AP Archive
Welcome  Guest
Sign in or Register

 

Displaying 1 - 10 of 55 results

CHINA: BEIJING: BID FOR 2008 OLYMPIC GAMES
Title:
SD
Summary: CHINA: BEIJING: BID FOR 2008 OLYMPIC GAMES
Story No: 206162
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 12/01/2001 00:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

Mandarin/Nat

(B) Billions of dollars are being spent on improving Beijing's environment as part of the city's bid to win the 2008 Olympic Games.

Officials say the campaign will focus on cleaning the air, improving sewerage and minimising industrial pollution.

Workers have already started planting trees as other areas of environmental concern are being addressed.

Officials also say the campaign will be good for the country on the whole, regardless of its impact on China's Olympic bid.

SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin)

"The first important task for Beijing is to reform the energy structure, reusing the pollution caused by coal burning."

SUPERCAPTION: Wang Guangtao, Vice Mayor, City Construction and Environmental Department

SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin)

"Planting more trees will guarantee cleaner air for our city."

SUPERCAPTION: Voxpop

SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin)

"We should guarantee good air quality during the Olympics. And even after the Olympics, the air quality will still be good or even better. That's our basic goal."

SUPERCAPTION: Yu Xiaouan, Director of Environment Division of Beijing's Olympic Bid

Beijing, China, January 12, 2001

1. Various industrial pollution

2. Various of balloon used as part of environmental tests

3. Various media conference

4. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Wang Guangtao, Vice Mayor of the City Construction and Environmental Department

5. Various trees being transported and planted

6. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) - Voxpop

7. Various of model of Olympic stadium

8. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Yu Xiaouan, Director of Environment Division of Beijing's Olympic Bid

9. Various traffic, industrial and transport pollution

Beijing, China, January 12, 2001

1. Various industrial pollution

2. Various of balloon used as part of environmental tests

3. Various media conference

4. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Wang Guangtao, Vice Mayor of the City Construction and Environmental Department

5. Various trees being transported and planted

6. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) - Voxpop

7. Various of model of Olympic stadium

8. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Yu Xiaouan, Director of Environment Division of Beijing's Olympic Bid

9. Various traffic, industrial and transport pollution

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: Summer Olympic games, Environment, Municipal governments, Pollution, Air quality, Industrial pollution, Environment and nature, Environmental concerns, Olympic games, Events, Local governments, Government and politics, Sports
Locations: Beijing, China, Greater China, East Asia, Asia
Show story thumbnails
CHINA: IOC MEMBERS MEET JIANG ZEMIN
Title:
SD
Summary: CHINA: IOC MEMBERS MEET JIANG ZEMIN
Story No: 210036
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 21/02/2001 00:00 AM
People: Jiang Zemin
Subscription:

Natural Sound

Sixteen members of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) were greeted by Chinese president Jiang Zemin on the first of their four-day inspection visit to Beijing.

The Chinese capital hopes to convince the IOC delegates that Beijing is their best possible choice to host the Olympic games in 2008.

The Olympic inspectors got off to a positive start Wednesday with praise for Beijing's on- paper proposals to host the 2008 Games.

Hein Verbruggen, head of the inspection team, said its members were "happy" with the city's official bid report.

But he urged officials to be ready for "straightforward questions" on matters ranging from stadiums to transportation to air quality.

The IOC city survey is a key moment for Beijing's drive to land the world's most prestigious sporting event.

New anti-graft rules bar International Olympic Committee members from visiting bid cities, so voting members who pick the winning city this summer will rely heavily on the inspection team's findings.

Beijing's rivals are Paris, Istanbul, Osaka, and Toronto.

In the afternoon, delegates and reporters were loaded onto separate buses, then driven off in convoy with their way apparently cleared by traffic police.

A Beijing bid committee official briefed IOC delegates using a model of the Olympic Green, the 12 square kilometer park space where the main venues will be located.

At the National Olympic Sports Center delegates and were taken to the recently refurbished combined sports hall where two middle school teams were playing handball in a citywide competition.

Beijing has put on its best face for the visit.

Lawns are dyed green in mid-winter, roadsides adorned with flowers and urban grime scrubbed away.

Security has been tightened.

Relatives of imprisoned democracy activists who asked to meet the commission members said Tuesday they were being followed by police.

Security was tight on Tiananmen Square Wednesday, the scene of frequent protests by the outlawed Falun Gong meditation group.

But so far, there have been no reports of Falun Gong protests during the IOC visit.

Beijing, China - 21 February 2001

1. IOC evaluation commission chairman Hein Verbruggen walking past camera and shaking hands with President Jiang Zemin

2. Cameramen, pan to another IOC delegate Simon Balderstone shaking hands with Jiang

3. Jiang posing with IOC delegation

4. Group photo

5. Chinese Olympic bid delegates seated, pan to Pres. Jiang and Mr. Verbruggen seated

6. Pres. Jiang speaking with Verbruggen in English

7. Verbruggen talking

8. Jiang and Verbruggen seated

9. IOC delegation leaving Beijing hotel

10. Wide shot of bus

11. Delegates standing next to scale model of stadium complex, with UPSOUND of IOC delegate saying "How many seats?" and Chinese guide responding "This is 7,000 seats."

12. Walking shot of delegates entering stadium with handball game in progress and sound of shouting and applause

13. Verbruggen and another IOC delegate speaking, pan to handball court with players

14. Verbruggen listening to another IOC delegate speaking

15. Wide shot of exterior of stadium

16. Verbruggen walking from building with Chinese guide, pullout to wide of walking

17. IOC delegates boarding bus

18. Crowd around bus

19. Tiananmen Square with guard at attention

20. Police matching on square

21. History museum with people on Square

Beijing, China - 21 February 2001

1. IOC evaluation commission chairman Hein Verbruggen walking past camera and shaking hands with President Jiang Zemin

2. Cameramen, pan to another IOC delegate Simon Balderstone shaking hands with Jiang

3. Jiang posing with IOC delegation

4. Group photo

5. Chinese Olympic bid delegates seated, pan to Pres. Jiang and Mr. Verbruggen seated

6. Pres. Jiang speaking with Verbruggen in English

7. Verbruggen talking

8. Jiang and Verbruggen seated

9. IOC delegation leaving Beijing hotel

10. Wide shot of bus

11. Delegates standing next to scale model of stadium complex, with UPSOUND of IOC delegate saying "How many seats?" and Chinese guide responding "This is 7,000 seats."

12. Walking shot of delegates entering stadium with handball game in progress and sound of shouting and applause

13. Verbruggen and another IOC delegate speaking, pan to handball court with players

14. Verbruggen listening to another IOC delegate speaking

15. Wide shot of exterior of stadium

16. Verbruggen walking from building with Chinese guide, pullout to wide of walking

17. IOC delegates boarding bus

18. Crowd around bus

19. Tiananmen Square with guard at attention

20. Police matching on square

21. History museum with people on Square

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: Summer Olympic games, Sports governance, Olympic games, Events, Sports
People: Jiang Zemin
Organisations: International Olympic Committee, China government
Locations: Beijing, China, Greater China, East Asia, Asia
Show story thumbnails
China Olympics Beijing Youth
Title:
SD
Summary: China plans ahead for sporting success in 2008
Story No: 309111
Source: SNTV, APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 12/07/2001 00:00 AM
People: Jet Li
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Exterior Shichahai Sports School

2. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) School secretary Liu Hongbin

"The history of this school is quite long. It was formed in 1958, so it has been going over 40 years. In that time, we have produced 20 World Champions."

3. Boys prepare for gymnastics

4. Boy on pommel horse

5. C/u hands on pommel horse

6. Boy on rings

7. Girl on beam

8. Girls on bar

9. Baby

10. W/s Table Tennis

11. C/u boys playing table tennis

12. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) School Secretary Liu Hongbin

"I can say that if Beijing stages the Olympic Games in 2008, our students will certainly be taking part, and will certainly win medals."

13. Low angle boys playing table tennis

STORYLINE

With a decision on which city is to host the 2008 Olympics imminent, Beijing is doing all it can to ensure the IOC takes the Chinese option.

At the same time, the city is making sure its athletes are ready to compete at the highest level should Beijing win out over the other candidates.

This is the Shichahai Sports School in central Beijing.

For many years, it has produced a stream of talent.

If Beijing does stage the 2008 Olympic Games, then the champions of those Games are already being prepared.

Shichahai is a part-time sports school whose pupils are the cream of Beijing's sporting youth.

There are schools like it all around China.

The children, like these gymnasts who are all around nine years old, are selected from tests at their own schools, and are then offered the opportunity to supplement their education with top-class sports coaching.

While not all may be ready for 2008, this school has produced many champions, like gymnast Ma Yanhong, a gold-medallist in 1984, and Kui Yuanyuan, silver-medallist in Sydney.

Naturally, table tennis is one of the sports on the curriculum here, and among their alumni is former World Champion Wang Tao.

Shichahai students have not only excelled in sport - Kung Fu's latest film star, Jet Li, was a student here.

In seven years time, who is to say Shichahai won't produce an Olympic champion?

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: Summer Olympic games, Table tennis, Men's artistic gymnastics, Artistic gymnastics, Olympic games, Events, Sports, Gymnastics, Men's artistic gymnastics, Men's gymnastics, Men's sports, Men's gymnastics
People: Jet Li
Locations: Beijing, China, Greater China, East Asia, Asia
Show story thumbnails
China Beijing Traffic
Title:
SD
Summary: Focus on Beijing's traffic problems ahead of Olympics
Story No: 309113
Source: SNTV, APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 13/07/2001 00:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Junction with Beijing 2008 sign

2. Wide of traffic on motorway

3. Traffic with signs in distance

4. Traffic shots out of car

5. Inside of Traffic Control centre

6. TV screens close-up

7. Policeman on phone

8. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Deputy Director Traffic Control, Meng Xianlong

"By 2008 should we have the Olympic Games, we will have some very good solutions. Our public transport system will have developed a lot. We think that by that stage there will be 2,500,000 vehicles in Beijing, but our public transport system such as the underground will have improved so that by 2008 we will have a good and safe system."

9. Policemen on phone

10. Police badge

11. Three policemen study computer

12. TV screens low-angle

STORYLINE

As Beijing prepares to stage the 2008 Olympic Games, one main infrastructure problem has been highlighted.

Over the last 20 years or so, Beijing, like many other Asian cities, has become increasingly choked with traffic.

Beijing's bicycles, which were previously so omnipresent, have been pushed aside, as the city has taken to four wheels.

That, of course, means more pollution, and, as the volume of cars, taxis, buses and lorries increases, moving around the city becomes more difficult.

Some remedies are obvious.

In addition to the three ring roads currently circling the city, another is being built, and a fifth planned.

Five new underground lines are also being built, in addition to the present two, to improve public transport by 2008.

However, traffic still needs to be kept flowing, with the result that the Beijing police have invested in a state-of-the-art traffic control system, enabling them to pinpoint trouble around the entire network.

With 2008 in mind, there are plans to upgrade even the current system.

Beijing traffic is by no means the most fluid in the world, but the city is intent on keeping moving towards 2008.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: Traffic, Summer Olympic games, Mass transit system operations, Transportation, General news, Olympic games, Events, Transportation and shipping, Industrial products and services, Industries, Business, Sports
Locations: Beijing, China, Greater China, East Asia, Asia
Show story thumbnails
China Olympics
Title:
SD
Summary: Clean pix of launch of emblem for 2008 Olympic Games
Story No: 382004
Source: POOL, APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 03/08/2003 00:00 AM
People: Jackie Chan
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

APTN

1. Actor Jackie Chan and others arriving at ceremony

2. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Jackie Chan, Actor:

"It's just like when you look at my face and the Chinese style jacket that I'm wearing, you'd know immediately that I'm Chinese. Therefore this emblem is very important because you have to make people understand at first sight where it is from."

3. Pan from Michael Payne, International Olympic Committee marketing director, to Chan being interviewed

4. Chan shaking hands with interviewer

5. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Chen Wu, One of the emblem designers:

"We want to show the five thousand year-old Chinese culture and its long flowing tradition. We also want to show the inner concept of a combination of Chinese traditional culture and the Olympic spirit."

6. Man walking past promotional signs along entrance to ceremony

7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Brad Copeland, Image advisor for International Olympic Committee:

"This is the beginning of a journey of communication of literally telling the story of the Beijing Olympic bid to the world, of Beijing and the new China. And I think that the logo will be a very important first step."

8. Crowds inside Temple of Heaven

9. Chan shaking hands with retired former Olympic world table tennis champion Deng Yaping, they bow to each other and crowd

10. Audience applauding

11. Officials arriving at stage

POOL

12. Wu Bangguo, Chairman of the National People's Congress of the People's Republic of China, and Hein Verbruggen (standing on the left), Chairman of the Coordination Commission at the International Olympic Committee for the Games of the XXIX Olympiad lift up emblem

13. Close up of emblem

APTN

14. Pan right of people waving Chinese flags and emblem flags

15. People waving flags

16. Tilt down from logo banner above roof of Temple gates to audience

17. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Vox pop, Xu Jixian:

"I think the thinking of the design is an extraordinarily creative one because it combines the traditional and the modern era. It also reflects the traditional Chinese culture. I think, it is wonderful for us to have such an emblem which is a combination of the history and today."

18. Pan from crowd to ceremony on Temple of Heaven

STORYLINE:

Organisers of the Beijing Olympics unveiled the 2008 Games' emblem - a Chinese character for the name of Beijing drawn to look like a running athlete - at a ceremony on Sunday night attended by film star Jackie Chan and hundreds of dancers.

The event at the Temple of Heaven, a centuries-old Beijing landmark, was also attended by more than two-thousand invited guests, including film director Zhang Yimou and Wu Bangguo, the chairman of China's legislature.

The communist government has promoted the games as a matter of national pride and evidence of China's modernisation, heavily publicising every step in the preparations.

At the ceremony on Sunday night, an oversized traditional Chinese stamp carved with the emblem arrived by double-decker bus and was carried to a stage by Chan and Chinese table tennis star Deng Yaping.

Wu and Hein Verbruggen, an International Olympic Committee official, stamped the symbol onto a scroll and held it up for the audience to see on large video screens.

Guests were shown a video by Zhang promoting the seal and hundreds of performers in red leotards danced.

The emblem is based on the Chinese character "Jing," which is part of the name of Beijing and also can be written on its own to refer to the Chinese capital.

The emblem also includes the Olympic rings and the words "Beijing 2008".

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: Government and Politics, International organizations
People: Jackie Chan
Locations: China
Show story thumbnails
China Torch 2
Title:
SD
Summary: WRAP Olympic torch arrives in Beijing
Story No: 419498
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 08/06/2004 09:42 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

Beijing Capital Airport

1. Plane carrying Olympic flame arriving at airport

2. Plane taxiing

3. Police and other people at airport taking pictures

4. Officials from Beijing municipal government and Beijing Olympic Organising Committee waiting by the plane

5. Beijing vice mayor Liu Jingmin (left) and Jiang Xiaoyu (right), vice chairman of Beijing Olympic Organising Committee

6. Olympic Ambassador Spiros Lambridis descending from plane with flame

7. Close shot, flame, pull out to Olympic ambassador shaking hands with Liu Jingmin and Jiang Xiaoyu

8. Pan from press to officials

9. Close shot, flame, pull out to Liu Jingmin, Greek ambassador to China (white man in suit) and other officials

10. Liu talking to Olympic ambassador who holds a bunch of flowers

11. Jiang Xiaoyu passing the flame to Gu Yaoming, Secretary General of China Olympic Committee

12. Flames being passed among officials

Mutianyu Great Wall, Huairo County, Beijing

13. Children painting mural with Great Wall in background

14. Various of children painting

15. Trumpeters playing fanfare - pulls out

16. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Zhang Mao, Beijing vice mayor

"This ceremony today realises the handshake between China and Greece, the two oldest civilised countries, across remote time and space. It is a very important, historic moment for the development of the Olympics."

17. Children, standing by paintings, and representatives of China's ethnic minority groups applauding

18. SOUNDBITE (English) Spiros Lambridis, Olympic Ambassador

"The Great Wall may well have been constructed for defensive purposes, however today's China and the proud city of Beijing, by

constructing these new magnificent sporting installations for the world's youth to compete peacefully in 2008, proves also it's ability to promote through the Olympic games peace, friendship between nations and cultures."

19. Women dressed in five Olympic colours carrying torch in procession along red carpet

20. Close-up of torch being carried - pans as women walk past

21. Women handing over torch to officials who hold it aloft - with AUDIO of choral music

22. Close-up of torch being held - pulls out

23. Onlookers cheering

24. Cutaway of cameramen

25. Crowd representing 28 Olympic events waving flags - pulls out to wide of ceremony with AUDIO of music

STORYLINE:

The Olympic flame continued its global journey ahead of this summer's Olympiad in Athens with a stop on Tuesday in Beijing, host city for the 2008 games.

There was a warm reception for the flame, being brought for the first time to China.

Officials gathered at Beijing Capital airport to greet an Olympic ambassador who brought the flame on a special flight.

Later, at an elaborate ceremony at the Great Wall, the flame was united with the torch that will carry it through the streets of the Chinese capital on Wednesday.

The Beijing relay will begin at the Great Hall of the People in the centre of the city.

From there it will pass historic sites such as the Forbidden City and the Temple of Heaven on a 50-kilometre (30-mile) route which ends at the

Summer Palace, the former imperial resort in the city's northwest.

It's the flame's fifth stop in its 78-thousand-kilometre (46-thousand and 800-mile) journey across six continents, 27 countries and 33 cities.

After leaving China, the flame is due to travel to New Delhi.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Locations: China
Show story thumbnails
Olympics Beijing
Title:
SD
Summary: BOCOG progress report on venue construction
Story No: S01063
Source: SNTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 07/04/2006 11:58 AM
People:
Subscription:

SOURCE: SNTV

RESTRICTIONS: SNTV clients only. Scheduled news programmes only. Use within 14 days. If interested in archive use after 14 days please call +44 20 8233 5500 / twiarchive@imgworld.com. No internet.

DURATION: 2:33

SUGGESTED LEAD-IN:

With less than two years to go until the 2008 summer games, the pace of construction at the Olympic venues in Beijing is being shifted to a higher gear.

Officials from the Beijing Organising Committee of the 29th Olympic Games (BOCOG) officials made it clear on Tuesday (28th March) that the projects will fall within budget.

SUGGESTED VOICEOVER:

Beijing''s already rapid pace of construction for the 2008 Olympics is moving into a higher gear, with more workers being hired so that progress can remain on schedule.

So far construction has begun on 20 of the 31 competition venues.

The construction of the main Olympic stadium - the National Stadium commonly known as the "Bird''s Nest" - is progressing smoothly.

Speaking at a news conference on Tuesday, officials from the Beijing Organising Committee of the 20th Olympic Games (BOCOG) stressed that despite of fears of cost escalation, expenses were under control.

SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin)

"We are controlling the construction cost of the two main venues, the National Stadium and the National Swimming Center, within the approved budget by the State Development and Reform Committee."

SUPER CAPTION: Jin Yan, Deputy director of Olympic Projects Construction Committee of BOCOG.

The approved budget of the main Olympic Stadium is around 3.13 billion yuan ($3.9 million US dollars), while the budget for the National Swimming Center is 1.02 billion yuan ($1.28 million US dollars).

BOCOG expects the main structures of all of the venues to be constructed by the end of this year with the remaining construction to be completed by the end of 2007.

SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin)

"Next year, most of the venues will enter the stage of installation and adjustment. So the construction work of this year, for instance, the structural building and the application of key technology are the bases for the timely completion of the venues next year. So this year (2006) is crucial and a tough year."

SUPER CAPTION: Jin Yan, Deputy director of Olympic Projects Construction Committee of BOCOG.

Only ten months ago, the International Olympic Committee urged Beijing to slow down the pace of construction fearing that the venues would be completed too early and run up additional operating expenses.

But Jin and other officials defended the pace of construction, insisting that they have got it just right.

Some of the larger showcase venues, like the 91,000-seat National Stadium which requires 42,000 tons of steel, presented technical problems that needed to be worked out.

SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin)

"We need to overcome a lot of problems in the aspects of technology and resources in the process of application of new technology, new materials, new craftsmanship as well as the new structure and frames."

SUPER CAPTION: Jin Yan, deputy director of Olympic Projects Construction Committee of BOCOG.

BOCOG expects the number of workers to rise from the current 17,000 to more than 30,000 by the midway stage of 2006 as construction of more projects begin.

SHOTLIST: Beijing, China, - March 28th 2006.

1. 00:00 - Wide shot pan construction site of National Stadium

2. 00:09 - Medium shot construction site

3. 00:13 - Various shot workers

4. 00:24 - Various shot of construction site

5. 00:33 - Wide shot presser given by Beijing Organizing Committee of 29th Olympic Games(BOCOG)

6. 00:37 - SOUNDBITE (Mandarin): Jin Yan, deputy director of Olympic Projects Construction Committee of BOCOG:

7. 00:54 - Wide shot construction site

8. 00:58 - Tilt up drilling machine working at the site

9. 01:08 - SOUNDBITE (Mandarin): Jin Yan, deputy director of Olympic Projects Construction Committee of BOCOG:

10. 01:36 - Wide pan construction site of the National Swimming Center

11. 01:45 - Various of translucent bubbles being put up outside the building

12. 01:59 - SOUNDBITE (Mandarin): Jin Yan, deputy director of Olympic Projects Construction Committee of BOCOG

13. 02:18 - Various shots of construction site of the National Swimming Center

SOURCE: SNTV.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: Sports, Hiring and recruitment, Summer Olympic games, National budgets, Olympic games, Technology, Personnel, Business, Events, Government budgets, Government finance, Government business and finance, Government business and finance, Government and politics, National budgets, National governments
Locations: Beijing, China, Greater China, East Asia, Asia
Show story thumbnails
China Traffic 3
Title:
SD
Summary: WRAP Olympic test bans cars from streets ADDS traffic controller
Story No: 533260
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 17/08/2007 07:39 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

1. High shot of traffic in city

2. Various high shots of traffic

3. Cars, buses and cyclists

4. Cyclists passing camera, street traffic in background

5. Wide interior of traffic control centre

9. Big screen showing city's main arterial routes

10. Close-up of traffic control officer

11. Monitors showing traffic

12. Computers with map of city's main arterial routes in background

13. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Shao Jie, Director of the Beijing Public Security Bureau, Traffic Control Centre:

"The exhaust from cars is more than twice its usual level. Generally the overall condition of Beijing traffic is pretty good."

14. People waking beside buses

15. Bus crowded with passengers

16. Pedestrians crossing street

17. Subway train arriving at station and passengers getting off

18. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Mr. Li, subway passenger:

"My life is sort of affected by the traffic ban. My child feels tired to take the subway train. It is more comfortable for me to drive, but it is something we should do to give up driving for the sake of blue sky in Beijing and the Beijing Olympics."

19. Pan of subway train arriving in station

20. Passengers inside crowded subway train

21. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Ms. Zhang, subway train passenger:

"I think the traffic ban is a great idea. I strongly support it, as it saves a lot of energy."

22. Traffic on street

STORYLINE

Beijing city officials yanked hundreds of thousands of private vehicles off the streets on Friday to test whether a partial car ban would clear health-threatening smog and ease gridlock during next year's Olympic Games.

An estimated 400-thousand private cars were affected by the ban on the first day of the four-day trial, the official Xinhua News Agency reported.

Violators were to be fined 100 yuan (13 US dollars) if caught driving in the city and ordered to return home, a Beijing Traffic Police spokesman said.

Traffic on the main roads flowed at a brisker pace than normal, while police maintained a normally visible presence.

The effect of the partial ban was closely monitored by Beijing's Traffic Control Centre.

The centre's director, Shao Jie, said the new measures were necessary because "the exhaust from cars is more than twice its usual level."

Upwardly mobile Beijingers have grown used to the comforts of driving as private car ownership exploded in the past five years.

Many commuters opted to car pool, take taxis, buses, the subway or take the day off work.

Subway cars were tightly packed with commuters during the morning rush hour.

"I think the traffic ban is a great idea. I strongly support it, as it saves a lot of energy," said one subway commuter.

Emergency vehicles, taxis, buses and other public-service vehicles were exempt as were those given special passes by Beijing Olympic organisers to attend sports test events around the city.

Details of the plan were announced last week by city authorities, who said the four-day plan would take 1.3 (m) million cars off the road.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: Mass transit systems, Automotive industry regulation, Rail transportation industry, Summer Olympic games, Transportation, General news, Industry regulation, Government business and finance, Business, Government business and finance, Government and politics, Industry regulation, Government regulations, Transportation and shipping, Industrial products and services, Industries, Olympic games, Events, Sports
Locations: Beijing, Beijing, China
Show story thumbnails
Taiwan Olympics
Title:
SD
Summary: 2008 Olympics torch won't go to island after talks with China fail
Story No: 537238
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 21/09/2007 05:59 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide shot exterior of National Council on Physical Fitness and Sports

2. Advertising board for the 2008 Olympics

3. Close-up of electronic number reading "322" indicating Olympics countdown

4. Wide shot of news conference

5. Cameras

6. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Yang Chung-he, Chairman of Chinese Taipei Sports Federation:

"China suddenly changes her mind. China has brought the terms that we previously rejected back to our discussion in August. Therefore we cannot reach a consensus regarding the torch relay."

7. Wide shot of news conference

8. SOUDNBITE: (Mandarin) Tsai Chen-wei, chairman of Taiwan Olympic Committee:

"If they (China) are playing little tricks, then we will lose the foundation of mutual trust. In the past we were based on mutual trust, once we are about to sign the paper, it comes with terms like 'China Taipei', 'the first domestic stop', which were not in our discussions."

9. Wide pan of street

10. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Ms Yeh, Vox Pop - Woman:

"It shouldn't involve politics. It (the torch relay) is part of the sports activity and should go back to discussions related to sports. If it's politics, it's politics."

11. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Ms Chen, Vox Pop - Woman:

"Everyone knows the Olympic torch relay. Why we don't let it come to Taiwan? We should let the world know about Taiwan."

12. Wide shot copy of document dated 12 February 2007 between Beijing's and Taiwan's Olympics Committees

13. Pan right of paragraph, reading: "Taiwan cannot use its national flag, national emblem and national anthem during the torch relay."

STORYLINE:

Negotiations between Taiwan and China on the torch relay route for the 2008 Summer Olympic Games are at a dead end, and the torch will not come to Taiwan, international and Taiwan Olympic officials said Friday.

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) said in an e-mail to The Associated Press that it had been following discussions between China's and Taiwan's Olympic committees, and that a "solution between the two has not been found ... The route will now have to go ahead without a stop in Chinese Taipei."

At a Taipei news conference, Taiwan Olympic Committee Chairman Tsai Chen-wei said that the IOC had demanded a September 20 cut-off date for negotiations on the relay, and that with the deadline having passed, Taiwan could not be on the route.

Yang Chung-he, chairman of Chinese Taipei Sports Federation, added, "China suddenly changes her mind. China has brought the terms that we previously rejected back to our discussion in August. Therefore we cannot reach a consensus regarding the torch relay."

"Chinese Taipei" is a term often used internationally for the island or its sports teams.

Taiwan and China split amid civil war in 1949, and communist Beijing still claims the democratic, self-governed island as Chinese territory.

It often objects to Taiwan's name being formally used in international events. Taipei is Taiwan's capital city.

The IOC e-mail, from Emmanuelle Moreau, media relations manager from the International Olympic Committee, expressed regret over Taiwan's non-inclusion in the route.

The torch controversy began in April, when Taiwan backed out of participating in the relay because of a dispute over the route.

The route proposed by Beijing organisers had the torch arriving in Taiwan from Vietnam on April 30, 2008, and going on to China-controlled Hong Kong.

Many in Taiwan had pushed for a route that took the torch from Taiwan to China via another country.

The self-governing island objects to any measures that appear to consider it a part of Chinese territory.

It had contended that the contiguity of the Taiwan and Hong Kong stops made this appear to be the case.

AP Television interviewed a few residents of Taipei on Friday and opinion appeared to be mixed.

Ms Yeh said the sports relay "shouldn't involve politics. It is part of the sports activity and should go back to discussions related to sports."

Ms Chen thought the torch relay would promote Taiwan overseas.

"Everyone knows the Olympic torch relay. Why we don't let it come to Taiwan? We should let the world know about Taiwan," she said.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: Territorial disputes, Olympic torch relay, Olympic games, Sports governance, Government and politics, War and unrest, General news, Events, Sports
Organisations: Chinese Taipei Olympic Team, International Olympic Committee
Locations: Taipei, Taipei, Taiwan
Show story thumbnails
China Olympics
Title:
SD
Summary: Countdown to Beijing 2008 begins
Story No: 428506
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 21/09/2004 13:16 PM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

1. Wide shot of the ceremony for the Olympic countdown clock in front of the Chinese National Museum in Tiananmen Square

2. Medium shot people on the podium. From left to right, representative of Beijing citizen, Athens Olympic shooting gold medalist Wang Yifu, Beijing Vice mayor Liu Jingmin, OMEGA president

Stephen Urquhart, representative of Beijing students

3. Close up of gold medalist Wang Yifu waving to audience

4. Close up of Beijing 2008 Olympic logo

5. Medium shot of people on the podium starting the clock countdown.

6. Wide shot ceremony

7. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Jiang Xiaoyu , Vice President of Beijing Organising Committee for the Games (BOCOG)

"Time flies on the countdown clock and this will power and motivate our Olympic preparations. We will take now as the starting point and make concrete and solid efforts towards our work (for the Beijing 2008 Olympics)."

8. Wide shot of people watching the ceremony

9. People holding Chinese national flags and watching the ceremony

10. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Tourist, vox pop

"I cannot describe my feeling now, all I can say is that I am very happy and proud."

11. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Tourist, vox pop

"I am eagerly awaiting the start of the Beijing 2008 Olympics."

12. Various of the clock

STORYLINE

Beijing's Olympic clock on Tuesday began counting down the four years left until the Chinese capital hosts the summer games.

Standing 14 meters (46 feet) tall in Beijing's Tiananmen Square, the clock displays the number of days, hours, minutes and seconds left until the games start in 2008.

The vice President of Beijing's organising committee, Jiang Xiaoyu, said the clock will add new enthusiasm to the preparations for the Olympic Games.

The Chinese government is attaching enormous national pride to its hosting of the Olympics.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Locations: China
Show story thumbnails

Displaying 1 - 10 of 55 results

 
Share Story
 
*
*
*
 

You have successfully shared item(s).
Share
Cancel
Close
 
Message Box

OK
No
Yes