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(HZ) France Solar Powered Boat
Title:
SD
Summary: A solar powered eco-boat is a floating hotel for tourists
Story No: 568784
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 06/22/2008 06:03 AM
People:
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SHOTLIST

Canal du Midi, France - 22 May 2008

1. Various views of Le Soleil d'Oc solar powered boat on river

2. Sign on boat

3. Solar power cells on boat roof, as boat navigates on canal

4. Various views of Capestang village and surrounding countryside

5. Various of Dominique Renouf steering boat

6. SOUNDBITE (French) Dominique Renouf, boat owner:

"I had been navigating on classic boats for 21 years, big diesel engines, fuels, oil, noise...I had enough, really enough of all that, and since I am on the Canal du Midi I became really aware of the pollution on the Canal, and I wanted to do something about it."

6. Various views of water in the Canal

7. SOUNDBITE (French) Dominique Renouf, boat owner:

"The narrower the waterway the less water there is, and if in this waterway there are far too many boats, like 800 small diesel barges, which throw back in hydrocarbons and brown waters and used oils, then eventually you get to a saturation point."

Capestang, France - 22 May 2008

8. Pan to fire engine

9. Dirty water

10. Various of firefighters dispersing pollution in canal water

Canal du Midi, France - 22 May 2008

11. Various of motorboats on the canal

12. Various of people on motorboats

13. SOUNDBITE (French) Pierre Meunie, environmentalist:

"On the canal there are people with the set of mind of the motorway tourist, who are going to put to use all the power in their engines to create waves and mess things up so this creates erosions on the banks. So there is more pollution linked to fuels and the drinking water is compromised, we should not forget that many villages rely on the water from the canal, which is filtered underground to drink."

14. Various of views of canal and landscape from Soleil d'Oc, people on boat

15. SOUNDBITE (French) Marie Madeleine Dalla Zuana, tourist:

"This is peace, with the eyes on the landscape, on the vineyards, anticipating the wine we are going to drink, the monuments we are going to see and the friends all around."

16. View of landscape from boat

17. SOUNDBITE (French) Catherine Bouche, tourist:

"The quietness, the fact that we don't produce engine noise, to navigate slowly in silence is really pleasant, really calming."

18. Tourists on board watching motor boat overtake

19. Back shot of motor boat

20. SOUNDBITE (French) Alain Schwob, tourist:

"Here is the difference with a boat that makes noise, creates pollution, shakes the riverbed, while we take it real slow and calm, without producing waves."

21. Side view of canal and countryside from boat

Capestang, France - 22 May 2008

22. Beauty shot of Capestang

23. Various of people preparing and enjoying evening ritual of aperitif and snacks in village

LEAD IN

If you are looking for an eco-holiday, how about cruising the Canal du Midi in South Western France on a sun-powered eco-boat?

A floating hotel which sleeps 12 claims to spare the atmosphere 10 tonnes of CO2 per year, and this, added to the magnificent landscape of the Languedoc countryside, makes it the perfect holiday for tourists with an ecological conscience.

STORYLINE

Life flows slowly on the Canal du Midi....and peacefully, if you happen to cruise on the Soleil d'Oc, the first and only solar powered barge of its kind.

The 30 metre-long (32 yard) boat does without a traditional motor engine, having given up its roof to 80 square metres of solar photovoltaic panels plus two arrays of solar pipes for the production of hot water.

The Soleil d'Oc has been designed to fit in properly with the waterway it navigates: the 17 century engineering masterpiece, the Canal du Midi, now a UNESCO world heritage site.

Opened in 1681, it is 240 kilometre (149 miles) long and it connects the river Garonne to the Rtang de Thau on the Mediterranean.

The Soleil d'Oc uses two submerged engines of 8 kilowatt each totally fed by the solar power collected by the roof panels and stored in two big batteries.

During the spring and summer months this is enough to provide motion and electricity to the facilities on board.

On rainy days the batteries are recharged at docks during the night.

The boat is the brainchild of Dominique Renouf, who started a love affair with waterways some twenty years ago.

She claims that running the Soleil d'Oc costs 48 times less than a diesel engine one of the same size.

Renouf says she had been navigating on classic boats for 21 years, but she had enough of big diesel engines, fuels, oil and noise, which pollute the canal.

The classification of the Canal du Midi as an UNESCO site has not prevented the hundreds of diesel engines which cruise its waterways in the traditional holiday months of July and August.

Water pollution is a real problem, as boats usually release their brown waste into the Canal.

The maximum speed allowed on the canal is 6 km (3.7 miles) per hour, but many flout that rule.

The result is that the bed and the banks of the canal are under constant stress, the sides collapse and the riverbed rises all the time.

Pierre Meunie is a former boat owner and environmentalist who campaigns on behalf of the historic canal.

He complains about people, who show off the power of their boat engines, creating waves and stir the waters, creating damage to the riversides.

This week a group of friends from the region near Geneva in Switzerland, are enjoying the quietness of their barge floating smoothly with no noise or vibration.

From May to October, the Soleil d'Oc moves between Beziers and Carcassonne, with stopovers in the surrounding vineyards of Minervois and Corbieres, and the numerous villages, churches and chateaux which line the itinerary.

Keyword wacky

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Subjects: Solar power, Hotels and resorts, Alternative and sustainable energy, Water pollution, Water quality, Travel, Pollution, Noise pollution, Wine, Marine transportation industry, Cultural preservation, Leisure travel, Environmental concerns, Energy and the environment, Environment, Environment and nature, Accommodations, Lifestyle, Water environment, Water pollution, Alcoholic beverages, Beverages, Food and drink, Transportation and shipping, Industrial products and services, Industries, Business, Cultures, Social affairs
Locations: France, Western Europe, Europe
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(HZ) Mexico England
Title:
SD
Summary: A town in Mexico has a suprisingly English feel
Story No: 544547
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 11/23/2007 06:06 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

Real del Monte, Hidalgo State - recent

1. Wide shot of cactus and arid Mexican mountains

2. Wide shot of Real de Monte centre

3. Wide shot of Real de Monte church tower and clock

4. Medium shot of English-style coffee shop - "Old Pratts Coffee Shop"

5. Tilt down on bakery "El Portal Pastes," shop selling English-style Cornish pasties

6. Close up shot on plate of Cornish pasties coming out of oven

7. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Ciro Peralta, owner of El Portal Pastes:

"The difference with the Mexican pasty, made here in Real del Monte, is that here we put in some chili and spices."

8. Close up shot of chef hand mixing pot of vegetables

9. Close up shot of chef folding pastry into pasty shape

10. Medium shot of Peralta putting pasties in oven

11. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Ciro Peralta, owner of El Portal Pastes:-

"The people who come here should know the pasties originate from England, so we put British flags on the boxes, along with Mexican flags because we are in Mexico."

12. Close up shot of Pasty boxes with Mexican flag and Union Jack

13. Medium shot of Peralta putting souvenirs in cabinet

14. Close up of hat with British "Union Jack" flag

15. Wide shot of Mexicans playing amateur soccer

16. SOUNDBITE (Spanish), Manuel Garcia-Oliver, descendent of British miner and local historian

"They want to build a monument as a homage to football player. The English brought this sport to Mexico."

17. Close up shot of face of English soccer players in statue

18. Close up shot of face of Mexican soccer player in statue

19. SOUNDBITE (Spanish),Manuel Garcia-Oliver, descendent of British miner and local historian

The Mexican is the one with his leg toward the ground, and the English player is the one behind. If you get up close you see the difference in their features."

Mexcio City - recent

20. Wide shot of Mexico's Olympic soccer stadium in Mexico City

21. Wide shot of Mexican soccer fans going into game at stadium

22. Wide shot of Mexican soccer fans chanting

Real del Monte, Hidalgo State - recent

23. Pan of Garcia walking past old mine machinery

24. Medium shot of Garcia from behind walking into mine

25. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Manuel Garcia-Oliver, descendent of British miner and local historian

"The English brought steam machinery and it was something new. People were startled by these huge machines. They were used to rustic machines used by the Spanish, who were a bit behind, despite being Europeans."

26. Medium shot of steam-driven mining machine

27. Close up shot on black and white photo of Mexican miners

28. Wide shot on Methodist church established by English

29. Close up shot of church sign

30. Tilt down on gate of English cemetery

31. Close up shot on sign at gate of cemetery: "Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord"

32. Medium shot of graves of various English miners

33. Close up shot of grave of English miner killed by Mexicans

34. SOUNDBITE (Spanish), Garcia-Oliver discussing grave of English clown Richard Bell:

"The English made fun of him because he was a clown. So to get the last laugh he asked to be buried in this graveyard in the opposite direction of the rest of the graves, which have their feet facing the East (and England)."

35. Close up shot on grave of Richard Bell

36. Medium shot of graveyard

LEAD IN

In the arid mountains of central Mexico, the town of Real del Monte is a surprising slice of little England.

Bakeries in the town even produce authentic Cornish pasties.

An old graveyard reveals how the town got such an Anglican flavour, and how football came to Mexico.

STORYLINE:

When Mexico gained independence from Spain in 1821, the British were anxious to get their hands on Mexico's gold and silver.

Investors in London brought the mine in Real de Monte and sent over a team of miners, mostly from Cornwall in the West-Country.

Although long dead, the British are fondly remembered and their traditions live on.

Ciro Peralta owns the "El Portal Pastes" bakery, one of many in Real del Monte selling the Cornish pasties brought over by the English miners.

A pasty is a classic English dish, made by wrapping wheat pastry around hot meat or vegetables.

Pasties could last for long trips down mines and have a knotted rim so miners could eat them with dirty fingers.

But these pasties have a twist.... mexican chefs add some extra chili to give the pasties a tropical hot flavour.

Visitors from all over Mexico come to taste them.

The English miners played soccer on fields outside the mines with the Mexican workers.

The Mexicans fell in love with the game and it spread across the nation.

Soccer is now Mexico's favourite sport and the government is building a museum of football and a statue showing Mexicans and English people playing soccer together outside the mine where they first kicked a ball around.

Among the football enthusiasts is Manuel Garcia-Oliver, a descendent of a British miner and local historian.

Garcia-Oliver has collected oral stories about how the English used to pay Mexicans to play against them but use their own referees to win.

He says that the English brought industrialisation to Mexican mines, with steam powered machines.

The English miners, including Garcia's grandfather, were buried in their own graveyard on the top of a hill.

English poems and proverbs decorate the graves, but the graveyard is now decaying and overgrown.

According to folklore, the cemetery began because there was a cruel English boss and Mexicans did not want him buried with them.

Almost all the tombs point to England, where the miners had hoped to return.

But one tomb has its back turned to England.

In that tomb was a clown called Richard Bell, who became very popular in Mexico.

Garcia-Oliver says Bell thought Mexico gave him more than England ever had so he asked to buried, turned away from his homeland.

Thanks to its mining past Real del Monte is a corner of Mexico, that is forever England.

Keyword wacky

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Subjects: Soccer, Men's soccer, Flour and baked goods manufacturing, Sports, Men's sports, Men's soccer, Food manufacturing, Food, beverage and tobacco products manufacturing, Consumer product manufacturing, Consumer products and services, Industries, Business
Locations: Mexico, England, North America, Mexico, Central America, Latin America and Caribbean, United Kingdom, Western Europe, Europe
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(HZ) Russia Railway Children
Title:
SD
Summary: A railway run entirely by children
Story No: 535621
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/09/2007 05:38 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

Moscow, Russia - August 28 2007

1. Wide shot children marching at the opening of the Children of the Railway Workers Olympics

2. Wide shot children making way onto field

3. Mid shot judge handing the batons to the participants of relay race at the Children Olympics

4. Close up judge fires the starting gun pan to children running

5. Mid shot children running

6. Wide shot children screaming supporting the runners

7. Mid shot pan young girls chanting to support the runners

8. Wide shot children running the relay race

9. Mid shot young girls warming up ahead of the races

10. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Ira Vasilchuk, participant of the Children Olympics

"I always wanted it (to be in the railway), I have been to lots of places, lots of cities already. And being here is the most important thing for me. Because my parents work here (on the railway) and I represent the railways here."

Irkutsk, Eastern Siberia, Russia - August 23, 2007

11. Wide shot of Children Railway train

12. Close up young train driver in his cabin pan to train control panel

13. Close up train driver in the cabin, rail track in the background

14. Close up train control panel monitor

15. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Vyacheslav Rogov (14 years old), Children Train Driver

"I was scared. It is always scary at first. When I first got in here and started driving, I was scared. But then I got used to it, and it was very interesting. I learnt what all those speed counters and other gadgets mean. I now understand everything and it is quite easy for me."

16. Wide shot Children Railway station

17. Wide shot young railway workers reporting to the instructor

18. Close up instructor

19. Mid shot young girls in railway uniform

20. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Irina Skvortsova, Children Railway instructor

"They feel themselves grown-ups, they feel responsible here. And it is very important for them, at their age, to feel somehow above other kids who don't wear uniforms. The most important thing is - even if they will not become railway workers in the future, - they find a lot of friends here, they communicate and they learn the skills that could probably be useful for them in the future."

21. Wide shot Children Railway train

22. Mid shot kids in railway uniforms near train

23. Close up tourists in the train

24. Mid shot young girls in uniforms in the train doors

25. Close up young train conductor closing the train door

26. Wide shot pan tourists in the train

27. Close up children looking out of the train window

28. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Vasya Solyanov(13 years old), Train Conductor:

"I want to finish school as soon as possible and to enter the Railway Institute. And after that to work as a head of a railway station somewhere."

29. Wide shot tourists in the wagon

30. Mid shot tourists

31. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Anna, Irkutsk citizen

"I have heard a lot about this train, but have never been here before. And now my relatives from Chelyabinsk have arrived and we decided to go and take a ride. They don't have a Children's Railway in Chelyabinsk, so we were all very interested."

32. Wide shot tracking shot of railway platform, young girl with a stop sign standing on the platform

LEAD IN:

The Railway is one of the many things that holds a lot of mystique for children and adults alike.

Children love the sound of trains as they chug along on their journey, and many even dream of becoming train drivers when they grow up.

But for children in the Siberian town of Irktutsk, that dream can become a reality from the age of 11.

STORYLINE:

This is not an ordinary children's sports day. This is the first ever Railway Workers' Children Olympics. And if you think it's an event just for children of railway workers...think again. Some of these teenagers are railway workers themselves. They are train drivers, and ticket collectors and conductors.

They all represent railroads and railway families from various parts of the country.

The Russian railway system is a growing and changing industry. With over 1.2 million employees and 1.3 billion passengers annually, the state-owned company is one of the biggest in the world.

Many of the children at the Olympics have come from families who have worked on the railways for generations. And many plan to follow their parents and grandparents into the profession.

Ira Vasilchuk has come to the Olympics from the small town of Belogorsk in the Russian Far East.

Her parents and grandparents work at the Zabaikalskaya railway and she wants to be a train conductor herself - when she grows up.

"I always wanted it (to be in the railway), I have been to lots of places, lots of cities already. And being here is the most important thing for me. Because my parents work here (on the railway) and I represent the railways here."

But some children don't have to wait until they're grown up to drive a train.

These teenagers from the Siberian city of Irkutsk have their own railway.

At a special school they are taught all about the railway industry and then can put what they learn into practice on a 3km long line.

They operate the entire line themselves. Today's driver is 14-year old Vyacheslav Rogov. He was 12 when he started driving the train.

"I was scared. It is always scary at first. When I first got in here and started driving, I was scared. But then I got used to it, and it was very interesting. I learnt what all those speed counters and other gadgets mean. I now understand everything and it is quite easy for me."

He had to pass a special exam and got a license to drive the train. He really thinks of this as of his future profession.

The Children's Railway has a long history in Russia. It was invented in the 1930's, and the world's first railway was opened in Moscow's famous Gorky Park in 1932.

By the 1950's the former USSR had developed a whole network of railway schools and at the break-up of the Soviet Union in 1991, the country had 52 children's railways.

More than half have since closed. But its hoped that they will be revived. and with the enthusiasm of the children who have been trained to work on the railway, this looks like it could be the case.

13 year old Vasya Solyanov says "I want to finish school as soon as possible and to enter the Railway Institute. And after that to work as a head of a railway station somewhere."

Children from ages 11 to 16 perform all the duties associated with the railroad, including engineer, attendant, flagman and stationmaster.

But this is no game.

They have to undergo a five-year training period, studying theory for three years before they get any practical experience.

All teenagers at the Irkutsk Children's Railway treat their jobs very seriously, because it allows them to feel themselves grown-ups says Irina Skvortsova who is the Children's Railway instructor.

Children who work at the railway everyday in the summer seem to prefer being railway conductors, linemen, switchmen and fare collectors to playing games and hanging around in the streets, like many of their friends.

The Railway is great for the tourist industry too. Visitors from all over the country and some curious locals ride the train and put the children through their paces.

Keyword-wacky

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Subjects: Train travel, Olympic games, Travel, Lifestyle, Events, Sports
Locations: Russia, Moscow, Eastern Europe, Europe
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(HZ) Argentina Theme Park
Title:
SD
Summary: Theme park offers a glimpse of the life and times of Jesus Christ
Story No: 495705
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 09/10/2006 04:58 AM
People:
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SHOTLIST:

1. Exterior of Tierra Santa (the Promised Land) theme park entrance

2. People queuing to get in to park

3. Ticket office

4. Various of cashiers at entrance dressed in costumes

5. Wide of mock Calvary Hill (hill upon which Jesus Christ was crucified)

6. Statue of Jesus Christ on cross

7. Mock Calvary Hill

8. Roman soldier statues

9. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Victoria Rodriguez, Mexican tourist :

"It's very different for a priest or your own family to explain these things to you than for you to live it, feel it, follow the path that Jesus walked."

10. Various of statue of Jesus Christ being judged

11. People listening to tour guide

12. Various of statue of Jesus Christ being resurrected

13. Woman and girl looking on

14. Various of statue of Jesus Christ being resurrected

15. Wide of group of school children on school trip

16. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Federico Petronabe, school student on trip to park :

"The resurrection was fantastic because it is as if we were really there."

17. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Liliana Velasquez, school student on trip to park :

"It's a lovely place and I learnt a lot of things about religion and I think it is fantastic."

18. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Lucas Centuriau, school student on trip to park :

"I never thought it would be so fun and anyway I really like the way it has been done. What I really like was the Last Supper, it was really realistic. And the animals, everything, I love it. Also the planes that go by!"

17. Plane flying above Tierra Santa theme park

18. Various of religious statue

19. Various of tourists in the theme park

20. Mosque in the theme park

21. Exterior of mosque

22. Close up of woman in costume outside mosque

23. Man dressed as monk walking in front of tourists

24. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Maria Ferro, director of Tierra Santa theme park:

"I think that with what is happening today in Jerusalem where are people are fighting and there is war, I think that they really don't know that there is a God for everyone - beyond that we are fighting. What the park wants to do it is create a union - whether I'm Muslim, you are Jewish, he is Catholic, we can unite because that is the point - in reality, the point is to find God in each and everyone one of us through different religions."

25. Various of mock Wailing Wall

26. Man in costume sweeping

27. Sign for public telephone

28. Man dressed as Roman soldier walking through street

LEAD IN :

Jewish, Christian and Muslim tourists are drawn to the world's traditional religious sites in the Middle East.

But now the Promised Land, as seen at the time of Jesus christ, has come to the Argentine capital.

The theme park even includes a replaying of the resurrection of Christ, every thirty minutes.

STORYLINE :

Near Buenos Aires there is a curious sight to be seen.

Called Tierra Santa, or the Promised Land, it is a religious theme park featuring a replica of the city of Jerusalem at the time of Jesus Christ.

Believers and non-believers alike can take a stroll around the mock Promised Land.

There are fake trees, houses, livestock, people and of course scenes from the life of Jesus Christ.

And it is very poplar, as thousands come every year to travel back in time to see the Jerusalem of Jesus Christ's time.

Some scoff at the park, but others are clearly moved.

Mexican tourist, Victoria Rodriguez , says to experience the life Christ lived is special.

To make sure visitors don't miss out on the highlights of Jesus Christ's life, his resurrection (when he rose from the dead) is replayed every thirty minutes.

During the mock resurrection a statue of Jesus Christ slowly emerges from a plastic mountain, as choral music plays.

Measuring around 60ft (18.2 metres) in height, the statue towers above the audience - this time mostly school children who came here as part of their religious studies programme.

One student, Federico Petronabe, says he thinks the mock resurrection is fantastic.

Another, Lucas Centuriau, said he was surprised at how much fun the park was. And he added he liked watching all the planes fly past.

Situated right next to the city's airport, the park's biblical feel is constantly being challenged by low-flying planes.

But that doesn't seem to bother the visitors, who come in their droves, especially during religious holidays.

Tierra Santa theme park doesn't just try to bring the traveller to the roots of Christianity. Islam and Judaism are also represented.

Maria Ferro, the director of Tierra Santa, says she firmly believes in the theme park, and the experience it offers.

The park also features a mock Western Wall, and just like the real one, the surface of the Kotel is scattered with paper letters containing prayers and wishes.

Ferro says every year the messages and prayers are taken to the real Western Wall in Jerusalem.

Keyword-wacky unusual

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Subjects: Christianity, Islam, Religion, Amusement and theme parks, Student travel, Travel, Social affairs, Recreation and leisure, Lifestyle, Amusement and theme parks, Leisure travel
Locations: Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires F.D., Argentina
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(HZ) Croatia sea Organ
Title:
SD
Summary: An unusual piece of 'musical' architecture attracts visitors to a Croatian town
Story No: 541357
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/29/2007 05:23 AM
People:
Subscription:

CROATIA SEA ORGAN

SOURCE: AP TELEVISION NEWS

RESTRICTIONS: HORIZONS CLIENTS ONLY

LENGTH: 5.25

SHOTLIST:

AP Television

Riva, Croatia - recent

1. Pan shot of Riva (city coastline) seen from the boat

2. Wide shot of St. Donatus' church

3. Tilt up over the Narodni trg (Peoples' Square)

4. Pan of the organ from a boat

5. Various people relaxing on the sea organ

6. SOUNDBITE: (German) Tourist

"The Sea Organ is very beautiful, impressive! It will remain in my memory. I like the way it fits into the environment. I've been playing a pipe organ in church for twenty years now. This is a lovely way to connect with nature."

7. Close of the holes on the stairs of the Organ

8. Mid of the holes on the stairs of the Organ

9. Mid of muzzles of organ pipes

10. Close of feet of tourists walking over the Organ

11. Mid of waves lapping at the Organ

12. Wide of waves lapping at the Organ, a boat passing, a female swimmer approaches

13. Wide of the female swimmer washed by the waves

14. Pan of Organ and swimmers

15. Various of Nikola Basic working on drawing

16. Close of sea organ drawing

17. Computer simulation of the organ

STILLS - Courtesy of Nicola Basic

18. The Photo of the Organ during construction

19. The photo of a male worker during the construction of the Organ

20. The photo of divers planting the tubes during the construction

AP Television

Riva, Croatia - recent

21. Close of the European Prize for Urban Public Space

22. SOUNDBITE: (croatian) Nikola Basic, Architect

"I knew that the sea when it laps at cavities, holes, underwater caves and hollows, produces different sounds. Using this experience - this phenomenon of collision of two media: the solid one and the liquid one, which, on planetary level, always deliver the phenomenon of sound - I developed the idea further."

23. Pan of the Organ from the boat

24. Tilt up over the construction site of the Sun monument

25. Wide of worker on the construction site

26. Wide of Basic talking to the workers in front of a ship

27. Close of Basic

28. Wide of Basic with workers

29. SOUNDBITE: (Croatian) Nikola Basic, Architect

"We are going to use the daytime to collect the sunlight, and to transform it into electric energy. In the evening, after the sunset, we will use the electric energy to produce the energy of light, returning in a way, the energy given to us by the Sun, back to the Sun."

30. Computer simulation of the Sun monument

31. Close of computer simulation of the Sun monument, the blue line marking the Sea Organ

LEAD IN:

The sun-bleached town of Zadar has been attracting thousands of visitors since a unique piece of architecture was developed a few years ago.

The giant award-winning musical instrument built into the Croatian coast is "played" by the sea, providing a very different experience to visitors.

Now the architects behind the project are planning to add a solar powered amphitheatre to the structure, that will be used for music concerts and theatrical performances.

STORYLINE:

The three thousand year-old the coastal town of Zadar is no stranger to cultural heritage.

From the Roman forum to ancient churches it's history is etched in its architecture.

But there's a new-comer to this ancient town that has warmed the hearts of both locals and tourists.

At first glance this two year old construction doesn't seem to be the ideal coastal idyllic vista.

But these stark stone steps are part of a gigantic organ which is played day and night by the lapping of the sea.

Tourists and locals alike come here to relax, meditate or to simply enjoy the music.

One tourist from Germany says she loves the way the structure connects with nature.

She's not alone.

The creator of this unique construction is architect Nikola Basic.

Raised on one of the near-by islands, Basic spent a lot of his childhood listening to the waves hitting the coastal rocks and hollows and it was here that his idea was born.

The organ works in a similar way to a classic pipe organ, only here the sound is produced by the pressure of waves, instead of by bellows.

There are 35 organ pipes on tubes differing in radius. They produce sound using air pressure produced by the low and high tides.

During construction of the instrument Basic was helped by the acoustic engineer Ivan Stamac and by Vladimir Androcec, an expert in sea hydraulics.

He says he was inspired by the sound of both sea and stone.

It has not taken very long for the Sea Organ to achieve almost a cult status.

Each new visit gives fans a new musical experience.

At once a gentle lullaby, then forceful, energetic tones as the wind joins the sea in concerto.

And even when the sea is completely calm the Organ is known to suddenly wake up and give a surprise salute to a passing boat.

The natural orchestra has rendered this part of Zadar unique in the world.

Last year the organ was awarded the European Prize for Urban Public Space.

Now Basic has decided to add to the organ by creating a monument to the Sun - a solar powered public space project in form of amphitheatre intended for plays and concerts.

Basic says that by harbouring the sun's rays during the day the monument will be able to give them back to the sun at night.

The new project is due to be completed and officially inaugurated on 20 November, 2007.

====

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Subjects: Electric power generation, Coastlines and beaches, Travel, Space industry, Electric utilities, Utilities, Industries, Business, Electric utilities, Energy industry, Environment and nature, Lifestyle, Aerospace and defense industry, Industrial products and services
Locations: Croatia, Eastern Europe, Europe
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Spain Stress
Title:
SD
Summary: Spaniards relieve stress by taking hammers to hotel
Story No: 528259
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 07/03/2007 02:59 PM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

Keyword-wacky

1. Wide of NH Alcala hotel

2. Hotel sign

3. Hotel reception

4. People in lobby

5. Wide of news conference, participant walking in with boxing gloves on

6. Close-up of dummy

7. "Stressed" businessman, Christian del Vino punching dummy wearing boxing gloves

8. Participating student, Ander, punching dummy

9. Taxi driver, Felix, punching dummy

10. Pan from photographers to beds in room

11. Hammers

12. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Christian Del Vino, Businessman:

"Basically I'm stressed out because of my work situation. I'm in charge of lots of people and I would like to be able to work with more experienced people."

13. Participant getting dressed in overalls and hard hat

14. Selection of hard hats

15. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Felix, Taxi driver:

"I could be one of a million stressed people in this town because this city it isn't 'liveable' in. We have to live here, there is no solution, but this city is not comfortable."

16. Felix using hammer to destroy television in hotel room

17. Participant using hammer to destroy light and picture in room

18. Participant destroying mirror in bathroom

19. Participants destroying television in bedroom

20. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Christian Del Vino, Businessman:

"I feel free. It was a lot of fun."

(Q: What were you thinking?)

"I was thinking about nothing. I was thinking about relaxing."

21. Tilt up from debris on floor of bathroom to smashed mirror

22. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) Ander, Student:

"It is really tiring. If I had to do it everyday as my job, I don't think I would like it so much."

23. Pan of destroyed hotel room

STORYLINE:

Stressed Spaniards armed with mallets and hard hats were set free in a Madrid hotel on Tuesday with permission to demolish the interior as a way of letting off steam.

A group of 30 people were chosen by psychologists to trash 10 of the building's 146-rooms as part of the11-year-old hotel's refurbishment plan.

After being chosen from an internet survey, the stressed out volunteers were invited to the central NH Alcala to undergo a round of pschological tests.

These tests were to prove who was the most stressed and who most deserved to release their pent-up anger on the hotel's fading furniture.

After hitting a plastic dummy, volunteers were given a blood pressure test and finally a psychological exam.

Once officially and medically confirmed as "stressed" they got their chance to set about the hotel.

"Basically I'm stressed out because of my work situation. I'm in charge of lots of people and I would like to be able to work with more experienced people," one of the participants, businessman Christian Del Vino said, before letting off steam trashing part of the hotel.

"I feel free. It was a lot of fun," he said, after using a mallet to destroy a television set and smash a bedside lamp in one of the rooms.

"I was thinking about nothing. I was thinking about relaxing," he added.

"I could be one of a million stressed people in this town because this city it isn't 'liveable' in," said another "stressed" participant, Felix, a taxi driver in the Spanish capital.

Following a gruelling session destroying part of the hotel, Ander, a student stressed out by studying for a Masters degree, told AP Television: "It is really tiring. If I had to do it everyday as my job, I don't think I would like it so much."

According to the psychologists such strenuous exercise produces endorphins, which makes people feel better.

Once the rooms have been rebuilt and refurbished, sometime in September, all the volunteers will be invited to a gala dinner and a night's stay in the hotel.

Keyword-wacky -bizarre

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Locations: Madrid, Community of Madrid, Spain
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(HZ) Lapland Elves
Title:
SD
Summary: Children can learn how to be an elf at the 'Elf School'
Story No: 505419
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 12/06/2006 06:01 AM
People:
Subscription:

++CLIENT REFEED++

LAPLAND ELF SCHOOL

SOURCE: AP TELEVISION NEWS

RESTRICTIONS: HORIZONS CLIENTS ONLY

LENGTH 5:40

SHOTLIST

1. Various of elves icing cookies

2. Elf buried under cuddly toys with children

3. Various of musical performance and dancing

4. Pan from families waiting to elves

UPSOUND: (English) Semir Elf, Elf School Teacher

"Hello everybody... so are you all coming to the elf school ?...good very well and do you speak English ?

5. Cutaways of child waving

6. Semir Elf opens door

UPSOUND: (English) Semir Elf, Elf School Teacher

"so welcome to my school.. come this way please. "

5. People enter room

6. Various of Semir elf addressing class

7. Cutaway elf shaking head

8. Wide of elves

9. Close up of boy watching

10. UPSOUND: (English) Semir Elf, Elf School Teacher

"What do you need to have, something very very important so you can be an elf.....? "

11. Wide of elf handing out hats

12. Various of families wearing hats

13. Various of class

14. UPSOUND: (English) Semir Elf, Elf School Teacher

"Keever ... Oover ... Toover"

15. Mid of Semir Elf

UPSOUND: (English) Semir Elf, Elf School Teacher

"magic happens"

16. Two children watching

17. Wide of Semir Elf and assistant elf

UPSOUND: (English) Semir Elf, Elf School Teacher

"Do you remember the three magic words we just learned ?"

18. Cutaway of tree, christmas lights come on

UPSOUND: (English) Semir Elf, Elf School Teacher

" ... then here we go.... altogether ...Keever ... Oover ... Toover..... oh ...did you do that ? "

19. Wide of people doing the 'magic' actions

UPSOUND: (English) "Keever ... Oover ... Toover"

20. Various of elves and people dancing

UPSOUND: (English) Semir Elf, Elf School Teacher

"....put the trousers on ... hold the hat ... and go very very low and again.. other leg.. now hold the hat and go very very low... now reindeer...now walk like an elf.. oh come on Daddy !... reindeer .. very good.. "

21. Wide of everyone clapping

22. People leaving

SOUNDBITE : (English) Semir Elf , Elf School Teacher

"We teach them (the students) how to be speaking elfish.. which is a very difficult and complicated language, but once I teach them to speak elfish and once I tell them the magic spell, which is 'Keever ... Oover ... Toover'.. then they know how magic comes"

23. Elves playing

24. SOUNDBITE : (English) Semir Elf , Elf School Teacher

"A special announcement for everyone watching right now my name is Semir and I'm the Elf teacher in the Elf school in Santa Park in Lapland on the arctic circle. And I would like to wish everybody a merry, merry, merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.. bye"

LEAD IN :

Lapland is the land of Santa Claus and Christmas magic...

Elves are mysterious beings who help Santa Claus, and spread the magic of Christmas. But what does it take to become an elf?.

Children who travel to Lapland to visit Santa can learn how to be an elf at the Santa Park's 'Elf School'

STORYLINE:

Not far from Santa's village near the arctic circle in Lappish Finland, lies the home of Santa's elves.

Deep under ground, in the place called 'Santa Park', the elves are engaged in elfish activities from the productive, such as baking cookies, to the downright silly, like be buried in a mound of stuffed toys.

They are always pleased for an excuse to play with the children who visit from all across the globe in the weeks leading up to Christmas.

The multi-talented elves can dance and sing, and delight in performing for their visitors.

But what does it take to become an elf ?

Visitors young and old can find out at the Santa Park Elf School.

The elf school teacher is called Semir, and he is not to be trifled with.

Semir is assisted by another elf who translates everything he says in English into Finnish.

Semir greets the children and their parents outside the Elf School.

UPSOUND: (English) Semir Elf, Elf School Teacher

"Hello everybody... so are you all coming to the elf school ?... and do you speak English"

UPSOUND: (English) Semir Elf, Elf School Teacher

"So welcome to my school.. come this way please. "

Once inside, everyone removes their hats, so they can get a special elf hat instead.

UPSOUND: (English) Semir Elf, Elf School Teacher

"What do you need to have, something very very important so you can be an elf.....? "

The correct answer is a special hat.

Once the hats are distributed and everyone is wearing them, the lesson continues.

Now comes the most important lesson .. the three magic elfish words...

UPSOUND: (English) Semir Elf, Elf School Teacher

"Keever ... Oover ... Toover"

They mean nothing in particular, but bring magic.

UPSOUND: (English) Semir Elf, Elf School Teacher

"Magic happens"

Now the magic words have been learnt, then the music starts.

UPSOUND: (English) Semir Elf, Elf School Teacher

"Do you remember the three magic words we just learned ... then here we go.... altogether ...Keever ... Oover ... Toover..... oh ...did you do that ? "

The spell certainly has worked its magic on the Christmas tree as the lights mysteriously come on.

Now teachers and students must do a special elf dance.

UPSOUND: (English) Semir Elf, Elf School Teacher

"Now follow us with a dance..... here we go....put the trousers on ... hold the hat ... and go very very low and again.. other leg.. now hold the hat and go very very low... now reindeer...now walk like an elf.. oh come on Daddy !... reindeer .. very good.. "

Lesson over, the newly qualified elves leave to continue their holiday in Lapland's winter wonderland.

But for everyone who can't make it to Elf school Semir Elf has a special message ...

"I would like to wish everybody a merry, merry, merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.. bye"

AP TELEVISION NEWS

====

Clients are reminded:

(i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Television News Library on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: info@aptnlibrary.com.

(ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service

(iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory.

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Subjects: Language education, Christmas, Dance, Education, Social affairs, Holidays, Occasions, Lifestyle, Performing arts, Entertainment, Arts and entertainment
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France Baguettes
Title:
SD
Summary: First vending machine dispensing hot baguettes launched
Story No: 700341
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 08/08/2011 07:12 PM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

1. Close-up of baguettes being placed on shelf inside of a traditional bakery

2. Close-up of baguettes

3. Close of customer picking up baguette, zoom out and pan to customer

4. Cashier handing out change to customer

5. Exterior traditional bakery

6. Wide of Jean-Louis Hecht outside of his automated baguette dispenser

7. Hecht using his computer to adjust settings on the dispenser

8. Close-up on dispenser screen and the different settings

9. Interior of dispenser moving baguette

10. Hecht placing baguettes inside the refrigerator portion of the dispenser

11. Hecht taking baguettes out of the dispenser slot

12. SOUNDBITE (French) Jean-Louis Hecht, Owner, Automated Baguette Dispenser:

"This machine is, above all, a service. We are going to offer quality service to people who need this service. There are a lot of people working off hours, who work at night, the police, nurses, doctors, firemen, taxi drivers. All of these people have the right to eat fresh bread."

13. Close-up screen reading (French) "Fresh Baguette"

14. SOUNDBITE (French) Jean-Louis Hecht, Owner, Automated Baguette Dispenser:

"I don''t believe it at all (that French fear automated machines) because the French are foremost ''bon-vivants'', they like good things, they like to eat well. France is well known for its good bread and this bread is going to be restored in value by this machine here because it will be served hot. The bread is hot and crispy and served by this machine here."

15. Baguette falling into slot of the machine

16. Isabelle Urdapilleta tasting a baguette offered by Jean-Louis Hecht

17. SOUNDBITE (French) Isabelle Urdapilleta, local resident:

"It''s the fact that it is in the machine that bothers me. Bread is like fruit and vegetables, it is supposed to be sold in the market. It is not supposed to be sold hermetically-sealed in a supermarket and this is exactly the same. I don''t want to buy bread from a machine. I want to say ''hi'' to my baker and see her face and know that it is she who made the bread and be happy otherwise I won''t be happy eating it."

18. Urdapilleta walking off with baguette

19. Another customer taking baguette offered by Hecht from the dispenser and walking off with it

STORYLINE

A French baker thinks he has found the answer to the problem of getting a fresh, warm baguette, when France''s thousands of bakeries are closed.

Jean-Louis Hecht has rolled out a 24-hour automated baguette dispenser, promising warm bread for hungry night owls, shift workers or anyone else who doesn''t have time to pick one up during their bakery''s opening hours.

"There are a lot of people working off hours, who work at night, the police, nurses, doctors, firemen, taxi drivers. All of these people have the right to eat fresh bread," Hecht said.

The vending machines take partially cooked loaves, bake them and deliver them steaming within seconds to customers, all for one euro (one dollar, 42 cents).

Hecht currently only operates two machines, one in Paris, another in the town of Hombourg-Haut in northeastern France, each next to his own bakeries.

Hecht foresees expansion in Paris, around Europe and even the US

Despite the expansion of fast-food chains, (m) millions of French remain true to their beloved baguette: it is still a staple of breakfast in France - most often with butter and jam - and the preferred accompaniment for lunch, dinner and cheese.

Yet customer convenience here often takes a back seat to lifestyle rhythms. Many stores in small towns and even lower-traffic areas of Paris close for lunchtime.

And in August, many businesses - including bakeries - shut down for part or all of the summer holiday month.

Late-night supermarkets are rare, even in Paris. And they''re generally seen as a source of low-grade, desperation bread, not the artisanal product of a certified baker.

Hecht wants his automated baguette machine to fill in the gaps.

But judging from some of the feedback he''s been getting, Hecht will have to convince many people that his automated baguette machine is the future.

"I don''t want to buy bread from a machine. I want to say ''hi'' to my baker and see her face and know that it is she who made the bread and be happy otherwise I won''t be happy eating it," said Isabelle Urdapilleta.

keyword wacky

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Subjects: Flour and baked goods manufacturing, Food manufacturing, Food, beverage and tobacco products manufacturing, Consumer product manufacturing, Consumer products and services, Industries, Business, Food, beverage and tobacco products manufacturing, Agriculture, food and beverage manufacturing
Locations: Paris, France
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(HZ) South Africa Castle
Title:
SD
Summary: Claims an historic building is haunted
Story No: 538928
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 10/07/2007 05:04 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST

1. Zoom into Cape Town with Table Mountain in background

2. Pan castle

3. Castle Guardsmen on parade

4. Alida Riddell stands at the Castle

5. SOUNDBITE (English): Alida Riddell, Spiritual Medium:

" I think there's a lot to be said about all historic buildings of this nature in that there will always be pockets where the energies are very negative ad very sad because of what happened all those years ago. Then if you had to move into other areas you'd find there's happiness, and it's this complete contrast. When you're in the gardens it feels peaceful and relaxed. So it's only when you go into those pockets where the actual despair happened that you pick it up strongly."

6. Pan to 'The Dark Hole'

7. Alida Riddell connecting to the spirit world.

8. SOUNDBITE (English): Alida Riddell, Spiritual Medium:

He was about six foot and he was bleeding from the mouth, and also questioned why they were punished for just wanting to act out their cultures - for that they were punished. He was beaten and blood was pouring down his mouth. And in essence he was saying we're all the same actually, it's just our skin colour that's different, so the clothes we wear are different. Lot's of questioning why was it ever done?'

9. Guardsmen on parade exit through archway

10. Lolly Raa stands at toilet entrance

11. SOUNDBITE (English): Lolly Raa, retired Castle Restaurant Manageress

"She looked like some tragedy had happened in her life, because she'd go past you so quickly, and you'd hear that (sigh) like that, and she kept doing (sigh) so either she had suffered something, or someone in the family had suffered something, but it must have been many many many moons ago because of the dress she wore� it was one of those real Dutch frocks that they wore in those days with the pinafore and the cap on the head, you know?'

16. British flag at Castle entrance

17. Entrance to Governor's house

18. View from Governor's house

19. Stephanie Hoffman in the Ballroom annexe

20. SOUNDBITE (English): Stephanie Hoffman, museum attendant, The Castle

'As I walked I heard another person walking behind me, the footsteps of another person walking behind me. But it wasn't like a flat shoe, because I could hear the heel of the shoe. And I was standing still trying to find out if it was my imagination or if it's really somebody walking behind me, and the sound wasn't there any more. And I started walking again and the sound came back, the footsteps came back. But anyway, I just ignored it and I switched the lights off. But before I got to the door, the door slammed closed.'

21. Lydia Hassiem stands on the Castle lawn

22. SOUNDBITE (English): Mrs Lydia Hassiem, Castle receptionist

'But it cannot be true, how can there be spooks and ghosts around? Until this very night, that was the first experience I had seeing this bride, running across the grass patch, right up to the first stairs then the second stairs, and then disappeared.'

23. Bell tower at the Castle's entrance

25. Ronnie Smayile stands in front of the Bell tower

26. SOUNDBITE (English): Mr Ronnie Smayile, Catering, The Castle

'Sometimes that bell rings but there's nobody there to ring the bell. When we come up to check in there, there's nobody in there - but that bell rings.'

27. Lolly Raa sits on a bench

28. SOUNDBITE (English): Mrs Lolly Raa, retired Castle Restaurant Manageress

'At first I was frightened, but then eventually I got so used to it, you know, that I looked forward to seeing them.'

29. Visitors walk under Castle archway

30. Statue of Neptune looking over the Castle

LEAD IN:

Historic Cape Town in South Africa seems to be haunting some visitors.

In one of the oldest examples of colonial rule in the city, the ghosts of the past are said to be making their presence felt.

STORYLINE:

Cape Town was established in the mid-seventeenth century as a replenishment station for ships en route between Europe and the Far East.

The heart of the expanding town, both under early Dutch, and later British control, was the fortification known as the Castle of Good Hope.

Constructed as protection from rival European powers and against indigenous attacks, the castle was also a community of its own.

It served as the seat of justice and civil administration, and was home to the Governor, his officials and the garrison.

Today the castle remains a working military fort, and is open to the public.

But it is also said to be home to the ghosts of those tortured and executed in years gone by.

Alida Riddell is a spiritual medium who says the castle has pockets of negative energy.

In the early days of the castle, in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, Dutch law required a confession before an execution could be carried out.

Torture was frequently used to obtain such confessions, and these cruel acts were carried out in this room, known as the Dark Hole.

Inside this torture chamber, Alida Riddell claims to connect with the spirit world.

Many of the Castle's employees maintain they've had experiences of witnessing apparitions and other paranormal activities.

Lolly Raa is the retired manageress of the Castle restaurant, and she says she frequently saw the apparition of a Dutch lady from a bygone (previous) era, in this passageway.

At the turn of the nineteenth century, the British took over control of the Cape from the Dutch.

Lady Anne Barnard was the wife of the first British Colonial Secretary, and she was said to have ruled the social life in Cape Town.

Indeed, it is said she still makes an appearance in the ballroom from time to time.

Here, museum attendant Stephanie Hoffmann has experienced what she believes to be Lady Anne's presence.

Castle receptionist Lydia Hassiem describes an apparition often seen at the castle - a lady in a wedding dress.

In the twentieth century, a suicide took place at the Castle.

The ringing of the Castle's bell of its own accord is ascribed to this tragedy.

Caterer Ronny Smayile explains that when the bell rings and they check, they find no one at the bell tower.

Lolly Raa says that although she was at first frightened of the apparitions, she later looked forward to seeing them.

Keyword wacky

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Locations: South Africa, Cape Town, Southern Africa, Africa
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(HZ) Russia Chicken legs
Title:
SD
Summary: Man builds his own Russian fairy tale house on chicken legs
Story No: 681301
Source: AP TELEVISION
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 03/26/2011 04:03 AM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

AP Television

Ulyanovka, Russia - February 23rd, 2011

1. Mid of hut turning

2. Wide of hut on chicken legs rotating

3. Close of "chicken claws"

4. Close of hut turning

5. Mid of Vasily Kozin, craftsman who constructed hut, carrying ladder

6. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Vasily Kozin, Craftsman:

"The main difficulty was the high centre of gravity and the question of constructing it on two legs because it didn't look good on four legs. Then it was rather easy to build it. In fact there is a metal structure inside, then we just made a form of the legs with plaster. And that's it. It was not difficult."

7. Mid of wooden head of deer on top of hut

8. Close up of Vasily Kozin putting up ladder to go inside hut

9. Mid of Vasily Kozin entering hut

10. Tilt up floor of hut to Vasily Kozin looking around

11. Mid of Vasily Kozin talking

12. Mid of ceiling

13. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Vasily Kozin, Craftsman:

"Mainly newlyweds and tourists climb up here to have a look. You know, sometimes they close the door and do something, I have no idea what. Well, I haven't finished it all here yet, but for now it is not important that the appearance isn't done. It is not totally materialistic. I would say it is more something like a temple for me."

14. Tilt up from base of hut

15. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Vasily Kozin, Craftsman:

"There are five tons of metal, and my friend sold that to me for the price of scrap metal. As for the motor which turns around the hut, well they are not produced now. The motor which I have was made in USSR. The new one from Germany costs around 2,500 euros (USD �3545), but for this one I paid $300."

16. Mid of Vasily Kozin's workshop, green with red door

17. Close of door handle in form of a hand

18. Mid of Alexander Schurov, artist and neighbour of Vasily Kozin, painting on wall

19. Mid low angle of Alexander Schurov painting

20. Close of painting

21. Mid of Alexander Schurov painting

22. Close of palette

+++AUDIO AS INCOMING++

23. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Alexander Schurov, Artist / Neighbour to Vasily Kozin:

"It is very interesting here indeed because, firstly, I can step aside from certain (conventional) standards; and secondly, if there are more things like this then it will be more interesting to go and look around. Also one can visit such places and get acquainted with people."

24. Close up of wooden bear

25. Mid of Vasily Kozin carving wood in workshop

26. Close of wood carving

27. Close of Vasily Kozin working

28. Mid of Vasily Kozin working

28. Wide road alongside chicken hut, with cars driving along road

29. Mid of Konstantin Raikhlin, curator of exhibition projects, taking pictures of hut

30. Mid over the shoulder of Konstantin Raikhlin taking photographs

31. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Konstantin Raikhlin, Voxpop:

"This is a real attraction in a place forgotten by God because here there is nothing else to see except this. But when you drive by you will smile, I think it's good."

32. Wide of hut, cargo vehicles driving by

33. Mid of wooden sculpture with hut turning round behind

34. Close of hand of wooden sculpture with sign for Victory and hut in background

LEAD IN:

A classic Russian fairytale has come true for the village of Ulyanovka - about 40 km (24.85 miles) away from Saint Petersburg

As the story goes the old hag Baba Yaga lived in a house on chicken legs and was able to make the whole building spin around in a circle whenever she asked it to.

Now Ulyanovka has a spinning house all of its own, but there's no witch or magic commanding it.

STORYLINE:

This wooden spinning house in Ulyanovka near Saint Petersburg doesn't need the magic command of the old witch Baba Yaga to make it turn.

Perched on giant chicken legs, it spins continuously.

The man who built it - Vasily Kozin - says there's no magic involved in making it spin - but insists - a little like Baba Yaga - that he's the only one who knows how to do it.

"The main difficulty was the high centre of gravity and the question of constructing it on two legs because it didn't look good on four legs. Then it was rather easy to build it. In fact there is a metal structure inside, then we just made a form of the legs with plaster. And that's it. It was not difficult."

Kozin used to be the head of a lemonade factory, but when it became bankrupt in the mid 2000's he decided to buy a plot of land in Ulyanovka and use it to fulfil a lifelong dream - to build Baba Yaga's fairytale house.

The construction weighs more than 15 tons.

The base contains a special gear motor - taken from a Soviet mobile crane - to help the house spin around.

The interior isn't quite finished. Kozin says there's a lot more work to be done, but it's already become a popular sight for tourists and locals.

"Mainly newlyweds and tourists climb up here to have a look. You know, sometimes they close the door and do something, I have no idea what. Well, I haven't finished it all here yet, but for now it is not important that the appearance is done. It is not totally materialistic (about money). I would say it is more something like a temple for me," he says.

Inspired by fairy tales written by great Russian poet Alexander Pushkin, Kozin says everything is possible when you have a dream, and money should never be a barrier.

Today he earns a living from building smaller versions of Baba Yaga's house for local children.

Kozin says the villagers didn't know what to make of his spinning house at first, but they soon warmed to it.

Artist Alexander Schurov is even helping him complete the project.

"It is very interesting here indeed because, firstly, I can step aside from certain (conventional) standards; and secondly, if there are more things like this then it will be more interesting to go and look around. Also one can visit such places and get acquainted with people," he says.

Kozin lives alone. He has separated from his wife and his children are grown up, but he says his wooden house keeps him happy.

On the road that connects Saint Petersburg to Moscow, thousands of cars and lorries drive by Kozin's hut each day. Some drivers stop to take photos.

"This is a real attraction in a place forgotten by God, because here there is nothing else to see except this. But when you drive by you will smile, I think it's good," says passer-by Konstantin Raikhlin.

For Kozin this really is the stuff of fairy tales - and it's proving a winner all round.

Keyword wacky bizarre

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Subjects: Residential construction, Visual arts, Construction and engineering, Industrial products and services, Industries, Business, Arts and entertainment
Locations: Saint Petersburg, Russia, Eastern Europe, Europe
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