AP Archive
Welcome  Guest
Sign in or Register

 

Displaying 1 - 10 of 60 results

Chn Olympic Bird's Nest 2
Title:
SD
Summary: Fireworks display seen outside Olympic stadium for opening ceremony
Story No: 573920
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 08/08/2008 02:25 PM
People: Jacques Rogge
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

++NIGHT SHOTS++

1. Wide of fireworks exploding above National Stadium, the "Bird's Nest"

2. Various of fireworks and smoke above the "Bird's Nest"

3. Onlookers outside the stadium

4. Various of fireworks above stadium

5. Onlookers and policeman outside the stadium

6. Various of fireworks above stadium

++NIGHT SHOTS++

7. Pull-out from policemen to onlookers lining street near stadium

8. Close-up of man waving flag

9. Various of fireworks

10. Pan of onlookers

11. Onlookers waving flags

STORYLINE:

China commandeered the world stage on Friday, celebrating its first-time role as Olympic host with a stunning display of pageantry and pyrotechnics to open the games.

The country welcomed scores of world leaders to an opening ceremony watched by 91,000 people at the eye-catching National Stadium and a potential audience of four billion worldwide.

The ceremony began at 8 p.m. (1200GMT) on the eighth day of the eighth month of 2008 - auspicious in a country where eight is the luckiest number.

It was depicted as the largest, costliest extravaganza in Olympic history, bookended by barrages of some 30,000 fireworks.

AP Television filmed the spectacular bursts of colour above the stadium, nicknamed the Bird's Nest.

Large crowds gathered outside the stadium to watch the breathtaking display.

The three-hour ceremony featured more than 10-thousand performers, a third of them drawn from the ranks of China's military.

The Beijing Games have been among the most politically contentious in history, attracting protests from pro-Tibet, human rights and press freedom groups.

International Olympic Committee president Jacques Rogge has said the Summer Games will allow China and the rest of the world to learn more about each other.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: Fireworks displays, Olympic opening ceremonies, Summer Olympic games, Spectaculars, Entertainment, Arts and entertainment, Olympic games, Events, Sports
People: Jacques Rogge
Locations: Beijing, Beijing, China
Show story thumbnails
Malaysia Torch 2
Title:
SD
Summary: Torch bearer, bites, STILLS of Japanese family held for pro-Tibet demo
Story No: 562025
Source: AP TELEVISION, AP PHOTOS
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 04/21/2008 09:43 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

AP Television

1. Wide of crowd holding Chinese flags at opening ceremony of torch run

2. Pan from children playing instruments to Chinese dragon dance

3. Close-up of dragon mask

4. Wide crowd holding Chinese flags

5. Close-up of sign reading: (English) "I Love China."

6. Crowd chanting and holding poster reading: (English) "Tibet and China are one."

7.SOUNDBITE: (English) Yin Sha, vox pop:

"I feel exciting and very happy. I'm proud of China get a strong and all the Chinese people unite together. One world, one China, one Olympic."

8. Officials lighting Olympic torch

9. Crowd cheering

10. Wide of fireworks on stage

11. Close-up of crowd waving flags

12. President of Olympic Council of Malaysia, Imran Jaafar, starting the torch run

13. Wide Jaafar carrying torch

14. Various torchbearers running amid heavy security

15. Various of torch run going through the city

AP PHOTO - No Access Malaysia/No Access Canada/For Broadcast use only - Strictly No Access Online or Mobile

16. STILL: A Japanese man unfurls a pro-Tibet banner before the start of the torch relay

17. STILL: Supporters of China grab a pro-Tibet banner unfurled by a Japanese man before the torch relay

18. STILL: A Japanese man, left, is led away by police officers after he unfurled a pro-Tibet banner before the torch relay

STORYLINE:

Malaysian police detained a Japanese family who unfurled a Tibetan flag just before the first runner took off with the Olympic Torch on Monday, guarded by one thousand policemen along the route.

Witnesses said the adult couple and a boy were heckled by bystanders, who appeared to be Chinese, at Independence Square where the 16-kilometre (10-mile) relay began.

More than an hour later, the president of the Olympic Council of Malaysia, Imran Jaafar, set off with the torch.

Thousands of Chinese - many of them wearing red - had gathered to watch the send-off.

"I feel exciting and very happy. I'm proud of China get a strong and all the Chinese people unite together. One world, one China, one Olympic," said Yin Sha who was watching the event.

Some carried Chinese flags and Chinese language banners that read: "The Torch will spread around the world," and "No one can split China."

The witnesses said some of the bystanders, who included many students, shouted "Taiwan and Tibet belong to China" during the confrontation.

Witnesses said the family unfurled a pro-Tibet banner and shouted "free Tibet."

They couldn't recall the exact wording on the banner because of the commotion, and declined to be named, fearing involvement with the police.

Kuala Lumpur police chief Muhammad Sabtu Osman said the Japanese were held after they waved a Tibetan flag.

He did not mention the banner.

He said they were detained "only for documentation," and said he had no information that they were beaten by other crowd members as some witnesses reported.

Muhammad Sabtu said a monk was also detained at the scene, but he said it was just a "preventive" measure and added that he had no immediate information that the monk had done anything wrong.

It was not immediately clear if the monk was Malaysian.

Criticism of China's human rights record has turned the 2008 Olympics into one of the most contentious in recent history.

Protests have dogged the torch relay during its stops in Paris, London and San Francisco, with demonstrations over China's crackdown in Tibet where it forcefully put down anti-government riots.

Fear of further disruptions has triggered unprecedented security for the Malaysian leg.

Some one thousand policemen and commandos were deployed along the route in Kuala Lumpur even though police have not received reports of any planned protests, said a police spokesman who declined to be named, citing protocol.

The flame arrived on Sunday from Bangkok, where its relay was unmarred by demonstrations.

In Kuala Lumpur, its route will highlight various landmarks including the top of the Kuala Lumpur Tower, a telecommunications installation that provides a scenic view of the city.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Locations: Kuala Lumpur, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Show story thumbnails
China Oly US Facemasks
Title:
SD
Summary: US cycling team arrives wearing anti-pollution masks, Aus team comment
Story No: 573554
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 08/05/2008 11:02 AM
People: Jennie Reed, Bobby Lea, Michael Friedman
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

5 August 2008

1. Wide of members of US track cycling team members arriving at Beijing airport wearing facemasks

2. Pan between US track cycling team members Jennie Reed and Bobby Lea, both wearing facemasks

3. Wide of US track cycling team members on walkway at airport, wearing facemasks

4. US track cycling team member Michael Friedman pushing luggage trolley, wearing mask

5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Michael Friedman, Member of US Track Cycling Team:

"It's just a precautionary air pollution... you know, you got to take every chance you have just to protect the airways you know, I mean it's really just taking every precaution necessary. Who knows how bad it's going to be in a few days so if you can resist any air pollution, any contaminants, then you know it's better performance hopefully. You know, really that's all it is, hopefully for a better performance."

6. US team official with two members of US track cycling team - both wearing facemasks

4 August 2008

7. Wide of haze around National Stadium (Bird's Nest), traffic on motorway in foreground

8. National Stadium (Bird's Nest) and Olympic broadcast tower barely visible through haze

9. Woman on bicycle wearing mask to filter pollution

5 August 2008

10. Australian athletes and officials entering news conference

11. Wide of news conference

12. SOUNDBITE: (English) Russell Mark, Australian Double Trap Shooter:

"To be honest for us, the smog actually helps us. The more the better for an old guy like me. I can actually see those orange discs a lot better in the sky if it's a perfect white background, so as many cars as they can get on the road the day I compete I'd be quite happy about it. I'm not particularly worried about it. Later on in the week when I run the marathon it might be different, but at this stage it's not a cause of concern."

13. Tilt-up from audience to Mark speaking at news conference

4 August 2008

14. Sun seen through haze on Olympic Green

15. Various of police on electric bikes through haze

16. Workers on Olympic Green with public entrance seen through haze

17. National Stadium through haze

STORYLINE:

US Olympic cyclists arrived in Beijing wearing facemasks on Tuesday, despite assurances the city's notorious air pollution levels have dropped, three days before the opening of the Olympiad.

Four members of the track cycling team wore the protective masks as they arrived at Beijing's international airport.

There appeared to be less haze over the city on Tuesday, after high humidity contributed to poor visibility on Monday.

The city's Environment Protection bureau put the Air Pollution Index (API) in the 60-80 range, which counts as a moderate reading.

US track cyclist Michael Friedman said the face mask was just a precaution.

"You got to take every chance you have just to protect the airways," Friedman told AP Television.

"I mean it's really just taking every precaution necessary. Who knows how bad it's going to be in a few days so if you can resist any air pollution, any contaminants, then you know it's better performance hopefully," he added.

Team mate Bobby Lea said his mask was also to filter any pollution, while Jennie Reed put hers down to "avoiding germs."

The athletes are believed to be the first to arrive in the Olympic city wearing masks.

Other Olympic teams have brushed off pollution fears, with Australian Olympic officials saying it is not an issue for athletes.

Australian double trap shooter, Russell Mark, said the smog actually helps.

"I can actually see those orange discs a lot better in the sky if it's a perfect white background, so as many cars as they can get on the road the day I compete I'd be quite happy about it," Mark said at a news conference in Beijing on Tuesday.

"Later on in the week when I run the marathon it might be different, but at this stage it's not a cause of concern," he joked.

Beijing's polluted air has been one of the biggest worries for Olympic organisers and prompted drastic measures

earlier this month that included pulling half the city's 3.3 million vehicles off the road, halting most construction and closing some factories in the capital and surrounding provinces.

On Tuesday the International Olympic Committee's (IOC) chief medical official expressed confidence that air pollution would not pose a "major" risk to athletes and visitors at the Beijing Games.

The IOC will receive hourly data around the clock to monitor pollution levels throughout the August 8-24 Games.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: Summer Olympic games, Men's track cycling, 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, Women's track cycling, Air pollution, Air quality, Track cycling, Environmental concerns, Sports governance, Smog, Olympic games, Events, Cycling, Sports, Men's track cycling, Men's cycling, Men's sports, Men's cycling, Women's cycling, Women's cycling, Women's sports, Women's track cycling, Environment, Environment and nature, Air pollution, Pollution
People: Jennie Reed, Bobby Lea, Michael Friedman
Locations: Beijing, Beijing, China
Show story thumbnails
China Oly Morning 2
Title:
SD
Summary: WRAP China hopes to top medals table, orchestra ADDS Samaranch
Story No: 575100
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 08/19/2008 05:37 AM
People: Juan Antonio Samaranch
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide of National Stadium, known as the "Bird's Nest"

2. Olympic flame on top of stadium

3. Chinese with flags taking pictures in front of Bird's Nest

4. Close-up of people taking pictures

5. Olympic broadcast tower

6. Olympic rings on top of tower

7. Crowd walking on Olympic Green

8. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Song Kuo, Chinese spectator:

"I think China will get more than 40 gold medals, and I don't think any country will be able to compete with China. I don't think the USA can catch up."

9. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Liu Shuge, Chinese spectator:

"I hope we can win many many more gold medals, but so far I think we have done a really great job by getting 39."

10. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Wu Shitong, Chinese spectator:

"It is a historical achievement, we will definitely top the gold medal list if we can win about 50 golds, the USA won't possibly catch up."

11. Wide of Forbidden City

12. Wide of former IOC (International Olympic Committee) President Juan Antonio Samaranch touring the Forbidden City

13. Zoom in as Samaranch is presented with a book

14. Cutaway of photographers

15. SOUNDBITE: (English) Juan Antonio Samaranch, former President, IOC:

"I think China will be the number one in gold medals, and the number one in organisation."

16. Wide of Beijing Middle School youth orchestra performing in Tiananmen Square

17. Close-up of Chinese flag

18. Conductor

19. Orchestra members playing saxophones

20. Orchestra members playing clarinets

21. Orchestra playing in Tiananmen Square with crowd in foreground

22. Various of crowd listening

23. Wide of orchestra members playing double bass

24. Orchestra members playing clarinets

25. Orchestra playing with soldier in background

26. Orchestra member playing flute

27. Wide of crowd listening

STORYLINE:

Chinese spectators arriving for Day 11 of Olympic competition hope their nation will soon have an unassailable lead in the medal tally.

China has won 39 gold medals, its total haul of 67 medals sitting just below the US total of 72.

The US has scooped 22 gold medals to date, but China has strong contenders in several contests to come.

The nation's strong medal performance has helped raise spirits after Monday's shock pullout by injured national hurdling hero Liu Xiang.

"I think China will get more than than 40 gold medals, and I don't think any country will be able to compete with China. I don't think the USA can catch up," said spectator Song Kuo.

Similar optimism could be found among the many Chinese fans arriving at the Bird's Nest stadium.

"It is a historical achievement, we will definitely top the gold medal list," said another spectator, Wu Shitong.

It was a sentiment echoed by former IOC (International Olympic Committee) President Juan Antonio Samaranch on Tuesday.

"I think China will be the number one in gold medals," he said during a tour of the Forbidden City, adding that he believed China would also be judged "number one in organisation" - a coveted title in itself.

Beijing's newspapers are gushing over China's success.

The normally staid People's Daily, flagship newspaper of the ruling Communist Party, carried the gold-medal tally on the front page of Monday editions, but accompanied it with an editorial that urged appreciation for all medal winners, regardless of country.

Such public appeals are signals from the communist leadership to ordinary Chinese not to let pride turn into more ugly displays of nationalism.

Away from Olympic Green, China is using Tiananmen Square to showcase its cultural talent.

On Tuesday, a youth orchestra from Beijing's Middle School performed for visitors to the square.

Tourists must still pass through strict security checks to enter the square, introduced after human rights protests ahead of the Olympics.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, Summer Olympic games, Orchestral music, Sports governance, Olympic games, Events, Classical music, Music, Entertainment, Arts and entertainment, Sports, Government and politics
People: Juan Antonio Samaranch
Organisations: China Olympic Team, China government, International Olympic Committee
Locations: Beijing, Beijing, China
Show story thumbnails
Thailand Torch 3
Title:
SD
Summary: Lighting of the Olympic torch in Bangkok, protest
Story No: 561880
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 04/19/2008 10:38 AM
People: Samak Sundaravej
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

1. Wide of the Chinese Gate, Olympic flame lighting ceremony starts

2. Mid of Chinese security officers holding Olympic flame and unlit torch

3. Wide of the ceremony at the Chinese Gate

4. Cutaway cameraman

5. Mid of speech on the stage

6. Close of a Chinese security officer holding unlit Olympic torch

7. Wide of Chinese security officers, one of them is holding case with Olympic flame in it

8. Wide of the first torchbearer (he is a Thai politician) walking towards the stage

9. Wide of official on the stage passing the lit torch on to another who holds it up

10. Cutaway photographer

11. Wide of a Thai official passing the torch to the first torchbearer, he waves to crowd, starts running, flanked by Chinese security officers

12. Mid shot sea of waving Chinese flags tilt down to Olympic supporters in yellow shirts

13. Various of police at the scene

14. Various of Free Tibet protesters in front of the United Nations building

15. Wide of a man holding a flame speaking into loudspeaker, man next to him holds sign saying "Anti China No Freedom"

16. Wide of Olympic supporters marching to the United Nations building

17. Wide of Olympic supporters shouting in front of the UN building

STORYLINE:

The Olympic torch was lit in Bangkok on Saturday, and set off on a route around the city, flanked by Chinese security officers, amid tight security.

Thai authorities had beefed up security ahead of the torch relay, deploying 2,000 police to protect the Olympic flame from protesters.

The 10.5-kilometre (6.3-mile) relay started in Bangkok's Chinatown and will end at the Royal Plaza, although the route may be changed or shortened at the last minute if protesters try to disrupt it.

Growing criticism of China's human rights record have turned the Olympics - which begin in August in Beijing - into one of the most contentious in recent history.

Protests over China's crackdown on Tibetan demonstrations against Beijing's rule have dogged the torch relay at various stops on its worldwide journey that began at the ancient site of the original Olympics in Greece.

A coalition of human rights and other activist groups in Thailand held a protest outside the U.N.'s Asian headquarters, which is on the planned relay route in Bangkok.

A counter-protest by Chinese supporters was also held outside the UN building, but the two groups were kept apart and there was no trouble between them.

On Friday, Prime Minister Samak Sundaravej said his government could provide adequate security and warned crowds not to try to disrupt the relay.

The torch arrived by plane on Friday under tight security and was quickly whisked off to a luxury hotel.

Thailand's crown princess welcomed the flame shortly after its arrival.

The torch was scheduled to leave for Malaysia on Saturday night.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: Protests and demonstrations, Olympic torch relay, Political and civil unrest, General news, Olympic games, Events, Sports
People: Samak Sundaravej
Organisations: United Nations
Locations: Bangkok, Bangkok, Thailand
Show story thumbnails
China Beijing Traffic
Title:
SD
Summary: Focus on Beijing's traffic problems ahead of Olympics
Story No: 309113
Source: SNTV, APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 07/13/2001 12:00 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Junction with Beijing 2008 sign

2. Wide of traffic on motorway

3. Traffic with signs in distance

4. Traffic shots out of car

5. Inside of Traffic Control centre

6. TV screens close-up

7. Policeman on phone

8. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Deputy Director Traffic Control, Meng Xianlong

"By 2008 should we have the Olympic Games, we will have some very good solutions. Our public transport system will have developed a lot. We think that by that stage there will be 2,500,000 vehicles in Beijing, but our public transport system such as the underground will have improved so that by 2008 we will have a good and safe system."

9. Policemen on phone

10. Police badge

11. Three policemen study computer

12. TV screens low-angle

STORYLINE

As Beijing prepares to stage the 2008 Olympic Games, one main infrastructure problem has been highlighted.

Over the last 20 years or so, Beijing, like many other Asian cities, has become increasingly choked with traffic.

Beijing's bicycles, which were previously so omnipresent, have been pushed aside, as the city has taken to four wheels.

That, of course, means more pollution, and, as the volume of cars, taxis, buses and lorries increases, moving around the city becomes more difficult.

Some remedies are obvious.

In addition to the three ring roads currently circling the city, another is being built, and a fifth planned.

Five new underground lines are also being built, in addition to the present two, to improve public transport by 2008.

However, traffic still needs to be kept flowing, with the result that the Beijing police have invested in a state-of-the-art traffic control system, enabling them to pinpoint trouble around the entire network.

With 2008 in mind, there are plans to upgrade even the current system.

Beijing traffic is by no means the most fluid in the world, but the city is intent on keeping moving towards 2008.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: Traffic, Summer Olympic games, Mass transit system operations, Transportation, General news, Olympic games, Events, Transportation and shipping, Industrial products and services, Industries, Business, Sports
Locations: Beijing, China, Greater China, East Asia, Asia
Show story thumbnails
China Torch
Title:
SD
Summary: Torch relay at Three Gorges dam project
Story No: 566815
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 06/01/2008 10:03 AM
People: Karen Mok
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

1. Mid of torch being lit, pull out of torch bearer passing torch to unidentified official

2. Spectators cheering, waving flags

3. Close-up of woman cheering, stickers with Chinese flag on her face

4. Olympic doubles tennis champion Li Ting, receiving torch, zoom in on Li holding up torch

5. Crowd cheering

6. Tracking shot of Li running with torch, spectators cheering in background

7. Wide of wall of Three Gorges Dam

8. Hong Kong singer and actress Karen Mok lighting her torch from previous torch bearer, giving him "high five", pan of Mok running off with torch

9. Mok running with torch, stops to light torch of next bearer

10. Close-up of Mok giving next torch bearer "high five", laughing

11. SOUNDBITE (English) Karen Mok, Hong Kong Actress and Singer:

"It's the most wonderful thing in the world I think, and I think today the fact that we're running right here on the dam, that's like one of the greatest things on Earth and I think this is, this is amazing. And I want the whole world to see how great this Olympics is going to be."

12. Wide of torch relay closing ceremony

13. Spectators waving flags, cheering

14. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Shi Dongbing, Worker, China Yangtze Three Gorges Project Corporation:

"Now that I can see the Three Gorges dam with my own eyes and see the Olympic torch being passed on the dam itself, it makes me feel very proud."

15. Three Gorges Dam, pan to closing ceremony with last torch bearer, Cao Guangjing, deputy general manager of China Yangtze Three Gorges Project Corporation, running on stage with torch

16. Cao lighting flame in cauldron

17. Close-up of flame burning in cauldron

STORYLINE

The Olympic torch on Sunday arrived in Yichang - home to the world's largest dam.

Thousands of spectators jostled to catch a glimpse of the torch as it made its way across the city towards the Three Gorges Dam as part of its tour of central China's Hubei province.

The relay was opened by Olympic doubles tennis champion Li Ting.

Several others were given the opportunity to carry the torch, including Hong Kong actress and singer Karen Mok.

She was amongst the few who actually carried the flame across the dam, an experience she described as "the most wonderful thing in the world".

"The fact that we're running right here on the dam, that's one of the greatest things on Earth and I think this is amazing. I want the whole world to see how great this Olympics is going to be," she told AP Television.

The five-hour-long relay ended with a closing ceremony near the dam attended by hundreds of spectators, including many workers involved in the construction of the dam.

"Now that I can see the Three Gorges dam with my own eyes and see the Olympic torch being passed on the dam itself, it makes me feel very proud," one of them told AP Television.

Cao Guangjing, who is the deputy general manager of the China Yangtze Three Gorges Project Corporation, was given the honour of finishing the Yichang leg of Hubei relay.

The Three Gorges Dam, which uses the power of the Yangtze River, is the world's largest hydroelectric scheme.

When fully on line next year, the 22 (b) billion US dollar project will provide enough power to light the equivalent of San Francisco, Los Angeles and Sacramento combined.

But the dam has been widely criticised for its adverse impact on the surrounding environment.

Critics have attributed landslides and the submergence of nearby low lying villages to the construction of the dam.

The Olympic flame is next scheduled to arrive in Jingzhou, the last leg of the Hubei relay.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: Tennis, Sports
People: Karen Mok
Locations: Hubei, Hubei, China
Show story thumbnails
China Olympics
Title:
SD
Summary: Countdown to Beijing 2008 begins
Story No: 428506
Source: APTN
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/21/2004 01:16 PM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

1. Wide shot of the ceremony for the Olympic countdown clock in front of the Chinese National Museum in Tiananmen Square

2. Medium shot people on the podium. From left to right, representative of Beijing citizen, Athens Olympic shooting gold medalist Wang Yifu, Beijing Vice mayor Liu Jingmin, OMEGA president

Stephen Urquhart, representative of Beijing students

3. Close up of gold medalist Wang Yifu waving to audience

4. Close up of Beijing 2008 Olympic logo

5. Medium shot of people on the podium starting the clock countdown.

6. Wide shot ceremony

7. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Jiang Xiaoyu , Vice President of Beijing Organising Committee for the Games (BOCOG)

"Time flies on the countdown clock and this will power and motivate our Olympic preparations. We will take now as the starting point and make concrete and solid efforts towards our work (for the Beijing 2008 Olympics)."

8. Wide shot of people watching the ceremony

9. People holding Chinese national flags and watching the ceremony

10. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Tourist, vox pop

"I cannot describe my feeling now, all I can say is that I am very happy and proud."

11. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Tourist, vox pop

"I am eagerly awaiting the start of the Beijing 2008 Olympics."

12. Various of the clock

STORYLINE

Beijing's Olympic clock on Tuesday began counting down the four years left until the Chinese capital hosts the summer games.

Standing 14 meters (46 feet) tall in Beijing's Tiananmen Square, the clock displays the number of days, hours, minutes and seconds left until the games start in 2008.

The vice President of Beijing's organising committee, Jiang Xiaoyu, said the clock will add new enthusiasm to the preparations for the Olympic Games.

The Chinese government is attaching enormous national pride to its hosting of the Olympics.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Locations: China
Show story thumbnails
Taiwan Olympics
Title:
SD
Summary: 2008 Olympics torch won't go to island after talks with China fail
Story No: 537238
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/21/2007 05:59 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide shot exterior of National Council on Physical Fitness and Sports

2. Advertising board for the 2008 Olympics

3. Close-up of electronic number reading "322" indicating Olympics countdown

4. Wide shot of news conference

5. Cameras

6. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Yang Chung-he, Chairman of Chinese Taipei Sports Federation:

"China suddenly changes her mind. China has brought the terms that we previously rejected back to our discussion in August. Therefore we cannot reach a consensus regarding the torch relay."

7. Wide shot of news conference

8. SOUDNBITE: (Mandarin) Tsai Chen-wei, chairman of Taiwan Olympic Committee:

"If they (China) are playing little tricks, then we will lose the foundation of mutual trust. In the past we were based on mutual trust, once we are about to sign the paper, it comes with terms like 'China Taipei', 'the first domestic stop', which were not in our discussions."

9. Wide pan of street

10. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Ms Yeh, Vox Pop - Woman:

"It shouldn't involve politics. It (the torch relay) is part of the sports activity and should go back to discussions related to sports. If it's politics, it's politics."

11. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Ms Chen, Vox Pop - Woman:

"Everyone knows the Olympic torch relay. Why we don't let it come to Taiwan? We should let the world know about Taiwan."

12. Wide shot copy of document dated 12 February 2007 between Beijing's and Taiwan's Olympics Committees

13. Pan right of paragraph, reading: "Taiwan cannot use its national flag, national emblem and national anthem during the torch relay."

STORYLINE:

Negotiations between Taiwan and China on the torch relay route for the 2008 Summer Olympic Games are at a dead end, and the torch will not come to Taiwan, international and Taiwan Olympic officials said Friday.

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) said in an e-mail to The Associated Press that it had been following discussions between China's and Taiwan's Olympic committees, and that a "solution between the two has not been found ... The route will now have to go ahead without a stop in Chinese Taipei."

At a Taipei news conference, Taiwan Olympic Committee Chairman Tsai Chen-wei said that the IOC had demanded a September 20 cut-off date for negotiations on the relay, and that with the deadline having passed, Taiwan could not be on the route.

Yang Chung-he, chairman of Chinese Taipei Sports Federation, added, "China suddenly changes her mind. China has brought the terms that we previously rejected back to our discussion in August. Therefore we cannot reach a consensus regarding the torch relay."

"Chinese Taipei" is a term often used internationally for the island or its sports teams.

Taiwan and China split amid civil war in 1949, and communist Beijing still claims the democratic, self-governed island as Chinese territory.

It often objects to Taiwan's name being formally used in international events. Taipei is Taiwan's capital city.

The IOC e-mail, from Emmanuelle Moreau, media relations manager from the International Olympic Committee, expressed regret over Taiwan's non-inclusion in the route.

The torch controversy began in April, when Taiwan backed out of participating in the relay because of a dispute over the route.

The route proposed by Beijing organisers had the torch arriving in Taiwan from Vietnam on April 30, 2008, and going on to China-controlled Hong Kong.

Many in Taiwan had pushed for a route that took the torch from Taiwan to China via another country.

The self-governing island objects to any measures that appear to consider it a part of Chinese territory.

It had contended that the contiguity of the Taiwan and Hong Kong stops made this appear to be the case.

AP Television interviewed a few residents of Taipei on Friday and opinion appeared to be mixed.

Ms Yeh said the sports relay "shouldn't involve politics. It is part of the sports activity and should go back to discussions related to sports."

Ms Chen thought the torch relay would promote Taiwan overseas.

"Everyone knows the Olympic torch relay. Why we don't let it come to Taiwan? We should let the world know about Taiwan," she said.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
Subjects: Territorial disputes, Olympic torch relay, Olympic games, Sports governance, Government and politics, War and unrest, General news, Events, Sports
Organisations: Chinese Taipei Olympic Team, International Olympic Committee
Locations: Taipei, Taipei, Taiwan
Show story thumbnails
China Banknote
Title:
SD
Summary: Bird's nest stadium replaces Mao on bank note, reax
Story No: 570704
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 07/09/2008 10:28 AM
People: Mao Zedong
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

1. Mid shot of security

2. People queing outside bank

3. Bank of China sign

4. Various of people queuing and entering the bank

5. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Vox pop, no name given:

"I came here last night around 11 pm, and waited all night. At that time there were about 400 or 500 people waiting. I thought that I had no chance of buying it. But today I bought it in the end, so I'm very happy."

6. Close up of banknote

7. SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Vox pop, no name given:

"People from our generation worship Mao Zedong, and now this note doesn't have a picture of Mao Zedong. We feel lost and disappointed."

8. Mid of security

9. Various of people queueing

STORYLINE

Hundreds of people lined up outside banks in Beijing on Wednesday to get the new 10-yuan note commemorating the 2008 Olympics.

Most began queuing on Tuesday evening, waiting through the night.

"I came here last night around 11 pm, and waited all night. At that time there were about 400 or 500 people waiting. I thought that I had no chance of buying it. But today I bought it in the end, so I'm very happy," said one man.

The six (m) million banknotes issued - a tiny distribution meant almost as a souvenir - were unable to meet the demand as only about half of the people waiting in line in front of the largest branch of the Bank of China in Beijing bought the new note.

The Olympic bank notes bumped off the picture of Mao Zedong, the founding leader of communist China, replacing it with a sketch of the new National Stadium - the Bird's Nest, which is also the emblem of the Beijing Games.

Both are set against the backdrop of the Temple of Heaven, one of Beijing's iconic sites.

"People from our generation worship Mao Zedong, and now this note doesn't have a picture of Mao Zedong. We feel lost and disappointed," said one elderly man.

The back of the note features a statue of a Greek discus-thrower and the year 2008 written in Arabic script.

The new note is slightly larger than the ordinary 10-yuan note, worth about 1.45 US dollars, which will continue to circulate.

Expand shotlist extract
Minimize shotlist extract
People: Mao Zedong
Locations: Beijing, Beijing, China
Show story thumbnails

Displaying 1 - 10 of 60 results

 
Share Story
 
*
*
*
 

You have successfully shared item(s).
Share
Cancel
Close
 
Message Box

OK
No
Yes