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SNTV Review Bizarre 1
Title:
HD
Summary: End of Year Review. Bizarre Part 1 of 2
Story No: 1024417
Source: SNTV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 28/12/2014 09:14 AM
People: Charlie Chaplin
Subscription:

SCRIPTING INFORMATION:

A seasonal - and sensible - way to start the bizarre sporting year �

It is early January in Weidenthal, southern Germany - and this is the 12th annual Christmas Tree-throwing World Championships.

There are three disciplines in the competition - 'Weitwurf' (javelin-style), 'Hammerwurf' (hammer-style) and 'Hochwurf' (high jump-style) - with the overall world champion declared after a total distance has been calculated over the course of the day.

34-year-old Rudiger Kaas ended Frank Schwender's three-year reign as world champion.

And afterwards, the sporting equipment was disposed of in the appropriate manner.

Eight off-road trucks raced on the ski slopes at Sunday River Ski Resort in Newry, Maine, as part of the Red Bull Frozen Rush.

The event featured eight 900-horsepower trucks and professional drivers racing against each other on the resort's unpredictable snowy terrain.

Each truck was modified with giant spiked tyres designed to handle the snow and ice.

The drivers climbed the nearly mile-long (1.6-kilometre) course, ascending 550 vertical feet (168 metres) before returning again to the base of the hill.

Californian Ricky Johnson took the top spot on the podium.

The village of Llanwrtyd Wells in Wales hosted the World Mountain Bike Chariot Racing Championships.

Fifteen teams took up the challenge and pedalled in specially-commissioned "mountain bike chariots" in teams of three.

Two did the hard work at the front - the lucky other got to ride around in the attached rubber barrel.

Back across the Atlantic and over 100 professional rodeo cowboys took to the slopes in the 40th Annual Cowboy Downhill in Steamboat Springs, Colorado.

The event began with the dual slalom where side-by-side courses tested the racers speed, agility - and rodeo skills.

Competitors had to negotiate the gates, survive the large jump in the middle, lasso a lucky individual, saddle a horse and cross the finish line in the fastest time.

How would Robert Marchand have fared?

At the end of January, the 102-year-old Frenchman broke his own cycling world record in the over-100s category, riding 26.927 kilometres (16.7 miles) in one hour, more than 2.5 kilometres better than his previous best time, set two years prior.

The retired firefighter and lumberjack also holds the record for the 100 kilometres, covering the distance in four hours, 17 minutes and 27 seconds in 2012.

Marchand would have done well to avoid Ashbourne in early March.

The Derbyshire town staged its annual Shrovetide football match - an ancient pastime with the goal areas around three miles (five kilometres) apart and lasting anything up to eight hours.

The fixture dates back centuries - the first recorded reference is from 1683.

With few rules and no limit on the numbers taking part, the game has little to do with normal football.

Staying in England and every Easter Monday for more than 50 years, the World Coal Carrying Championships have taken place in the heart of what was Yorkshire's mining country.

The participants are laden down with a 50-kilo sack of coal and must run with it from the 'Royal Oak Pub' to the 'Shoulder of Mutton Pub' - a distance of one mile (1.6 kilometres).

The men's champion this year was Chris Birkin, who, after his triumph, said it was the hardest thing he had ever done.

Birkin completed the course in four minutes and 46 seconds.

Look at this bunch - keen, pristine, jocular, lithe.

They do not look so clever half-an-hour later ... the Maldon Mud Race will take care of that.

At its deepest, the mud is 45 centimetres deep - enough to entrap the weary and unwary.

The 2013 champion James Haskey-Jones successfully defended his title - opting for an upright technique.

Many though, were reduced to crawling through the thick sludge.

One weekend every year for the last four centuries the rural English town of Chipping Campden has been taken over by the Cotswold Olimpicks - a collection of largely harmless and fun activities.

The headline event, the Shin-kicking World Championships, is not one of them.

Canadian Ross Langill came across to England specifically to indulge in this painful practice.

The 24-year-old will now be taking the shin-kicking crown back home to Vancouver after defeating two-time defending champion Zak Warren in two straight bouts.

A messy sporting affair took place at Coxheath near Maidstone on Saturday.

With teams of four doing battle over a series of rounds, this is the World Custard Pie Throwing Championship.

Inspired by actor, comedian and pie-thrower Charlie Chaplin, it began in 1967.

As for the 'pies' - they are actually a mixture of water and flour.

The 49th Great Knaresborough Bed Race was run on June the 14th.

The event is part fancy-dress pageant and part-gruelling time trial over a 2.4-mile (3.9-kilometre) course, ending with a swim through the icy waters of the River Nidd.

First staged in 1966, the Bed Race has spawned other similar events in the USA, Germany, New Zealand and elsewhere in the UK.

Each year the race features 90 teams of six runners and a passenger - that's 630 people sweating around the course.

The fastest teams complete the course in around 14 minutes - sometimes quicker.

And with the FIFA World Cup well under way in Brazil, Blairmore in Scotland played host to an altogether different type of football - the bizarre but growing sport of swamp soccer.

Originating from the swamps of Finland - where players found it to be an excellent way of training for cross-country skiing - swamp soccer tournaments are now held across the globe, including in Brazil, China and the Netherlands.

16 teams from around the world congregated to compete for the sport's ultimate crown - the Swamp Soccer World Cup.

Surprisingly, no training is required for the sport: all that is needed is a sense of fun and a fearless spirit when it comes to mud and heavy legs.

Each team consists of six players but sides can draw on an unlimited supply of substitutes throughout the match.

A game lasts a gruelling 24 minutes of filthy fun - on a specially-prepared pitch that has been ploughed and flooded to produce a swamp.

Weidenthal, Rhineland Palatinate, Germany - January 5th, 2013.

1. 00:00 Pan down from pine forest to 'Knutfest'.

2. 00:06 Competitor throws 'Javelin' style.

3. 00:11 Eventual men's winner Rudiger Kaas throwing 'High Jump' style.

4. 00:21 Competitor throws 'Hammer' style.

5. 00:26 Wide shot bonfire, pan to child waving.

Sunday River Ski Resort, Newry, Maine, USA - January 10th, 2014.

6. 00:32 Action from Red Bull Frozen Rush.

Llanwrtyd Wells, Wales - January 11th, 2014.

7. 00.55 Start of heat.

8. 01.03 Race action.

Steamboat Springs, Colorado, USA - January 20th, 2014.

9. 01:25 Highlights from slalom event.

Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, near Paris, France - January 31st, 2014.

10. 01.53 Robert Marchand starting race.

11. 02.19 Marchand on bicycle arriving at the end of race.

12. 02.25 Supporters applauding.

13. 02.29 Marchand raising hands after winning his challenge.

14. 02.33 SOUNDBITE (French): Robert Marchand, 102-year-old cycling champion.

"I haven't trained well, because the temperature was very low. I competed only at 90 per cent of my potential."

15. 02.42 Marchand shaking hands with crowd.

Ashbourne, Derbyshire, England - March 4th, 2014.

16. 02:47 Mid of shoe repair shop boarded up.

17. 02:50 Wide of people walking along street.

18. 02:54 Match-starter Stuart Lees throws ball to start game.

19. 02:59 Match in progress.

20. 03:09 Policeman.

21. 03:12 Match in progress.

22. 03:23 Match taking place in River Henmore.

23. 03:28 Ball being knocked around.

24. 03:33 Wide of people walking at dusk.

Gawthorpe. Yorkshire, England - April 21st, 2014.

25. 03:37 Men with coal sacks on their backs.

26. 03:44 Race underway, Chris Birkin (no.1) leads from start.

27. 03:49 Birkin wins.

28. 03:59 Birkin sitting on bale of hay, breathing heavily.

River Blackwater, Maldon, Essex, England - May 25, 2014.

29. 04:03 Competitors warm up

30. 04:18 Race in progress

Chipping Campden, England - May 31st, 2014.

31. 04:48 Competitors stuffing hay into trousers for protective purposes.

32. 04:53 Shin kicking bout.

33. 05:06 End of second bout of shin kicking final won by Ross Langill of Canada.

34. 05:14 Langill (left) shakes hands with runner-up Zak Warren (right).

35. 05:18 SOUNDBITE (English): Ross Langill, winner:

(On how the competition went) "Tiring, very tiring. That was hard. The hay really protects the shins, but it's really the feet that takes all the brunt. Trainers, it hurt."

Coxheath, Kent, England - May 31st, 2014.

36. 05:30 Close up bucket of 'custard' (water and flour) being mixed.

37. 05:34 Mid of people mixing custard.

38. 05:38 Bout in progress.

39. 05:46 Bout in progress.

Knaresborough, Yorkshire, England - June 14th, 2014.

40. 05:49 Establishing shot of Knaresborough.

41. 05:55 Team approaches start line.

42. 05:58 Starter fires gun.

43. 06:00 Team racing on road.

44. 06:06 Teams crossing river.

Blairmore, Argyll, Scotland - June 28th and 29th, 2014.

45. 06:19 Tractor churning up pitch.

46. 06:23 Man watering pitch.

47. 06:26 Matches in progress.

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Subjects: Men's cycling, Cycling, Men's soccer, Record setting events, International soccer, Professional soccer, Men's sports, Sports, Men's cycling, Men's soccer, Soccer, General news
People: Charlie Chaplin
Locations: United Kingdom, Scotland, Germany, England, Wales, United States, Colorado, Western Europe, Europe, North America
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Review Bizarre 1
Title:
HD
Summary: End of Year Review. Bizarre Part 1 of 2
Story No: 1024019
Source: SNTV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 22/12/2014 11:25 AM
People: Charlie Chaplin
Subscription:

SOURCE: SNTV.

RESTRICTIONS: SNTV clients only. Scheduled news programmes only. Use within 14 days. If interested in archive use after 14 days please contact www.aparchive.com. Internet use only for SNTV clients with digital rights licensed in their contract. For any questions regarding rights restrictions please contact SNTV Planning (planning@sntv.com)

DURATION: 06:56.

SHOTLIST:

Weidenthal, Rhineland Palatinate, Germany - January 5th, 2013.

1. 00:00 Pan down from pine forest to 'Knutfest'.

2. 00:06 Competitor throws 'Javelin' style.

3. 00:11 Eventual men's winner Rudiger Kaas throwing 'High Jump' style.

4. 00:21 Competitor throws 'Hammer' style.

5. 00:26 Wide shot bonfire, pan to child waving.

Sunday River Ski Resort, Newry, Maine, USA - January 10th, 2014.

6. 00:32 Action from Red Bull Frozen Rush.

Llanwrtyd Wells, Wales - January 11th, 2014.

7. 00.55 Start of heat.

8. 01.03 Race action.

Steamboat Springs, Colorado, USA - January 20th, 2014.

9. 01:25 Highlights from slalom event.

Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, near Paris, France - January 31st, 2014.

10. 01.53 Robert Marchand starting race.

11. 02.19 Marchand on bicycle arriving at the end of race.

12. 02.25 Supporters applauding.

13. 02.29 Marchand raising hands after winning his challenge.

14. 02.33 SOUNDBITE (French): Robert Marchand, 102-year-old cycling champion.

"I haven't trained well, because the temperature was very low. I competed only at 90 per cent of my potential."

15. 02.42 Marchand shaking hands with crowd.

Ashbourne, Derbyshire, England - March 4th, 2014.

16. 02:47 Mid of shoe repair shop boarded up.

17. 02:50 Wide of people walking along street.

18. 02:54 Match-starter Stuart Lees throws ball to start game.

19. 02:59 Match in progress.

20. 03:09 Policeman.

21. 03:12 Match in progress.

22. 03:23 Match taking place in River Henmore.

23. 03:28 Ball being knocked around.

24. 03:33 Wide of people walking at dusk.

Gawthorpe. Yorkshire, England - April 21st, 2014.

25. 03:37 Men with coal sacks on their backs.

26. 03:44 Race underway, Chris Birkin (no.1) leads from start.

27. 03:49 Birkin wins.

28. 03:59 Birkin sitting on bale of hay, breathing heavily.

River Blackwater, Maldon, Essex, England - May 25, 2014.

29. 04:03 Competitors warm up

30. 04:18 Race in progress

Chipping Campden, England - May 31st, 2014.

31. 04:48 Competitors stuffing hay into trousers for protective purposes.

32. 04:53 Shin kicking bout.

33. 05:06 End of second bout of shin kicking final won by Ross Langill of Canada.

34. 05:14 Langill (left) shakes hands with runner-up Zak Warren (right).

35. 05:18 SOUNDBITE (English): Ross Langill, winner:

(On how the competition went) "Tiring, very tiring. That was hard. The hay really protects the shins, but it's really the feet that takes all the brunt. Trainers, it hurt."

Coxheath, Kent, England - May 31st, 2014.

36. 05:30 Close up bucket of 'custard' (water and flour) being mixed.

37. 05:34 Mid of people mixing custard.

38. 05:38 Bout in progress.

39. 05:46 Bout in progress.

Knaresborough, Yorkshire, England - June 14th, 2014.

40. 05:49 Establishing shot of Knaresborough.

41. 05:55 Team approaches start line.

42. 05:58 Starter fires gun.

43. 06:00 Team racing on road.

44. 06:06 Teams crossing river.

Blairmore, Argyll, Scotland - June 28th and 29th, 2014.

45. 06:19 Tractor churning up pitch.

46. 06:23 Man watering pitch.

47. 06:26 Matches in progress.

SCRIPTING INFORMATION:

A seasonal - and sensible - way to start the bizarre sporting year �

It is early January in Weidenthal, southern Germany - and this is the 12th annual Christmas Tree-throwing World Championships.

There are three disciplines in the competition - 'Weitwurf' (javelin-style), 'Hammerwurf' (hammer-style) and 'Hochwurf' (high jump-style) - with the overall world champion declared after a total distance has been calculated over the course of the day.

34-year-old Rudiger Kaas ended Frank Schwender's three-year reign as world champion.

And afterwards, the sporting equipment was disposed of in the appropriate manner.

Eight off-road trucks raced on the ski slopes at Sunday River Ski Resort in Newry, Maine, as part of the Red Bull Frozen Rush.

The event featured eight 900-horsepower trucks and professional drivers racing against each other on the resort's unpredictable snowy terrain.

Each truck was modified with giant spiked tyres designed to handle the snow and ice.

The drivers climbed the nearly mile-long (1.6-kilometre) course, ascending 550 vertical feet (168 metres) before returning again to the base of the hill.

Californian Ricky Johnson took the top spot on the podium.

The village of Llanwrtyd Wells in Wales hosted the World Mountain Bike Chariot Racing Championships.

Fifteen teams took up the challenge and pedalled in specially-commissioned "mountain bike chariots" in teams of three.

Two did the hard work at the front - the lucky other got to ride around in the attached rubber barrel.

Back across the Atlantic and over 100 professional rodeo cowboys took to the slopes in the 40th Annual Cowboy Downhill in Steamboat Springs, Colorado.

The event began with the dual slalom where side-by-side courses tested the racers speed, agility - and rodeo skills.

Competitors had to negotiate the gates, survive the large jump in the middle, lasso a lucky individual, saddle a horse and cross the finish line in the fastest time.

How would Robert Marchand have fared?

At the end of January, the 102-year-old Frenchman broke his own cycling world record in the over-100s category, riding 26.927 kilometres (16.7 miles) in one hour, more than 2.5 kilometres better than his previous best time, set two years prior.

The retired firefighter and lumberjack also holds the record for the 100 kilometres, covering the distance in four hours, 17 minutes and 27 seconds in 2012.

Marchand would have done well to avoid Ashbourne in early March.

The Derbyshire town staged its annual Shrovetide football match - an ancient pastime with the goal areas around three miles (five kilometres) apart and lasting anything up to eight hours.

The fixture dates back centuries - the first recorded reference is from 1683.

With few rules and no limit on the numbers taking part, the game has little to do with normal football.

Staying in England and every Easter Monday for more than 50 years, the World Coal Carrying Championships have taken place in the heart of what was Yorkshire's mining country.

The participants are laden down with a 50-kilo sack of coal and must run with it from the 'Royal Oak Pub' to the 'Shoulder of Mutton Pub' - a distance of one mile (1.6 kilometres).

The men's champion this year was Chris Birkin, who, after his triumph, said it was the hardest thing he had ever done.

Birkin completed the course in four minutes and 46 seconds.

Look at this bunch - keen, pristine, jocular, lithe.

They do not look so clever half-an-hour later ... the Maldon Mud Race will take care of that.

At its deepest, the mud is 45 centimetres deep - enough to entrap the weary and unwary.

The 2013 champion James Haskey-Jones successfully defended his title - opting for an upright technique.

Many though, were reduced to crawling through the thick sludge.

One weekend every year for the last four centuries the rural English town of Chipping Campden has been taken over by the Cotswold Olimpicks - a collection of largely harmless and fun activities.

The headline event, the Shin-kicking World Championships, is not one of them.

Canadian Ross Langill came across to England specifically to indulge in this painful practice.

The 24-year-old will now be taking the shin-kicking crown back home to Vancouver after defeating two-time defending champion Zak Warren in two straight bouts.

A messy sporting affair took place at Coxheath near Maidstone on Saturday.

With teams of four doing battle over a series of rounds, this is the World Custard Pie Throwing Championship.

Inspired by actor, comedian and pie-thrower Charlie Chaplin, it began in 1967.

As for the 'pies' - they are actually a mixture of water and flour.

The 49th Great Knaresborough Bed Race was run on June the 14th.

The event is part fancy-dress pageant and part-gruelling time trial over a 2.4-mile (3.9-kilometre) course, ending with a swim through the icy waters of the River Nidd.

First staged in 1966, the Bed Race has spawned other similar events in the USA, Germany, New Zealand and elsewhere in the UK.

Each year the race features 90 teams of six runners and a passenger - that's 630 people sweating around the course.

The fastest teams complete the course in around 14 minutes - sometimes quicker.

And with the FIFA World Cup well under way in Brazil, Blairmore in Scotland played host to an altogether different type of football - the bizarre but growing sport of swamp soccer.

Originating from the swamps of Finland - where players found it to be an excellent way of training for cross-country skiing - swamp soccer tournaments are now held across the globe, including in Brazil, China and the Netherlands.

16 teams from around the world congregated to compete for the sport's ultimate crown - the Swamp Soccer World Cup.

Surprisingly, no training is required for the sport: all that is needed is a sense of fun and a fearless spirit when it comes to mud and heavy legs.

Each team consists of six players but sides can draw on an unlimited supply of substitutes throughout the match.

A game lasts a gruelling 24 minutes of filthy fun - on a specially-prepared pitch that has been ploughed and flooded to produce a swamp.

SOURCE: SNTV.

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Subjects: Men's cycling, Cycling, Men's soccer, Record setting events, International soccer, Professional soccer, Men's sports, Sports, Men's cycling, Men's soccer, Soccer, General news
People: Charlie Chaplin
Locations: United Kingdom, Scotland, Germany, England, Wales, United States, Colorado, Western Europe, Europe, North America
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SNTV Bizarre Maldon Mud Race
Title:
HD
Summary: Filthy tactics at Maldon Mud Race in Essex.
Story No: 1011953
Source: SNTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 26/05/2014 17:14 PM
People:
Subscription:

SOURCE: Surridge Films.

RESTRICTIONS: SNTV clients only. Scheduled news programmes only. Use within 14 days. If interested in archive use after 14 days please contact www.aparchive.com <http://www.aparchive.com>. Internet use only for SNTV clients with digital rights licensed in their contract. For any questions regarding rights restrictions please contact planning@sntv.com

DURATION: 2:31.

STORYLINE:

Competitors get filthy at the Maldon Mud Race on Sunday (25th May) in Essex, England.

SCRIPTING INFORMATION:

The River Blackwater was looking serene before hundreds of racers descended its muddy waters.

At it's deepest, the mud is 18-inches (45 centimetres) deep - enough that some runners literally got stuck in the mud.

The 2013 champion James Haskey-Jones successfully defended his title - opting for an upright technique.

But most were decided to crawl or wade through the thick sludge.

There was an eclectic mix of people competing - some young, some old, some clothed, some not.

All were caked in the mud - and certainly needed a hot shower to clean up afterwards.

SHOTLIST: River Blackwater, Maldon, Essex, England. 25th May, 2014.

1. 00:00 Wide of River Blackwater.

2. 00:04 SOUNDBITE (English) Unnamed contestants:

"Cold wet mud in my knickers."

"Yeah. I think it is going to be hard. We are probably going to be the ones last and stuck in the mud having to be rescued."

3. 00:15 Musketeers warm-up.

4. 00:20 Muscle man in underpants.

5. 00:26 Old man in underpants.

6. 00:32 Start of race.

7. 00:46 Eventual winner James Haskey-Jones.

8. 00:51 SOUNDBITE: (English) Brian Farrington, Maldon Mud Race Charity:

"The mud is approximately 18 inches deep at its deepest. And it's been there a while. The good thing this year is that they have actually dredged the river. So, the mud is deeper this year."

9. 01:05 James Haskey-Jones winning the race.

10. 01:11 Close up of mud.

11. 01:16 Old man in mud.

12. 01:22 Close up of lady in mud.

13. 01:29 Mid of people running..

14. 01:36 Man dressed as a woman in mud.

15. 01:42 Woman crawling in mud...

16. 01:46 Man rolling in mud

17 . SOUNDBITE (English) Unnamed contestants.

"So so tiring. But it was good fun and it was well worth it."

"Yeah. Do it. Everyone should do it."

18. 02:02 Naked man in showers.

19. 02:15 Man falls in mud.

SOURCE: Surridge Films.

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SNTV Bizarre UK Wife Carrying
Title:
HD
Summary: UK Wife Carrying Championships from Dorking.
Story No: 1007756
Source: SNTV
Aspect Ratio: 4:3
Date: 17/03/2014 21:29 PM
People:
Subscription:

SOURCE: Surridge Productions.

RESTRICTIONS: SNTV clients only. Scheduled news programmes only. Use within 14 days. If interested in archive use after 14 days please contact www.aparchive.com <http://www.aparchive.com>. Internet use only for SNTV clients with digital rights licensed in their contract. For any questions regarding rights restrictions please contact planning@sntv.com

DURATION: 02:00

STORYLINE:

Seventh edition of the annual UK Wife Carrying Race takes place in Dorking, Surrey on Sunday (March 16).

SCRIPTING INFORMATION:

'To have and to hold' the traditional marriage vow states - and in Dorking, Surrey on Sunday that vow was certainly sacred.

The sleepy English town played host to the seventh edition of the annual UK Wife Carrying Race - an event that sees a man and his 'wife' going head over heels for glory.

But first, some clarification of the rules.

The duo don't actually have to be married - or male and female - to take part. Also, all 'wives' must weigh at least 50 kilogrammes - and, if not, then the weight is added before the start to level the field.

Wife carrying was said to have originated in the UK over twelve centuries ago,when Viking raiders rampaged into town and promptly carried away any local 'wenches' that took their fancy.

After an absence of some 900 years, the skill has made a comeback - and an elite field took to the start line ready to shoulder the burden of competition.

Men hoping to keep a firm grip on their significant other have many options.

Many recognised holds were in evidence on the day: the bridal carry, the piggy-back, the fireman's carry the well-recognised and very fast Estonian Hold (wife hangs upside-down on man's back, legs crossed in front of the man's face).

Some even tried the new - and arguably flawed - 'Dorking Hold', AKA (also known as) the reverse Estonian, but most that did found this approach somewhat heavy going.

Whilst some got too carried away in the battle for supremacy - others kept their nerve and went on to capture greatness.

Rich Blake Smith, carrying his 'wife' Anna (55kg), narrowly beat Vytautas Kirkliauskas of Lithuania, carrying his wife (who is actually his wife) Neringa Kirliauskiene (52kg), and covering the 380-metre course in only two minutes in good-to-firm conditions.

The Lithuanian had previously placed third at the World Wife Carrying Championships in Finland.

The happy couple took home a barrel of ale and a generous cash sum to put towards competing at the World Wife Carrying Championships, which take place at Sonkajarvi in July.

Come summertime, Smith and his passenger will aim to carry their success on to the world stage.

SHOTLIST: Dorking, England. 17th March, 2014.

1. 00:00 Various of competitors receiving instruction on rules of event

2. 00:27 Tilt up to competitor

3. 00:32 Wide of start of race

4. 00:46 Wide of competitors through water obstacle

5. 00:51 Various of end of race

6. 01:10 SOUNDBITE: (English) Rich Blake Smith (left), 'Anna' (right), Winners:

Rich Blake Smith: "I don't think a great deal, what does it mean to you Anna?"

Anna: "Well, it's an international competition."

Rich Blake Smith: "It's an international event, yeah..Lithuania, Belgium, France and the U.K...battling it out and this time the U.K came out on top, which is always a plus isn't it."

7. 01:27 Various of trophy presentation

8. 01:32 Various of winner presentation

SOURCE: Surridge Productions.

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Locations: United Kingdom, Lithuania, England, Western Europe, Europe, Eastern Europe
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SNTV Bizarre Mascot
Title:
HD
Summary: Mascot Grand National takes place in England
Story No: 991607
Source: SNTV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 06/05/2013 18:48 PM
People: Usain Bolt
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

Kempton Park Racecourse, Sunbury, London, England, UK - May 6th, 2013.

1. 00:00 Wide pan from horse to Kempton grandstand

2. 00:09 Mid tilt up of man fixing number to mascot

3. 00:14 Mid of mascot putting on costume head

4. 00:18 Mid of former Olympic 400-metre runner Iwan Thomas getting ready

5. 00:24 Mid pan of mascot putting on costume head

6. 00:31 SOUNDBITE: (English) Streetly the swift:

"I've heard the bee (Mr. Bumble) is pretty useful, so if I can aim towards him, wings out, and try and block him off maybe, I don't know. I don't know if that's going to work or not. Just compete and do my best."

7. 00:44 Mid of man putting shirt over head of giraffe mascot

8. 00:49 SOUNDBITE: (English) Jenny the Giraffe:

"I was here last year to watch it and our entrant finished fourth, so did really well. I'm hopeful that I'll emulate his efforts, but I'll give it a good go. I'm certainly going to nod for the line with my height advantage. So yes, can't wait. Looking forward to it."

9. 01:09 Various of mascots meeting their young fans

10. 01:18 Mid of mascot receiving a good luck kiss

11. 01:22 Mid pan from spectators to mascots walking to start line

12. 01:29 Low angle wide of mascots walking to start line

13. 01:36 Cutaway of child eating ice cream

14. 01:41 Various pans of race - Barry Barratt wins race

15. 02:15 Mid pan of disappointed Mr. Bumble, winner in 2010 and 2012

16. 02:22 SOUNDBITE: (English) Barry Barratt (asked how it feels inside the mascot suit):

"Like a hot box. So really, really hot. Ecstatic to win and ecstatic to be here. (The) Crowd's amazing, everybody is having fun. What more could we ask for?"

17. 02:35 SOUNDBITE: (English) Mr. Bumble:

"Oh, gutted (disappointed). Thought I was going to make history today with a hat-trick, but I got penalised on the start line for doing so well last year. If I knew that then I would have slowed down a bit last year. If I started from the front I obviously would have won, but that's how it goes, I suppose."

18. 02:51 Mid of Barry Barratt receiving trophy

19. 02:59 Crowd cutaway

20. 03:02 Mid of Barry Barratt performing 'lightning bolt' celebration.

SOURCE: SNTV.

STORYLINE:

Barry Barratt won the 2013 Mascot Grand National at Kempton Park Racecourse in England on Monday (May 6th).

SCRIPTING INFORMATION:

There was a main event with a difference at Kempton park in the south of England on Monday, with 27 runners dressing up as all manner of furry animals to compete in the Mascot Grand National.

First run 14 years ago, the race attracts mascots from sports teams and safety campaigns from the length and the breadth of the country.

This year the focus was on Mr. Bumble, who was looking to become the first winner of three Mascot Grand Nationals.

The Barnet Football Club mascot matched the record of Chaddy the Owl and Wacky Macky Bear by winning last year's race - his second in succession.

He would do well to come first in a field that included Olympic silver medallist Iwan Thomas, but a handicap system based on previous performance and foot size ensured a level playing field.

After meeting their young fans in the grandstand, the mascots headed on to the turf to do battle over one furlong (200 metres).

There was to be no hat-trick for Mr. Bumble - a considerable handicap saw him start some way short of the starting line and the gap was too great to close.

As he buzzed his was through the field, Barry Barratt - a safety mascot for a major building firm - stormed to victory.

The winner received a trophy and the applause of the crowd before performing Usain Bolt's 'lighting bolt' celebration.

The Jamaican may be the fastest man in the world, but until he has repeated his feats dressed as a rabbit, a bear or perhaps even a giant fire extinguisher, Barry Barratt will retain the title of the world's fastest mascot.

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Subjects: Steeplechase, Horse racing, Sports
People: Usain Bolt
Locations: England, United Kingdom, Western Europe, Europe
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SNTV Bizarre Roof Bolt
Title:
HD
Summary: Roof bolting championship from Tasmania
Story No: 988883
Source: SNTV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 12/03/2013 13:22 PM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

Fingal, Tasmania, Australia - March 9th, 2013

1. 00:00 Low angle wide of start of roof bolting match

2. 00:09 Mid of team bolting

3. 00:17 Close of roof bolter

4. 00:20 Close of bolts

5. 00:24 Wide of match

6. 00:26 Mid pan of roof bolting team

7. 00:39 Close of bolting

8. 00:41 Close of roof bolter

9. 00:45 Mid of judges inspecting torque

10. 00:52 Wide pan of roof bolters starting final

11. 00:59 Various of Les Benton and Scott Pate in final

12. 01:10 Various of Viv Ward and Rob Coker in final

13. 01:35 Close of bolts

14. 01:36 Wide of Viv Ward and Rob Coker finishing in the final

15. 01:45 SOUNDBITE: (English) Rob Coker, Roof bolting winner:

"We're both out, not underground anymore, both of us, so little bit harder, don't sort of get the chances to practice, and there's pretty hot competition here today and I didn't think we'd have much of a chance, but everything went well with us all day actually. We bolted well in all the heats and yes, lucky enough we went right through to the end, which is the main thing."

16. 02:05 Mid of Viv Ward being congratulated by Les Benton and Scott Pate

17. 02:11 SOUNDBITE: (English) Viv Ward, Roof bolting winner:

Q: "How many times is this you've won it now?"

"I think it's six, yes. So, six. Nineteen ninety-five (1995), I think, was the first one we won, so, yes. So, we've had a pretty good run of it, yes."

Q: "Does it get any easier?"

"No. No. It was pretty hard today. I'll be stiff and sore tomorrow."

18. 02:29 Crowd cutaway.

SOURCE: sntv.

STORYLINE:

Highlights from the Fingal Valley Festival's roof bolting championship, which was held in Tasmania, Australia on Saturday (March 9th).

SCRIPTING INFORMATION:

Roof bolting was a sport born below ground, but the Fingal Valley Festival in Tasmania has brought the pursuit up into the daylight.

Traditionally, miners drill bolts into mine roofs to add stability and increase safety.

Take the operation above ground in a contest between two pairs and you have an event that rivals the popularity of the Fingal Valley Festival's coal shovelling and sheep shearing competitions.

Competitors drill up into a concrete block using a series of drills - two-foot, four-foot and finally a five-foot drill - before inserting a sachet of fast setting glue.

When the roof bolt is pushed into the hole, the glue sachet bursts and sets the bolt in place.

Competitors allow seven seconds for the glue to set before they put a nut on the end of the bolt and tighten it to a torque - a measure of the turning force on an object - of at least 150 pounds.

Once the allotted number of nuts and bolts have been fixed into place, judges measure the torque and check that no more than 40 millimetres of thread are sticking below the nut.

Points are then deducted if neither criteria are met to a satisfactory standard.

After a round of heats, the four leading pairs have another turn, with the two fastest going through to the grand final.

This year's head-to-head title decider was between local favourites Viv Ward and Rob Coker - five-time winners in the event - and Queenslanders Les Benton and Scott Pate.

Ward and Coker, who first took part in the event back in 1994, put their experience to good use, winning the final in a time of two minutes, 17.24 seconds.

The prize for their sixth title - $3000 Australian dollars ($3098 US dollars).

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Subjects: Fairs and festivals, Recreation and leisure, Lifestyle
Locations: Tasmania, Tasmania, Australia
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SNTV Bizarre Coal Shovel
Title:
HD
Summary: Coal shovelling competition from Tasmania
Story No: 988832
Source: SNTV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 11/03/2013 12:14 PM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

Fingal, Tasmania, Australia - March 9th, 2013

1. 00:00 Wide of Fingal

2. 00:05 Wide tilt down from trees to coal heap

3. 00:09 Mid of 'World Coal Shovelling Titles' sign

4. 00:13 Mid tilt down of shovel on coal heap

5. 00:20 Close of competitor as his feet grip into coal heap

6. 00:26 Mid of competitor patting down goal heap before competition

7. 00:30 Various shots of competitors preparing to shovel

8. 00:41 Wide of shovelling

9. 00:47 Mid of shoveller

10. 00:53 Crowd cutaway

11. 00:56 Mid of spectators with shovelling in background

12. 01:02 Mid of shoveller

13. 01:06 Mid of shoveller

14. 01:11 Crowd cutaway

15. 01:15 Wide of doubles final

16. 01:45 Wide of doubles winner Mal Woods shaking hands with opponents

17. 01:51 Crowd cutaway

18. 01:54 Wide of Mal Woods' winning performance in the final round

19. 02:00 Cutaway of clock

20. 02:04 Mid of shoveller

21. 02:08 Mid of Mal Woods' winning performance in the final round - pan to - wide shot of opponent

22. 02:16 Mid of Mal Woods' winning performance in the final round

23. 02:21 Mid of steward telling Mal Woods his time and celebrations

24. 02:40 SOUNDBITE: (English) Mal Woods, Singles and Doubles winner in the World Coal Shovelling Championships:

Q: "How do you feel?"

"Knackered (very tired). My arms are shaking. I thought I'd lost it. I threw a couple of.... I lost balance and I thought 'oh, I've lost control.' But.... the time was still up there, so...."

25. 02:53 Close of silver shovel - tilt up to - close of Mal Woods

26. 02:58 Mid shot of shovel being dropped into coal heap.

SOURCE: SNTV

STORYLINE:

Highlights from the 32nd World Coal Shovelling Championships, which were held in Tasmania, Australia on Saturday (March 9th).

SCRIPTING INFORMATION:

The sleepy town of Fingal in Tasmania, Australia awakens each year in mid-March, with hundreds attending the Fingal Valley Festival.

Highlights include roofbolting and sheep shearing competitions, but the main event is undoubtedly the World Coal Shovelling Championships, which were held for the 32nd time this year.

Using a 'banjo shovel' - which has a flat, extra wide blade - competitors race to fill a skip with half a tonne (508 kilograms) of loose coal from a heap, with the six fastest shovellers going through to the final.

The coal needs to be stacked properly before the starter's gun goes off and experienced entrants know that pacing themselves is essential - there is no use going off too fast.

Efficient shovellers start from the bottom of the heap, letting the coal fall on to the shovel, and as they tire, they work their way up the heap so that they don't have to throw the coal as far.

There is also a doubles competition, which was this year won by Mal Woods and Russell Lowe, who filled their skip in 19 seconds flat.

Woods has competed at the World Coal Shovelling Championships for more than ten year, but this was his first title.

The Tasmanian made up for lost time by then adding the singles title to his growing collection.

Woods posted an unbeaten time of 34.97 seconds, although his mark was a good deal slower than the current record of 26.78 seconds.

keyword wacky

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Locations: Australia, Tasmania, Oceania
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DV Oldest Marathon Retires (VO)
Title:
SD
Summary: The man known as the world's oldest marathon runner ran his last long distance competitive race in Hong Kong on Sunday. 101 year-old Fauja Singh finished the Hong Kong marathon (6.25 miles) in one hour and 32 minutes.
Story No: 834078
Source: SNTV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 25/02/2013 12:00 PM
People:
Subscription:

HEADLINE: Raw: 101 year-old runner retires after last race

CAPTION: The man known as the world's oldest marathon runner ran his last long distance competitive race in Hong Kong on Sunday. 101 year-old Fauja Singh finished the Hong Kong marathon (6.25 miles) in one hour and 32 minutes. (Feb. 25)

Keyword-wacky-bizarre

SNTV

Hong Kong - February 25, 2013

STORYLINE:

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Subjects: Athlete retirement, Recreational running, Sports, Recreational sports, Outdoor recreation, Recreation and leisure, Lifestyle
SNTV Bizarre Wingman
Title:
HD
Summary: Highlights from World Wingsuit Race 2013 in Brazil.
Story No: 987735
Source: SNTV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 14/02/2013 21:56 PM
People:
Subscription:

SHOTLIST:

Castelo, Brazil. Recent.

Castelo, Brazil. Recent.

1. 00:00 Various of mountain, site of wingsuit flight's jumping point.

2. 00:06 Various of fliers jumping from cliff top, in pairs.

3. 00:09 Close of fliers starting their flight.

4. 00:17 Various of wingsuit fliers during flight.

5. 00:21 Close of wingsuit flier landing.

6. 00:29 Wide of wingsuit flier flying in air, opening parachute.

7. 00:33 Wide of wingsuit fliers parachute-landing on ground.

8. 00:52 SOUNDBITE: (English) Roberta Mancino, Italian model and wingsuit competitor:

(Question: What kind of person can do it?")

"You don't know until you start. You have to be there and jump and then you know if you can or not. It is not for everybody."

9. 01:02 Various of wingsuit fliers preparing on mountain cliff.

10. 01:10 Various of photos of deceased Argentine wingsuit flier.

11. 01:14 SOUNDBITE: (English) Gui Padua, Organiser of World Wingsuit Race 2013:

"It is very sad when we lose friends, you know. This year for example I lost eight friends. So we get, not only me, but all the community, we get like a little bit cold about death. You know, it is crazy to say that, but we try not to let it affect us so much because want to keep flying."

12. 01:40 Various of wingsuit fliers jumping from cliff top.

13. 01:45 Various of wingsuit fliers in flight.

14. 01:56 Wide of wingsuit fliers jumping from cliff top.

15. 01:59 Wide of Norwegian Espen Fadnes celebrating his win at awarding ceremony.

SOURCE: SNTV.

STORYLINE:

Norwegian extreme sportsman Espen Fadnes soars to victory at the 2013 World Wingsuit Race in Castelo, Brazil.

SCRIPTING INFORMATION:

The sumptuous landscape of Castelo in Brazil provided a breathtaking setting for the 2013 edition of the World Wingsuit Race.

As wingsuit flying is an extreme sport, it usually has a relatively small turnout of hardcore competitors, 32 were set for take off on this occasion.

Wingsuit flying is a sport where the athlete soars through the air using a special jumpsuit called a wingsuit, which adds surface area to the human body to enable a significant increase in lift.

Modern wingsuits, first developed in the late 1990s, create the surface area with fabric between the legs and under the arms.

A wingsuit flier normally lands with a parachute opening.

Jumping from a small platform atop a cliff, the athletes can reach a speed of 200-kilometres per hour, and their performance was judged by two standards - distance flown and accuracy of landing.

In the race - and unlike the vast majority of international sports - men and women compete on equal terms.

Italian flyer and professional model Roberta Mancino was leading the field at the start of the four-day event.

On the second day of the competition, there was a sad reminder of the huge risks these daredevils take.

An Argentine flier, who was not competing in the event, died after impacting the cliff at a high speed.

Many participants say that nothing will stop them from continuing to fly in wingsuits.

For many the addiction to the sport stems from the fact that it allows them to realise the dream of human flight.

Espen Fadnes, a Norwegian professional extreme sportsman, was crowned the victor at the World Wingsuit Race 2013.

wacky

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Subjects: Skydiving, Recreational sports, Outdoor recreation, Recreation and leisure, Lifestyle
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SNTV Extreme China Ice swimming
Title:
HD
Summary: Hardy souls take the plunge in Harbin.
Story No: 986251
Source: SNTV
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Date: 13/01/2013 16:57 PM
People:
Subscription:

STORYLINE:

Hardy souls from across China, and further afield, take the plunge in Harbin each year for a spot of ice swimming in the Songhua River.

SCRIPTING INFORMATION:

"Yay!" ice swimmers shout to the crowd while walking towards the pool in the middle of the Songhua River, half-naked in temperatures of minus 25 degrees Celcius (minus 13 degrees Fahrenheit).

It seems that the severely cold northern winter is cheering them up rather than giving them cold feet.

These bold individuals are not daunted by the icy flags, icy hand rails, even icy ground.

They jump into the water without hesitation.

Then they draw on all of their energy reserves and dash towards the finishing line.

The pool is 25 metres long, and swimmers have to be in and out of it in less than two minutes.

This is to prevent them getting too cold.

To create a swimming pool from beneath the river's icy surface which is more than one-metre thick, workers start breaking the ice before dawn.

To most this sport is not about winning or losing, it's about the thrill of taking part.

Lu Guogui, a retired worker from Harbin explained the appeal: "Sometimes the irritation of the cold water can drive away disease. So ice swimming is good for our health."

Currently, there are more than 300 members of the Harbin Ice Swimming Association.

"The severely cold weather makes it difficult to promote ice swimming as popular as swimming in summer. But still it is a very attractive sport. People of younger generations are joining in and succeeding those who become too old to do it," chairman Fan Xuekun commented.

SHOTLIST:

Harbin, China. January 5th, 2013.

1. 00:00 Tracking shot of ice swimmers cheering and walking to the pool.

2. 00:10 Close shot of frozen flags over water with swimmers jumping in.

3. 00:20 Close shot of swimmer swimming.

4. 00:25 Wide shot of swimmers in water surrounded by ice and snow.

5. 00:29 Mid shot of swimmer jumping into water.

6. 00:35 Close shot of swimmer swimming towards the other end of the pool.

7. 00:44 Mid shot of people watching.

8. 00:48 Close shot of people watching.

9. 00:52 SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Zhou Ke, Ice Swimmer from Harbin:

"After doing ice swimming for so many years, I can't tell you all the good things about it in such a short time. The best thing about it is the courage and willpower that it gives me. You definitely will gain a lot if you keep doing it."

10. 01:01 Close and racking focus from ice to a swimmer warming up.

11. 01:08 Close from back of the swimmer jumping into water.

12. 01:12 Mid shot of the swimmer swimming.

13. 01:18 Wide shot of the swimmer touching the finishing point.

14. 01:23 SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Xu Furui, Ice Swimmer from Zhejiang Province:

"I feel so good. My body feels comfortable. Yes, I'll keep the habit of ice swimming for a long time."

15. 01:31 Wide shot of female swimmers jumping into water.

16. 01:36 Mid shot of female swimmer swimming.

17. 01:40 Mid shot of female swimmer swimming towards the end.

18. 01:46 SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Zhao Zhongling, 56-year-old Ice Swimmer from Harbin:

"I fell in love with ice swimming as soon as my friend introduced it to me. You feel really excited right afterwards and more refreshed putting on your clothes."

19. 01:56 Close shot pile of snow in front of water.

20. 02:01 Close tracking shot of man swimming.

21. 02:07 Mid shot of Russian observers cheering.

22. 02:11 Close shot of two Russian females cheering.

23. 02:16 Close and tilt-down of Russian swimmer out of water.

24. 02:24 SOUNDBITE (English) Oleg Ivanov, Ice Swimmer from New Siberia, Russia:

"Very excited. Very warm, it's very warm. Very good."

25. 02:31 Mid shot of old man jumping into water and swimming.

26. 02:42 Wide shot of senior swimmers swimming.

27. 02:45 Close shot of man reaching the finishing line.

28. 02:51 SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Wu Chunfu, 68-year-old Ice Swimmer from Liaoning Province:

"I'm much healthier than before since I started doing this. It's like a piece of cake to me. I'm feeling very good."

29. 02:59 Mid shot of people watching

30. 03:03 Close up of a woman with thick hat and mask

31. 03:08 Close up of a woman with blurred glasses

32. 03:12 SOUNDBITE (English) Stephanie Gunawan, Indonesian student and spectator:

"It's crazy. If there were anything that cause them to swim in a cold weather like this, it's goodness."

33. 03:20 SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Lu Guogui, retired worker from Harbin:

"It's good. Sometimes the irritation of the cold water can drive away disease. So ice swimming is good for our health."

34. 03:31 Mid shot of sunlight reflection on the water.

35. 03:35 Mid shot of swimmers jumping into water.

36. 03:43 Mid shot from the back of the swimmers swimming.

37. 03:49 Mid shot of hand rail covered with ice.

38. 03:53 Close shot of the steel rail covered with ice.

39. 03:58 SOUNDBITE (Mandarin) Fan Xuekun, Chairman of Harbin Ice Swimming Association:

"The severely cold weather makes it difficult to promote ice swimming as popular as swimming in summer. But, still, it is a very attractive sport. People of younger generations are joining in and succeeding those who become too old to do it."

40. 04:16 Close and racking focus from ice block to swimmers jumping into water.

41. 04:21 Close shot ice block with swimmers swimming by.

SOURCE: SNTV

wacky

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Subjects: Women's sports, Sports
Locations: Harbin, China, Russia, Greater China, East Asia, Asia, Eastern Europe, Europe
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