have estimated is gushing into the sea, but some is still escaping. He would not say how much.

Several professors who have watched video of the leak have said they believe the amount spewing out is much higher than official estimates.

Proegler said the 210,000 gallons, 5,000 barrels, has always been just an estimate because there is no way to measure how much is spilling from the seafloor.

Markey told reporters that one of the main things underscored by the new video was that the "five thousand barrels a day estimate that BP pushed all along is dead wrong".

"BP has lost all credibility, now the decisions will have to be made by others, because it is clear they have been hiding the actual consequences of this spill," he said.

Markey also said that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had directed oil giant BP to use a less toxic form of chemical dispersants to break up the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

Two Obama administration officials confirmed the order, which comes just days after EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson publicly described use of dispersants as a trade-off between health risks and limiting further environmental damage.

The chemicals break apart the oil and keep it from reaching the surface.

One of the chief agents being used, called Corexit 9500, is identified as a "moderate" human health hazard that can cause eye, skin or respiratory irritation with prolonged exposure, according to safety data documents.

A spokeswoman for the EPA declined immediate comment.

The White House has asked BP PLC to make public detailed information about the Gulf oil spill including all measurements of the growing leak, sampling of air and water quality, trajectories of underwater plumes and locations of dispersants.

White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs said on Thursday that the White House is writing to BP asking the company to put that information on its website and be more transparent about its response.

Scientists also are criticising government agencies for not pushing the company harder to let independent experts take measurements

Small amounts of light oil have washed up in delicate coastal areas of Louisiana over the past several weeks, but nothing like the brown ooze from the spill that started coating marsh grasses and hanging in the shallow water of a wetland on Wednesday.

The well blew out after an explosion a month ago on the offshore drilling rig Deepwater Horizon that killed 11 people.

At least six (m) million gallons have spilled so far, making it the worst US environmental disaster in decades.

The Exxon Valdez tanker spilled 11 (m) million gallons in Alaska in 1989.

BP, which was leasing the rig when it exploded, was marshalling equipment and conducting tests on Thursday ahead of a new effort to choke off the oil flow.

Crews hoped that by Sunday they can start a procedure known as a "top kill," which involves pumping heavy mud into the crippled equipment on top of the well, then permanently sealing it with cement.

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Subjects: Oil spills, Industrial accidents, Oceans, Oil and gas drilling, Government and politics, Pollution, Environmental concerns, Environment, Environment and nature, Oil spills, Accidents, Accidents and disasters, General news, Oil and gas support services, Oil and gas, Energy, Industries, Business
People: Edward Markey, Henry Waxman, Robert Gibbs, Lisa Jackson
Organisations: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, United States government
Locations: District of Columbia, Massachusetts, United States, North America
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US Oil 4
Title:
SD
Summary: BP CEO disputes claims of underwater oil plumes
Story No: 646995
Source: POOL, AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 31/05/2010 00:45 AM
People: Tony Hayward
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

POOL

Venice, Louisiana

1. Tony Hayward, CEO of BP, talking to US Coast Guard employees

2. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tony Hayward, Chief Executive of BP PLC:

"Well, the answer is the first thing is to say we're sorry. We're sorry for the massive disruption it's caused to their lives. We're... there's no one who wants this thing over more than I do. You know, I'd like my life back. So there's no one who wants this thing done more than I do and we are doing everything we can to contain the oil offshore, defend the shoreline and return people's lives to normal as fast as we can. There's just no effort being spared in any dimension."

3. Cutaway Hayward speaking to man

4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tony Hayward, Chief Executive of BP PLC:

"You can question whether the effectiveness of that response and I accept that some of it may not have been perfect. But from the very beginning we have responded with absolutely everything. We're not saying it's only a thousand barrels a day, so... no, we've responded to deal with a much bigger issue than we appear to be dealing right now. Now there's frustration for everyone. I think no one's more frustrated than myself that we haven't been able to stop the leak."

5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tony Hayward, Chief Executive of BP PLC:

"There's no evidence of the... oil has a specific gravity that's about half that of water, it's very difficult for oil to stay in a column. It wants to go to the surface because of the difference in specific gravity."

6. Hayward's feet as he walks through muddy area, tilts up to show Hayward

AP TELEVISION

Golden Meadow, Louisiana

7. Shrimp boat sitting idle

8. Sign saying "Fresh Shrimp - Sold Out"

9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Joey Bouziga, Resident:

"I was very disappointed. I had a lot of hope they would cap it, you know. It means a lot to our community here."

10. Pick-up truck backing boat into water

11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Kurt Leboeuf, Boater:

"It's the beginning of summer. People wait all year long for this, to go out and enjoy their summer times and now we're stuck at home. You know you talk to a working man. You ask how many working men when summer's over and they're off, want to go enjoy their weekends and get away from their wives. Now we're stuck at home with our wives. It's double jeopardy for us, you know. I mean we want to be out enjoying the leisure life that we've been doing our whole lives and we can't do it."

12. Men on boat

13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Kurt Leboeuf, Boater:

"We're just mad that we can't enjoy our outdoors. And our livelihood is affected. We can't make a living. I mean there is no money coming in right now. You can't catch fish, you can't sell shrimp. Everybody... it's a trickle down effect. And it's sad.

14. Men on boat heading out

STORYLINE

Chief executive of BP, Tony Hayward, said on Sunday he was sorry and frustrated that the oil company has been unable to cap a pipe that has been gushing oil into the Gulf of Mexico for more than a month.

He also disputed claims by scientists that large undersea plumes have been set adrift by the Gulf oil spill.

Hayward said the oil naturally rises to the surface of water, and that BP's sampling showed "no evidence" that oil was suspended in large masses beneath the surface.

"Oil has a specific gravity that's about half that of water, it's very difficult for oil to stay in a column. It wants to go to the surface because of the difference in specific gravity," he said.

Hayward made the remarks as he toured the oil spill command centre in Venice, Louisiana.

Scientists from several universities have reported plumes of what appears to be oil suspended in clouds that stretched for miles and reached hundreds of feet beneath the Gulf's surface.

Hayward also said the company was narrowing its response to the oil spill to the Louisiana coast, and reinforcing clean-up there for an effort that could last months.

The spill is the worst in US history - exceeding even the 1989 Exxon Valdez disaster off the Alaska coast - and has dumped between 18 million gallons (68 million litres) and 40 million gallons (150 million litres) into the Gulf, according to government estimates.

The leak began after the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded on 20 April, killing 11 people.

Almost six weeks later, no significant oil has hit other Gulf states, but they remain guarded.

That is little comfort for residents of Louisiana whose lives have been impacted by the spreading oil.

People in Golden Meadow tried to be hopeful but were disappointed that BP wasn't able to stop the leak using a method called "top kill" in which engineers tried for three days to overwhelm the crippled well with heavy drilling mud and junk 5-thousand feet (15-hundred metres) underwater.

One man joked that the spill meant that working men would have to stay at home with their wives instead of going out to fish and enjoy other outdoor activities.

But he added that it was sad that no one could make a living because the oil spill had shut down the fishing and shrimping industries.

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Subjects: Coastlines and beaches, Oil spills, Oil and gas drilling, Crustaceans, Environment and nature, Pollution, Environmental concerns, Environment, Oil spills, Industrial accidents, Accidents, Accidents and disasters, General news, Oil and gas support services, Oil and gas, Energy, Industries, Business, Marine animals, Animals, Crustaceans, Arthropods
People: Tony Hayward
Locations: Louisiana, United States, North America
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US Oil 3
Title:
SD
Summary: Tar balls reach the Florida coast; latest from spill cam
Story No: 647471
Source: AP TELEVISION, BP HANDOUT
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 04/06/2010 18:59 PM
People: Barack Obama, Thad Allen
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

BP HANDOUT

Gulf of Mexico - 4 June 2010

1. Underwater video from Enterprise Rov 2 camera, showing cap on pipe and oil escaping

2. Underwater video from Viking Poseidon, showing crate with stream of oil

3. Underwater video from Skandi camera showing oil escaping into sea

AP TELEVISION

Pensacola Beach, Florida - 4 June 2010

4. Close-up of local resident Henry Fairleigh picking up tar balls on beach

5. Tilt down from Fairleigh's face to his hand holding tar balls

6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Henry Fairleigh, local resident: ++ENDS WITH TILT DOWN TO TAR BALLS IN FAIRLEIGH'S HAND++

"I'm trying to get it off the coast so it's safer to walk and stuff."

7. Wide of people on beach

8. Close-up of Fairleigh scooping up a tar ball

9. Wide of waves breaking on beach

10. People walking on beach

11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Joe Fairleigh, local resident:

"I think it's ridiculous, I think it's absolutely absurd that there's not more. I know this is massive, but it's a massive company. I mean it's a worldwide, huge, (b) billion dollar company that should be able to implement things better. Along with, partnered with the federal government. Where's the federal government? You know, it's very disappointing that, you know, within a few hours that people can't be out to, you know, help kind of clean this stuff up. And you know it's a safety hazard, obviously for the public as well as the environment as far as the wildlife and the fish and the things in the ocean, it's very disappointing."

12. SOUNDBITE: (English) Henry Fairleigh, local resident:

"My hands are sticky now from collecting all the oil."

AP TELEVISION

Navarro, Florida - 4 June 2010

13. Wide of people on beach

14. Various of tar balls on sand

STORYLINE:

BP engineers adjusted a new cap placed over a broken oil well in the Gulf of Mexico on Friday, trying to collect the crude oil gushing into the sea and now polluting four US states.

Even though the inverted funnel-like device was set over the leak late on Thursday, crude continued to spew into the sea.

The device started pumping oil and gas to a tanker on the surface overnight, but it wasn't clear how much.

Engineers hoped to close several open vents on the cap throughout the day in the latest attempt to contain the oil.

As they worked on the system underwater, the effect of the BP spill was widely seen.

Gooey tar balls have been collecting on the white sands of Florida's beaches.

Some swimmers rushed out of the water after wading into the mess, while others inspected the clumps with fascination, some taking pictures.

A father and son tried to clean up a stretch of Pensacola beach by scooping the tar balls up off the sand.

11-year-old Henry Farleigh said that his hands were" all sticky now from collecting all the oil."

His father Joe Fairleigh said both BP's and the federal government's handling of the oil spill was "very disappointing."

President Barack Obama arrived in Louisiana on Friday for updates on the spill and meetings with residents and local officials.

After landing at the New Orleans airport, Obama headed into a briefing at an airport hangar with Coast Guard Admiral Thad Allen, the federal official

leading the response to the spill, and other officials.

He then planned to make remarks and drive to Grand Isle, a barrier town affected by the spill, to meet with residents.

Friday marked Obama's third visit since the devastating spill began after the oil rig exploded on April 20, killing 11 workers.

A mile below the water's surface, the cap has different coloured hoses loosely attached to it to help combat the near-freezing temperatures and crystals that could clog it.

Allen said progress was being made but cautioned against being too optimistic.

He said a very rough estimate of current collection would be about 42-thousand gallons (159-thousand litres) a day, though he stressed the information was anecdotal.

To put the cap in place, BP had to slice off the main pipe with giant shears after a diamond-edged saw became stuck.

By doing so, they risked increasing the flow by as much as 20 percent, though Allen said it was still too soon to know whether that had happened.

The best chance to plug the leak is a pair of relief wells, which are at least two months away.

So far, anywhere between 21 (m) million and 46 (m) million gallons (between 79.5 (m) million and 174. (m) million litres) of oil have spewed into the Gulf, according to government estimates.

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Subjects: Coastlines and beaches, Environment and nature
People: Barack Obama, Thad Allen
Locations: Pensacola, Florida, United States, North America
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US Pelicans
Title:
SD
Summary: Operation underway to rescue pelicans following oil spill
Story No: 801877
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 06/06/2010 00:28 AM
People: Thad Allen
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

Barataria Bay, Louisiana

1. Pan from marsh to pelican carcass

2. Various of pelican stuck in oil

3. Pan from pelican to boat

4. Plaquemines Parish coastal zone manager PJ Hahn taking pelican out of oil

5. Mid of Hahn and pelican

6. Hahn and another man place oil-covered pelican into bag

Grand Isle, Louisiana

7. Wide of crews rescuing bird

8. Various of rescue boat

9. Close-up of oil in water

10. Wide of pelicans and other birds

11. Wide of rescue team running after bird that can no longer fly

12. Various of rescue team with birds in hands

13. Close-up of rescue worker placing bird in boat

14. SOUNDBITE (English) Sam Marye Lewis,International Bird Rescue:

"It's very sad to see the mothers and the rookery and the very oiled mothers sitting on the eggs; that's just very sad, I believe, for all of us."

15. Mid of workers with bird

16. SOUNDBITE (English) Kayla Dibenedetto, US Fish and Wildlife:

"It's an adrenaline rush but we know we're doing our job and that's what we're here to do and it feels great to be able to get one at a time."

17. Wide of workers chasing bird

18. SOUNDBITE (English) Tim Kimmel, US Fish and Wildlife:

"At the time you don't think about it, you're doing it for the birds. You go out there and you try to catch every one you can catch. When you get it it's a bonus."

19. Wide of birds flying

STORYLINE:

The wildlife apocalypse along the Gulf Coast that everyone has feared for weeks is fast becoming a terrible reality.

Pelicans struggle to free themselves from oil, thick as tar, that gathers in hip-deep pools, while others stretch out useless wings, feathers dripping with crude.

Dead birds and dolphins wash ashore, coated in the sludge.

Seashells that once glinted pearly white under the hot June sun are stained crimson.

Scenes like this played out along miles of shoreline on Saturday, nearly seven weeks after a BP rig exploded and the wellhead a mile below the surface began belching millions (m) of gallon of oil.

The oil has steadily spread east, washing up in greater quantities in recent days, even as a cap placed by BP over the blown out well began to collect some of the escaping crude.

The cap, resembling an upside-down funnel, has captured about 252,000 gallons of oil, according to Coast Guard Admiral Thad Allen, the government's point man for the crisis.

If earlier estimates are correct, that means the cap is capturing from a quarter to as much as half the oil spewing from the blowout each day.

But that is a small fraction of the 23 million (m) to 47 million (m) gallons government officials estimate have leaked into the Gulf since the April 20 explosion that killed 11 workers, making it the nation's largest oil spill ever.

In Louisiana, along the beach at Queen Bess Island, oil pooled several feet deep, trapping birds against unused containment boom.

With no oil response workers on Queen Bess, Plaquemines Parish coastal zone management director PJ Hahn decided he could wait no longer, pulling an exhausted brown pelican from the oil, the slime dripping from its wings.

Meanwhile, off Grand Isle, Louisiana a large group of biologists and fish and wildlife agents were out on the water looking for oil-covered birds.

The officials rescued the birds that could no longer fly.

Speaking about the rescue efforts, Kayla Dibenedetto from the US Fish and Wildlife agency said "it's an adrenaline rush but we know we're doing our job and that's what we're here to do and it feels great to get one at a time."

After six weeks with one to four birds a day coming into Louisiana's rescue centre for oiled birds at Fort Jackson, 53 arrived on Thursday and another 13 Friday morning, with more on the way.

Federal authorities say 792 dead birds, sea turtles, dolphins and other wildlife have been collected from the Gulf of Mexico and its coastline.

Yet scientists say the wildlife death toll remains relatively modest, well below the tens of thousand of birds, otters and other creatures killed after the Exxon Valdez ran aground in Alaska's Prince William Sound.

The numbers have stayed comparatively low because the Deepwater Horizon rig was 50 miles off the coast and most of the oil has stayed in the open sea. The Valdez ran aground on a reef close to land, in a more enclosed setting.

Experts say the Gulf's marshes, beaches and coastal waters, which nurture a dazzling array of life, could be transformed into killing fields, though the die-off could take months or years and unfold largely out of sight.

The damage could be even greater beneath the water's surface, where oil and dispersants could devastate zooplankton and tiny invertebrate communities at the base of the aquatic food chain.

Keyword: Animals

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Subjects: Wildlife management, Dolphins, Oil spills, Birds, Fish, Wildlife, Carnivores, Animals, Coastlines and beaches, Search and rescue efforts, Environment, Environment and nature, Wildlife management, Natural resource management, Marine mammals, Marine animals, Marine mammals, Mammals, Pollution, Environmental concerns, Oil spills, Industrial accidents, Accidents, Accidents and disasters, General news
People: Thad Allen
Locations: Louisiana, United States
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(HZ) US Seafood
Title:
SD
Summary: Sniffing out tainted seafood following the BP oil spill
Story No: 647765
Source: AP Television News
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/06/2010 05:01 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

Pascagoula, Mississippi - June 3, 2010

1. Close-up glass container of cooked prawns

2. Close-up glass container of raw oysters, William Mahan sniffing and stirring

3. SOUNDBITE: (English) William Mahan, Agriculture Extension Director, University of Florida and student in sniffer class:

"For me, the oysters are a little more challenging to pick up the taint (smell) in ...."

4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Gerald Wojtala, International Food Protection Training Institute Executive Director:

"With training, the nose is very good and quite capable of detecting some of these aromatic hydrocarbons that are found in oil at a very low level."

5. Mahan smelling a bowl of oysters

6. SOUNDBITE: (English) William Mahan, Agriculture Extension Director, University of Florida and student in sniffer class:

"We started out sniffing different samples of oil, to just sort of train our nose and mind to recognising it."

7. Mid, Mahan smelling samples

8. SOUNDBITE: (English) William Mahan, Agriculture Extension Director, University of Florida and student in sniffer class:

"People sort of smell it a little differently. Some people might refer it to like car oil and some people might think it smells more like diesel fuel and so, everybody has a unique nose."

9. Mid, Mahan smelling yeast sample

UPSOUND: (English) William Mahan, Agriculture Extension Director, University of Florida and student in sniffer class: "baking bread ... yeast"

10. Mahan smelling fuel oil sample

UPSOUND: (English) William Mahan, Agriculture Extension Director, University of Florida and student in sniffer class: "Filling the car, gas."

11. Mid, trainer showing students how to neutralise their noses by smelling the back of their arms

12. Close-up training samples

13. Mahan sniffing fish and taking notes

14. SOUNDBITE: (English) Gerald Wojtala, International Food Protection Training Institute Executive Director:

"Obviously there are a lot of laboratory tests that can be used to detect contamination, but when you think of the volume of seafood that comes in, there is a need for screening that seafood and we do that using the human senses and specifically the human nose."

Pass Christian, Mississippi - June 2, 2010

15. Various views, workers processing prawns that have just been unloaded from fishing boats

16. Close-up Joe Jenkins, owner Crystal Seas Seafood Company, inspecting seafood he is looking to buy

17. SOUNDBITE: (English) Joe Jenkins, Crystal Seas Seafood Company owner:

"Here we don't have federal inspectors or state on any level, so we have to inspect our own seafood products here to make sure they are safe and oil free and really good to eat."

18. Close-up prawns being unloaded

19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Joe Jenkins, Crystal Seas Seafood Company owner:

"We do know what to look for and when they go into the tanks we look for sheen in tanks and all that to make sure there is no oily shrimp in them."

20. Wide, prawns on conveyor belt

Pascagoula, Mississippi - June 3, 2010

21. SOUNDBITE: (English) Gerald Wojtala, International Food Protection Training Institute Executive Director:

"Our food supply is not 100 per cent safe, but we know a lot about how to make it safe."

Pass Christian, Mississippi - June 2, 2010

22. SOUNDBITE: (English) Joe Jenkins, Crystal Seas Seafood Company owner:

"We are not going to have inspectors everywhere. Everybody has got to do their own job in inspecting their own shrimp in their own seafood markets to make sure they don't have a problem with any oily shrimp, whatsoever."

23. Mid, fishing boat tying up at dock

Barataria Bay, Louisiana - June 6, 2010

24. Various of tide washing up thick oil

Golden Meadow, Louisiana - May 30, 2010

25. Shrimp boat sitting idle

26. Sign saying "Fresh Shrimp - Sold Out"

LEADIN:

Fishing communities along the U.S. Gulf Coast are preparing for the economic fall out following the Deepwater Horizons oil spill.

To help ensure the seafood harvested from the Gulf coast is safe to eat - inspectors are turning to an age-old method of detecting spoilt food.... sniffing it.

STORYLINE:

Trainee sniffer William Mahan bends over a bowl of raw prawns and inhales deeply, using his left hand to wave the scent up toward his nose. Deep breath. Exhale. Repeat.

He clears his palate with a bowl of freshly cut watermelon before moving on to other seafood - both cooked and raw. Deep breath. Exhale. Repeat.

About 40 inspectors were trained recently at a federal fisheries lab in Pascagoula, Mississippi, to sniff out seafood tainted by oil and make sure the product reaching consumers is safe to eat.

Mahan is an agricultural extension director with the University of Florida based in Apalachicola, where some of the world's most famous oysters are culled.

Mahan says he find it more difficult to detect the aroma of oil in oysters than in prawns.

"For me, the oysters are a little more challenging to pick up the taint (smell) in ...."

Gerald Wojtala is the International Food Protection Training Institute Executive Director.

He says that the human nose is very sensitive and a good tool.

"With training, the nose is very good and quite capable of detecting some of these aromatic hydrocarbons that are found in oil at a very low level."

Mahan explains how they trained their noses to smell different aromas.

"We started out sniffing different samples of oil, to just sort of train our nose and mind to recognising it."

He says that everything smells the same smell a little differently.

" Some people might refer it to like car oil and some people might think it smells more like diesel fuel and so, everybody has a unique nose."

Wojtala says that human senses are needed to screen the seafood.

"Obviously there are a lot of laboratory tests that can be used to detect contamination, but when you think of the volume of seafood that comes in, there is need for screening that seafood and we do that using the human senses and specifically the human nose."

But with thousands of fishermen bringing in their catch at countless docks across the four-state region, the task of inspectors, both sniffers and others, is daunting.

It's certainly not fail-safe.

The first line of defence began with closing a third of federal waters to fishing and hundreds more square-miles of state waters.

Joe Jenkins owns Crystal Seas Seafood Company on the docks at Pass Christian.

He'll be buying thousands of pounds of shrimp.

Jenkins says that they have to check their produce is safe to eat.

"Here we don't have federal inspectors or state on any level, so we have to inspect our own seafood products here to make sure they are safe and oil free and really good to eat."

Firstly they examine it visually.

"We do know what to look for and when they go into the tanks we look for sheen in tanks and all that to make sure there is no oily shrimp in them." Jenkins says.

The trained sniffers will be deployed where needed, when suspicions are raised about seafood being illegally culled from closed waters, or even to test fish from open waters.

No agency has yet reported finding or stopping any tainted seafood from getting to market.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has also been sampling seafood both in closed and open waters, and sending it off for chemical testing, with more than 600 fish and shrimp processed to date.

State and local inspectors are fanning out across the region to docks, seafood processors and restaurants, some now armed with specially trained noses.

NOAA currently has 55 inspectors at its Mississippi lab, with another 55 in training.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration also has a role with its own inspectors, though the agency said it only has "several seafood specialists" currently in the Gulf area.

The agency has deployed a mobile lab to Florida that is testing samples of fish caught in waters not yet believed to be affected by oil, because fish don't stay in one place.

Gulf fishermen are already suffering from the perception that their product is tainted, according to the Louisiana Seafood Promotion and Marketing Board.

Fishermen say they can't sell a tainted product anyway, whether it is inspected or not.

Even without an oil spill, people sometimes get sick from tainted seafood, or suffer illnesses from contamination in red meat such as E. coli.

Although not infallible, the human nose has been used for centuries in the making of wine, butter and cheese.

Now it is hoped that sensitive noses can help prevent illnesses caused by tainted seafood, but it must be emphasised that experts advise that nothing is fail-safe.

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Subjects: Oil spills, Fish, Undergraduate education, Animals, Pollution, Environmental concerns, Environment, Environment and nature, Oil spills, Industrial accidents, Accidents, Accidents and disasters, General news, Marine animals, Higher education, Education, Social affairs
Locations: Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida, United States, North America
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US Oil Spill 2
Title:
SD
Summary: Obama and coast guard on latest oil spill developments
Story No: 647689
Source: BP, AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 07/06/2010 19:24 PM
People: Barack Obama, Thad Allen, Robert Gibbs
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

BP HANDOUT

Gulf of Mexico - 7 June 2010

1. Underwater video of oil gushing out of ruptured pipe

AP TELEVISION

Washington, DC - June 7, 2010

2. US President Barack Obama meeting with Cabinet members

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Barack Obama, US President:

"It's going to take some time. It's not going to be easy. But, you know, this is a resilient ecosystem. These are resilient people, down on the Gulf Coast. I had a chance to talk to them, and they've gone through all kinds of stuff over the last 50, 100 years. And they bounce back. And they're going to bounce back this time."

4. Wide of Cabinet meeting

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Barack Obama, US President:

"We're confident that not only are we going to be able to get past this immediate crisis, but we are going to be focusing our attention on making sure the coast fully recovers and that eventually it comes back even stronger than it was before this crisis."

6. Zoom into Obama speaking

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Barack Obama, US President:

"We have gotten reports that have been confirmed by our independent scientists that the top hat mechanism that was put in place is beginning to capture some of the oil. We are still trying to get a better determination as to how much it's capturing."

8. Wide of meeting

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Barack Obama, US President:

"Even if we are successful in containing some or much of this oil, we are not going to get this problem completely solved until we actually have the relief well completed. And that is going to take a couple more months."

AP TELEVISION

Washington DC - 7 June 2010

10. US Coast Guard Admiral Thad Allen, national incident commander for oil spill, at news conference

11. SOUNDBITE (English) US Coast Guard Admiral Thad Allen, National Incident Commander for oil spill:

"In the last 24 hours, the production of the Discover Enterprise over the wellhead produced 11-thousand barrels of oil. They continue to increase over the first three days of operation. We have gone from six-thousand to 11-thousand, trying to increase that production rate, ultimately close the vending valves and move to a greater capacity."

BP HANDOUT

Gulf of Mexico - 7 June 2010

12. Various underwater shots of BP oil spill

AP TELEVISION

Washington DC - 7 June 2010

13. SOUNDBITE (English) US Coast Guard Admiral Thad Allen, National Incident Commander for oil spill:

"I call it..it's kind of an oil budget. How much is coming out, how much did we skim, how much did we burn and then so we can account for where all the hydrocarbons went and that's a work in progress right now. We'll be able to give you a much finer estimate once we establish the flow rate."

14. Wide shot US White House press secretary Robert Gibbs and Admiral Allen

15. Cutaway graphic showing extent of Coast Guard efforts to fight oil spill

16. SOUNDBITE (English) US Coast Guard Admiral Thad Allen, National Incident Commander for oil spill:

"Dealing with the oil spill on the surface is going to go on for a couple of months. After that, it will be taken care of. I agree with you, long-term issues of restoring the environment and the habitats and stuff will be years. I have separated out two different functions."

(Question: Exxon Valdez...)

"I have no argument with that characterisation."

BP HANDOUT

Gulf of Mexico - 7 June 2010

17. Underwater video of BP oil spill

STORYLINE:

US President Barack Obama sought to reassure Americans on Monday that the Gulf Coast would "bounce back" from the worst oil spill in the nation's history, but not without time, effort and reimbursement from BP.

Surrounded by Cabinet members, Obama said that not only is he confident that the crisis will pass but also that the affected area "comes back even stronger than ever."

The president has been speaking out on the disaster almost daily and has visited the Louisiana coast three times since the April 20 explosion that killed 11 workers and unleashed the oil gusher.

How he is seen handling the disaster by the American public could define his second year in office.

The president and top federal officials were briefed on the government's battle against the spill by Coast Guard Admiral Thad Allen, who is overseeing the government's efforts in dealing with the tragedy.

Allen earlier on Monday told reporters a cap on the damaged oil well is now keeping up to 462-thousand gallons (1.7 (m) million litres) of oil a day from leaking into the Gulf.

That's up from about 441-thousand gallons (1.6 (m) million litres) on Saturday and about 250-thousand gallons (965-thousand litres) on Friday.

Obama said that government scientists and other experts confirmed that the device "is beginning to capture some of the oil. We are still trying to make a better determination as to how much it's capturing."

"What is clear is that the economic impact of this disaster is going to be substantial and it is going to be ongoing," Obama said.

Later on Monday BP PLC said that it plans next month to replace the cap now in place over the oil well with a slightly bigger cap.

Company spokesman Robert Wine told The Associated Press on Monday that the company believes the bigger cap will fit over more of the outflow pipes than the current cap.

He says it will "provide a better, tighter fit." But he says the change will allow oil currently being collected to again spew out into the Gulf during the changeover.

BP said on Monday that the cost of the response has reached about 1.25 (b) billion US dollars.

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Subjects: Cabinets, Oil spills, Coast guard, Government and politics, Coastlines and beaches, Pollution, Environmental concerns, Environment, Environment and nature, Oil spills, Industrial accidents, Accidents, Accidents and disasters, General news, Armed forces, Military and defense
People: Barack Obama, Thad Allen, Robert Gibbs
Organisations: U.S. Coast Guard, United States military, United States government
Locations: District of Columbia, United States, North America
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(HZ) US Cajun Oil
Title:
SD
Summary: Native American tribe under threat from oil spill
Story No: 648545
Source: AP Television News
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 15/06/2010 23:42 PM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

Barataria Bay, Louisiana - June 6

1. Various of tide washing up thick oil

2. Various of crab crawling along oil covered beach

Point-Aux-Chenes, Louisiana - May 29, 2010

3. Pan of Dale Everon pulling his shrimp boat up to dock

4. Medium of worker scooping shrimp into buckets

5. Close same

6. Close iced shrimp in cooler

7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Dale Everon, Shrimper

"Now is the time we make our money, and they shutting it down. So, we going to be losing all of this."

8. Pan conveyor belt carrying washed shrimp to worker dumping bucket of shrimp into wash

9. Tilt down shrimp rolling off conveyor belt to container full of shrimp

10. Medium men loading huge crate of shrimp, moves in to close of shrimp

11. Wide worker shoveling ice onto load of shrimp

12. Medium worker shoveling ice

New Orleans - June 3, 2010

13. Set up Shirley Laska, Sociology Professor at University of New Orleans as she points to locations of indian tribes on map

UPSOUND: (English) Shirley Laska, Sociology Professor at University of New Orleans

"Down in this area here, between this finger and this finger. And the two communities are about in this area here. Then if you go farther west, you can go down to Dulac which is over here, and that is a Houma nation community. So you've got three different Indian, Native-American Indian groups in this area."

14. SOUNDBITE: (English) Shirley Laska, Sociology Professor at University of New Orleans

"Their garnering of the resources has stopped. Their boats are in, they're in their homes. They're meeting in their communities and their churches, talking because they have no crop that they can catch. Because if they catch it, they can't sell it. So right now, it has literally brought these communities to a dead halt."

Point-Aux-Chenes, Louisiana - May 29, 2010

14.Close sign for Live Oak Baptist Church,

16. Wide of church

17. Tilt up Charles Verdin, Pointe-Au-Chien Indian Tribe Chief addressing group

UPSOUND: (English) Charles Verdin, Pointe-Au-Chien Indian Tribe Chief

"We really do love it over here. I mean this is our home, this is where we want to be at. Maybe, something will happen. I'm hoping and praying."

18. Pan of community members

19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Charles Verdin, Pointe-Au-Chien Indian Tribe Chief

"Fishing, yeah, they fish, sell, they make money and all support themself. A big thing too is they eat what they catch. It will be tough for them too. Same thing like me. I can't imagine, you know, living without having fresh seafood and I know they the same. Uhh�.. It's scary. "

20. Wide of community members with Alaskan Faith Gemmill talking

21. UPSOUND: (English) Faith Gemmill, Alaskan Native American

"So even the women who are washing the clothes will be exposed. "

22. SOUNDBITE: (English) Theresa Dardar, Member of Pointe-Au-Chien Tribe

"We hate to see what's happening in the Gulf because it's a threat to our livelihood and to our land, our sacred grounds. And hopefully, we can stop it from getting here."

Orange Beach, Alabama - June 12

23. Wide of beach; pan right to mid of oil on sand

24. Close of oil-stained cup

25. Wide of oil-stained cup and sand

26. Close of oil on sand

27. Wide of workers removing oil from beach

28. Close of shovels in sand

Point-Aux-Chenes, Louisiana - May 29, 2010

29. SOUNDBITE: (Cajun French) Theresa Dardar, Member of Pointe-Au-Chien Tribe

"It's going to ruin the fishermen's business. It's going to kill all the shrimp, crab and oysters. Then the fishermen won't have a way to make a living. The spill will ruin businesses. They will do the best they can and what they can to stay in the community as long as possible."

30. Close platter of seafood (crab, shrimp and crawfish) zooms out to show Chief Albert Naquin Isle de Jean Charles tribal chief

31. Close Naquin peeling shrimp

32. SOUNDBITE: (English) Albert Naquin, Biloxi-Chitimacha Tribal Chief from nearby Isle de Jean Charles

(TILTS DOWN TO CRAB HE DESCRIBES)

"This makes me feel good. Maybe it'll dirty your hands, but it's all worth it. I guess I was brought up this way, you know. A friend was talking the other day. Normally, this crab here, they fix them to where you can fry them in a frying pan. Call that pot-fried crabs."

33. Close crab in Naquin's hand

Montegut, Louisiana - May 29, 2010

34. Pan from idled shrimp boat to line of boats at docks

35. Pan of empty bayou to recreational fishers

36. Medium of recreational fishers

37. Wide of shrimp boat heading out to sea

38. Medium of shrimp boat heading out to sea

LEADIN

The huge BP oil spill off the Gulf coast is threatening not only the wildlife of the region but also the livelihoods of hundreds of native American families.

The Pointe-Au-Chien tribe in Louisiana has been promised compensation but many remain skeptical, and see hard times ahead.

STORYLINE:

Dale Everon motors his shrimp boat up to the dock in Point-Aux-Chenes, Louisiana.

He has nearly 3,000 pounds of shrimp to sell - a good day's catch for him. But it could be his last catch for a long time.

He's just learned that the waters he usually trawls for shrimp have all been shut down because of the massive oil slick spreading across the Gulf of Mexico. It's only halfway through the season and every day he can't work costs him thousands of dollars in lost earnings.

"Now is the time we make our money, and they shutting it down. So, we going to be losing all of this," he says.

And, the end of the season also hits the seafood dock, which will have nothing to buy. It's workers will have no jobs either. BP has promised to compensate people for their economic losses, but this native American community in Louisiana's bayous is unsure.

In a church nearby, community members have gathered to talk over the problem. Some of the men would normally be out fishing, instead they are contemplating a life without fishing.

Pointe-Au-Chien Indian Tribe Chief Charles Verdin wears the ubiquitous fisherman's white rubber boots known locally as Cajun Reeboks.

He is trying to ease fears and help his community weather this manmade storm.

Hurricane Katrina drove many families out and the latest calamity worries those who have returned.

At the meeting, they hear from some visiting members of tribes in Alaska. The visitors describe their struggles with the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill in their homeland.

Faith Gemmill warns that the oil can harm people in many different ways.

"So even the women who are washing the clothes will be exposed. That's why there needs to be a decontamination unit."

Verdin says the community doesn't want to leave. And it will be hard for people used to independent living and relying on their own resources to rely on a "handout" from BP.

"Fishing,yeah, they fish, sell, they make money and all support themself. A big thing too is they eat what they catch. It will be tough for them too. Same thing like me. I can't imagine, you know, living without having fresh seafood and I know they the same. It's scary."

After the meeting there is a traditional regional meal of boiled shrimp, crawfish and crab. All of the food was swimming just hours before.

Chief Albert Naquin from nearby Isle de Jean Charles relishes such food and fears the impact the oil may have.

"This makes me feel good. Maybe it'll dirty your hands, but it's all worth it. I guess I was brought up this way, you know. A friend was talking the other day. Normally, this crab here, they fix them to where you can fry them in a frying pan. Call that pot-fried crabs," he says, brandishing a bright red crab.

With oil still spewing into the Gulf, it's impossible for locals to know when or if the shrimp and other seafood will be safe to harvest again.

Theresa Dardar sees the marshy bayous as home and fears the oil floating just miles away.

"We hate to see what's happening in the Gulf because it's a threat to our livelihood and to our land, our sacred grounds. And hopefully, we can stop it from getting here."

In the Cajun French spoken locally, she vows the Point-Au-Chien won't leave.

New Orleans University Professor Shirley Laska has long studied the tribes living in the bayous. She says it's a culturally rich area that has faced approaching development on one side, and the advance of seawater on the other. She says the spill could mean the end for some native American communities.

"Their garnering of the resources has stopped. Their boats are in, they're in their homes. They're meeting in their communities and their churches, talking because they have no crop that they can catch. Because if they catch it, they can't sell it. So right now, it has literally brought these communities to a dead halt."

On a summer weekend, where the road ends and the water takes over, it would normally be crowded and busy.

But, the commercial fishermen have nowhere to fish locally. And only a handful of recreational fishermen visit. Many are scared off by reports of giant oil slicks. The few who persevere get to see the beautiful countryside under threat.

Even before the leak, oil's influence on the south Louisiana landscape was unmistakable. Signs warning about underground pipelines are everywhere. So are plastic poles in canals to show the pipelines' location. Out in the marsh, oil and gas facilities are often the only lights visible at night.

Since the 1930s, oil and natural gas companies dug about 10,000 miles of canals, straight as Arizona highways, through the oak and cypress forests, black mangroves, bird rushes and golden marshes. If lined up in a row, the canals would stretch nearly halfway around the world.

They funneled salt water into the marshes, killing trees and grass and hastening erosion. Some scientists say drilling caused half of Louisiana's land loss, or about 1,000 square miles.

Oil companies have long argued that their drilling in south Louisiana consistently was approved by federal and state agencies and did not violate the law. Most attempts to get oil companies to fill in the canals have failed in court.

Land claims have proven hard to win because south Louisiana's American Indians have not won recognition as sovereign tribes by the federal government.

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Subjects: Oil spills, Fish, Animals, Coastlines and beaches, Native Americans, Women's fashion, Commercial fishing and hunting, Pollution, Environmental concerns, Environment, Environment and nature, Oil spills, Industrial accidents, Accidents, Accidents and disasters, General news, Marine animals, Fashion, Beauty and fashion, Lifestyle, Agriculture, Agriculture, food and beverage manufacturing, Industries, Business
Locations: Louisiana, Alaska, New Orleans, United States, North America
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US Oil 2
Title:
SD
Summary: WRAP Congress hearing into Gulf oil spill; BP CEO, briefing
Story No: 648778
Source: POOL, AP TELEVISION, BP Handout
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 17/06/2010 21:48 PM
People: Tony Hayward, Bart Stupak, Henry Waxman, Steve Scalise, Joe Barton, Bruce Braley, Joe Biden, Barack Obama
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

POOL

Washington, DC

1. Various, BP Chief Executive Tony Hayward swearing an oath before the committee

2. Various, woman identified as Diane Wilson interrupting Hayward, being restrained

3. UPSOUND: (English) Diane Wilson, protester:

"You need to charged with a crime. You need to go to jail about (unintelligible) ... You need to be charged with a crime."

4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tony Hayward, BP CEO:

++Soundbite starts on back view of Hayward testifying++

"The explosion and fire aboard the Deepwater Horizon and the resulting oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico never should have happened and I am deeply sorry that it did. "

5. Back view of Hayward testifying

6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Bart Stupak, Democrat representative from Michigan, the panel's chairman:

++Includes cutaway of Hayward listening++

"Mr Hayward, you owe it to all Americans. We are not small people, but we wish to get our lives back. For the Americans who live and work on the Gulf coast it may be years before they get their lives back. For the Americans who lost their lives on the rigs, their families may never get their lives back."

7. Mid shot of hearing

POOL

Washington, DC

8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tony Hayward, BP CEO:

++Soundbite starts on Congressman Henry Waxman listening:++

"I'm not prepared to draw conclusions about this accident until such time as the investigation is concluded."

9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Henry Waxman, Democrat representative for California:

"Are you failing to cooperate with other investigators as well? Because they are going to have a hard time reaching conclusions if you stonewall them, which is what we seem to be getting today."

10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tony Hayward, BP CEO:

"I'm not stonewalling. I simply was not involved in the decision making process."

11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Henry Waxman, Democrat representative for California:

"What is your conclusion?"

12. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tony Hayward, BP CEO:

"I haven't drawn a conclusion, Mr Chairman."

13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Henry Waxman, Democrat representative for California:

"I see. My time has expired and I'm just amazed at this testimony Mr Hayward. You are not taking responsibility, you're kicking the can down the road and acting as if you have nothing to do with this company and nothing to do with the decisions."

14. SOUNDBITE: (English) Steve Scalise, Republican representative - Louisiana:

"This shouldn't be happening (holding up a photograph of a pelican covered in oil). We put plans in place to stop this from happening and our plans are not being approved. Now I would love it if our plans were being rejected because there were better alternatives that were being offered by somebody that were being approved - but there are no other alternatives."

15. Pull out of Congressmen

16. SOUNDBITE: (English) Joe Barton, Republican Representative - Texas:

"But, I am ashamed of what happened in the White House yesterday. I think it is a tragedy of the first proportion that a private corporation can be subjected to what I would characterise as a shakedown."

17. SOUNDBITE: (English) Bruce Braley, Democrat representative - Iowa:

"Did you consider that to be a slush fund?"

18. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tony Hayward, BP CEO:

"As I said in my testimony, I hope people will now see that we are good for our word."

19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Bruce Braley, Democrat representative - Iowa:

"And can we take that as a no in response to my question, sir, that you did not consider this to be a slush fund?"

20. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tony Hayward, BP CEO:

"I certainly didn't think it was a slush fund."

AP TELEVISION

Washington, DC

21. SOUNDBITE: (English) Joseph Biden, US Vice President:

"There is no shakedown; it's insisting on responsible conduct and a responsible response to something they caused. And I find it outrageous to suggest that if in fact we insisted that BP demonstrate their preparedness to put aside (b) billions of (US) dollars; in this case 20 (b) billion (US dollars) to take care of the immediate needs of people who are drowning."

BP HANDOUT

Gulf of Mexico

22. Underwater shot of oil spill

STORYLINE:

American Members of Congress channelled the nation's anger over the oil spill calamity at the boss of the company that caused it, subjecting BP chief executive Tony Hayward to a withering day of judgment on Thursday.

The stoic oil man said he was out of the loop on all decisions at the well and coolly asserted, "I'm not stonewalling."

That infuriated members of Congress even more, Democrats and Republicans alike.

The pillorying had been anticipated for days and unfolded at a nearly relentless pace.

Chastened by heavy criticism from American lawmakers, a grim-faced Hayward said on Thursday he was "deeply sorry" for his company's catastrophic oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

More than eight weeks after the spill began and a day after BP agreed to a 20 (b) billion US dollar victims' compensation fund, Hayward said under oath to lawmakers that he was "personally devastated" by the April explosion of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig that triggered the giant spill.

As Hayward began to testify, a woman protester disrupted the hearing and had to be forcibly removed from the room by Capitol police.

The woman, identified as Diane Wilson, shouted to Hayward from the back of the room: "You need to be charged with a crime."

A group of protesters milled in the hallway outside the hearing room, including Wilson, a 61-year-old fourth-generation fisher from Seadrift, Texas, near the Gulf Coast.

Wilson, appearing with a black-stained hand, said she wanted to send a message that Hayward should go to jail.

She was grabbed by Capitol police and taken from the room.

"The fire and explosion on the Deepwater Horizon never should have happened and I'm deeply sorry that it did," Hayward told the panel.

And, while "we need to know what went wrong" Hayward also said that it was still too early to say what caused the incident.

But before testifying, Hayward had to endure more than an hour of mostly unrelenting criticism from Democrats and Republicans alike.

The panel's chairman Democratic Congressman Bart Stupak told Hayward, "We are not small people, but we wish to get our lives back."

Stupak was throwing back at the oil giant comments made the day before by BP Chairman Carl-Henric Svanberg - about how BP sympathised with the "small people" of the Gulf - and Hayward's earlier remark that he wanted his "life back."

With multiple investigations continuing and primary efforts focused on stopping the leak, there was little chance the nation would learn much from Hayward's appearance about what caused the disaster.

Yet even those modest expectations were not met as the CEO told lawmakers at every turn that he was not tuned in to operations at the well.

He said his underlings made the decisions and federal regulators were responsible for vetting them.

Hayward spoke slowly and calmly in his clipped British accent as he sought to deflect accusations - based on internal BP documents obtained by congressional investigators - that BP chose a particular well design that was riskier but cheaper by at least 7 (m) million US dollars.

At one point a frustrated California Representative, Henry Waxman, Democratic chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, interrupted the CEO.

"You are not taking responsibility, you're kicking the can down the road and acting as if you have nothing to do with this company and nothing to do with the decisions."

Hayward calmly insisted: "I'm not stonewalling. I simply was not involved in the decision-making process."

Louisiana Republican Steve Scalise, expressing the frustration felt along the Gulf Coast, demanded Hayward's assistance in getting more relief to stopping the oil from coming ashore.

In a jarring departure that caught fellow Republicans by surprise, Congressman Joe Barton, the top Republican on the panel, used his opening statement to apologise - twice - to BP for the pressure put on the company by President Barack Obama to contribute to a compensation fund for people in the afflicted Gulf of Mexico states.

Barton called the 20 (b) billion US dollar fund that BP agreed to Wednesday a "shakedown" and "slush fund."

He later backed off, saying BP should "do everything possible to make good on the consequences" and apologised in the event his earlier apologies were misconstrued.

Barton's received at least 100,470 US dollars in political contributions from oil and gas interests since the beginning of 2009, the second-highest amount among all the committee members.

Iowan Democrat Bruce Braley sought Hayward's opinion on the "shakedown."

In response, Hayward admitted that he didn't think the amount set aside after meetings at the White House Wednesday was a "slush fund."

Vice President Joe Biden later called the shakedown comment "outrageous."

"There is no shakedown; it's insisting on responsible conduct and a responsible response to something they caused."

As of Thursday morning, the BP well has gushed as many as 118 million gallons (447 million litres) of oil into the Gulf of Mexico.

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Subjects: Violations of environmental law, Crime, Legal proceedings, Corporate management, Legislature, Legislature hearings, Coastlines and beaches, Corporate crime, Corporate news, Business, Corporate crime, General news, Law and order, Personnel, Government and politics, Environment and nature
People: Tony Hayward, Bart Stupak, Henry Waxman, Steve Scalise, Joe Barton, Bruce Braley, Joe Biden, Barack Obama
Organisations: U.S. Democratic Party, U.S. Republican Party, United States Congress, United States government
Locations: Washington, United States
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US BP 2
Title:
SD
Summary: BP execs arrive at WHouse, reax to Obama address
Story No: 648666
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 16/06/2010 16:16 PM
People: Tony Hayward, Barack Obama
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SHOTLIST

St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana - 16 June 2010

1. Tilt up from water to fishing boats docked at marina ++MUTE++

2. Various of fishing boats ++MUTE++

3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Teddy Hammers, Harbour and Marina Owner:

"In my opinion, he didn't talk enough about stopping the oil. You know, we need to stop this oil because it's just too much oil coming in here and then we've got hurricane season on us and it's devastating."

4. Wide sign, reading: (English) "Marina Motel" ++MUTE++

5. Pan from sign, reading: (English) "Go Marina Launch", to wide of Marina Motel ++MUTE++

6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Robert Berthelot, Marina and Motel Owner:

"While they were trying to stop this leak, the President was out playing golf instead of working with these people. Now he's coming back backtracking, saying he was there. He wasn't there. All he did was create... he was causing more problems for BP while they were in a crisis, instead of working with them and getting down here and stopping this oil before it got to the Gulf. Now it's coming on land which is creating a lot of problems."

7. Wide of St. Bernard Parish resident John Brignac and others getting on a fishing boat ++MUTE++

8. Close up of Brignac on boat ++MUTE++

9. SOUNDBITE: (English) John Brignac, St. Bernard Parish resident:

"Oh, I thought it was interesting, I thought it was a pretty good speech. I mean, he's the president and there is only so much he can do. I mean, everything is really in BP's hand. I think he's doing everything he can, you know?"

Washington, DC - 16 June 2010

10. Wide exterior of White house, BP executives, including BP Chairman Carl-Henric Svanberg and CEO Tony Hayward, walking up steps and entering the White House

STORYLINE:

U.S. President Barack Obama met top BP officials on Wednesday to press his demands that the London-based oil giant pay into a claims fund for victims of the worst oil spill in the US's history.

BP (British Petroleum) Chairman Carl-Henric Svanberg, CEO Tony Hayward, and other officials were seen arriving at the White House.

It was Obama's first direct meeting with BP officials since one of their oil wells blew out off the Louisiana coast nearly 60 days ago, and started gushing crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico.

While Hayward has served as the voice of the company, the White House has been emphasising the role of the company's chairman, Svanberg, instead.

The meeting came after Obama vowed to "make BP pay" for the catastrophic oil spill that has wreaked havoc on the economy, the environment and the way of life along the Gulf, in an address from the Oval Office on Tuesday night.

Obama offered no immediate remedies for a frustrated nation, but rather said he was creating a "battle plan" for long-term Gulf Coast restoration.

In making the address, Obama sought to defend his handling of the crisis and stoke new confidence that he can see the job through.

But many whose livelihoood depend upon the fishing and tourism industries in the Gulf weren't impressed with the president's assurances, in an area that is traditionally Republican-leaning.

Teddy Hammers, who owns a harbour and marina in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana, relies on shrimpers and fishermen to use his boats and buy his fuel and groceries. These days they're not coming around. And he wanted to hear the President's plan for stopping the flow of oil into Gulf waters.

"In my opinion, he didn't talk enough about stopping the oil. You know, we need to stop this oil because it's just too much oil coming in here and then we've got hurricane season on us and it's devastating," said Hammers.

Just a short distance away, the owner of the Gulf Outlet Marina and Motel was similarly cynical about Obama's address.

"While they were trying to stop this leak, the President was out playing golf instead of working with these people. Now he's coming back backtracking, saying he was there. He wasn't there. All he did was create... he was causing more problems for BP while they were in a crisis instead of working with them and getting down here and stopping this oil before it got to the Gulf. Now it's coming on land which is creating a lot of problems," said Robert Berthelot.

But local resident John Brignac said Obama was helpless to stop the oil, and said he believed the President was doing "everything he can" to stop the oil and restore the Gulf.

"I thought it was a pretty good speech. I mean, he's the president and there is only so much he can do....everything is really in BP's hand. I think he's doing everything he can, you know?" said Brignac.

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Subjects: Accidents and disasters, Weather patterns, General news, Climate, Environment and nature
People: Tony Hayward, Barack Obama
Locations: Louisiana, United States, District of Columbia, North America
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